Is Antigone a Feminist/Anti-Feminist Play

I think Antigone was a feminist play because of three main facts. Antigone was in all the conflicts, even though Creon started them all, even though Creon had all the power, Antigone still won the war between her and Creon, also no woman in her time would even think of doing the things that Antigone did. Antigone was in all the conflicts, which include, Antigone vs. Creon, Antigone vs. Ismene, Antigone vs. society, and Antigone vs. herself. In all conflicts showed feminism. In the conflict, Antigone vs.

Creon, there was feminism, when Creon asked Antigone if what she did was true and she replied, I do, I deny nothing, (Sophocles Prologue 52). She didnt hesitate; she said it with total confidence with all her nerves, not caring about the consequences. In the conflict, Antigone vs. Society, Antigone showed feminism when in front of all the people of Thebes. Thebes, and you my fathers gods, and ruler of Thebes, you see me now the last, unhappy daughter of a live of kings, you kings, led away to death.

You will suffer, and what not transgress the laws of heaven (Sophocles 74-79). Antigone was explaining to the city of Thebes how she is being suffered because of an act she committed to fulfill her deeds of the laws of the gods in heaven, and from love and passion she had towards her brother, Polynieces. In the conflict Antigone vs. Ismene, when Antigone was explaining to her sister, Ismene, about her plan to bury their brother, Ismene didnt approve, but Antigone again showed feminism.

Antigone a tragic play written by Sophocles

Antigone is a tragic play written by Sophocles in about 441b. c. The play is a continuation of the curse put upon the household of Oedipus Rex. Sophocles actually wrote this play before he wrote Oedipus, but it follows Oedipus in chronological order. The story of Antigone begins after the departure of Oedipus, the king of Thebes, into self-exile. Oedipus two sons, Eteocles and Polyneices, were left to rule over Thebes. An argument over rights to power forces Polynices to leave Thebes. Some time passes and Polynices returns with the army from Argos and attempts to overthrow his brother.

The two brothers fight and kill one another and the war ends. Creon, the uncle of the two brothers becomes the new king of Thebes. Because Polynices proved to be an enemy of the state, Creon chose to leave his body unburied. In the Greek culture, the denial of Funeral rights was a fate reserved for the worst criminals (). This is the point where the dialogue of the play actually begins. Antigone, sister to Polynices and Eteocles, disobeys Creon and properly buries the body of Polynices.

When Creon hears what Antigone has done he has her placed in a cave and essentially buried alive. This enrages Creons son, Haimon, who turns his own sword upon himself. When Eurydice, Creon wife her the news she to kills herself. Creon is left at the end to mourn the death of two nephews, a niece, a son, and a wife. This play more than an issue of right verses wrong or fate verses free will; it is a collision between the rightful demands of the family and the laws of the state (). Creon being in the position of ruler chooses to follow the demands of the state.

There is much debate as to which character was in the right. Was Antigone right to disobey the king for the sake of her family or was Creon right in his duty as ruler to preserve order and punish enemies of the state? Through looking at the history of the era, the intentions of the playwright, and the critical analysis and commentary offered on the play, it is in my opinion that Sophocles intended Creon to be the character who was in the right, not Antigone. The start of theater and drama in Ancient Greece took form in about 5th century b. with Sophocles being considered the master of tragedy.

In his plays and those of the same genre, classic fables that the people of the era knew well were used to tell the stories. The tragic heros of these stories often strive to live honorable and righteous lives, but because of some mistake their lives would often great and noble death. The idea that serving the state was proper way to gain honor was a popular belief during this time period. This philosophy was echoed by Plato in his book, the Republic. Plato dealt with establishing the ideal state.

The way to achieve the ideal state was through striving for justice. Justice, according to Plato, is doing only the tasks assigned to them by nature. This is the fundamental notion for his creation of an ideal city. It is both knowing what true justice is and where one belongs in the city that the ideal can be achieved. Justice in a city can be found in an individual as well outside the individual because it is a concept that is universal. If a ruler of a state was to maintain order and control over his people he must then seek the best way to obtain justice.

In crucial decisions, the ruler must look the see what is the good for the whole if he is to achieve this idea of justice. If Sophocles, believed along these same lines, and it is my opinion that he did, then Creons actions toward Polynices were justified. Creon acted in the best interest of the people. A trader of the state could not go unpunished. This was Creon’s duty as a ruler: it was the task assigned to him by nature. If Creon was right in his decision to punish Polynices then Antigone was wrong to defy the king.

Creons next step, the imprisonment of Antigone, must also be considered justified since she has defy deliberately disobeyed his orders. Looking at the dialogue of the chorus may provide insight into the intentions of Sophocles. The chorus was partly considered to be a character participating in the story and a mouthpiece for the author. The chorus in Antigone seems to justify the decision of Creon to take the life of Antigone. In the prologue, the choragos states Polynices was the the wild eagle shouting insults above our land.

This line establishes Polynices as an enemy to the state of Thebes. If Polynices is the enemy, then Creon must punish him for his actions. In Ode I at the end of scene I, the chorus states when the laws are kept how proudly the city stands! When the laws are broken what of this city then? This is in response to Antigones action of covering the body of her brother. The chorus takes the position that Creons order must be followed for the state to maintain justice. This puts Antigone in the wrong for her actions.

If she disobeys the king deliberately then her she must accept the consequences of death. Creon had no choice but take the life of Antigone if he was to maintain order. In Ode II the chorus comments on the mortal arrogance of Antigone which seems to reassert the actions of Creon. The arrogant, headstrong Antigone seemed almost willing for her punishment. The chorus in Scene IV points to the fault of Antigone when it says to Antigone, You walk at last to the underworld; untouched by sickness, broken by no sword. What women has ever found your way to death?

The chorus here continues to blame Antigone for the result of her death, not Creon. In the same Scene, the chorus continues and says, You made your choice, Your death is the doing of your conscious hand. Commentary on the play offers several opinions as to which character acted rightly. One commentary makes the point that for Creon to maintain order in a city that has recently undergone civil war the he had to take punish Polynices as a criminal. This was not an action based on personal hatred. This was an action taken as a rightly appointed ruler for the overall welfare of his state.

This is a duty that must be upheld by any ruler, president or politician. Their main responsibility is the welfare of the people the serve. This means putting family matters second to the good of the entire people. Another point made by several different critiques is that the play focuses on the actions of Creon, not Antigone. By focusing on the action of Creon then it seems that Sophocles intended Creons actions be given highest priority. This is further support by the removal of Antigone from the play only two-thirds of the way through.

Sophocles might have done this to allow the chorus of the play to follow Creon and therefore side with him on his decisions. Creon undoubtedly suffers the most for his actions. His decisions cause him to loose many members of his family. The grief he must have felt for these decisions is hard to comprehend. Whether or not Creon wanted to be king was not a circumstance that he had power over. But since he was king he know had a responsibility to lead and protect his people. This meant punishing those that opposed the state of Thebes family or not.

Therefore it was a correct decision. It served to good of the whole not Creons own selfish desires. Antigone defied this decision putting her in the same category of her brother a trader of the state. Therefore she must also be punished in much the same way as a criminal of the state was punished. Through looking at the history of the time period, the statements of the chorus, and the critical analysis offered, I believe it was Sophocles to portray the character of Creon as the character that acted correctly.

The play Antigone, written by Sophocles

The opening events of the play Antigone, written by Sophocles, quickly establish the central conflict between Antigone and Creon. Creon has decreed that the traitor Polynices, who tried to burn down the temple of gods in Thebes, must not be given proper burial. Antigone is the only one who will speak against this decree and insists on the sacredness of family and a symbolic burial for her brother. Whereas Antigone sees no validity in a law that disregards the duty family members owe one another, Creon’s point of view is exactly opposite.

He has no use for anyone who places private ties above the common good, as he proclaims firmly to the Chorus and the audience as he revels in his victory over Polynices. He sees Polynices as an enemy to the state because he attacked his brother. Creon’s first speech, which is dominated by words such as “authority” and “law”, shows the extent to which Creon fixates on government and law as the supreme authority. Between Antigone and Creon there can be no compromisethey both find absolute validity in the respective loyalties they uphold.

In the struggle between Creon and Antigone, Sophocles’ audience would have recognized a genuine conflict of duties and values. From the Greek point of view, both Creon’s and Antigone’s positions are flawed, because both oversimplify ethical life by recognizing only one kind of good or duty. By oversimplifying, each ignores the fact that a conflict exists at all, or that deliberation is necessary. Moreover, both Creon and Antigone display the dangerous flaw of pride in the way they justify and carry out their decisions.

Antigone admits right from the beginning that she wants to carry out the burial because the action is glorious. Antigone has a savage spirit; she has spent most of her life burying her family members. Creon’s pride is that of a tyrant. He is inflexible and unyielding, unwilling throughout the play to listen to advice or Antigone. Creon’s love for the city-state cause him to abandon all other beliefs. He tries to enforce this upon the people of Thebes. He wants them to think that his laws should be followed before any other personal, moral, or religious belief.

This is where the conflict of character occurs between Antigone and Creon. Antigone knows that the sacred laws held by heaven are far more important than those made by a king. It is the danger of pride that leads both these characters to overlook their own human qualities and the limitations of their own powers The Chorus is made up of older men of the city. Some of the times the Chorus speaks in this drama, it seems to side with Creon and the established power of Thebes.

The Chorus’s first speech (117-179) describes the thwarted pride of the invading enemy: The God Zeus hates bravado and bragging. Yet this encomium to the victory of Thebes through Zeus has a cunningly critical edge. The Chorus’s focus on pride and the fall of the prideful comments underhandedly on the willfulness seen in Antigone and will see in Creon. In Creon’s first speech, where he assumes the “Now here I am, holding all authority and the throne, in virtue of kinship with the dead” and reiterates his decree against the traitor Polynices (191-192).

In lines 308-309 the Chorus says to Creon “My lord: I wonder, could this be God’s doing? This is the thought that keeps on haunting me. The Chorus is questioning Creon if it could be the doing of God who buried Polynices, Creon replies; “Stop, before your words fill even me with rage that you should be exposed as a fool, and you so old. For what you say is surely insupportable when you say the gods took forethought for this corpse” (310-313). Even though Antigone exhibits a blamable pride and a hunger for glory, her disobedience is less serious than those of Creon.

It is evident that Antigone’s actions are driven by a love for her brother, and a desire to please the gods. While Creon’s actions are founded in his quest for more power and complete control over the city of Thebes and its people. Antigone’s crime harms no one directly, whereas Creon’s mistakes affect an entire city. We learn from Teiresias that new armies are rising up in anger against Thebes because of Creon’s treatment of their dead. More important, Creon’s refusal to bury Polynices represents a more radical insult to human values than Antigone’s refusal to heed Creon’s edict.

Creon says at the beginning of the play that the sight of Polynices’ unburied corpse is an obscenity, but he clearly doesn’t understand the implications of his own words. “You shall leave him without burial; you shall watch him chewed up by birds and dogs and violated” (224-226). Whereas Antigone breaks a law made by a particular ruler in a particular instance, a law that he could have made differently, Creon violates an unwritten law, a cultural must. Creon goes forward, prepared to do what is necessary to right his wrongs. However, as is often the case in life, he does not repent soon enough.

In the aftermath, he is left with the deaths of three people, all of which he caused. He is left to remember all the things he could have done differently, and that is possibly the worst punishment of all. Ultimately, King Creon learns his lesson, but it is a hard lesson and one that brings down everyone around him. Perhaps he, himself, says it best. “Lead me away, a vain silly man who killed you, son, and you, too, lady. I did not mean to, but I did. I do not know where to turn my eyes to look to, for support. Everything in my hands is crossed. A most unwelcome fate has leaped upon me” (2044).

Nevertheless, my sympathies are most likely tipping toward Antigone in this encounter. Just before the argument between Antigone and Creon, the sentry gives a vivid and disgusting description of the disinterment of Polynices’ corpse. Polynices’ rotting body is the physical evidence, or perhaps a symbol, of the injustice of Creon’s decree and of the ruin it will bring about in Thebes. The description of the squalor of the corpse prepares the audience to be sympathetic to Antigone’s arguments, even as she flies in the face of law with a pride that easily matches Creon’s.

Antigone draws a distinction between divine law and human law, between the “great unwritten, unshakable traditions” and the statute of individual rulers such as Creon. Each of Antigone’s actions was admirable, in the interest of her brother and the gods. She buries her brother without worrying what might happen to her. However, Antigone debated over the issue of whether to bury her brother or not. In the end she ultimately decided that her life was not as valuable as making sure her brother rests in peace. She was only trying to please the gods whereas Creon was working directly against the will of the gods.

With each viewpoint located at opposite ends of the social spectrum, a dilemma is unavoidable when the two face each other. This is the backbone for the entire plot of Antigone. On one side is Antigone, who pursues her self-righteous beliefs whole-heatedly and without question. On the other side is Creon, who acts in response to what he believes are best for the society. Both characters are justified in their behavior. It is their motives that set them apart from each other. Antigone knows that she will suffer personal anguish if she does not carry out her actions.

If my husband were dead, I might have had another, and child from another man if I lost the first. But when father and mother both were hidden in death my brother’s life would bloom for me again” (959-962). Antigone was unable to complete the three stages of womanhood: she is not a daughter because her parents are dead, she won’t be a wife, and she won’t be a mother. Because of this she believes that her motive is one that should be accepted and that the love for a brother could never be viewed as foolish. Creon, on the other hand, makes his decisions as a king rather then an uncle.

He is concerned with keeping the city-state in order, and his public perception untarnished. He cannot let feelings like love and kindness for Antigone prohibit him from ruling a nation. Both Antigone and Creon believe the gods support their positions. Antigone believes that by Creon denying Polynices a proper burial, he is denying him a right granted by the gods. “The time in which I must please those that are dead is longer than I must please those of this world. For I shall lie forever You, if you like, can cast dishonor on what the gods have honored” (86-89).

She believes that he will not be granted life after death if he is not buried, and that the gods permit all a chance at immortality. When speaking to Antigone it seemed that the Chorus was siding with Creon: “You went to extreme of daring and against the high throne of Justice you fell, my daughter, grievously. ” “.. it is your own self-willed temper that has destroyed you” (901-903, 920-921). However, despite her disobedience to Creon, Antigone is the tragic hero in this play she exploited high standing morals, good intentions, and a high rank.

With both characters assuming religious approval for their actions, it is impossible to exploit any mistakes that may exist within the two viewpoints, making a conclusion that much more difficult. Throughout the play, each character rattles off the reasons for their actions. Both also justify their actions religiously, believing they are the ones acting accordingly by the gods. The entire plot is a construction of conflict between personal and social motives, a scene not uncommon in today’s society.

Sophocles attempts to answer the debate by ultimately showing that the gods approved of Antigone’s motives and that Creon should have buried his nephew. But with so much unnecessary bloodshed committed at the end of the story, it is impossible to believe that this is the final decision. Sophocles believed that the individual held the power and the state shouldn’t have total control over an individual. This is hardly a solution to the debate, the fact that everyone dies. Rather, it is a sign that the debate will live on for all of eternity.

Antigone – Creon’s Strict Orders

Antigone did the right thing by defileing Creon’s strict orders on burying Polynices because the unalterable laws of the gods and our morals are higher than the blasphemous laws of man. Creon gave strict orders not to bury Polynices because he lead a rebellion, which turned to rout, in Thebes against Creon, their omnipotent king. Antigone could not bare to watch her brother become consumed by vultures’ talons and dogs. Creon finds out that somebody buried Polynices’ body and sent people out to get the person who preformed the burial.

Antigone is guilty and although she is to be wed to Creon’s son, Haemon. He sentences her to be put in a cave with food and water and let the gods decide what to do with her. He was warned by a blind profit not to do this, but he chooses to anyway, leaving him with a dead son, a dead wife, and self-imposed exile. Antigone had good reasons for her actions. She did obey the rules of her gods, which were that any dead body must be given a proper burial, with libatations.

This would prevent the soul from being lost between worlds forever, along with wine as an offering to the gods (page 518- side note). Nor could Antigone let Creon’s edicts go against her morals (lines 392-394). She chooses to share her love, not her hate (line 443). She couldn’t bare to see one family member be chosen over the other because of what a king had decided was right, which she contravened. Why condemn somebody who stood up for what they believed in and is now dead for it anyway? Bringing homage to the family was very important to Antigone (line 422-423).

The gods’ laws come before mortal laws in Antigone’s point-of-view, which is how I believe also. In death, you will answer to your god and no man will have control of your fate in the world that lies hereafter. Therefore by obeying the gods, hopefully, will result in a happy afterlife, which are what most people strive for in ancient times and now. If man does not honor you for noble efforts, your gods’ will. Antigone’s act was honorable. She stood up to the highest of powers so she could honor her brother, knowing the consequence would be death.

Most likely she figured there is only a certain amount man can do to you, so she might as well stand up for not only her family and beliefs, but her gods as well (lines 377-389). Creon could have easily changed his mind, and there were fair amounts of warning. But his decisions lead him into an empty life that could have been adverted if only he would have put his pride aside for a while. Simply because he was too egotistical and too tempermental, his son died (line 986) along with his wife (lines 1080-1081), which left him hapless and with a deep sense of deplorable sorrow leading to self-imposed exile (lines 1119-1126).

The story of Antigone

The story of Antigone has been written and translated numerous times. However, the plays written by Sophocles and Jean Anouilh are the most discussed. Despite sharing a similar plot, these adaptations are very different. In Sophocles’s Antigone, Kreon appears to be the protagonist. However in Anouilh’s, it is Antigone. In Sophocles’s Antigone, Antigone does not appear strong, instead she is almost submissive to Kreon. This Antigone is doing what she does only because of her religion and the gods she believes in. In her death, she does not lose much. She never mentions Haimon directly; he seems to lose more in her death than she does.

Antigone is not a tragic heroine, by dying, she has her wish fulfilled – she wants to die for what she does. Antigone was a martyr, not a tragic heroine. There is considerable distinctionbetween the martyr and the tragic protagonist. The martyr suffers and dies for a particular cause and may consciously seek death. The tragic protagonist… has every reason to live amd makes a heroic struggle to survive . (Miller 13) Kreon has every reason to live, he is ruler of Thebes; he is king. He does not die, but he is destroyed. Kreon loses nearly everything he has.

In the play, he is forced to keep his word to his people. His tragic flaw is an unbending will. Kreon cannot accept that he is wrong. He believes that only his opinion counts. He is unafraid to express his decision to leave Polyneices outside the wall “to be feasted upon by carrion birds” even though the chorus is obviously disgusted. O fate of man, working both good and evil! When the laws are kept how proudly his city stands! When the laws are broken, what of his city then? Never may the anarchic man find rest at my hearth, Never be it said that my thoughts are his thoughts. (Sophocles 599)

Because of his lack of judgment and unwillingness to bow to a woman, he is thrown into complete disarray and dispair. His flaw is an unbending will, and a failure to accept that he is wrong. Even when Teiresias tells him to repent and admit his wrong, he refuses. His downfall becomes his own doing. A tragic hero often comes to learn something about himself and his surroundings. Antigone did not give herself time to do this. She remained a stubborn character, refusing to see anything from more than her own point of view. Creon, however, realized far too late the error of his ways when his own family suffered from his decisions.

