The Good, the Bad, and the Tragic: Morality in Hamlet, The Once and Future King, and Oedipus

We face moral dilemmas every day of our lives—whether it’s giving money to a homeless man or taking a peek at a peer’s chemistry test. Fortunately, the stakes aren’t high. The tragic figures of Hamlet, The Once and Future King, and Oedipus experience moral quandaries, too; only these characters struggle instead with violence, murder, and … Read more

Armor and how it happens to Iliad’s Achilles to have it?

Symbolism is a reoccurring theme in the Iliad; one commonly takes note that after the death of Patroclus, Achilles’ old armor transforms from representing “divine Achilles” to the symbolism of death, or Patroclus symbolizing the sacrificial servant. Although the symbolism between Achilles’ old and new armor is often scrutinized, one may notice a reoccurring resemblance … Read more

Development of Characterization n Beowulf, Gilgamesh, and the Iliad

What makes a character in a story different from any other character? While reading epic novels about the Anglo-Saxon culture and epic heroes, a character’s characterization and his development of characterization set him apart from the other characters in the novel. There are multiple ways that characterization developed while using a different literary element present … Read more

An Analysis of Power, Authority and Truth in Antigone, a Play by Sophocles

Antigone: an analysis on Power, Authority and Truth In Sophocles’ play Antigone, Kreon, the warrior King may overrule Antigone, a mere woman’s, struggle for political power, but can he match Antigone’s resistance in a fight for political authority? Political power in a state rises from the presence of a force that exerts dominance. The public’s … Read more

Homer’s Iliad and the experience with Honor in the Iliad

In his Iliad, Homer uses the character of Diomedes to personify his definition of effective leadership, often juxtaposing him with the unproductive and cowardly Agamemnon. Homer believes that the bravery to assert one’s opinions and the willingness to act independently, even against authority, constitutes a successful leader. After suffering severe casualties and losses at the … Read more

Greek Goddess Pandora

Pandora: The first mortal goddess The Pandora’s Box myth focuses much of its efforts towards exploring the curiosity which intrigues individuals of all gender (both men and women). Immediately Pandora decides to open the box given to her by her father, the outcomes are vivid depictions of her being a woman who brought evil to … Read more

What Makes An Urban Legend?

Urban legends are mythical stories involving occurrences of the recent history. These stories often include elements of humor and horror that spread quickly and are commonly believed to be true; they typically echo humanity’s deepest fears or concerns. An urban legend can be retold with different settings and characters, but the central theme or idea … Read more

The myth about Persephone

Zeus, the King of the Gods, was having an affair with the goddess of the harvest, Demeter. They conceived a beautiful goddess named Persephone. Demeter was very protective of her daughter, keeping her naive to the ways of the world and dressing her as a child, even as she grew into a women. She meant … Read more

Unavoidable Destiny: Flannery O’Connor’s Southern Adaptation of Oedipus Rex

Flannery O’Connor’s Wise Blood is a powerfully unsettling novel concerning a lost man in the grotesque, dark world of the American South. Published in 1949, Wise Blood’s protagonist Hazel Motes serves as a reflection of the power of mythology that continues to assert itself in O’Connor’s text. Throughout the course of the novel, Hazel Motes’s … Read more

Mythology Study: The God Apollo

The God Apollo Introduction: Mythology is everywhere. In fact it has such a grip on our world that our lives would be very different without it. Mythology is the subject of myths and legends, normally dealing with imaginary creatures. Myths have been told since the beginning of time. The purpose of these myths is to … Read more

The Female Discourse and Patriarchal World of Medea

Although Euripides was known for his propensity to challenge tradition and complacency, his Medea was quite controversial when it was introduced in 431 B.C. in Classical Greece (ca. 479-323 B.C. ). Athenian society, a man’s world by organization, had no place for women outside of the home. When a girl was young, she was ruled … Read more

SEndings of ambassadors in the Iliad

Throughout the Iliad, conflict commonly arise between characters regardless of whether they are allies, close friends, or enemies; many of these conflicts arise due to issues involving pride, power, glory, and honor. In Book Nine of the Iliad, Agamemnon’s embassy utilizes logos and ethos in order to convince Achilles to rejoin the Greeks in battle. … Read more

