Ironic Situations Present in Jude the Obscure

In his work, Jude the Obscure, Thomas Hardy tells the tale of two people hopelessly in love, fighting against both internal and external conflicts to pursue that love and have some semblance of a normal life together. Set in England in the late 19th century, this story is about Jude and Sue’s struggle to overcome … Read more

Analysis of In Tenebris II

Psalm 142, verse 2: “No man cared…” This Biblical verse applies perfectly to “In Tenbris”, a poem written out of despair for the society Hardy in which lived. He expresses his pity and contempt for the materialist citizens and power hungry rulers. The rhyme scheme is a playful and simply happy one (abab), something similar … Read more

Importance of Heredity in "Tess of the D’Urbervilles;

In Tess of the d’Urbervilles, heredity governs life. Through the narrative voice and the character’s responses, Thomas Hardy explains how Tess’ “slight incautiousness of character inherited from her race” (71) defines her life. More specifically, traits from her parents and her family legacy follow throughout her life. Tess’ mental and physical predisposition originates with her … Read more

The Image of the Nightingale in Keats’s “Ode to a Nightingale” and Hardy’s “The Darkling Thrush”

John Keats’s “Ode to a Nightingale” and Thomas Hardy’s “The Darkling Thrush,” though written nearly a century apart, share many poetic elements that allow readers to effectively draw a surface parallel between the two poems. Though both of these poems have analogous stylistic elements, a similar solitary speaker in nature and an overall forlorn tone, … Read more

Hardy and Thomas’s Poetry: Comparison

‘In my memory / Again and again I see it strangely dark / And vacant of a life but just withdrawn.’ Edward Thomas’s The Chalk Pit suggests a number of ways of considering the correlation between memory and writing. The line is at once visually stimulating and ‘strangely dark.’ It communicates an emptiness or absence … Read more

Running from Destiny

In Tess of the d’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy primarily showcases man’s inability to elude fate. Society’s constraints highlight the futile nature of attempting to change the course of one’s life, for the inability to transcend one’s social classes mirrors the impossibility of transcending one’s destiny. Similarly, Hardy’s deft control of atmosphere and setting to provide omens … Read more

Thomas Hardy’s Social Commentary in Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles provides social commentary on many issues prevalent in Victorian society. In particular, Hardy uses Tess’ submission to her parents, Alec d’Urberville, Angel Clare, and society as a whole to examine the sexual double standard prevalent in Victorian society. Tess is a strong character, enduring many hardships in her life; … Read more

The Critical Role of Paganism in ‘Tess of the D’Urbervilles’

Upon reading Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles, one may notice that references to pagan goddesses and ancient religions of the past are strewn throughout the book. These allusions range from the affectionate names of endearment by which Angel Clare refers to Tess, such as “Artemis” and “Demeter,” to the climax leading to the end … Read more

Birds as a Symbol of Freedom in "Tess the d’Ubervilles;

Constituting one of the dominant symbols in Thomas Hardy’s classic work Tess of the D’Urbervilles are the continually reappearing birds. The birds symbolize varying degrees of freedom, foreshadowing the events of Tess’s life and frequently paralleling them as well. Tess encounters birds in the wild, birds in captivity, and birds that are fatally wounded, each … Read more

The Role of Surrounding in Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Thomas Hardy, in Tess of the D’Urbervilles, takes great pains to relate the characters to their surroundings, especially in the parallelism between Tess’ emotional disposition and her physical environment. It is not surprising, therefore, that the two interpersonal relationships which are the most important to Tess’ life have their origins in a fertile garden and … Read more

The Influence of Nature in "Far from the Madding Crowd"

In Far from the Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy uses nature to influence the actions of his shepherd and shepherdess protagonists, Bathsheba Everdene and Gabriel Oak, in two separate episodes involving rain storms. The conflict of Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd centers upon Bathsheba Everdene’s battle with and between her three suitors, Gabriel Oak, William … Read more

Tess of D’Urbervilles: an Example of an Unconventional Heroine

In Thomas Hardy’s tendentious Victorian novel, Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Hardy uses a format akin to that of a tragic hero to critique the double standards of Victorian society. His heroine, Tess, challenges Victorian standards by maintaining her innate purity and refusing to be defined by society even after committing acts that ought to both … Read more

Analysis of The Shadow on the Stone

Thomas Hardy wrote “The Shadow on the Stone” after his wife’s death, and the ghost he mentions is his wife’s. The poem focuses on the realities of time and death. The poet’s feelings are complex, which is reflected in the complex rhyme scheme of the poem. The title shows us how Emma has always been … Read more

Sue and Arabella in Jude the Obscure

Thomas Hardy’s diary contains an entry that explains how he will show the world something it needs to be shown in a story about a poor, struggling young man who has to deal with ultimate failure (Howe 132). This brief description of a story has turned into Hardy’s phenomenal Jude the Obscure. Jude is emotionally … Read more

Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy: Review

In Hardy’s Jude the Obscure, Hardy shows his views on religion and commitment to the Church which were said to have declined in the latter years of his life. (Ingham, xxvii) Throughout the book Hardy displays his feeling that religion is something that people use in order to satisfy themselves by giving their lives’ meaning. … Read more

Thomas Hardy The Convergence of the Twain Analysis

Thomas Hardy The Convergence of the Twain Essay
Thomas Hardy The Convergence of the Twain Analysis
Essay Subjects: Poetry, Shows and Events.

Keywords: Hardy’s poems, impersonality of Hardy, Convergence of the Twain, present tense, heavy use of caesurae, Hardy’s confessional work, current situation of The Titanic

The form and structure of “The Convergence of the Twain” are very much unlike many of Hardy’s poems, a possible response to the scale of his commitment to writing publically or perhaps simply an exploration of form to try and convey his own views, slightly antithetical in themselves, on the disaster. The poem is divided into eleven heroic triplets, self-containing the stanzas with the rhyme scheme, and leaving the poem in an isometric form- possibly highlighting the impersonality of Hardy’s view on the events.

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