Creon had to live with the knowledge that he brought his downfall upon himself. It is right that it should be. I alone am guilty I know it, and I say it. Lead me in. Quickly, friends. I have neither life nor substance. Lead me in. (622) Antigone dies with self-pride, which in a way, worsens Creon’s agony. As a protagonist, Kreon constantly struggles against his pride. The laws of the gods state that every man should be buried; however Creon deliberately disobeys that. He realises his mistakes, however, his pride gets in the way. According to the Greeks, it was hubris or excessive pride that destroyed him.

In the end, Creon is punished, he has lost everything. By the end of the play, Antigone appears as the one who had thrown Creon’s life into disarray. Creon seems vulnerable and destroyed; almost pitifully pathetic. Throughout the play, he fights for the respect he desperately wants. He feels that he has to prove himself to his people, prove that he is a man who means what he says. In Sophocles’s Antigone, Creon also has the most lines. He has over twice as many lines than Antigone. The play’s focus is on Kreon and the struggles he goes through to prove that he is capable of ruling his state and his household.

However in Jean Anouilh’s Antigone, Kreon takes on a different personality. While he obviously suffers in Sophocles’s Antigone, in Anouilh’s, he is cold and composed. After the deaths of Antigone, Haemon and Eurydice, Creon merely says “They say it’s dirty work. But if I didn’t do it, who would? ” Even after the bloodshed, Creon still believes that he is correct, he is not destroyed or even repentant. In Anouiilh’s Antigone, Antigone emerges as the protagonist and tragic heroine. She is much more human than Sophocles’s rendering of her in the sense that she feels more than the earlier Antigone.

She doesn’t want to die but she knew that she would. In her dialogue with Kreon, she does not remain calm like the earlier Antigone, but instead attacks his idea of politics and most importantly, his idea of happiness. What kind of happiness do you foresee for me? Paint me the picture of your happy Antigone. What are the unimportant little sins that I shall have to commit before I am allowed to sink my teeth into life and tear happiness from it? (Anouilh 57) Antigone’s tragic flaw would be that she is much too stubborn and often rushes headlong into things. However, at the end, she seems to realise what she had done.

Forgive me, my darling. You would all have been so happy if not for Antigone. ” Unlike Sophocles’s Antigone, who stays stubborn to the end; knowing that what she did was right, Anouilh’s Antigone is very afraid. She doubts herself a little; she is strong but she is human. She does not welcome her death; she fears it. Antigine has every reason to live. She loved Haemon and her sister but she also loved her dead brother. She has a strong sense of duty; even when Creon denounces her brother, she still tries to convince herself that he[Polyneices] is a good man.

Antigone does not begin Anouilh’s play, but the chorus (wh does) points to her as the protagonist of this play. she will burst forth as the dark tense serious girl, who is about to rise up and face the whole world alone-alone against the world and against Creon, her uncle, the Kingshe is going to dieshe would much rather live than die. (13) Antigone is the protagonist in Anouilh’s play, however, she is not in Sophocles’. The two different protagonists in each play are just another difference between the intepretations of two different authors. However, both Antigone and Creon stand out as the protagonist in their respective plays.

Creon: A Monarch Within His Rights

In Antigone, especially with the feminist movement now holding the title character, as prototypical downtrodden woman, the king Creon is often villified. While accepting the fact that Creon has misogynist tendencies, the gender issues can cause the pure argument of validity of actions, to fall by the wayside. So supposing for a moment, that Antigone’s rebellion had been undertaken by a male, would Creon’s choices have been different. Did he choose such harsh punishment and intractable course because Antigone was a woman ? As I read him, this is not the case. He has made a value judgement as to who is traitor and who is worthy.

He has made a secondary judgement as to the rights of traitors, and the need of the people to know the consequences of traitorous acts. While one may disagree, with the value judgements he has made, as king he is well within his rights, indeed his obligation, to rule according to what he believes best at the time. Outcomes are not always the best vantage point from which to judge a man. Creon did not have the advantage the reader has of seeing final outcomes, indeed we must remember these outcomes were contrived by Sophocles, to illustrate his point of view.

Is it not conceivable that in real life, these outcomes are far from assured, indeed a bit preposterous ? So then to summarize, Creon simply made his best decision, and that decision was with in his right to rule as the recognized sovereign. On the surface, Antigone is the classic tragic hero, it is she that Sophocles wants us to be drawn to. It is Creon against who he stacks the cards. A writer’s value judgement, nothing more. So then, once more assuming Antigone is a male instead, are her or his actions noble or foolhardy, and irresponsible.

While on the surface it appears noble to risk death for a principle, is it really ? Aren’t relationships more important than principles ? Much is made of Creon sentencing his own son’s fiance to death, did she not by her foolhardy, kneejerk reaction sentence herself. Where is her consideration for her husband to be ? And her sister, who has lost so much, and now clings to her so desparately, is rebuffed and dismissed as not worthy of the glorious Antigone. Her actions seem motivated as much by a personal desire for vainglory, than for moral principle.

She will die on her sword, no matter this issue or another. She seems a pulpit thumper of the highest order. Creon, on the other hand, shows flexibility after his initial intractable course. When confronted by the gods, with the error of his thinking, he is ready to adjust and relent, for a king, this is remarkable humility. How often, do we see Clinton or other modern politicians run to admit their wrongs? Others show no faith in the king’s ability to reassess, and at last come to the proper decision.

It is their rashness that is to blame for their own demise. Justice has always come about slowly, Martin Luther King recognized this, Gandhi recognized this. People of tolerance and patience, while they may participate in acts of civil diobedience, are seldom rash or foolhardy. Even hunger strikes, such as Chavez, are often more for expediency than a sincere death wish. Antigone had a death wish, a noble death at all costs, to be immortalized in strident conflict.

Silly, I think. Does taking a stand sometimes involve death ? Yes, of course. The times in which it does must be carefully considered, and the feelings of those to be left behind, protected and considered. Does Antigone ever consider, really consider her sister’s pain at all ? Dietrich Bonhoffer is a historical example of defiance to a state resulting in loss of his life. It was never about glory for him, and his choice was the result of the understanding that Nazi philosophy would result in untold suffering for millions. Not the pompous bleating over one unburied body, a traitorous body at that.

Sometimes the needs of the many do outweigh the concerns of the one. A wise ruler makes that value judgement often, especially in war time. Those who value principle over their own life, must assess the costs to their relationships, the import of the issues for which they sacrifice not only their own life, but the future happiness of those who love and value them. Martyrdom in itself is no virtue. Perhaps Sophocles is giving us a hint into the flawed character of Antigone, the etymology of her name is ” contrary birth ” .

As she is led away by the guards she alludes to her family, and their role in her doom. She has made the choice, but still ever the victim, blames her dysfunctional roots. She seems to me the penultimate in egocentricity, lost in her glorious cause, to hell with what those who love me, need. She blames Creon, she blames her family, she puts down poor Ismene, who truly loves her, she ignores the needs of her betrothed. Yet, she bemoans her own cruel fate ? Sorry, just don’t buy it.

Her better course of action in my mind was to patiently buck the system, hold her principles, yet compromise them when the higher law of love for others should have guided her. She speaks of higher laws than civil laws, yet can’t recognize that there are yet even higher ones, the laws of love. Creon, having come late to the right decision, ready to relent, is now faced with the multiple tragedies, and predictibly blames himself. His decision did not have the initial benefit of knowing the rashness of the subject Antigone.

In Machiavellian logic, his decision was to instill fear in his subjects, fear over the consequences of treason. The outcomes turned out in tragic fashion, yet with less impulsive responders, can see different outcomes. So then, while I recognize the character defects inherent in Creon. I respect his taking seriously the ruling of his people, and recognize the complexity of the issues he was dealing with. Antigone, can be immortalize as one of the first females to challenge authority. And gender issues aside, for I grant the misogyny of Creon, his actions to me as far more defensible than Antigone’s.

Antigone – Pride and Conflict of Law

Sophocles Antigone, in its later phases is no longer about the conflict of law; It is about stubbornness and self will, about the sin of refusing to listen; about a man who has never been told. Conflict of law, presents the initial disturbance within Thebes. Creon, King of Thebes, refuses to bury the body of Polynices, for in his eyes Polynices is his countrys enemy Antigone pg. 131. Thus, despite breaking the laws of the gods, Creon holds his power higher than that of God and heavens and enforces his law.

As the story follows, Sophocles expands on the ignorance presented by Creon and Antigone, and it is also found that it is impossible to defeat an ignorant man, or woman in argument. It is this ignorance, that establishes the notion of the sin and punishment that both Creon and Antigone face due to their stubbornness and self will. Antigone holds her love of family, and respect to the dead, elevated beyond the laws of Creon, whom she believes, has no righteous justification to close his eyes to the honor of the deceased.

In her determination to fulfill Polynices rights, she runs directly into Creons attempts to re-establish order. This leads to encounters of severe conflict between the dissimilarities of the two, creating a situation whereby both Creon and Antigone expose their stubbornness and self will. It is Antigones morals, which drive her to betray the laws of man, in order to honor the laws of God. Knowing and comprehending the consequences of defying Creons ruling do not restrain the intensity of Antigones self will, yet it feeds her hunger to achieve her principles.

Losing sight of her future, Antigone allows her stubbornness to consume her life, taking with it, the prospect of marriage, motherhood and friendship. As the story continues, we find that Antigone focuses more on the need to establish her human ethics in spite of Creon, rather than proving the incorrectness of man defying gods laws. Following the unlawful burial of Polynices, Antigone openly admits to Creon the knowledge of the following punishment by carrying out such a defying act. I knew it naturally, It was plain enough.

Antigone pg. 8. With the intention of gratifying the laws of the gods, Antigone holds neither guilt nor regret as she feels that she has brought justice to the eternal rest of her brother. Antigone rejects her life in a deeply heroic yet tragic stand, certain that this is all that she can do to prove the intensity of her self-righteousness. Creons judgment over the living and dead infuriates Antigone, and on many occasion we encounter their conflicts, which are based not only on their differences- but also on many of their similarities.

In an almost reflective similarity to Antigone, Creon advances to extreme measures in order to fulfill his need to repair and strengthen his territory. He was concerned with re-establishing the social order which the shocking news of Jocastas and Oedipuss incest had fractured, and which the civil war between their sons had almost ruined. Charles Paul Segal Conflicts of Antigone pg. 46. Creon prides himself to be a powerful dictator and leader within the Theban society. He rules his city with the contention that his law is the only law. As opposed to Antigones stubbornness, Creons is far more illogical and dominatingly based.

Indeed, Sophocles demonstrates the sin of refusing to listen, and about a man who has never been told supremely through Creons character. On many occasion Creon speaks of honor and goodness overruling evil, I am determined, that never, If I can help it, Shall evil triumph over good Antigone pg. 131-132. Yet he ceases to identify the hypocritical aspect of his decisions, to defy the laws of God, in order to pursue his own beliefs of mankind. It is towards the later stages of the story that Creons inability to hear and listen to advice is increasingly evident.

Teiresias enters this ordeal, offering advice to Creon. Despite his outreach, Creon bemuses Teiresias and neglects to listen to the importance of his words. You have given a son of you loins, To death, in payment for death Antigone pg. 154. Once again Creon is warned by the chorus that Teirasias words are not to be taken lightly, it is then that Creon steps down and adheres to the given advice, Now I believe, it is by the laws of heaven that man must live. This change of attitude arises because Creon believes that this is the best course of action for his city, and for himself.

For the reason that Creon had still not changed for the benefit of others, but more so to accompany his power, the deaths of Antigone, his son Haemon, and wife Eurydice end his personal happiness. The ignorance and stubbornness encountered through Antigone and Creon prove to be the greatest tragedy, as it is this that leads to their demise. Antigones self will and determination lead to suicide as a final ultimation that she believes will burden Creons existence, and shed light to her morality and religious beliefs.

It is Creons negligent nature that fails him. His greed for power and authority over his city, confine his ability to see beyond his own thoughts and judgment. This is his ultimate sin, as it leaves him with a great deal of power and authority, yet this is meaningless when the love of family is lost at the expense of gratification of mans laws, in conflict with the laws of heaven. While Creon has the expectation of his words to be carried out, it is his own words that have significant meaning as they are words that capture his downfall.

The main theme of Antigone

The main theme of Antigone is the moral contradiction between doing good and bad. Meaning, you can still do bad when doing something good. An important ideal in Ancient Greece was the belief that the government was to have no control in matters concerning religious beliefs. In Antigone’s eyes, Creon betrayed that ideal by not allowing her to properly bury her brother, Eteocles. She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, and Creon did not have the power to deny Eteocles that right. Antigone’s strong beliefs eventually led her to her death by the hand of Creon.

Never, though, did she stop defending what she thought was right. As Creon ordered her to her death, Antigone exclaimed, “I go, his prisoner, because I honoured those things in which honour truly belongs. ” She is directly humiliating Creon by calling his opinions and decisions weak and unjust. She also emphasizes “his prisoner,” which tells us that Creon’s decision to capture Antigone was his own, and was not backed up by the majority of the people. She feels that Creon is abusing his power as king and dealing with her task to a personal level.

Creon’s actions are guided by the ideal that states “Man is the measure of all things. ” The chorus emphasizes this point during the play by stating that “There is nothing beyond (man’s) power. ” Creon believes that the good of man comes before the gods. Setting the example using Polynices’ body left unburied is a symbol of Creon’s belief. “No man who is his country’s enemy shall call himself my friend. ” This quote shows that leaving the body unburied is done to show respect for Thebes. After all, how could the ruler of a city-state honor a man who attempted to invade and conquer his city.

From that perspective, Creon’s actions are completely just and supported by the ideals. Though most of Creon’s reasonings coincide with the Greek ideals, one ideal strongly contradicts his actions. The ideal states that the population would be granted freedom from political oppression and that freedom of religion would be carried out. Creon defied both of these. First, Antigone was “his prisoner”, not necessarily the publics. In fact, the general population supported Antigone, though they were too scared to say anything.

Haemon, the son of Creon, knew of this, and told Creon, “Has she not rather earned a crown of gold? – Such is the secret talk of the town. ” This proves that Creon was exercising complete domination of political power, which is strictly forbidden in the new ideals. Also, not allowing Antigone perform her religious ceremony of burying her brother is interfering with religious affairs. This denies Antigone freedom of religion, hence, contempt for this ideal. Today in age, you can do much more bad when doing good. Such as transportation. We all need to get around from place to place, job to job, and a lot of other places.

We all complain about how we have all of this pollution, and smog. And we are all surprised where it is coming from. What we don’t’ realize, is that we, the people who drive around form all of the places, are creating all of that smog that everyone else is complaining about. So why do we continue to drive, and add to the pollution? Because the scientists have to go to their laboratories to figure out what they can do. But they will need some light in that building. So then the people at the electric company have to go to work. That’s more pollution in order to solve the pollution problem.

Then if the electric guys have to go to work, they will get old, and we will need other people to replace them later on in life. So in order to educate people in that business we will need the teachers to go to work and teach kids how to do their job. And that’s some more pollution. So as you can see, just to do something good like freeing the world of the posing pollution problem can cause more bad then good. Something from my own life, that I have experienced that I’m doing more bad than good (when I’m trying to accomplish something good) was when I went to throw this cup out of the car.

The good thing that I was doing, was getting the cup out of the car and in the circle of energy on the earth. And if it would rain soon, the fishes in the sea would have a nice little cup to drink out of and share a drink with their friend. But, at the same time, I was doing a bad thing by adding to the litter on the street. It can be a good thing with a bad thing attached to it by the waist. Just like in the play. One person thought it was a good thing, yet it was doing bad while good. It’s a really weird concept.

Light and Darkness Found in Antigone and the Gospel of John

As a child, my world was enraptured by the wonderful Fisher-Price toy known as the Lite-Brite. By inserting multicolored little pegs into their corresponding slots on a detailed guide, I could transform drab, dull, and dark pieces of paper into wondrous works of brilliant art. The light that filled and transformed the plastic pegs closely parallel concepts of light and darkness found within the Gospel of John and in Sophocles’ drama Antigone. The Gospel of John focuses on the profound meaning of the life of Jesus, whom he saw as the manifestation of God’s Word (logos).

Teiresias, of Sophocles’ play Antigone, is blind prophet whose lack of vision does not prevent him from recognizing the truth. The words of John and the characterization of Sophocles, although similar in many aspects, differ in the extent to which their concepts of light and darkness affect humanity. Sophocles’ light, in the form of Teiresias, allows truth to permeate throughout one’s lifetime. John’s light, as the manifesta tion ofthe logos, presents truth and enlightenment to humanity, but also ensures a glorified and joyous afterlife through Christ’s salvation.

Teiresias, the voice of fate and harbinger of truth in Sophocles’ play Antigone, humbly enters the drama by addressing the malevolent Creon and stating that he “must walk by another’s steps and see with another’s eyes” (Antigone, 102). The wise prophet was metaphorically declaring that he delivered the message of a higher truth. This truth existed as Natural Law. Teiresias advised his monarch to choose a different course in life. His divine vision more than compensated for his lack of physical sight, for it allowed him to walk on a wise and virtuous path.

The sage shared the knowledge and truth that he perceived with others who were too caught up in conventional matters to realize the xistence of a higher purpose. Teiresias allowed those who stood “on fate’s thin edge” (Antigone, 102) to walk safely to a plateau of illumination. The blind prophet combated pride, arrogance, and ignorance to deliver his message of enlightenment. John’s message of the illumination and enlightenment provided by Christ is very similar to Sophocles’ Teiresias. John explained that “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God” (John 1:1).

The Word or Logos that John is referring to manifested itself on earth in the form of Jesus Christ. The prophet states that Jesus is “the light [that] shines in he darkness, and the darkness has not overcome [him]” (John 1:5). According to John, Jesus had redefined the Jewish covenant with God and allowed all people realize the truth. By following the examples of Christ, one can see actions and faith define a virtuous life, not actions-in-themselves. Jesus carried with him the divine message of God and shared his words with everyone.

All people, from the despised prostitute to the aged blind man experienced a fraction of God’s glory through interaction with Christ. Like Teiresias, Jesus allows people to depart from the sinful path of worldly consumption to tread upon a ore virtuous path. Jesus allowed people to walk within the footsteps of the Lord. Light and darkness both play integral parts in the Gospel of John and in Sophocles’ play Antigone. In both literary works, a person serves as a divine tool who delivers the message of a higher purpose to the ignorant masses engulfed by darkness.

Although the purposes of these messengers are similar, a vast difference exists between them. Teiresias offered and gave advice to individuals to allow them to live a virtuous life while on earth. The Gospel of John illustrates that Jesus came to earth to bring more than enlightenment. Jesus came to bring salvation to the masses. In Sophocles’ Antigone, Teiresias states that “honest counsel is the most priceless gift” (Antigone, 103). John disagrees with the words of the worldly sage, for with Jesus it is shown that human actions pale in comparison to the acts of God.

Jesus condemns the judgements of men in saying “You judge according to the flesh, I judge no one. Yet even if I do judge, my judgment is true, for it is not I alone that judge, but I and he who sent me” (John 8:15-16). Although the judgments of Teiresias may appear to be wise and virtuous, they seem dull and corrupt when compared ith the holy radiance of God. To John, the most priceless present is that which God lovingly gave. To John, the greatest gift to humanity was Jesus Christ who shared his holy message to not only individuals but to the entire world.