For the Greater Good of the Community: The Chorus and the Importance of the “City-State” in Oedipus Rex

As a kind of collective character onto itself, the Chorus in Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex assumes multiple functions and qualities that, together, effectively blur the lines between the private and public spheres of the drama. Evidenced in the text by their roles as observers and instigators, as well as social commentators, and then in the film-version … Read more

The Construction of Medea’s Identity in the Play

How far is it true to say that Medea loses her identity throughout Euripides’ Medea. Perhaps in order to address this title, it is necessary to look for a definition of ‘identity’. The Oxford English Dictionary defines it as ‘individuality, personality… absolute sameness’. The question now becomes firstly does Medea the character change fundamentally in … Read more

Defining the Soul of Oedipus: Sophocles’ Play Alongside Plato’s Republic

Translations of Sophocles’ play are generally interpreted in one of two ways, ‘Oedipus Rex’, meaning Oedipus the King, or ‘Oedipus Tyrannus’, meaning Oedipus the Tyrant. The exact distinction between the two titles is undefined, though through the lens of Socrates’ five characterizations of the soul, the readers can identify what type of man he is. … Read more

Body Language: Injury and Identity in The Odyssey and Oedipus the King

In describing the characters of Odysseus and Oedipus, Homer and Sophocles both avoid defining these men by typical physical characteristics such as stature or distinctive facial features. Instead, these authors focus on detailing specific bodily wounds that function as embodiments of each character’s identity. Parallel plotlines in The Odyssey and Oedipus the King reveal the … Read more

The Question of Ethics in Medea

At first glance, the system of ethics presented by Euripides in his masterpiece Medea seems to parallel the systems found in several other tragedies of ancient Greek theatre. This system of helping friends and harming enemies, which recurs throughout many of tragedians’ works, attempts to rationalize the excessive violence and hostility (Blundell 1989). This system … Read more

The Different Types of Blindness of the Characters in Oedipus Rex by Sophocles and The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

Types of Blindness Life is full of things that humans wish to forget. Using blindness as a buffer from reality is a natural response to dangerous stimuli. The types of blindness are easily classified into many categories. These classifications make understanding stories and characters much better. The characters in Oedipus Rex by Sophocles and The … Read more

Hades and Persephone

Demeter is the goddess of the harvest and agriculture, and her daughter Persephone is her greatest pride in life. Demeter’s love for her daughter is what makes the crops and flowers grow every day. One day, Persephone was playing in the fields and Hades looked up at her from the underworld, and immediately fell in … Read more

Cassandra’s Final Monologue

Cassandra’s final monologue in Aeschylus’s Agamemnon plays a transformative role in terms of the movement of the plot and, upon close examination, functions as a key for many of the tragedy’s larger themes. She begins by equating prophecy, be it the physical act or the emotional ramifications of foreknowledge of events, with intense pain. ‘Oh, … Read more

The Quest for Truth in Oedipus Rex

Frank Kermode writes in his book The Genesis of Secrecy “We are most unwilling to accept mystery, what cannot be reduced to other and more intelligible forms. Yet that is what we find here: something irreducible, therefore perpetually to be interpreted; not secrets to be found out one by one, but Secrecy” (143). Sophocles’ play … Read more

An Analysis of the Journey of Odysseus

Prompt 2 – The Humbling of Odysseus The Odyssey presents its readers with many moments of grief – Penelope grieves over the possible loss of her husband, Telemachus is riddled with the grief the suitors give him by trying to take over his missing father’s estate. Perhaps the most striking example of grief is during … Read more

Who is Medusa?

Who is Medusa? Many parts of the myth suggest, through its basic obscurity, the tragic nature of Medusa. Even though the gifts that Medusa was given was the gift from Athena to Asclepius of two drops of Gorgon’s blood. One of the drops has the power to cure and even resurrect, while the other is … Read more

Demystifying the myths on the great war as depicted in Under Fire by Henri Barbusse and All quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria

Writing towards the end of the twentieth century, German literary scholar Hans Wagener reflects on the deep resonance of war literature, stating: “When we think about certain periods of history, epoch-making books come to mind that capture the spirit of those times most vividly”. Indeed, literary expressions of the Great War have performed a crucial … Read more