Jesus proclaimed that “I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life” (John 8:12). The Gospel of John and Sophocles’ Teiresias in his drama Antigone shared many common concepts regarding light and darkness. Both emphasized that the truth and enlightenment could not be found with worldly means. Teiresias, the lind prophet, and Jesus Christ, the humble Messiah, shared the message of a higher existence with people who had not yet experienced the light.

A difference exists in the fact that while Teiresias attempted to follow the path of virtuosity, the limits of his human mind and actions could not provide salvation for the ignorant masses. Jesus carried with him a divine purpose that not only enlightened but saved. Christ did not solely emphasize on the physical existence, but also explained matters belonging to the realm of the divine. Teiresias’s message made profound changes in the lives of individuals. Jesus’s message broke through the barriers of ethnocentricity and engulfed the entire world in its light.

In the ways that the Gospel of John and Sophocles’ play Antigone are similar, they are also different. The very path to righteousness that makes the two literary works comparable makes them different. While both allow people to embark on the path of light, only the Gospel of John carries the secret to eternal salvation. In a way similar to a child playing with a Lite- Brite, the Gospel of John and Sophocles’ character Teiresias allow rainbows of light to exist in a world devoid of color.

While both allow the existence of a form of the truth, it is only the Gospel of John that provides a detailed guide that will allow a person to find order in their truth. Through such truth and enlightenment, an abstract world of chaos and ignorance can be engulfed by a world full of order and wisdom. Realms of beauty and glory can manifest themselves to individuals who accept the truth and the essence of light as a message from a higher existence. Great joy and pleasure shall come to the child who can find beauty and order in a bleak world full of ignorance and emptiness.

Catharsis in Antigone

The word ‘catharsis’ is derived from the Latin word, ‘kathairein’, which means ‘to cleanse’ or ‘to purge’ – it stems from an Ancient Greek story about a Phoenix rising from ashes, with the ashes representing catastrophe and the rise of the bird representing purification. In Greek Tragedy, this term is used to describe the suffering a character faces because of a flaw in his nature, followed by a transformation or purification as a result of enduring the pain. One of the best examples of catharsis is shown in Sophocles’ Antigone.

Antigone is a play that deals with the conflict between divine and secular law, as represented by Antigone and Creon, respectively. The conflict begins when King Creon delivers an order to the public stating that Polyneices body, whom he regards as a traitor to the country, should not be buried. Antigone, Polyneices’ sister and Creon’s niece, objects to this order because she believes that depriving someone of a burial is being disrespectful to the gods. As a new king, Creon finds that he must be assertive in order to be respected.

He believes that giving in to a woman’s demands when she goes against his own decree is unbecoming, and therefore rejects Antigone’s plea by sending her off to a dungeon. Even when his own son, Haemon, and a respected prophet ask Creon to reconsider his decision, he dismisses them as foolish and remains firm. For example, he calls his son a “woman’s plaything” and claims that he is a weak person for protecting a woman’s interests. Even while Teiresias is the most trusted prophet in his city-state, Creon claims that “you (Teiresias) and he whole breed of seers are mad for money”.

Creon’s obstinacy and his lack of reverence for the gods are his ultimate flaws, and soon lead to the loss of everyone most dear to him – his niece, son and wife. Above all, he loses his dignity and self-respect, which are the very things he sought to protect with his tenacious policies. In the end, Creon is reduced to someone who, instead of being followed, is pitied by others. Even while the pain and suffering he brings upon himself is unbearable, Creon does a heroic deed when he accepts his harsh fate and nderstands that he alone is responsible for the deaths of his loved ones as well as his tarnished pride.

By comparing Creon’s behavior before and after the ‘catharsis’, we see that he does in fact change. In the beginning, he is so power-hungry that he refuses to listen to any advice that goes against his ruling, saying “The city is the King’s – that’s the law” and “Am I to rule this land for others – or myself? ” After enduring all the grief, however, we understand that Creon accepts his poor judgment nd is willing to work to correct himself. For example, he says “…

And the guilt is all mine – can never be fixed on another man, no escape for me. I killed you… I admit it all… ” While he is more egocentric before the catharsis, he becomes much more humble afterwards, saying, “I don’t exist – I am no one. Nothing” and “… everything I touch goes wrong… ” In the end, while the other characters give up and take the easy way out, Creon lives, suffers, faces his flaws, and accepts his guilt, which ultimately transforms and purifies him.

Creon’s Character in Antigone

In Sophecles’ Antigone, Creon is not a good person; in fact, he is a stubborn, selfish ruler. Creon rarely listens to an opinion other than his own. He also turns his back on his own niece, Antigone, because she breaks an unfair law by burying her brother’s body. Throughout the play, Creon ignores his son’s pleas to spare his fianc, Antigone, from execution. Creon rarely listens to another opinion other than his own. When the blind prophet Tiresias first brings news of his prophecy, Creon says, ” I’ve never wavered from your advice before.

Tiresias then continues to tell Creon of how, while practicing augury, he heard the sounds of the irds ripping each other to pieces. When he was unable to light the sacrifice, he realized that Creon’s pride had caused misfortune for this city. Tiresias explains that is because of Creon’s refusal to bury Polynices. Creon responds, “Old man-all of you, so you shoot your arrows at my head like archers at the target… You’ll never bury that body in the grave, not even if Zeus’s eagles rip the corpse and wing their rotten pickings off to the throne of god!

In this scene, once Creon knows that the prophecy is not in his favor, he changes his opinion from trusting and following the ideas of Tiresias, to accusing him of plotting against him. We see that once Creon realizes that Tiresias does not agree with his opinion about the burial of Polynices’ corpse, Creon will not listen to what the prophet has to say, even if it means causing a “plague” on the city of Thebes. In the play, Creon constantly ignores the pleas of his niece, Antigone, and will eventually lead her to her death.

From the beginning, we see that Antigone is willing to do whatever it takes to preserve the honor of her brother, Polynices, even if it means losing her own life. “He is my brother and -deny it as you will- your brother to. ” Antigone would rather ie than see the honor of her brother and her family sacrificed. When Creon hears that the body of Polynices has been buried against his orders, he says “Never! Sister’s child or closer in blood then all my family clustered at my altar worshipping Guardian Zeus – she’ll never escape, she and her blood sister, the most barbaric death”.

Creon says this when he discovers that Antigone and Ismene are plotting against his orders. The statement shows that Creon has no interest in why Antigone proceeds to break the law to uphold her brother’s honor. In the play, Creon ignores not only the pleas of his niece, but also hose of his son, Haemon, who is set to marry Antigone. When Haemon says, “When you trample down the honors of the gods? ” To which Creon responds, “You soul of corruption, rotten through, woman’s accomplice”.

Creon automatically accuses Haemon of assisting Antigone in her illegal adventure. Creon even pushes his son to say that ,”Then she will die… but her death will kill another”. Even when his son has says this, Creon continues to argue with his son and even calls him a “woman’s slave”, one of the worst possible insults. Creon’s lack of understanding and caring for his son’s opinions shows that while he may think that he is doing a good hing, he has little understanding of what is best for his son.

Creon’s concern with his own power has caused him to lose sight of what was originally important to him – compassion and love for his only son. Creon is not a good person; in fact, he is a stubborn, selfish ruler. This thesis is supported by the quotes presented in this paper. If Creon had more concern about others and less concern about maintaining his own power, the final scenes of the play would have turned out quite differently. The tragic conclusion of the play is a direct result of the actions caused by Creon’s decisions.

Creons Defense to Oedipuss Accusations and Their Relevance

The role of the king in the time of Greek tragedies was simultaneously desired and dreaded because of the kings responsibility to the people and because of the effects of the position on the kings character. Creon reveals such ambivalent thoughts towards the kingship in his speech defending himself from Oedipuss conspiracy accusation in Oedipus the King; these ambivalent thoughts reveal much about the nature of the kingship, especially in conjunction with Creons later actions in Antigone.

In attempting to refute Oedipuss assertion that Creon has taken part in a conspiracy to obtain the kingship, Creon evaluates the nature of the kingship and of his present role. First, he says, “Consider, first, if you think any one/ would choose to rule and fear rather than rule and sleep” (36. 584-585). By this, Creon means that the main difference between his position and the kings is that of the accompanying action to ruling. In both positions, one is a ruler who holds great power over the state.

However, the king is placed in a greater place of accountability to the people. This accountability is what Creon says inspires “fear” in the king, for if affairs of state or of the people fall into decline, the king is the first person whom the citizenry look to blame. This is analogous to executive leaders throughout history, as one can see in looking at American presidents and the correlation between the present conditions and events of the nation to the publics opinion of the president, regardless of the actual impact that his decisions may have made in these conditions.

Creon maintains that he has the same amount of power as the king but without the accountability that inevitably leads a king to distress. Creons reasoning concerning the equality between his power and Oedipuss leads him to state: I was not born with such a frantic yearning to be a king- but to do what kings do. And so it is with every one who has learned wisdom and self-control. (36. 587-590) He means that he has never desired the position of king, because he sees no advantage over his present position in the state.

Rather, he sees the disadvantage of the fear that accompanies the position of king. Creon has evaluated this situation for his circumstances and then goes further in stating that anyone with wisdom and self-control would come to such a conclusion as well. This could be interpreted as an insult to Oedipus in two different ways. Creon could mean that Oedipus and anyone else who desires and assumes the kingship are by nature not people of wisdom and self-control- or he could be saying that the position of the kingship is one that strips an individual of his wisdom and self-control.

In support of the assertion that the kingship changes ones character, one could point to the events of Antigone and Creons striking change in character in the play. In Oedipus the King, Creon reveals himself to be a reasonable ruler, who makes rational decisions and is not quick to anger, as is revealed by his calmness in his responses to Oedipuss heated accusations. However, in Antigone, Creon has become prideful and irrational. His dealings with Antigone and Teiresias and his stubbornness in the play indicate a change in his character.

In fact, his actions, especially in his dealings with Teiresias the prophet, are very similar to Oedipuss actions in Oedipus the King. Just as Oedipus had done before him, Creon refuses to completely believe Teiresiass prophecies for the state. Creon also emulates his predecessors actions in his accusation of bribery directed towards Teiresias: “Out with it-/ but only if your words are not for gain” (201. 1128-1129). Creons words and actions in Antigone indicate that he has taken on the negative characteristics of king that he describes in his speech in Oedipus the King.

He has same amount of power as king, but he now seems to have lost his wisdom and self-control. This indicates that perhaps his words to Oedipus are, in fact, mainly an insult to the position of king and to what it evokes from a persons character rather than an insult solely directed towards Oedipus. Creon also feels that the king is generally not responsive to the desires of the citizenry: “But if I were the king myself, I must/ do much that went against the grain” (36. 590-591). By this, Creon means that in his present position, he is more apt than the king to know the will of the people and to respond accordingly.

Again, this seems to be a flaw inherent in the kingship based on Creons actions in Antigone. As king Creon is blind to the fact that the people of Thebes are opposed to his actions concerning the punishment of Antigone. One who is not king, Creons son Haemon, senses the will of the people: But what I can hear, in the dark,are things like these: the city mourns for this girl; they think she is dying most wrongly and most undeservedly of all womenkind, for the most glorious acts. (188. 746-749) Haemon has sensed that the people feel Creons actions are unjust, which is something that Creon is not aware of.

However, in his speech, Creon is also asserting that a king, even when aware of the will of the people, does not respond accordingly. He demonstrates this in Antigone when he says, “Should the city tell me how to rule them? ” (189. 794). Once again, Creons words in Oedipus the King and actions in Antigone correspond and indicate that his speech reveals characteristics that are inherent in the kingship and not just in Oedipuss rule. Creon finds these characteristics of a king to be despicable and prefers his own present position.

How should despotic rule seem sweeter to me/ than painless power and an assured authority? ” (36. 592-593). He is saying that his present power is less painful and even more effectual than that of a king. It is less painful in that he is not held directly accountable for the conditions of the state. It is more effectual both in that he has a better sense of the will of the people and in that he is less likely to allow selfish interest and pride to interfere with his execution of the will of the people.

Creons speech serves two purposes, both effectively. First, it is a convincing argument to prove that he is not involved a conspiracy to overthrow Oedipus, although Oedipuss pride does not allow him to be convinced by this argument. Secondly, and perhaps more importantly, Creons speech gives insight into the two-sided nature of the kingship, for although it is a position of great honor and power, it is also a position that often corrupts the man who holds it.

Creon believes that there is a certain type of man who desires such a position, a man who has not learned wisdom and self-control. He believes that he is a man who has learned these attributes; thus, he would not be susceptible to desire for the kingship and the corruption which would inevitably follow. However, his actions in Antigone show that there are very few men who will reject the kingship if presented with the opportunity and even fewer men who will not allow the kingship to corrupt them.

Antigone – Analysis of Greek Ideals

In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life’s complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered around the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change.

In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with the controversy of the Greek ideals. They both based their actions on their beliefs of what is right and wrong. The conflict arose when the ideals that backed up their actions clashed with each other, making it contradiction between morals. Antigone’s side of the conflict held a much more heavenly approach, as opposed to the mundane road that Creon chose to follow. Antigone feels that Creon is disregarding the laws of heaven through his edict.

After she is captured and brought to Creon, she tells him “I do not think your edicts strong enough to overrule the unwritten unalterable laws of God and heaven, you being only a man. ” Antigone’s staunch opinion is one that supports the Gods and the laws of heaven. Her reasoning is set by her belief that if someone is not given a proper burial, that person would not be accepted into heaven. Antigone was a very religious person, and acceptance of her brother by the Gods was very important to her. She felt that “It is against you and me he has made this order. Yes, against me.

Creon’s order was personal to Antigone. His edict invaded her family life as well as the Gods’. An important ideal in Ancient Greece was the belief that the government was to have no control in matters concerning religious beliefs. In Antigone’s eyes, Creon betrayed that ideal by not allowing her to properly bury her brother, Polynices. She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, and Creon did not have the power to deny Polynices that right. Antigone’s strong beliefs eventually led her to her death by the hand of Creon. Never, though, did she stop defending what she thought was right.

As Creon ordered her to her death, Antigone exclaimed, “I go, his prisoner, because I honoured those things in which honour truly belongs. ” She is directly humiliating Creon by calling his opinions and decisions weak and unjust. She also emphasizes “his prisoner,” which tells us that Creon’s decision to capture Antigone was his own, and was not backed up by the majority of the people. She feels that Creon is abusing his power as king and dealing with her task to a personal level. Creon’s actions are guided by the ideal that states “Man is the measure of all things.

The chorus emphasizes this point during the play by stating that “There is nothing beyond (man’s) power. ” Creon believes that the good of man comes before the gods. Setting the example using Polynices’ body left unburied is a symbol of Creon’s belief. “No man who is his country’s enemy shall call himself my friend. ” This quote shows that leaving the body unburied is done to show respect for Thebes. After all, how could the ruler of a city-state honor a man who attempted to invade and conquer his city. From that perspective, Creon’s actions are completely just and supported by the ideals.

Though most of Creon’s reasonings coincide with the Greek ideals, one ideal strongly contradicts his actions. The ideal states that the population would be granted freedom from political oppression and that freedom of religion would be carried out. Creon defied both of these. First, Antigone was “his prisoner”, not necessarily the publics. In fact, the general population supported Antigone, though they were too scared to say anything. Haemon, the son of Creon, knew of this, and told Creon, “Has she not rather earned a crown of gold? – Such is the secret talk of the town.

This proves that Creon was exercising complete domination of political power, which is strictly forbidden in the new ideals. Also, not allowing Antigone perform her religious ceremony of burying her brother is interfering with religious affairs. This denies Antigone freedom of religion, hence, contempt for this ideal. The contradictions between the beliefs of Creon and Antigone are strong throughout the play. Both have well-structured arguments, but neither completely dominates the other. Antigone is motivated by her strong religious feelings while Creon is out to make good for his city-state.

The chorus’ opinion is the determining factor, as in the end, they convince Creon to set Antigone free. Creon had to weigh each factor carefully, and in the end, he had to decide between ideals. His mind was torn in two. “It is hard to give way, and hard to stand and abide the coming of the curse. Both ways are hard. ” The contradiction of ideals was what led to Antigone’s, Haemon’s, and Megareus’ death. Both sides were just, all beliefs were supported. Creon was forced to decide the unanswerable, decipher the encoded, complete the impossible, and determine right from wrong when there was no clear answer.

The Similarities Between Creon And Antigone

“Ah Creon! Is there no man left in the world-” Teirsesias Greek theatre played a large role in Greece. The citizens were supposed to learn from the mistakes made in tragedies. The citizens should have learned what not to be like as a citizen or person. In a Greek trilogy written by Sophocles there are two ma in characters, Antigone and Creon. They are both strong willed and stubborn people. Both being unwilling to change, they both seal each others fate. Creon is passionate. . Antigone is full of rage. They are both so similar they can not see eye to eye .

Although they may seem quite different, Creon and Antigone share any similarities throughout the story. They are both very independent people. Antigone is extremely independent.. She doesn’t mind doing anything on her own. For example, in the beginning of the story when Antigone is talking with Ismene, she asks for her help . When Ismene refuses she is furious with her. Then Ismene decides to act independently. Creon is also very independent. He refuses to accept anyone’s opinions except his own. When his son Haimon comes to talk with him he refuses to listen , claiming that Haimon is “girlst ruck! ” and corrupted .

Teirsesais comes and tells him a morbid prophecy. Creon will not listen to this either. He claims that Teirsesais has been corrupted by money, like many prophets at that time. He finally listens to the Charagous when reminded th at Teiresias has never been wrong. Antigone has no problem working by her self either. She demonstrates this when she slipped by all the guards that were protecting the dead body of Polyneices. Creon and Antigone are both independent, and they are both very loyal. They are loyal to their views. Creon is especially loyal to his laws. Antigone is loyal to her beliefs. Creon will not change his laws.

An example of this occurs when he and An tigone argue. He calls her “A traitor” For giving a burial for her dead brother Polyneices. He is so loyal to his own laws that he fails to see that he is disobeying the law of the gods. Antigone puts the laws of the gods ahead of the laws of the state s. She goes ahead and buries her brother. Which was strictly prohibited by Creon. This shows her short-sightedness is because she only does what she thinks the gods want. Instead of abiding by the law that Creon decreed. Creon is also short-sighted because he refuses to believe any other opinions or laws than his own.

Creon and Antigone are both so loyal which can also make them very extreme. Creon is an extremist in reason. He thinks his law is the most important. Antigone is an extremist of passion. Creon is unwilling to put the god’s law above his law. He is u nwilling to listen to the passionate pleas of his son to let Antigone live. He instead puts his laws first, and states that if he lets Antigone live after she has broken his law, “How shall I earn the worlds obedience? ” His extreme will, later leads to his son’s death because he thinks his son has been corrupted by Antigone.

Antigone is equally as extreme and she will not listen to the reasoning of her sister Ismene. Ismene reminds her of the problems and dangers she is undertaking when she goes ou t to bury Polyneices. Antigone will not listen though, and this ends up killing her as well. Because Creon and Antigone are very extreme in their ways this can also make them cruel and foolish people. Creon is quite cruel to everyone around him. He never once listens to anyone, but instead he acts foolishly and hurts everyone. When he is talk ing to his son Haimon, he retorts that Haimon is “a fool” and that he is, “Taken in by a woman!

These words and his fathers attitude hurts Haimon and he becomes filled with rage towards his foolish father. Antigone is also cruel and foolish. Especial ly to her sister Ismene. Ismene tries to help Antigone in the start of the play. When she tries to tell Antigone not to risk everything to please the gods. Antigone won’t listen though, She just tells her “Go away Ismene. I will be hating you soon”, in a striking example of her cruelty. Ismene and Antigone have been caring sisters until suddenly Antigone abandons her because she does not agree to help bury their brother.

Creon also is cruel to his old friend and prophet, Teirsesias. Teirsesias co mes to warn him that if he does not free Antigone that bad things will happen, but Creon doesn’t believe him. He claims that Teirsesias has “sold out” as a prophet and shows how foolish he is not to trust a long standing friend who has never been wrong. Creon and Antigone are both plagued by hubris. Creon wants to stand by the law he has made. Antigone is willing to risk it all to stand by the law of the gods and what is right. Creon’s stubbornness is clear when his old friend and prophet Teirsesias. Tells him to free Antigone.

Creon stubbornly refuses and remarks to the old wise man, “Bribes are baser then any baseness” Creon does not even listen to Teirsesias, who made him king in the first place. He is so stubborn that he refuses to listen cl aiming that Teirsesias had been corrupted by money and so his pride hampers his good judgment. He is so concentrated on everyone being corrupted that he does not even listen to common sense. His son, Haimon tries to come tell him that he should not s entence Antigone to death. Creon is outraged by his son siding with her. He tells Haimon that he is a “Fool, adolescent fool! Taken in by a woman!

Haimon responds to this by saying that he is “perverse” Creon, even more outraged, calls him a “Girls struck fool” Haimon storms off with a loathing hatred for his father’s arrogant pride and stubbornness. Antigone has equal hubris herself. She is so passionate on burying her brother that she will not listen to reason. Full of arrogance and indignati on, she will not listen to the words of her sister. Ismene warned her of the dangers of burying their brother Polyneices but Antigone will not listen. She calls Ismene a “traitor” for not coming to help her and Ismene shakingly replies “I am so afraid o f you”.

Antigone, nstead of listening to the common sense of her sister, snaps back that “You need not be: you have yourself to consider, after all”. Later in the story Antigone is arrested for burying her brother and Ismene comes crawling back to her. Ismene breaks the conversation between Antigone and Creon by admitting that, “I am guilty, if she let me say so”. Antigone will not let her and retorts coldly, “No, Ismene. you have no right to say so. You would not help me, and I will not have you h elp me” This reveals clearly how arrogant and stubborn Antigone can be. Even after her sister wants to share in her punishment and crawls back to her.

She will not accept it to her own demise. Creon and Antigone are both remarkably similar people. Ironically, they are both so much the same that they can not see it. The flaws they share make neither of them willing to listen to the other. Many of their traits are identical, but their opinion s are so different that they can’t stand each other. Sophocles did an excellent job in portraying the two vast extremes of the spectrum, passion and reason. This story hopefully proves to people that neither extreme passion nor extreme reason, but rather be in the middle and achieve arete.

A Tragic Situation – Antigone

Tragedy is a description of an event that evokes a sympathetic feeling of emotion by the audience. The events involve people emotionally who were not involved in the situation physically. In the story of Antigone, Sophecles forces the audience to take pity on the poor girl’s situation. This story impacts the audience in such a way that the audience becomes emotionally enthralled in the plot of the story. All of Steiner’s, “Principle constants of conflict in the condition of man,” (360) were present in the tragic tale of Antigone. The conflicts confirm a tragic sense about the story.

In a tragedy drama is experienced and the characters typically suffer extremely. Consequently, this can happen because of a tragic mistake. The first of the ageless conflicts of man is, “the confrontation of men and women” (360). This principle is applied in the conflict between Antigone and Creon. Antigone broke a law that her uncle, Creon, had created. As a result of this she was to be killed. Sympathy is felt for Antigone because she was punished for take a stand for what she believed to be the right thing. Unfortunately the risk she took was going against her uncle Creon, who so happened to have power over her.

It was a tragic situation that Antigone was to be killed for such a ridiculous crime. Although Antigone should not have been punished for that law she had broken, she was willing to accept her death sentence. She said to Creon, “These laws- I was not about to break them, not out of fear of some man’s wounded pride, and face the retribution of the gods. Die I must, I’ve known it all my life- how could I keep from knowing? – Even without your death-sentence ringing in my ears. And if I am to die before my time I consider that a gain. Who on earth alive in the midst of so much grief as I, could fail to find this death a rich reward? 374)

Antigone was willing to risk her own life for the sake of her dead brother’s pride. Creon wants Antigone to know that he has control over her. She defied him and now he has no choice but to punish her. Otherwise it would mean a bruise on his reputation as a ruler. It would prove that he was of weak character, especially since a girl went against him. Creon said, “This girl was an old hand at insolence when she overrode the edicts we made public. But once she’d done it- the insolence, twice over- to glory in it, laughing, mocking us to our face with what she’d done.

I am not the man, not now: She is the man if this victory goes to her and she goes free. ” (375) Antigone made a fool out of her uncle and as a result he is retaliating in order to win back the control and power. She made it very difficult for Creon to feel satisfied with her execution. Antigone told him that she does not care if she dies because she already got what she wanted by burying her brother against Creon’s wishes. Even though she knew she was going to die she would die happy. Antigone won the battle over her uncle and the power struggle he put her through.

Enough. Give me glory! What greater glory could I win than to give my own brother decent burial? ” (375-376) Antigone told her uncle. Eteocles, Antigone’s other brother, was buried a well. His burial was not illegal because was not an enemy of Creon. Antigone tired tells him that every death deserves a proper burial no matter who they are. He was much closed-minded and refused to listen to her. The conflict of Antigone and Creon is a battle over power between man and woman. What makes this story even more tragic was the power Creon held over Antigone and her fate.

It was the power to decide whether she should live or die. He had the chance to free her from her doom. Although he realized this too late. When he realized this he gathered his men. He said to them, “Now- I’m on my way! Come, each of you, take up axes, make for the high ground, over there quickly! I and my better judgment have come round to this- I shackled her, I’ll set her free myself. I am afraidit’s best to keep the established laws to the very day we die. “(394) In this battle of man versus woman, Antigone had won. Creon had changed his ways, although, Antigone still died.

The second of Steiner’s principles of man is the conflict of age and youth. Creon has a confrontation with his son, Haemon, as well as his niece Antigone. At first Haemon is behind his father in his decision. When he first speaks with his father about the verdict of his bride, Antigone, he says, “Father, I’m your sonyou in your wisdom set my bearings for me- I obey you. No marriage could ever mean more to me than you, whatever good direction you may offer. “(380) The father and son began- to disagree when Haemon told his father that the people of Thebes disagreed with his decision.

Creon accuses him of taking the side of Antigone, “This boy I do believe, is fighting on her side, the woman’s died. “(383) Creon insulted his son by accusing him of taking the side of Antigone. Creon tells Haemon that he will not be able to marry his bride because he is going to kill her. It is a tragedy that a father is going to kill the woman that his son is in love with. This confrontation makes the audience feel sympathetic for Haemon. The situation became more tragic when Creon said, “Now, by heaven, I promise you, you’ll pay- taunting, insulting me!

Bring her out, that hateful- she’ll die now, here, in front of his eyes, beside her groom! “(384) The young conflicted with the old and resulted in death. This tragic confrontation led to the suicide of Haemon. The messenger alerted the people of Thebes of the death of Haemon and said, “Haemon’s gone, his blood spilled by the very hand-. “(395) This conflict was avoidable, yet ended in tragedy. Man conflicted with society is the following principle. At first Creon believed that the people of Thebes were on his side. He thought that the people would not break the laws that he created.

Creon said to Antigone, “You alone, of all the people of Thebes see things that way. “(376) He responded this way when Antigone told him that everyone disagrees with his decision but were to scared to speak up to him. Creon is confronted again with this situation when his son made him aware of this. Haemon tells his father, “The man in the street, you know, dreads your glance, he’d never say anything displeasing to your face. But it’s for me to catch the murmurs in the dark, the way the city mourns for this young girl. “(382) Haemon believed his father to be very stubborn and closed-minded.

His son visited a prophecy. Tiresias, the prophecy, told Creon that he could undo his mistake. The death of Antigone would cause more trouble than Creon had bargained for. The audience is forced to fell bad for the situation because Creon had been warned many times that he did not make the right decision. He refused to listen to the warnings. Creon replied to Tiresias’s prophet and said, “No reverend old Tiresias, all men fall its only human but the wisest fall obscenely when they glorify obscene advice with rhetoric- all for their own good. 392) It is ironic that when Creon said this he did not realize that he would be the one falling. Had he listened to his warnings earlier he would not have made such a tragically regrettable mistake. Another, of the five conflicts, is the confrontation of the living and the dead. This entire play is based around death for the mere fact that it began and ended with it. The entire point of the story was that Antigone wanted to burry her dead bother in order to pay her respects to him. In the first scene Antigone says to Ismene, “Why not? Our own brothers’ burial!

Hasn’t Creon graced one with all the rites, disgraced the other? Eteocles, they say, has been given full military honors, rightly so- Creon’s laid him in the earth and he goes with glory down among the dead. But the body of Polynices, who died miserably- why, a citywide proclamation, rumor has it, forbids anyone to bury him, even mourn him. He’s to be left unwept, unburied, a lovely treasure for the birds that scan the field and feast to their heart’s content. “(361) Ismene and Antigone are emotionally torn apart because both of their bothers were killed in battle.

To make matters worse, only one of their brothers was allowed legally to have a proper burial. Since they broke this law their lives were taken away from them. They knew the consequences of their actions. Yet, they proceeded anyway. Antigone warned her sister, “Such I hear, is the martial law our good Creon lays down for you and me- yes, me, I tell you- and he’s coming here to alert the uninformed in no uncertain terms, and he wont treat the matter lightly. Whoever disobeys in the least will die, his doom is sealed: stoning to death inside the city walls. 361) Before they committed the crime they knew Creon would seal their doom. They handed over their fate to him. It was tragic that these two sisters were willing to sacrifice their own lives for the respect of their dead brother. They were very loyal to their family. The story was filled with death. Not only had their two brothers died, but their father had passed as well. Their mother was dead as well. The audience has no choice but to feel sorrow for these two girls. They had suffered many losses. Four people in their family had died.

Their mother and father had commit suicide and their two brothers were killed in battle. The audience is led to believe that the only two the sisters have left is each other. Ismene thought of her future in terms of being dead. She knew she was going to die for her sin so she said to her sister, “I, for one, I’ll beg the dead to forgive me- I’m forced, I have no choice- I must obey the ones who stand in power. “(362) Antigone on the other hand did not care if she died. She felt she had nothing to lose. She made it seem as though her life was so horribly tragic that death was the only escape for from her horrible life.

Antigone said to Ismene, “Ant even if I died in the act, that death will be a glory. I will lie with the one I love and loved by him. “(363) Death was seen as an escape. The dead were not seen as gone, but in another world. They still existed but not among the living. In the end of the play three people added to the death count. Each death occurred because of another death. Antigone was killed because she buried her dead brother and it was against the law. Haemon killed himself because Antigone was killed. It was a tragedy that his own father had killed his bride.

Eurydice killed her self also. She was devastated that her son had killed himself. The entire play is filled with death. A lot of the dialogue also contains death. This set a tragic mood to the story. The last and final conflict of man is; man conflicted with the gods. Creon went against the gods when he decided to take the lives of others into his own hands. Antigone said to him, “Of course I did. It wasn’t Zeus, not in the least, who made this proclamation- not to me. Nor did that justice dwelling with the gods beneath the earth, ordain such laws for man. 374)

Antigone did not think that it was right that Creon imposed such laws upon them. She believed that the gods had control over them and she put her faith in Zeus. When she was talking to Ismene she said, “Do you know one, I ask you, one grief that Zeus will not perfect for the two of us while we still live and breathe? “(360) The gods had dealt her a tragic hand of life. Above all else she held the gods in highest power. One of the reasons why she did not obey her uncle’s law was because it was not a law created by the gods. “Do as you like, dishonor the laws the gods hold in honor. 363)

It was the gods law that she burry her brother. The people of Thebes feel the same way as Antigone. “Zeus, yours is the power, Zeus, what on earth can override it, who can hold it back? Power that neither sleep, the all-ensnaring no, nor the tireless months of heaven can ever overmaster- young through all the time, mighty lord of power, you hold fast the dazzling crystal mansions of Olympus. And throughout the future, late and soon as through the past, your law prevails: no towering form of greatness enters into the lives of mortals free and clear of ruin. 379)

It was a tragedy that Creon felt he could play god. He killed Antigone because he thought that he had the power to do so. There were very few people of Thebes that were on his side. Since he was the ruler he had the power to create laws. However, he did not have the power to go against the gods. The power he possessed went to his head. Tragedy is also present in the Aeschylus’s, Oresteia. Agamemnon had sacrificed his daughter to the gods. He had killed her for his own benefit. Calchas said, “My captains, Artemis must have blood! 307) Agamemnon killed sacrificed his daughter in order to protect himself because of a prophecy.

The profit told that terrible things would happen if he did not sacrifice blood. He said, “Obey, obey, or a heavy doom will crush me! – Oh but doom will crush me once I rent my child, the glory of my house- a father’s hands are stained, blood of a young girl streaks the altar. Pain both ways and what is worse? Desert the fleets, fail the alliance? No, but stop the winds with the virgin’s blood, feed their lust, their fury? – Feed their fury! – Law is law! – Let all go well. 307) Clytemnestra killed her husband upon his return from the battle of Troy. She was so heartbroken that he had killed her daughter.

The tragedy in this story is almost the same as that of Antigone. Death follows another death. Iphigenia was sacrificed by her father. He was killed for killing her and so was his mistress. Since Clytemnestra killed the two people she was sentenced to death. The tragedy is death. In the beginning of the story of Antigone the audience is forced to feel sorrow for Antigone. Towards the end they began to feel sympathy for Creon as well.

His display of moral weakness was the cause of three unnecessary deaths. The story of Antigone and Clytemnestra were different because the Antigone was the innocent party in the story. Clytemnestra may appear innocent to the audience but to the people in the story she was a murderess. Tragedy plays a large role in these two plays. An emotion of sorrow is felt by the audience. The characters of the plays go through terrible situations. Tragedy makes the stories more appealing to the audience because they become emotionally involved.

Analysis on the conflict men v. women found in Antigone

Many conflicts can be found within various plays. In Sophocles Antigone one of the many conflicts found is men versus women. The king of Thebes, Creon, has a problem with women. But not only the king, Ismene, Antigones sister as well refers to herself and her sister as being inferior to men. Women generally do not have the courage to stand up to their husbands. Yet Antigone is brave enough to disobey Creons law and ready to face the consequences. Her sister on the other hand is not this courageous. Ismene, instead says, we are only women, we cannot fight with men, Antigone!

The law is strong, we must give into the law in this thing, and in worse (923, Sophocles). Within the conflict of men versus women, Creon automatically assumes the killer is a man. When Creon is talking to the Sentry in scene one he says, the man who has dont this thing shall pay for it! Find that man bring me that man! (929). Creon is quick to blame the crime on a man. Not once did it cross his mind that the one whom was guilty of burying Polyneices could have been a woman. After the Sentry revealed Antigone to Creon and she confessed to burying her brother, the king was still baffled.

Then Ismene and Antigone were arguing whether they were equally guilty or not. The Creon replies, one has just now lost her mind; the other, it seems, has never had a mind at all (934). Again he goes on and insults women. He makes women look weak and less then men. Throughout the play, Creon continues to criticize women. He makes them look like they do not have a mind of their own; for they are but women, and even brave men run when they see Death coming (934). The conflict between men and women is shown throughout Sophocles Antigone. Creon himself has a problem with women and Ismene knows that she is a woman and should not get involved.

Antigone and Creon

Greek theatre played a large role in Greece. The citizens were supposed to learn from the mistakes made in tragedies. The citizens should have learned what not to be like as a citizen or person. In a Greek trilogy written by Sophocles there are two ma in characters, Antigone and Creon. They are both strong willed and stubborn people. Both being unwilling to change, they both seal each others fate. Creon is passionate. . Antigone is full of rage. They are both so similar they can not see eye to eye. Although they may seem quite different, Creon and Antigone share many similarities throughout the story.

They are both very independent people. Antigone is extremely independent.. She doesn’t mind doing anything on her own. For example, in the beginning of the story when Antigone is talking with Ismene, she asks for her help . When Ismene refuses she is furious with her. Then Ismene decides to act independently. Creon is also very independent. He refuses to accept anyone’s opinions except his own. When his son Haimon comes to talk with him he refuses to listen , claiming that Haimon is “girlst ruck! ” and corrupted . Teirsesais comes and tells him a morbid prophecy.

Creon will not listen to this either. He claims that Teirsesais has been corrupted by money, like many prophets at that time. He finally listens to the Charagous when reminded th at Teiresias has never been wrong. Antigone has no problem working by her self either. She demonstrates this when she slipped by all the guards that were protecting the dead body of Polyneices. Creon and Antigone are both independent, and they are both very loyal. They are loyal to their views. Creon is especially loyal to his laws. Antigone is loyal to her beliefs. Creon will not change his laws.

An example of this occurs when he and An tigone argue. He calls her “A traitor” For giving a burial for her dead brother Polyneices. He is so loyal to his own laws that he fails to see that he is disobeying the law of the gods. Antigone puts the laws of the gods ahead of the laws of the state s. She goes ahead and buries her brother. Which was strictly prohibited by Creon. This shows her short-sightedness is because she only does what she thinks the gods want. Instead of abiding by the law that Creon decreed. Creon is also short-sighted because he refuses to believe any other opinions or laws than his own.

Creon and Antigone are both so loyal which can also ake them very extreme. Creon is an extremist in reason. He thinks his law is the most important. Antigone is an extremist of passion. Creon is unwilling to put the god’s law above his law. He is u nwilling to listen to the passionate pleas of his son to let Antigone live. He instead puts his laws first, and states that if he lets Antigone live after she has broken his law, “How shall I earn the worlds obedience? ” His extreme will, later leads to his son’s death because he thinks his son has been corrupted by Antigone.

Antigone is equally as extreme and she will not listen to the reasoning of her sister Ismene. Ismene reminds her of the problems and dangers she is undertaking when she goes ou t to bury Polyneices. Antigone will not listen though, and this ends up killing her as well. Because Creon and Antigone are very extreme in their ways this can also make them cruel and foolish people. Creon is quite cruel to everyone around him. He never once listens to anyone, but instead he acts foolishly and hurts everyone.

When he is talk ing to his son Haimon, he retorts that Haimon is “a fool” and that he is, “Taken in by a woman! These words and his fathers attitude hurts Haimon and he becomes filled ith rage towards his foolish father. Antigone is also cruel and foolish. Especial ly to her sister Ismene. Ismene tries to help Antigone in the start of the play. When she tries to tell Antigone not to risk everything to please the gods. Antigone won’t listen though, She just tells her “Go away Ismene. I will be hating you soon”, in a striking example of her cruelty. Ismene and Antigone have been caring sisters until suddenly Antigone abandons her because she does not agree to help bury their brother.

Creon also is cruel to his old friend and prophet, Teirsesias. Teirsesias o mes to warn him that if he does not free Antigone that bad things will happen, but Creon doesn’t believe him. He claims that Teirsesias has “sold out” as a prophet and shows how foolish he is not to trust a long standing friend who has never been wrong. Creon and Antigone are both plagued by hubris. Creon wants to stand by the law he has made. Antigone is willing to risk it all to stand by the law of the gods and what is right. Creon’s stubbornness is clear when his old friend and prophet Teirsesias. Tells him to free Antigone.

Creon stubbornly refuses and remarks to the old wise an, “Bribes are baser then any baseness” Creon does not even listen to Teirsesias, who made him king in the first place. He is so stubborn that he refuses to listen cl aiming that Teirsesias had been corrupted by money and so his pride hampers his good judgment. He is so concentrated on everyone being corrupted that he does not even listen to common sense. His son, Haimon tries to come tell him that he should not s entence Antigone to death.

Creon is outraged by his son siding with her. He tells Haimon that he is a “Fool, adolescent fool! Taken in by a woman! Haimon esponds to this by saying that he is “perverse” Creon, even more outraged, calls him a “Girls struck fool” Haimon storms off with a loathing hatred for his father’s arrogant pride and stubbornness. Antigone has equal hubris herself. She is so passionate on burying her brother that she will not listen to reason. Full of arrogance and indignati on, she will not listen to the words of her sister. Ismene warned her of the dangers of burying their brother Polyneices but Antigone will not listen. She calls Ismene a “traitor” for not coming to help her and Ismene shakingly replies “I am so afraid o f you”.

Antigone, instead f listening to the common sense of her sister, snaps back that “You need not be: you have yourself to consider, after all”. Later in the story Antigone is arrested for burying her brother and Ismene comes crawling back to her. Ismene breaks the conversation between Antigone and Creon by admitting that, “I am guilty, if she let me say so”. Antigone will not let her and retorts coldly, “No, Ismene. you have no right to say so. You would not help me, and I will not have you h elp me” This reveals clearly how arrogant and stubborn Antigone can be. Even after her sister wants to share in her punishment and crawls back to her.

She will not accept it to her own demise. Creon and Antigone are both remarkably similar people. Ironically, they are both so much the same that they can not see it. The flaws they share make neither of them willing to listen to the other. Many of their traits are identical, but their opinion s are so different that they can’t stand each other. Sophocles did an excellent job in portraying the two vast extremes of the spectrum, passion and reason. This story hopefully proves to people that neither extreme passion nor extreme reason, but rather be in the middle and achieve arete.

Sophocles’ Antigone Essay

The debate over who is the tragic hero in Antigone continue on to this day. The belief that Antigone is the hero is a strong one. There are many critics who believe, however, that Creon, the Ruler of Thebes, is the true protagonist. I have made my own judgments also, based on what I have researched of this work by Sophocles. Antigone is widely thought of as the tragic hero of the play bearing her name. She would seem to fit the part in light of the fact that she dies in doing what is right. She buries her brother without worrying what might happen to her.

She “Takes into consideration death and the reality that may be beyond death” (Hathorn 59). Those who do believe that Antigone was meant to be the true tragic hero argue against others who believe that Creon deserves that honor. They say that the Gods were against Creon, and that he did not truly love his country. “His patriotism is to narrow and negative and his conception of justice is too exclusive… to be dignified by the name of love for the state” (Hathorn 59). These arguments, and many others, make many people believe the Antigone is the rightful protagonist.

Many critics argue that Creon is the tragic hero of Antigone. They say that his noble quality is his caring for Antigone and Ismene when thier father was persecuted. Those who ezd behind Creon also argue that Antigone never had a true epiphany, a key element in being a tragic hero. Creon, on the other hand, realized his mistake when Teiresias made his prophecy. He is forced to live, knowing that three people are dead because of his ignorance, which is a punishment worse than death. My opinion on this debate is that Antigone is the tragic hero. She tries to help her brother without worrying bout what will happen to her.

She says, “I intend to give my brother burial. I’ll be glad to die in the attempt, -if it’s a crime, then it’s a crime that God commands” (Sophocles 4). She was also punished for doing what was right. Her epiphany came, hidden from the audience, before she hung herself. Creon’s “nobleness” of taking in young Antigone and Ismene is overshadowed by his egotistical nature. He will not allow justice to come about simply because he wants to protect his image. He says, “If she gets away with this behavior, call me a woman and call her a an” (Sophocles 13).

These elements prove that Antigone is the tragic hero. Creon, underezding his ignorance may lead one to believe that he is the true protagonist. But, if you define the word protagonist you would find that a protagonist is one who is a leader or supporter of a cause. Antigone is in support of her own actions in the burial of her brother Polyneices. She entrusts that she is doing what the Gods want, contrary to the belief of Creon. Many readers and critics may say Creon suffered greator hardships. Some may say Antigone never had an epiphany.

Who ould underezd it if their own brother were left to the birds and dogs. There would be no rational thinking involved in a act like this. These are arguments envolved in deciding who is the tragic hero of Antigone. Critics, to this day, still argue about who is the tragic hero of Antigone. Many say that Antigone is the heroin. Others say that it is Creon. My research favors Antigone as the perfect protagonist. No matter who the reader sides with, it is agreed by most that there is a valid argument either way, in light of the fact that they both endure great hardships.

The story Antigone Creon

In the story Antigone Creon showed that to much power will corrupt anyone. As Creon became blessed with total control his character, principals, and his judgement deteriorated. Antigone was written by a man named Sophocles. He was a man that did an excellent job of showing how absolute power will corrupt absolutely. Using Creon’s utmost authority, Sophocles told of how everything he once stood for had crumbled. The play Antigone begins by telling of a troubled royal family. In this play there are nine main characters. I will focus on only a few of these characters.

The play starts with Antigone (niece of Creon) and her sister Ismene talking about how their father Oedipus died, and how his death brought very hard times. Their brothers Eteocles and Polynices have just died fight each other. Eteocles was fighting for the city, while Polynices was fighting against the city and was the supposed ‘traitor’. When the two died Eteocles was given full burial rites, but Polynices was given absolutely no burial rites of any kind because he was a traitor. His death was forbidden to be mourned throughout the city. The death of Eteocles and Polynices spurred Creon’s rite to the throne.

He insisted that the body of Polynices lay to rot for all the city to see. Antigone, being his sister, couldn’t stand to see this happen. She went and did her best to cover her brothers body. She got caught while doing this. She then was brought before her uncle the king. She denied nothing, and was pround to admit to the crime. Her stubborn uncle insisted that she pay the price for her crime. He took her to a rocky vault and walled her inside where she was to die for her crime. When Creon got back, his son Haemon started to argue about the fate of Anitgone.

Haemon was going to marry her, but now his own father wanted her dead. Haemon vowed never to return unless his love was released. Creon refuses to agree to free Antigone. Haemon storms out, and goes to first bury Polynices, then to find Antigone. When Haemon finds Antigone she has already hung herself. Creon arrives a short while after Haemon finds his love dead. Haemon first swing sword at Creon, then he shoves it into himself. Creon’s wife Eurydice hears from a messenger that her last living son has now killed himself. She blames it on her husband as she kills herself.

Creon arrives and acknowledges that everything is his fault. He asks to be taken away. He is brought to the a palace, and that is where the play ends. Creon’s leadership wsa hurt greatly because of his immoralistic character. Creon states that there are other women for his son to love when he states “There are other fields for him to plow”. (lines 642-643) Creon also believes that his son should obey his father’s request no matter what the circumstances. He tells of this when he says “That’s how you ought to feel within your heart, subordinate to your father’s will in every way”.

Creon took his power a step too far by insisting that everything be done his way, and I believe that is one of the reasons that he fell apart as a leader. Creon also suffered from a lack of rock solid principals. When he said ” I am in no mood to trade insults with a seer” (line 1168), he showed me that he felt that as a king he thought he was a better person than all others. He felt he had no time for ordinary people because he was of higher being. He also said “Not a word of hope-your doom is sealed” (line 1025).

It bothered me that he had the absolute lack of compassion because he said this when he was about to seal the fate of his own niece. To be a good leader you must have rock solid principals to fall back on in times of stress. Creon lost grasp of these, and that contributed to his demise as a leader. Creon lost his sense of judgement when he became an all-powerful ruler. There are many examples of this throughout the play. When Creon was talking to Ismene he said “Death would do it for me-break off their marriage” (line 648), this showed that he had lost grip of what was important to him and his family.

He only looked at negative aspects of the issue. He didn’t realize how bad he would hurt his family by killing Antigone. He goes on to further prove my point when, at the end of the play, he states “I murdered you, my son, against my will- you too, my wife” (lines 1462-1463). By this statement he means to take all blame for what has been done, and show that he had little sense of judgement at the time of the incident. As a leader Creon was a lost, undefined, wreck of a man. The power that came with his postition destroyed him. He lost control of what was important to his city and his family.

As he became blessed with total control his character, principals, and leadership deteriorated. In the play Creon stated “You cannot know a man completely, his character, his principals, sense of judgement, not till he’s shown his true colors, ruling the people, making laws” (stated in question #1). There is no better way to describe the reasons for the crumbling of Creon as a man than that statement. He was unable to stand-up for his own family when faced with adversity, and in the end that is what destroyed his ability to lead his city.

Antigone Was Right

The story of Antigone deals with Antigone’s brother who’s body has been left unburied because of crimes against the state. The sight of her brother being unburied drives Antigone to take action against the state and bury her brother regardless of the consequences. The concept of the Greek afterlife was far more important and sacred than living life itself. Everything they did while they were alive was to please the many gods they worshipped. They built temples for their Gods, made statues to symbolize their Gods, and had a different God to explain things that we now say are an act of mother nature.

Antigone percieved her actions to be courageous and valid, and Kreone, the King, percieved them as blasphemous. The entire story focuses on deciding who’s right. The question arises, “Did Antigone take proper action? ” Was it right to go against her Uncle Kreon’s wishes and go ahead and bury her brother that was to be left out for the vultures? Would it have been better just to leave the situation how it was? The fact is, Antigone did the right thing. She was acting out of divine influence so to speak. Since divinity and humanity are shown to be colliding forces where divinity out weighs humanity in ancient Greece.

Antigone was justified in her actions. Antigone was following divine laws, or walking with divine shoes, while Kreone followed the laws of the state. Her brother’s afterlife was so important to Antigone that she was willing to give up anything to ensure her brother’s happiness and “future” after his death. This supported in the play by the way she is so outspoken about what she had done after she is caught and while she is being questioned. “Why should I be ashamed of my loyalty to my brother? ” (Sophocles line 624).

Kreon didn’t like her speaking in the manner such as this because it shows him that she has no remorse for disobeying his orders. Furthermore, it damaged Kreone’s incredible pride. Kreone’s pride is so great in fact, that he can’t even be swayed by his son Haimon. Haimon asks his father to take his advice and not have Antigone executed, but, because of Kreon’s stubborness for the law of the state, Kreon gets furious and makes the situation worse then it already was.

He was way too proud to take advice from someone younger, and in his anger he decided to kill Antigone right away in front of Haimon’s eyes. Just understand: You don’t insult me and go off laughing. Bring her here! Let him see her. Kill her here, beside her bridegroom'” (Sophocles 919-921). This was too much for Haimon to take, and he runs out of the room, yelling, “‘her death will destroy others'” (Sophocles 908). Blinded by his pride and arrogance, Kreon takes that remark as a threat to himself, unknowing that it wasn’t directed to him, but was a suicide threat by his own son. Yet, Kreone may have been viewed as justified in his actions as well.

Kreon states that the gods would be unhappy if a traitor to their earth were to be buried. Someone that was a traitor to the Gods land would not be admired. The gods would agree that the person should be punished. Kreon “should” have been taken as correct on this argument because kings were the lawgivers and thought to be god-like. The same type of thing goes on in today’s government with our president. If we don’t like him , which many may not, that does not give us the right to ignore his laws or the laws of this country. The fact is laws are made for a reason, be it good or bad.

Even though they may seem a little far-fetched now, they were probably very reasonable then. The law may seem to be unjust to us in today’s society but that does not give anyone the right to create their own laws to live by. Unless, they are rebeling against a absoulutism; and this is precisely what Antigone was doing. In the story, Kreone was refferred to as a tyrant. “In the seventh and sixth centuries B. C. E. in one city-state after another, an individual “tyrant”-by which the Greeks meant someone who held the power contrary to the established traditions of the commmunity” (Bulliet pg. 1).

In other words, by defining Kreone as a tyrant in the text, they meant that he was dictator who took control and changed the laws of the land. Therefore, his laws were absoulute, and unjust in the first place. The morals that Antigone had instilled in her since the day of her birth are what caused her to rise above Kreone’s tyrany. Her moral concious could not allow her brother not to be burried. The fact that she was a woman standing up to the King, of all people, didn’t help sway Kreone’s decision.

Back then women did not have any more rights than the slaves did and to be talked to in such a powerful way by a woman was just unheard of, especially to a ruler. Only a strong willed woman with divine law in her corner could hope to accomplish a goal like standing up to a tyrant. Yet, Kreone had a chance to make amends. He was forewarned of his stupidity by many people “All mankind is subject to error. Once a mistake is made it is wise of him to make amends and not be unbending. Stubbornness is stupidity'” (Sophocles 1180-1184).

Teiresias, a old man who could accuratley tell the future, spoke these words to Kreone. However, Kreone’s stubborness held strong. This is why Kreone’s ego kept him from being righteous. Antigone’s actions were justified in tragedy of Antigone. But the magnitude of her actions can only be viewed when set against the background of the time period. A strong woman was unheard of in ancient Greece. But the interpretation that Antigone was justified in her actions and that she acted on the side of divinity, can help to visualize the text and the culture that produced Antigone.

Antigone vs. Creon

According to Aristotle, “tragedy is a representation of an action, which is serious, complete in itself, and of a certain length, it is expressed in speech made beautiful in different ways in different parts of the play; it is acted, not narrated; and by exciting pity and fear it gives a healthy relief to such emotion” (Lucas 25). This definition categorizes Sophocles’ Antigone as a model tragedy. Aristotle also states that ” a tragedy must include pain and sorrow, and a tragedy goes from happiness to misery” (Leech 33).

The main idea throughout the play is entrenched in the conflict between Antigone and Creon, the two protagonists, on the basis of morale and justice. Antigone’s actions are out of eros, or love and Creon’s actions are based on state laws and hubris, or pride. In Sophocles’ Antigone, tragedy predominates the drama from the beginning of the story when Polynices and Eteocles, two brothers, fight in a battle for the throne of Thebes. Although the city of Thebes has won the battle, the two brothers have killed one another and Thebes has no king. The brothers uncle, Creon, assumes position of king of Thebes.

Under his first decree Creon declares that no man will be allowed to bury Polynices since he brought an outside army from Argos to battle against Eteocles in Thebes. Antigone, Polynices and Eteocles’s sister, ignores Creon’s decree and gives Polynices a proper burial to honor the gods in spite of Creon’s decree. Now the battle between Antigone and Creon begins, and they are the focal point of the drama. Antigone and Creon have totally opposite views of justice. Creon feels that justice is given in regards to the state whereas, Antigone goes against the ideas of Creon and sets with the laws of the gods.

She appeals to the “justice that dwells with the gods below” (Sophocles 135), and she is ready for her fate, which is death. Antigone is unreasonable and unsensible, and she insist that sometimes justice is more important than the laws set by man. Since she defines her own laws, she must suffer the consequences for trying to disobey the laws of the state. Antigone makes no effort to conceal her deed and challenges Creon’s right to make laws that are in conflict with the will of the gods. Creon is an example of an authority figure who is too rigid an inflexible to admit his mistakes and errors in judgment until it is too late.

Eventhough Creon sets the laws of the state higher than the laws of the gods by denying Polynices a decent burial, Antigone knows that she must please the gods by burying Polynices. Antigone and Creon not only struggle on the basis of laws but also on family matters. Antigone not only lost her two brothers, but she will lose her respect for her family and the gods if she does not bury Polynices. Creon does not let his relation with Antigone as her uncle affect his dealings with Antigone in any way. He swears to punish her even if she is a “sister’s child or closer in blood”( Sophocles 784).

His job now is to protect and serve the people of Thebes in any way he possibly can, but most of all he must uphold the laws of the state. If he does not punish Antigone, he will look as though he is a weak ruler. Since Creon is related to Antigone, he must carry out the punishment of Antigone so the Thebians will see him as a strong and powerful king. Antigone goes alone to bury Polynices because Ismene, her sister, will not disobey Creon’s law. Ismene says “I do them no dishonor, but to defy the city, I have no strength for that” (Sophocles 771).

Ismene pleads with Antigone to change her mind because Ismene has no other immediate family besides Antigone. Ismene asks “how can I live alone, without her? ” (Sophocles 789). The disagreement between Antigone and Ismene is between their views of “idealism and realism” (Webster 88). Ismene tries to persuade Antigone to change her mind and to remember “that we are women we’re not born to contend with men” and “we must submit”( Sophocles 61). Antigone’s strong will ignores Ismene’s pleas for her to change her mind, and she buries Polynices to satisfy the gods.

When Creon finds out that Antigone has disobeyed him and only wants to die, he tries to argue with her, but she remains arrogant and says “if you think I am behaving like a fool, it is perhaps a fool calling me a fool” (Sophocles 135). Immediately, Creon realizes he cannot argue with Antigone and says “while I live, no woman shall rule me” (Sophocles 135). This statement suggests the motive of Creon as hubris, or excessive pride. Antigone declares that “is not my nature to share in hating, but to share in loving” (Sophocles 135). Antigone’s motive of eros, or love is evident.

Creon’s attitude expresses his fear of being controlled by a woman and makes that known to his son, Haemon, who cares for Antigone. To conquer his fear he must follow through with his decree to punish Antigone. Antigone sees her womanhood as a source for strength and accepts her role to die as an act of audacity. Unlike Creon, Antigone does not the support of anyone but herself. Haemon, the son of Creon, does not want Antigone to die for what she has done. He attempts to convince his father that he should change his view about Antigone going against Creon’s decree.

Creon tells him that he is young and is blinded by the fact that he is the “woman’s champion” (Sophocles 137). Haemen does not want to displease his father, but he is not willing to back down from what he believes is right. He want to marry Antigone someday and in his opinion his father is interfering with his life all because of a decree. Creon gets angry and says “bring forth that hated thing, that she may die forthwith in his presence–before his eyes–and her bridegroom’s side” (Sophocles 137). Haemen leaves his father’s side and dies beside his true love, Antigone.

Aristotle’s happiness to misery concept is now being unleashed on Creon in an extreme. He loses his son and soon will lose his authority over Thebes. The Family curse has finally taken the course on Antigone and her fate is beginning to be sealed ( Adams 57). Creon has not yet stated a death punishment in Antigone, but in order to portray his strong leadership image he must execute his decree even if Antigone is his niece. When Antigone enters before Creon again she is ready to pay the price for her actions against Creon’s decree.

Antigone compares her destiny with Niobe’s, the wife of a former ruler of Thebes, because Niobe was turned into stone and Antigone will be isolated in a stone cave. Also, Niobe’s children were taken away from her, and Antigone will never get to experience having a family with Haemon, Creon’s son. In the end Antigone feels deserted by everyone including the gods, who she honored by burying Polynices. Now Antigone must die alone like the “typical Sophoclean tragic hero” ( Adams 55). Creon regains his authority over Antigone by finally sentencing her to death.

Now he is assured of his power because he places the state before his own kin. But his own fate is being quietly sealed because he has put his own aspirations and goals higher than his reverence for the gods. In Sophoclean tragedy, the divine laws are always more prevalent then man’s or state’s law. By exposing Antigone to isolation Creon is not human but animal-like. Antigone and Creon accept their fates very differently. Antigone has “accepted death heroically” (Sophocles 138) while Creon has not acknowledged his fate until he has to suffer immensely for sentencing Antigone to death.

Now their roles are reversing in that Antigone strongly accepts her fate and Creon weakens at the sight of his fate. Creon is blinded by his hubris until it is too late, and Antigone understands the price she will pay for the eros of Polynices. In Antigone, there are many different antitheses and conflicts, and this state of conflict is embodied in the presence on stage of two protagonists, each diametrically opposed to the other (Segal 62). Antigone receives her punishment through death, but Creon will receive his chastisement when he is exiled from Thebes from the gods.

Antigone’s “self-accepted death is the source of what is beautiful and heroic in the play” (Segal 85). The main conflict in Antigone revolves around what is right and what is wrong. Of the two protagonists, Antigone stands on the correct laws and morale. She believes in divine law and not human law as Creon did. “Antigone feels her duty is to the gods, and Creon feels his duty is to the state (Webster 88). The death of the tragic hero, Antigone, brings Aristotle’s idea of a tragedy to life.

Antigone by Sophocles

Family is supposed to be the ultimate support, everlasting, and always ready to forgive. In Antigone by Sophocles, Creon is immersed in a “power trip” that alienates and even kills his family. He caused his son, Haemon’s death, his wife, Eurydice’s death and Antigone’s death. Creon views himself as the perfect leader, believes he is always correct, and in turn has to live with the guilt of three deaths that were his fault. Antigone goes alone to bury Polynices and deliberately disobeys Creon’s law.

Antigone not only lost her two brothers, but she will lose her respect for her family and the gods if she does not bury Polynices. When Creon finds out that Antigone has disobeyed him and only wants to die, he tries to argue with her, but she remains strong to her word. Immediately, Creon realizes he cannot argue with Antigone and says, “While I’m alive, no woman is going to lord it over me”(86). Creon does not let his relation with Antigone as her uncle affect his dealing with Antigone in any way. He swears to punish her even if she is family.

His job is to protect and uphold the laws of the state. If he does not punish Antigone he will look as though he is a weak ruler. Since Creon is related to Antigone, he must carry out the punishment of Antigone so the people of Thebes will see him as a strong and powerful king. Haemon does not want to Antigone to die for what she has done. He attempts to convince his father that he should change his view about Antigone going against Creon’s decree. Creon tells him that he young and has lost his “sense of judgement over a woman”(93).

Haemon does not want to displease his father, but he is not willing to back down from what he believe is right. Creon gets angry and says, “bring her out, that hateful-she’ll die now, here, in front of his eyes, beside her groom”(99). Haemon leaves his father’s side and dies beside his true love, Antigone. When Eurydice enters the palace she is faced with the news of her son’s death. She demands that the messenger tell her “the news, again, whatever it issorrow and [her] are hardly strangers”(121).

Eurydice blames Creon for the death of her son. She is so alarmed with the death that she kills herself. Creon returns with the body of Haemon only to find “a new corpse rising before [his] eyes”(125). Creon’s own destiny came about him, to prove that what he claims to be just isn’t always, and that the worst happenings and mistakes were his overconfidence and his pride. The rest of his life will forever be plagued with the tragedy and he will not be able to think the same way ever again.

Antigone a play written by Sophocles

Antigone is a play written by Sophocles that became a classic due to its controversial content. In this play, the Greek dramatist reflected mainly on Civil Disobedience. Antigone believes in the individual rights over the state rights. Creon, however, strongly believes in putting state over religion. The play does not only revolve on the political and religious issue, but also deals with the battle of the sexes. The play is about a strong-willed woman defying the laws of a proud king. Antigone is torn between her devotion to the gods and her loyalty to the king.

Creon, ruler of Thebes, issued the order to leave the traitor Polynices’ body ‘ to be left unburied, his corpse carrion for the birds and dogs to tear, an obscenity for the citizens to behold! ‘; Antigone was not about to simply obey this absurd decree. She felt that her personal responsibility lies to the gods and her family rather than the king. She then asked Ismene, her sister, to assist her with the burial, but was denied of any help. She was disappointed at first, but later on decided that she will do this with or without Ismene’s help.

Creon was warned about this and later found the culprit. He issued the death sentence for Antigone’s action. Creon informed his son, Haemon, of his fiancee’s deceit. Haemon, however, defended his beloved. He told his father that the whole city was on her side, but were afraid to say anything. He was instead accused of ‘being a woman’s accomplice’;, ‘fighting on her side, the woman’s side. ‘; Creon continued to threaten him with witnessing the execution of Antione. She was to ‘die, now here, in front of his eyes, beside her groom! Haemon countered him with a threat of his own that he will never set eyes on him again if he continues this violence.

Crion was apalled with his son. For that, Antigone was to die a very agonizing death. she was to be taken ‘down to some wild desolate path never trod by men, and wall her up alive in a rocky vault, and set out short rations, just the measure piety demands’;. The prophet Tiresias warned Crion of the consequences if he does not release Antigone soon. He told him of his dreams that he would lose the people he loves if he continues to be stubborn and stupid.

Creon admitted that the prophesies troubled him greatly. He ordered the release of Antigone, but was too late. He found her ‘hanged by the neck in a fine noose, strangled in her veils- and the boy, his hands slung around her waist…. ‘;. Haemon attacked him, but missed and instead drove his sword to his own heart. Creon witnessed all this an d realized that he brought it on himself. Back at the palace, his wife Eurydice heard the news and ended up killing hersilf.

Creon begged to be free of this guilt by demanding his own death. finally admitted to being a ‘rash, indiscriminate fool! ‘;. Antigone possesses the qualities everyone admires. She is defiant, strong-willed, rebellious, brave, loyal, and stubborn. Creon matches these strong qualities with cruelty, authoritativeness, one-sidedness and stubbornness. Stubbornness became their downfall. Antigone believed that the laws of the gods were of greater importance than the rules of the state. Creon, however, believed that since he’s the king, his word is the law and no one should dare defy him.

Besidesthe political and religious content, Antigone deals with the battle of the sexes as well. Creon continually brings up that woman are subservient to all men. he advised his son of ‘never letting some woman triumph over us. Better to fall from power, if fall we must, at the hands of a man- never be rated inferior to a woman, never. ‘; Both were so proud that it cost their own lives and their loved one’s death. I found this play very interesting. Even though this was produced centuries ago, we could still easily relate with the themes it depicted.

It encourages people of the modern world to stand for what they believe in. it teaches us to be more open-minded. We learn that there are no set rules. We do not always have to do what we are told. We just have to be aware of the consequences of our actions. Antigone also emphasizes on being proud. It is important to have pride for the reason of restoring one’s own self-esteem, however, having too much of it can lead to destruction. Admitting you are wrong is not so bad.

Antigone – Classic Tragedy

Justice is a word we hear today all the time. Left and right we hear of judges and citizens demanding justice. Is justice always the right way? It seems that justice is not always the correct solution to a problem, but a solution that is the easiest to make. The classic play Antigone is a perfect example of this. Antigone is classic tragedy at its finest. A simple civilized and humane right of burying a loved one is turned into a great loss. Creons inapt decision to hold his power and sentence Antigone to death causes him to lose the people he loves most.

The justice of the play is simply Creons punishment for his cruelty to Antigone. When Antigone learns that no one is to bury her brother, she immediately knows what she must do. She doesnt even hesitate to her decision and she is fully willing to face the consequences to do what is right. She believes that what she is doing is just a humane right and shes willing to die for what she believes in. She even tells Creon that what hes doing is against what the gods wanted and that his laws were worthless. She states: Not through dread of any human pride could I answer to the gods for breaking these.

It seems that gods are almost speaking to Creon through Antigone and warning him of his decision. Antigone is almost hailed to a god like status, as Oedipus was before her. She is extremely strong and unbelievably willing to sacrifice everything in the name of honor and pride. She so easily makes her decisions and chooses to die willingly without a second thought. The minute Creon questions her on breaking the law, she states: Die I must, -I knew that well (how should I not? )-even without thy edicts. What is even more is that Antigone was a woman, a woman in a time of extreme male domination.

This makes her even stronger of a person in the play and shows the growing strength of the gender that we know of today. The blind sear once again plays the roll of an extremely reliable, but ignored person. He warns Creon of his terrible mistake but when Creon goes to change his wrongs, he finds out its too late. Creon is given more than enough warnings of his fate as Antigone states in the play: And if my present deeds are foolish in thy sight, it may be that a foolish judge arraigns my folly. This angers Creon even more that someone would questions his authority but he believes that power is more important in the end than honor.

Creon believes justice is putting Antigone to death, while Antigone and Ismene believe justice is burying their brother. In the end the justice is Creons loss, which shows morals above a kings laws. The scheme of Sophocles plays tends to always be fate to the blind eye. The fate of Oedipus and now Creon are determined by single decision that they make without thinking twice. Oedipus killed his own father on the road to Thebes for power, and Creon sentenced Antigone to death for the same. In the end its the individual corruption from power that seemingly no one can control.

In Macbeth as well, power is the cause of his loss. Sophocles seems to say that our human nature causes us to be corrupt. Sophocles play Antigone is a story about knowing when not to obey a law. Its about doing what is right and the punishment that one suffers if they allow law to overcome natural rights. Antigone is also about being allowed to grieve a loss and giving honor by burying those we love. With all the death and tragedy that occurs in Antigone, what it all comes down to is that the justice of the play is Creons punishment for his ignorance.

Antigone – Analysis Of Greek Ideals

In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life’s complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered around the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change.

In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with the controversy of the Greek ideals. They both based their actions on their beliefs of what is right and wrong. The conflict arose when the ideals that backed up their actions clashed with each other, making it contradiction between morals. Antigone’s side of the conflict held a much more heavenly approach, as opposed to the mundane road that Creon chose to follow. Antigone feels that Creon is disregarding the laws of heaven through his edict.

After she is captured and brought to Creon, she tells him I do not think your edicts strong enough to overrule the unwritten unalterable laws of God and heaven, you being only a man. ” Antigone’s staunch opinion is one that supports the Gods and the laws of heaven. Her reasoning is set by her belief that if someone is not given a proper burial, that person would not be accepted into heaven.

Antigone was a very religious person, and acceptance of her brother by the Gods was very important to her. She felt that “It is against you and me he has made this order. Yes, against me. Creon’s order was personal to Antigone. His edict invaded her family life as well as the Gods’. An important ideal in Ancient Greece was the belief that the government was to have no control in matters concerning religious beliefs.

In Antigone’s eyes, Creon betrayed that ideal by not allowing her to properly bury her brother, Polynices. She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, and Creon did not have the power to deny Polynices that right. Antigone’s strong beliefs eventually led her to her death by the hand of Creon. Never, though, did she stop defending what she thought was right.

As Creon ordered her to her death, Antigone exclaimed, “I go, his prisoner, because I honoured those things in which honour truly belongs. ” She is directly humiliating Creon by calling his opinions and decisions weak and unjust. She also emphasizes “his prisoner,” which tells us that Creon’s decision to capture Antigone was his own, and was not backed up by the majority of the people. She feels that Creon is abusing his power as king and dealing with her task to a personal level. Creon’s actions are guided by the ideal that states “Man is the measure of all things.

The chorus emphasizes this point during the play by stating that “There is nothing beyond (man’s) power. ” Creon believes that the good of man comes before the gods. Setting the example using Polynices’ body left unburied is a symbol of Creon’s belief. “No man who is his country’s enemy shall call himself my friend. ” This quote shows that leaving the body unburied is done to show respect for Thebes. After all, how could the ruler of a city-state honor a man who attempted to invade and conquer his city. From that perspective, Creon’s actions are completely just and supported by the ideals.

Though most of Creon’s reasonings coincide with the Greek ideals, one ideal strongly contradicts his actions. The ideal states that the population would be granted freedom from political oppression and that freedom of religion would be carried out. Creon defied both of these. First, Antigone was “his prisoner”, not necessarily the publics. In fact, the general population supported Antigone, though they were too scared to say anything. Haemon, the son of Creon, knew of this, and told Creon, “Has she not rather earned a crown of gold? – Such is the secret talk of the town.

This proves that Creon was exercising complete domination of political power, which is strictly forbidden in the new ideals. Also, not allowing Antigone perform her religious ceremony of burying her brother is interfering with religious affairs. This denies Antigone freedom of religion, hence, contempt for this ideal. The contradictions between the beliefs of Creon and Antigone are strong throughout the play. Both have well-structured arguments, but neither completely dominates the other. Antigone is motivated by her strong religious feelings while Creon is out to make good for his city-state.

The chorus’ opinion is the determining factor, as in the end, they convince Creon to set Antigone free. Creon had to weigh each factor carefully, and in the end, he had to decide between ideals. His mind was torn in two. “It is hard to give way, and hard to ezd and abide the coming of the curse. Both ways are hard. ” The contradiction of ideals was what led to Antigone’s, Haemon’s, and Megareus’ death. Both sides were just, all beliefs were supported. Creon was forced to decide the unanswerable, decipher the encoded, complete the impossible, and determine right from wrong when there was no clear answer.

Antigone and Oedipus, by Sophocles

Antigone and Oedipus, written by Sophocles, are dramatic plays with a tragic ending. The main theme for Antigone is that people sometimes have to learn the hard way from their mistakes. This theme is expressed in the final four lines of the play. They read, There is no happiness where there is no wisdom; No wisdom but in submission to the gods. Big words are always punished, And proud men in old age learn to be wise. These lines are an important part of the play.

They symbolize Creons bad decisions he made, his defiance to the gods, the unishment he went through because of his edict, and the wisdom he gained because of all his mistakes. “There is no happiness where there is no wisdom” demonstrates how Creon not using wisdom in his decision affected him. By declaring that Polyneices could not have a proper burial, he went against the gods and the other citizens of Thebess beliefs. This was not a wise decision on his part, and because of it he lost his wife, his son, and his happiness. Creon also defied the laws of the gods.

This is what is expressed in the line, No wisdom but in submission to the gods. ” In Antigone, the edict and decisions that Creon made demonstrated that his law was more important then the gods laws. His defiance of the laws eventually made him believe, by talking to Teirisias, that something bad would happen to him, so he gave in to his decision. When he gave into the gods he gained wisdom and learned that his actions would be punished. Creons edict is considered his big words.

In the third line it says, “Big words are always punished. Creons edict was unished by his loss of happiness. He proclaimed to his city that Polyneices may not be buried, when he did this he was very proud and demanding about his decision. He was determined not to change his mind for anything. These big words that he proclaimed would bring his downfall. Because Creon locked Antigone up, for burying Polyneices, she killed herself. Creons son Haimon, who was engaged to Antigone, also committed suicide upon seeing his beloved Antigone dead. Also Creon’s wife took her own life.

If Creon hadn’t gone against what was ight, by making his laws more important then the gods laws, and issuing his edict, he would not have suffered the way he did. By getting involved in stopping Polyneices burial by his edict he brought upon his own terrible punishment. The last line, “Proud men in old age learn to be wise” explains the main theme of Antigone. The proud man is Creon, the King of Thebes. By all the mistakes he makes he learns to be wiser. As a ruler he was a very proud man. He didn’t seem to care about anything as long as his commands were carried out.

By losing his son and wife and probably the respect of many citizens of Thebes he grew wiser. Creon’s bad decisions he made, his defiance to the gods, the punishment he went through because of his edict, and the wisdom he gained because of all his mistakes, all contribute to the main theme of Antigone, that people sometimes have to learn the hard from their mistakes. The explication of the final four lines of the play really give a better understanding of the theme that Sophocles was trying to get across to his audience.

Morality in Sophocles’ Antigone

In Ancient Greece, life was full of complicated questions centered around the expanding field of science. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in the city-states and man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. As a result many new ideals and beliefs surfaced. These new ideals and beliefs, though good in intentions, often conflicted with one another and created complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Sophocles play Antigone that was written in this era. In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war concerning their ideals. They both base there actions on what they believe is right and wrong. The conflict arose when their ideals that backed up their actions on the burial of Polyneices clashed, creating a contradiction between morals.

Antigone’s side of the conflict held a much more divine approach, as opposed to the mundane path Creon chose to travel. Antigone feels that Creon is disregarding the laws of the heavens by ordering it unlawful for anyone to provide a proper burial for her brother Polyneices. Antigone’s opinion is one that supports the Gods and the laws of the heavens. Her reasoning is set by her belief that if someone were not given a proper burial, that person would not be accepted into heaven. Antigone was a very religious person and the acceptance of her brother by the Gods was very important to her. Creons order was personal to Antigone and his edict invaded her family life as well as the Gods. An important ideal in Ancient Greece was the belief that the government was to have no control in matters concerning religious beliefs. In

Antigone’s eyes, Creon betrayed that ideal by not allowing her to properly bury her brother, Polyneices. She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, and Creon did not have the power to deny Polyneices that right. Antigone’s strong beliefs eventually led her to death by the hand of Creon.

Creon’s actions are guided by the ideal that man is the measure of all things. Creon believes that the good of man comes before the Gods. An example of Creons belief was the unburied body of Polyneices. Creon doesn’t want to give honor to a man who attempted to invade and conquer his city. He denies burial for Polyneices to show respect for Thebes. From this standpoint, Creons decisions for denying burial for Polyneices are completely just and supports the ideals. Creon’s reasoning’s coincide with the Greek ideals except for two that strongly contradicts his actions.

The first is that Creon exercises complete domination of political power. He defies this ideal by holding Antigone as his prisoner and not the publics. The people of Thebes supported Antigone but were too scared to do anything about it. Creon found out about this through his son Haemon. The second is freedom of religion. By denying Antigone to perform burial ceremonies for Polyneices, he is denying Antigone the ideal that supports freedom of religion.

The contradictions between the beliefs of Antigone and Creon are strong throughout the play. Neither of their arguments dominates the other even though they are both right and wrong at the same time. Antigone is following divine law while Creon is trying to protect the integrity of the city-state. In the end, Creon was convinced to set Antigone free after he weighed the factors and debated the ideals. But it was too late. The contradiction of ideals was the cause of Antigone’s, Haemons, and Megareus death. Both sides were just and all beliefs were supported. The downfall is that Creon had to decide the unanswerable, and determine right from wrong when there was no clear answer.

Medea vs. Antigone: Compare

The two Greek plays, Medea and Antigone both exhibit opening scenes that serve numerous purposes. Such as establishing loyalties, undermining assumptions on the part of the audience, foreshadowing the rest of the play, and outlining all of the issues. Medea and Antigone share many similarities in their openings.

Both plays begin with providing the audience with the history and the consequences of certain situations that the characters were involved in. It also brings the audience to the present time, in which the play occurs. This enables the audience to have a clear and refreshed image of what aspect of the legend the play emphasizes or if any alterations were made. In Medea, the nurse is the first character who enters the play and reminds the audience of the legend of the Golden Fleece, and the love between Jason and Medea, from beginning to the end.

She also brings them to the present state Medea is in, which is of complete despair and depression after Jason remarried. “And she hates her children now, and feels no joy at seeing them.” (Oates, 292). In Antigone, one of the purposes of the chorus is to provide history to the audience. Although, Sophocles did change the structure a little. The first to enter the play are Antigone and Ismene, who are engaging in conversation over defying the edict forbidding their brothers burial, which brings the audience to the present time.

Shortly after, the chorus enters and recounts the reasons for the battle and death of Polyneices and Eteocles, brothers to Antigone and Ismene. The chorus appears every scene to serve as the voice of the culture, and counsels to the characters. “Save those two of cruel fate, who, born of one sire and one mother, set against each other their twain conquering spears, and sharers in a common death.” (Oates, 192).

While the chorus and the nurse recount the background of the story they simultaneously set the mood of the play. Their speeches are expressed with such deep emotion that the audience can’t help but become involved. The nurse in Medea sets a very tense mood that remains throughout the whole play. “I fear she may contrive some untoward scheme; for her mood is dangerous nor will she brook her cruel treatment.” (Oates, 292).

Another similarity these two plays share is the defiance of the traditional role of women. The Greek culture was set in the role that women should take and it was rarely violated. Women were expected to take the submissive role and never question a superior male. Their voice was rarely heard and their opinions were insignificant, especially in society. As far as marriage went, women must buy their husbands with a dowry and it was necessary fro them to remain married, even if it was a bad marriage. Divorce was illegal for women, while a man could remarry if he chose to do so.

This defiance from the traditional role forces the audience to view their society from a different angle. These plays examine a woman who isn’t submissive and makes her own decision; based on her own values instead of he one’s society forces them to accept. Overall Antigone’s character was stubborn, angry, dogmatic, and she put her family and religious beliefs before the state. The opening conversation between Antigone and Ismene discusses Creon’s edict forbidding the burial of Polyneices.

Antigone confides in her sister that she plans to defy the order and asks for her help. Ismene reminds Antigone that they are women and not strong enough to defy the state. Antigone views the loyalty to her brother and the law of the gods above the state and will die for Polyneices burial. She is a woman ruled by instincts, emotions, and extreme pride. “I shall rest, a loved one with him whom I have loved, sinless in my crime; for I owe a longer allegiance to the dead than to the living But if thou wilt, be guilty of dishonoring laws which the gods have stablished in honour.” (Oates, 189).

Medea examines a female who also defies the traditional role. Medea is depicted as a violent, savage woman who will stop at nothing to seek harm to her enemies. She attacks the role of women in society and disagrees with the way women are treated as inferior. “And yet they say we live secure at home, while they are at the wars, with their sorry reasoning, for I would gladly take my stand in battle array three times o’er, than once give birth.” (Oates, 298).

Sophocles’ Antigone and Euripides Medea are two Greek plays that share many similarities. For example, the way the audience is informed of history and the defiance of the traditional role of women are only two. Thus, Greek tragedy has many reoccurring themes, which can be directly related to the society in which they were written.

Antigone Gender Conflict

In the play Antigone there are many references that link to the oppression of women. Creon made many convictions insulting womenkind. His convictions seemed true to a large population of men. I believe the majority of men, in the ancient Greek times believed in the undeniable domination of women. The start of the Greeks began around 2000 B. C. with the Mycenaeans. They inhabited the Greek peninsula. (Perry 40) “If we transgress . . . we” (Beatty 61) Ismene claimed it was an outrageous thought to stand up to a man. Her view of the inferiority to men came from the many laws restricting the lives of omen.

Women lived most of their lives in their homes. They were allowed on the streets with the company of a man, or for the reason of a funeral or religious festival. Only the poverty stricken women were allowed to work outside the home. They were not allowed to own property. They lived their lives under the control of a male figure. (Kishlansky 75) Women in marriage did not gain much pleasure. They married between the ages of twelve and eighteen. (Kagan 53) The marriage was arranged by their fathers.

Marriages were conducted with these words, “I give this women for the procreation of legitimate hildren… I accept… And I give a certain amount as dowry… I am content. ” Clearly the purpose of the women was to bear children. The role of the husband is vague and seems as though he doesnt play much of a role in the household. Contact with other men was not allowed for the wives, yet for the husband it was common to pursue adulterous relationships. An Athenian male stated “Hetairai we have for our pleasure, mistresses for the refreshment of our bodies, but wives to bear us legitimate children and to look after the house faithfully. ” (Spielvogel 75)

“Kill your own sons bride?… Oh, there are other fields for him to plough. ” Was Creons answer to Ismene concerning his sons marriage to Antigone. (Beatty 69) Prostitution prospered during these times. There were two classes of prostitution. There were the slaves run by citizens and the refined courtesans. (Spielvogel 100) Male prostitutes were not citizens but foreigners. Female citizens were prostitutes, yet male prostitutes were not allowed. (Spielvogel 92) “Take them and keep them within. The proper place for women. ” (Beatty 70) In other words women did not have any place in public ife.

Their place was in the home raising children and running the household. It was of great importance for women to give birth to male children. The son would become the heir of the father. (Spielvogel 100) “Only for this do fathers pray for sons. Obedient, loyal, ready to strike down” (Beatty 71) Men also believed that a womens body was not capable to handle the weather. For this reason they should remain inside. (Spielvogel 101) Myths were used to justify the subjection of women. Myths about the first woman, Pandora, explained the supposed evil nature of omen.

In revenge of Prometheus giving fire to man, Zeus sent Pandora. When they took the gift of Pandora, they brought out evil. There were different versions of this myth. In a better version Pandora was curious. She opened a jar unaware she would release evil into the world. Slightly improving the image of women, yet Pandora is conclusively responsible for evil. (Kishlansky 54) Creon explained to his son, “To all ones enemies. Do not be fooled, my son, By lust and the wiles of women. ” (Beatty 70) Its evident many men believed they were superior to women.

Creon refused to lose a battle to a woman. “And will never betray it-least of all for a woman. Better be beaten, if needed, by a man, Than let a woman get the better of us. ” (Beatty 71) Whatever the battle was men did not want to be beat by women. Only men were allowed to participate and attend the Olympic games. Women were made separate games to attend. These separate games were dedicated to Hera, Zeuss wife. These games were attended by unmarried women. The women were allowed to compete in footraces on short tracks. They wore tunics, while the men competed naked.

Women who won the races did not receive the same honors as men. Men received public honors and a lifetime supply of food, paid for by the public. (Kishlansky 53) It seemed as though all men did not believe women had rights. There were some men who did believe women were more than housewives and bearers of children. Haemon states “Nor wish to be clever enough to prove you wrong, Though all men might not think the same as you do. ” (Beatty 71) In a Euripide tragedy a women described her place in society. “We women are the most unfortunate creatures. . . hild. (Kishlansky 76)

In many other plays the main characters were women. This may suggest women played a more profound role in society than portrayed by law. (Kagan 53) Even some of the wisest men were blinded to the rights of women. When Socrates was sentenced to death he had sent the women away. After he swallowed poison many of the male watchers began crying. “Really my friends, what a way to behave! Why, that was my main reason for sending away the women, to prevent this sort of disturbance;” (Spielvogel 96) Creon agreed that women lacked control f their emotions “Despicable coward!

No more will than a woman! ” (Beatty 72) The women of ancient Greek times suffered many hardships. They were only considered citizens for the sake of marriage and other duties to help men. They were considered evil and better off invisible. There were a few supporters of women. In many plays women were depicted as strong willed people. This leaves the likelihood that women were perceived as more than servers. It astonishes me to see some of these traditional views are still held, but luckily by a very small population.

Who is the Tragic Hero

Many may say that Creon is the tragic hero of Antigone. Creon and Antigones personas are equal-and-opposite throughout this play. The story belongs to both of them. Creon is the one who makes a mistake; his figure is perhaps more tragic. Hes the one that realizes that hes wrong, and he suffers for it. Antigone walks to her death with her eyes wide open, without shame. Antigone is the true hero of the play because she makes a correct, justifiable decision and dies by it. Creon is wrong. He is forced to live, knowing that three people are dead because of his ignorance, which many may say is a punishment worse than death.

Since Creon is ruined in the end of the play, we might pity him, but admiration would not be considered at all. Antigone gains our respect and admiration. She has made a choice between two bad options. Antigone can bury her brother and die; or she can uphold Creon, the Ruler of Thebes law and live a life filled with guilt and regret, which will probably lead to her own suicide in the end. Neither option is good. However, the tragic hero chooses the option that allows her to walk with the dignity and pride. Antigone chooses to bury Polyneices, and take on the sentence of death, which is admirable.

Creon has two choices too. He can allow the burial of Polyneices, please the gods, and live happily ever after with his wife Eurydice, Or he stubbornly hold onto the ridiculous law that he made up, even though warned by Teiresias that such an action is better off not doing for Creons own good. Creon does the foolish thing instead of the smart thing. We cannot admire that. The belief that Antigone is the hero is a strong one. Antigone is widely thought of as the tragic hero of the play bearing her name. She seems to fit the part due to the fact that she dies in doing what is right.

She buries her brother without worrying what might happen to her. She believes that Gods laws must be obeyed, whatever the consequences. She is almost glad to die in the attempt of burying her brother. She believes that if it is a crime, it is a crime that God commands. The wisest factor to help determine whom the real tragic hero trusts the title of the play. Sophocles named the play after her for a reason. After all, Sophocles is the author of many other plays that are well known in society. Other Sophocles plays named by a character is the character that is the hero, as well as most Greek plays.

“Antigone” the play written by Sophocles

“Antigone” the play written by Sophocles deals with moral law vs civil law. King Creon has condemned Princess Antgione. Antgione went against the kings decree and buried her brother Ploynices. Antgione now will be punished by starvation under King Creons decree. Antigone is a passionate, strong willed, and determined women. Antigone is a passionate character in the play we see this as we learn of her as we see her put moral law above civil law. An important ideal in Ancient Greece was the belief that the government was to have no control in matters concerning religious beliefs.

In Antigone’s eyes, Creon betrayed that ideal by not allowing her to properly bury her brother, Polynices. She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, and Creon did not have the power to deny Polynices that right. Antigone is ready to defy Creons decree and do what she feels in her heart is right we see this when she says “Will you life up his body with these bare hands and lower it with me? “. Threw out the play Antigone is strong willed. She doesnt want Ismene to explain the law to her.

When she asks Ismene to help her with the burial of Ploynice, Ismene says no. When Ismene tries to convince Antigone to not defy Creons decree Antigone tells her “I wont insist no, even if you should have a change in heart, Id never welcome you in the labor, not with me. So, do as you like, whatever suits you best- Ill bury him myself. “. Antigone is not willing to give up with out a fight and she isnt going to let anyone get in her way. Antigone is one of the strong willed characters in this play.

When she is done burring her brother, after all the torment she has endured she says “My reverence only brands me for irreverence! “. Antigone isnt sorry even though by doing the right thing she will be put to death by starvation in a tomb. She is obeying the law of the gods rather then the law of Creon. When Antigone takes matters in to her own hands and does what is right ,that shows strong soul . Having a strong sense of moral law in Greek mythology will lead to a good after life.

Antigone lost her own life to carry out justice. She obeyed the Gods over the civil law that was stated by King Creon. In modern day times we look to the moral codes more then the codes from Gods unlike the Greeks did. There are many current Antigones in today society, such as the many people who fight to stop abortion. They religiously dont believe in even though at the current time the government says its fine. Sometimes civil law has to step down to the moral codes of a society.

Antigone the Hero

Antingone is the heroine of western drama, and the play bears her name rather than Creons. I believe this statement to be true. Not only because Antigone is the Heroine, but because the story also revolves around her. If not for the conflict of disobeying her uncle, the story wouldn’t have a pourpose. This is the basis for most plays titles, is the main character, or thing that the plot revolves around. Antigone truly displays many characteristics of all kinds of heros, mainly Papas code hero. Where as Antigone shows the ability of sensing whats truly right and wrong, such as her brothers desecration.

Her Will power, and perseverance never to accept, the hatred for one of her brothers. Has truly made her a hero. Creon, yes, was a main character. But was undoubtedly the villain, being the center of all conflict, he could be nothing else. And as we all know a story is rarely ever named after the storys villain. Even though Creon is an honest and good man, his judgement is clouded by pride and excitement from his just recent acceptance as king of Thebes. But the thing that makes him wise in my eyes is the fact that he admits to his ignorance and thick headedness, before the punishments he received.

Antigone v. The Roman Women

In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with the controversy of the Greek ideals. They both based their actions on their beliefs of what is right and wrong. The whole problem arises when their believes and ideas encountered each other, making it contradiction between morals. Antigone’s side of the conflict held a much more heavenly approach, as opposed to the mundane road that Creon chose to follow. Antigone feels that Creon is disregarding the laws of heaven through his act.

After she is captured and brought to Creon, she tells him \”I do not think your edicts strong enough to overrule the unwritten unalterable laws of God and heaven, you being only a man. \” Antigone’s opinion is one that supports the Gods and the laws of heaven. Her reasoning is set by her belief that if someone is not given a proper burial, that person would not be accepted into heaven. Antigone was a very religious person, and acceptance of her brother by the Gods was very important to her.

She felt that \”It is against you and me he has made this order. Yes, against me. Creon’s order was personal to Antigone. His edict invaded her family life as well as the Gods’. In Antigone’s eyes, Creon betrayed the Gods by not allowing her to properly bury her brother, Polynices. She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, and Creon did not have the power to deny Polynices that right. Antigone’s strong beliefs eventually led her to her death by the hand of Creon. Never, though, did she stop defending what she thought was right. As Creon ordered her to her death, Antigone exclaimed, \”I go, his prisoner, because I honored those things in which honor truly belongs.

She is directly humiliating Creon by calling his opinions and decisions weak and unjust. She also emphasizes \”his prisoner,\” which tells us that Creon’s decision to capture Antigone was his own, and was not backed up by the majority of the people. She feels that Creon is abusing his power as king and dealing with her task to a personal level. Creon’s actions are guided by the ideal that states, \”Man is the measure of all things. \” The chorus emphasizes this point. Creon believes that the good of man comes before the gods.

Setting the example using Polynices’ body left unburied is a symbol of Creon’s belief. \”No man who is his country’s enemy shall call himself my friend. \” This quote shows that leaving the body unburied is done to show respect for Thebes. After all, how could the ruler of a city-state honor a man who attempted to invade and conquer his city? From that perspective, Creon’s actions are completely just and supported by the ideals. Though most of Creon’s reasonings match with the Greek ideals, the people questioned his action on this point.

First, Antigone was \”his prisoner\”, not necessarily the publics. In fact, the general population supported Antigone, though they were too scared to say anything. Haemon, the son of Creon, knew of this, and told Creon, \”Has she not rather earned a crown of gold? Such is the secret talk of the town. \” This proves that Creon was exercising complete domination of political power, which is strictly forbidden in the new ideals. Also, not allowing Antigone perform her religious ceremony of burying her brother is interfering with religious affairs.

This denies Antigone freedom of religion. The contradictions between the beliefs of Creon and Antigone are strong throughout the play. Both have well-structured arguments, but neither completely dominates the other. Some people still question who the real hero is in the play. Antigone is motivated by her strong religious feelings while Creon is out to make good for his city-state. The chorus’ opinion is the determining factor, as in the end, they convince Creon to set Antigone free. Creon had to weigh each factor carefully, and in the end, he had to decide between ideals.

This shows that the Greeks allowed their women or at least those in high position have the ability to speak on legal matters or to make their thoughts known which is in extreme contrast with most other early civilizations. Here we see Antigone protesting the lack of burial rite and of burial for here brother whom was struck down in combat. We see here disobeying a direct decree of the king and burying him any . A woman doing what she wants rather than what here patriarchal king tells her this is almost un heard of at this time.

As opposed to Sophocleses visage of what a woman should act like the Roman equivalent is just the opposite it states in the reading that that they(women) should always be in the power of fathers , brothers, and husbands,.. By this they author means that a woman in any status should always be subordinate to a man whether it be husband, brother, or father. The role of a good woman is to be chaste, dutiful, and submissive. In direct opposition to that of Greek, which was to uphold the truths of the gods as well as the roman morals however, as we see in Antigone women owe their allegiance to the gods before any man not so in Rome.

Antigone – Analysis of Greek Ideals

In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life’s complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered around the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change.

In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with the controversy of the Greek ideals. They both based their actions on their beliefs of what is right and wrong. The conflict arose when the ideals that backed up their actions clashed with each other, making it contradiction between morals. Antigone’s side of the conflict held a much more heavenly approach, as opposed to the mundane road that Creon chose to follow. Antigone feels that Creon is disregarding the laws of heaven through his edict.

After she is captured and brought to Creon, she tells him I do not think your edicts strong enough to overrule the unwritten unalterable laws of God and heaven, you being only a man. ” Antigone’s staunch opinion is one that supports the Gods and the laws of heaven. Her reasoning is set by her belief that if someone is not given a proper burial, that person would not be accepted into heaven. Antigone was a very religious person, and acceptance of her brother by the Gods was very important to her. She felt that “It is against you and me he has made this order. Yes, against me. Creon’s order was personal to Antigone. His edict invaded her family life as well as the Gods’.

An important ideal in Ancient Greece was the belief that the government was to have no control in matters concerning religious beliefs. In Antigone’s eyes, Creon betrayed that ideal by not allowing her to properly bury her brother, Polynices. She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, and Creon did not have the power to deny Polynices that right. Antigone’s strong beliefs eventually led her to her death by the hand of Creon. Never, though, did she stop defending what she thought was right.

As Creon ordered her to her death, Antigone exclaimed, “I go, his prisoner, because I honoured those things in which honour truly belongs. ” She is directly humiliating Creon by calling his opinions and decisions weak and unjust. She also emphasizes “his prisoner,” which tells us that Creon’s decision to capture Antigone was his own, and was not backed up by the majority of the people. She feels that Creon is abusing his power as king and dealing with her task to a personal level. Creon’s actions are guided by the ideal that states “Man is the measure of all things.

The chorus emphasizes this point during the play by stating that “There is nothing beyond (man’s) power. ” Creon believes that the good of man comes before the gods. Setting the example using Polynices’ body left unburied is a symbol of Creon’s belief. “No man who is his country’s enemy shall call himself my friend. ” This quote shows that leaving the body unburied is done to show respect for Thebes. After all, how could the ruler of a city-state honor a man who attempted to invade and conquer his city. From that perspective, Creon’s actions are completely just and supported by the ideals.

Though most of Creon’s reasonings coincide with the Greek ideals, one ideal strongly contradicts his actions. The ideal states that the population would be granted freedom from political oppression and that freedom of religion would be carried out. Creon defied both of these. First, Antigone was “his prisoner”, not necessarily the publics. In fact, the general population supported Antigone, though they were too scared to say anything. Haemon, the son of Creon, knew of this, and told Creon, “Has she not rather earned a crown of gold? – Such is the secret talk of the town.

This proves that Creon was exercising complete domination of political power, which is strictly forbidden in the new ideals. Also, not allowing Antigone perform her religious ceremony of burying her brother is interfering with religious affairs. This denies Antigone freedom of religion, hence, contempt for this ideal. The contradictions between the beliefs of Creon and Antigone are strong throughout the play. Both have well-structured arguments, but neither completely dominates the other. Antigone is motivated by her strong religious feelings while Creon is out to make good for his city-state.

The chorus’ opinion is the determining factor, as in the end, they convince Creon to set Antigone free. Creon had to weigh each factor carefully, and in the end, he had to decide between ideals. His mind was torn in two. “It is hard to give way, and hard to stand and abide the coming of the curse. Both ways are hard. ” The contradiction of ideals was what led to Antigone’s, Haemon’s, and Megareus’ death. Both sides were just, all beliefs were supported. Creon was forced to decide the unanswerable, decipher the encoded, complete the impossible, and determine right from wrong when there was no clear answer.

Antigone, One Of The Most Distinguished Pieces Of Theatrical Work

Antigone by Sophocles is one of the most distinguished pieces of theatrical work that reflects upon Greek mythology and culture. Antigone has several themes and circumstantial settings that can be indirectly referred or related to in modern society. Sophocles uses various and strategically placed characters to present his play as well as his themes. The play mainly revolves around Antigone who acts alongside her elder sister, Ismene. Both are daughters of Oedipus and Jocasta who are in the context of the play deceased.

This essay will analyze these two characters alongside one other female minor character, Eurydice who contributes significantly to the development and success of the play. From the start of the play, the audience is given a vague idea of both Antigones and Ismenes characters. Both sisters have suffered the anguish of having lost their brothers, Eteocles and Polyneices. It is at the beginning of the play that we see Antigones braveness.

She notifies Ismene of her intentions to bury Polyneices despite the fact that such an act is punishable by death, for Creon considers Polyneices to be a traitor and that by not having his body buried, Polyneices suffers a posthumous punishment. She makes this declaration while being fully aware of the penalties involved and this brings to light several other things about her character. The audience is able to see that she is confident in her actions and will justify anything that she does. Meanwhile Ismene can be viewed as being afraid and uneager to agree to an action.

She confronts her sisters statements by saying, ” But think of the danger ! Think what Creon will do ! ” (34, Prologue). This statement by Ismene create a vague feeling in the audience that Ismene is a pessimist. This view is further reinforced when she says, ” And do what he has forbidden ! We are women / We cannot fight with men, Antigone ! ” (46-47, Prologue). Hence Ismene is seen seeking a way out by giving excuses that are in a sense linked to negative stereotypes and this makes a reflection of her pessimistic nature.

Antigones actions at the beginning of the play reflect her impulsivness and rash manner in handling situations. Rather than try to confront Creon regarding the burial of her brother she goes ahead to bury him. Her impulsive manner is also seen when she doubts Ismenes promise that she will not divulge any information to anybody else regarding Antigones plans to bury her brother. She does this despite the reasonable consideration that Ismene is her only sister and family member left.

Her actions at this point also reflect on her indifference in carrying out actions that reflect on others. She does not seem to care about the fact that burying her brother may have unfavorable consequences on Ismene who would lose her sister and at the same time be in a dilemma. Ismene would have to risk telling the authorities and get her sister prosecuted so as to be a true patriot and to save her own life or keep mum and be prosecuted for aiding and abetting an offense alongside her sister whom she will eventually loose, regardless of what she decides to do .

This scenario presents a strong argument that Ismene is considerate and rational as she eventually decides to keep Antigones plans secret and continues to do so even when Antigone attacks her. She responds by saying, ” But a loyal friend indeed to those who love. ” (85, Prologue). This demonstrates Ismenes passive and unvengeful nature. Antigone bears responsibility well and can therefore be seen to be responsible. When brought before Creon, she admits her actions in burying Polyneices without much ado, she audaciously confesses, ” I do.

I deny nothing ” (52, ODE I, Scene II). She goes ahead and justifies her action, and calmly makes it clear that she is not afraid of the punishment due to be imposed on her.. In contrast Ismene bears a sense of responsibility just like her sister. When brought before Creon, she admits her role in Antigones crime without hesitation, she says, ” Yes, if she will let me say so. I am guilty. ” This and the ensuing exchange that follows between the sisters also brings to light other aspects of the sisters personalities.

One of the aspects that is brought out by this exchange is that of loyalty. Both Ismene and Antigone are loyal to each other even in a situation where it is at the expense of death. Ismene is ready to die alongside her sister. At the same time Antigone cares too deeply for Ismene and does not want Ismene to suffer the punishment of death. The idea that loyalty exists between the two sisters is reinforced by the fact that Ismene, while in the face of death, defends her sister.

When Antigone is declared as having lost her mind by Creon, she says, ” Grief teaches the steadiest minds to waver, King. ” (153, ODE I, Scene II). Other events that had occurred earlier in the play portray this feeling of loyalty and the sisterly love that exists between Ismene and Antigone. Both sisters place family duty above everything else. Ismenes earlier caution at the beginning of the play can now be interpreted as an act of sisterly love and concern. Eurydice who is Creons wife cum queen and Antigone are emotionally impulsive.

Antigone commits suicide when she is sentenced to death and confined to a vault of stone. Eurydice in turn commits suicide when she hears about the death of her son, Haemon. Hence both characters can be seen as compulsive and quick to act rather than face the harsh reality of suffering. All in all it can be said that Sophocles primarily uses the various characteristics presented by Antigone, Ismene and Eurydice to develop his play. Although of these characters are the same gender their characteristics differ greatly and this lies in with the underlying themes of the play.

Antigone v. The Roman Women

In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with the controversy of the Greek ideals. They both based their actions on their beliefs of what is right and wrong. The whole problem arises when their believes and ideas encountered each other, making it contradiction between morals. Antigone’s side of the conflict held a much more heavenly approach, as opposed to the mundane road that Creon chose to follow. Antigone feels that Creon is disregarding the laws of heaven through his act.

After she is captured and brought to Creon, she tells him “I do not think your edicts strong enough to overrule the unwritten unalterable laws of God and heaven, you being only a man. ” Antigone’s opinion is one that supports the Gods and the laws of heaven. Her reasoning is set by her belief that if someone is not given a proper burial, that person would not be accepted into heaven. Antigone was a very religious person, and acceptance of her brother by the Gods was very important to her. She felt that “It is against you and me he has made this order. Yes, against me.

Creon’s order was personal to Antigone. His edict invaded her family life as well as the Gods’. In Antigone’s eyes, Creon betrayed the Gods by not allowing her to properly bury her brother, Polynices. She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, and Creon did not have the power to deny Polynices that right. Antigone’s strong beliefs eventually led her to her death by the hand of Creon. Never, though, did she stop defending what she thought was right. As Creon ordered her to her death, Antigone exclaimed, “I go, his prisoner, because I honored those things in which honor truly belongs.

She is directly humiliating Creon by calling his opinions and decisions weak and unjust. She also emphasizes “his prisoner,” which tells us that Creon’s decision to capture Antigone was his own, and was not backed up by the majority of the people. She feels that Creon is abusing his power as king and dealing with her task to a personal level. Creon’s actions are guided by the ideal that states, “Man is the measure of all things. ” The chorus emphasizes this point. Creon believes that the good of man comes before the gods.

Setting the example using Polynices’ body left unburied is a symbol of Creon’s belief. “No man who is his country’s enemy shall call himself my friend. ” This quote shows that leaving the body unburied is done to show respect for Thebes. After all, how could the ruler of a city-state honor a man who attempted to invade and conquer his city? From that perspective, Creon’s actions are completely just and supported by the ideals. Though most of Creon’s reasoning’s match with the Greek ideals, the people questioned his action on this point.

First, Antigone was “his prisoner”, not necessarily the publics. In fact, the general population supported Antigone, though they were too scared to say anything. Haemon, the son of Creon, knew of this, and told Creon, “Has she not rather earned a crown of gold? Such is the secret talk of the town. ” This proves that Creon was exercising complete domination of political power, which is strictly forbidden in the new ideals. Also, not allowing Antigone perform her religious ceremony of burying her brother is interfering with religious affairs.

This denies Antigone freedom of religion. The contradictions between the beliefs of Creon and Antigone are strong throughout the play. Both have well-structured arguments, but neither completely dominates the other. Some people still question who the real hero is in the play. Antigone is motivated by her strong religious feelings while Creon is out to make good for his city-state. The chorus’ opinion is the determining factor, as in the end, they convince Creon to set Antigone free. Creon had to weigh each factor carefully, and in the end, he had to decide between ideals.

This shows that the Greeks allowed their women or at least those in high position have the ability to speak on legal matters or to make their thoughts known which is in extreme contrast with most other early civilizations. Here we see Antigone protesting the lack of burial rite and of burial for here brother whom was struck down in combat. We see here disobeying a direct decree of the king and burying him any . A woman doing what she wants rather than what here patriarchal king tells her this is almost un heard of at this time.

As opposed to Sophoclese’s visage of what a woman should act like the Roman equivalent is just the opposite it states in the reading that ” that they(women) should always be in the power of fathers , brothers, and husbands,.. ” By this they author means that a woman in any status should always be subordinate to a man whether it be husband, brother, or father. The role of a good’ woman is to be chaste, dutiful, and submissive. In direct opposition to that of Greek, which was to uphold the truths of the gods as well as the roman morals however, as we see in Antigone women owe their allegiance to the gods before any man not so in Rome.

Antigone did the right thing by defileing

Creon’s strict orders on burying Polynices because the unalterable laws of the gods and our morals are higher than the blasphemous laws of man. Creon gave strict orders not to bury Polynices because he lead a rebellion, which turned to rout, in Thebes against Creon, their omnipotent king. Antigone could not bare to watch her brother become consumed by vultures’ talons and dogs. Creon finds out that somebody buried Polynices’ body and sent people out to get the person who preformed the burial. Antigone is guilty and although she is to be wed to Creon’s son, Haemon.

He sentences her to be put in a cave with food and water and let the gods decide what to do with her. He was warned by a blind profit not to do this, but he chooses to anyway, leaving him with a dead son, a dead wife, and self-imposed exile. Antigone had good reasons for her actions. She did obey the rules of her gods, which were that any dead body must be given a proper burial, with libatations. This would prevent the soul from being lost between worlds forever, along with wine as an offering to the gods (page 518- side note). Nor could Antigone let Creon’s edicts o against her morals (lines 392-394).

She chooses to share her love, not her hate (line 443). She couldn’t bare to see one family member be chosen over the other because of what a king had decided was right, which she contravened. Why condemn somebody who stood up for what they believed in and is now dead for it anyway? Bringing homage to the family was very important to Antigone (line 422-423). The gods’ laws come before mortal laws in Antigone’s point-of-view, which is how I believe also. In death, you will answer to your god and no man will have control of your fate in the orld that lies hereafter.

Therefore by obeying the gods, hopefully, will result in a happy afterlife, which are what most people strive for in ancient times and now. If man does not honor you for noble efforts, your gods’ will. Antigone’s act was honorable. She stood up to the highest of powers so she could honor her brother, knowing the consequence would be death. Most likely she figured there is only a certain amount man can do to you, so she might as well stand up for not only her family and beliefs, but her gods as well (lines 377-389). Creon could have easily changed his mind, nd there were fair amounts of warning.

But his decisions lead him into an empty life that could have been adverted if only he would have put his pride aside for a while. Simply because he was too egotistical and too tempermental, his son died (line 986) along with his wife (lines 1080-1081), which left him hapless and with a deep sense of deplorable sorrow leading to self-imposed exile (lines 1119-1126). Antigone, Heamon, and Creon’s wife all could have been saved if only one man could have put aside his pride. It is clear that Antigone is not the one who did the wrong in this story, but Creon.

Antigone and Ismene

The personalities of the two sisters; Antigone and Ismene, are as different from one another as tempered steel is from a ball of cotton. One is hard and resistant; the other: pliable, absorbing and soft. Antigone would have been a strong, successful 90’s type woman with her liberated and strong attitude towards her femininity, while Ismene seems to be a more dependent 1950’s style woman. Antigone acts as a free spirit, a defiant individual, while Ismene is content to recognize her own limitations and her inferiority of being a woman.

In the Greek tragedy “Antigone”, by Sophocles; Antigone learns that King Creon has refused to give a proper burial for the slain Polyneices, brother of Ismene and Antigone. Infuriated by this injustice, Antigone shares the tragic news with Ismene. From her first response, “No, I have heard nothing”(344). Ismene reveals her passivity and helplessness in the light of Creon’s decree. Thus, from the start, Ismene is characterized as traditionally “feminine”, a helpless woman that pays no mind to political affairs.

Doubting the wisdom of her sisters plan to break the law and bury Polyneices, Ismene argues: We who are women should not contend with men; we who are weak are ruled by the stronger, so that e must obey…. (346) Once again Ismene’s words clearly state her weak, feminine character and helplessness within her own dimensions. Antigone, not happy with her sisters response chides her sister for not participating in her crime and for her passivity, saying, ” Set your own life in order”(346).

For Antigone, no law could stand in the way of her strong consideration of her brother’s spirit, not even the punishment of an early death. Ismene is more practical ; knowing the task is impossible, she feels the situation to be hopeless. It is a wonder, which of the two sisters are really guilty of these hronic charges. Of coarse, Antigone acted so quickly, and failed to take the advice of the moderate sister, Ismene. Instead, going against Creon’s words, Antigone rashly goes ahead and breaks the law.

Antigone is a fool, she must learn that such defiance, even when justified, is not conductive to longevity. Although Antigone is foolish, she is also courageous and motivated by her morals. Proper burial of the dead was, according to the Greeks, prerequisite for the souls entrance into a permanent home. Therefore, perhaps Ismene is also foolish for her quick refusal to help Antigone perform the duty of Polyneices proper burial. Ismene definitely seems hasty in her acceptance of personal weakness.

Perhaps in some way, both sisters are guilty of the same tragic sins. Perhaps it is this rashness, more subdued in Ismene’s case, that leads both sisters to their own destruction. To my surprise, there is a strange twist in both sister’s character towards the end of the play. Antigone makes a rather contrasting statement, “Not for my children, had I been a mother, Not for a husband, for his moldering body, Would i have set myself against the city As I have done”(368) These words defy rational explanation.

To judge from her attitude towards authority and law, Antigone would probably take on any task to preserve family dignity and human justice. In Ismene’s final words, she abandons her practical attitudes with a sudden rush of devotion towards the sister she abandoned in time of need. “Let me stand beside you and do honor the dead”(358). Ismene heroically takes a stand and shares Antigone’s crime. The two sister’s were crushed by the vindictive Creon, yet they were winners in spirit, in their determination , they died together, as one. Nobility shall live in their hearts forever.

Who Is The Tragic Hero In Antigone

The debate over who is the tragic hero in Antigone continue on to this day. The belief that Antigone is the hero is a strong one. There are many critics who believe, however, that Creon, the Ruler of Thebes, is the true protagonist. I have made my own judgments also, based on what I have researched of this work by Sophocles. Antigone is widely thought of as the tragic hero of the play bearing her name. She would seem to fit the part in light of the fact that she dies in doing what is right. She buries her brother without worrying what might happen to her.

She “Takes into consideration death and the reality that may be beyond death” (Hathorn 59). Those who do believe that Antigone was meant to be the true tragic hero argue against others who believe that Creon deserves that honor. They say that the Gods were against Creon, and that he did not truly love his country. “His patriotism is to narrow and negative and his conception of justice is too exclusive… to be dignified by the name of love for the state” (Hathorn 59). These arguments, and many others, make many people believe the Antigone is the rightful protagonist.

Many critics argue that Creon is the tragic hero of Antigone. They say that his noble quality is his caring for Antigone and Ismene when thier father was persecuted. Those who stand behind Creon also argue that Antigone never had a true epiphany, a key element in being a tragic hero. Creon, on the other hand, realized his mistake when Teiresias made his prophecy. He is forced to live, knowing that three people are dead because of his ignorance, which is a punishment worse than death. My opinion on this debate is that Antigone is the tragic hero. She tries to help her brother without worrying about what will happen to her.

She says, “I intend to give my brother burial. I’ll be glad to die in the attempt, -if it’s a crime, then it’s a crime that God commands” (Sophocles 4). She was also punished for doing what was right. Her epiphany came, hidden from the audience, before she hung herself. Creon’s “nobleness” of taking in young Antigone and Ismene is overshadowed by his egotistical nature. He will not allow justice to come about simply because he wants to protect his image. He says, “If she gets away with this behavior, call me a woman and call her a man” (Sophocles 13).

These elements prove that Antigone is the tragic hero. Creon, understanding his ignorance may lead one to believe that he is the true protagonist. But, if you define the word protagonist you would find that a protagonist is one who is a leader or supporter of a cause. Antigone is in support of her own actions in the burial of her brother Polyneices. She entrusts that she is doing what the Gods want, contrary to the belief of Creon. Many readers and critics may say Creon suffered greator hardships. Some may say Antigone never had an epiphany.

Who would understand it if their own brother were left to the birds and dogs. There would be no rational thinking involved in a act like this. These are arguments envolved in deciding who is the tragic hero of Antigone. Critics, to this day, still argue about who is the tragic hero of Antigone. Many say that Antigone is the heroin. Others say that it is Creon. My research favors Antigone as the perfect protagonist. No matter who the reader sides with, it is agreed by most that there is a valid argument either way, in light of the fact that they both endure great hardships.

The Greek tragedy, Sophocles’s

A master artisan and innovator of the Greek tragedy, Sophocles’s insightful plays have held their value throughout countless time periods and societies. Through the use of common literary techniques, Sophocles was able to express themes and ideas that reflect all of humankind. On particular idea was that Sophocles believed that hubris is destructive and will eventually lead to one’s demise. Creon, the proud king of Thebes has such a fatal flaw. His hubris alienates Teiresias, Haimon, and his people. Teiresias attempts to explain to Creon the severity of Creon’s ctions, but Creon only shuns Teiresias.

No matter how potent the signs, Creon “would not yield,” (Scene 5, Line 47). Creon’s hubris prevents him from recognizing his self-destructive behavior. Instead, he accuses Teiresias of disloyalty and succumbing to bribery. He feels Teiresias has “sold out” (Scene 5, Line 65) and that Creon was “the butt for the dull arrows of doddering fortunetellers” (Scene 5, Line 42). Such inventions of Creon prove to be both counter-productive and foolish, for Teiresias did speak the truth and Creon is only further rawn into his false reality dictated by hubris.

Creon’s fatal flaw overcomes him in a discussion with his son. Haimon confronts his father about Creon’s reckless and unreasonable actions dealing with Antigone. His hubris transcends his better judgement and causes Creon to become defensive. Creon then ignores his son’s recommendations on the basis of age and seniority as follows: “You consider it right for a man of my years and experience to go to a school a boy? ” (Scene 3, Line 95).

His anger intensifies until he explodes at his son, “Fool, adolescent fool! Scene 3, Line 114). At that point, Creon was far too immersed in his own foolish pride to recognize his perverseness. His hubris had reduced him into a raving lunatic only capable of destructive behavior. Not even the Choragos was too insignificant to suffer the wrath of Creon’s fatal flaw. The Choragos asked if the gods might have had some part in the burial of Polyneices. To this he replied in a most vile manner, “Stop! Must you doddering wrecks go out of your head entirely? “The gods! ” Intolerable! ” (Scene 1, Line 92).

The attitude of Creon’s response emonstrates the counter-productivity of his fatal flaw. The resolution of Antigone is Creon’s loss of everything dear to him. Creon is left a pitiful wreck, “I am alone guilty. “, “My own heart… darkness to final darkness”, “I have been rash and foolish. “, “To risk everything for stubborn pride. ” (Scene 5, Lines 121, 87, 143, and 93 respectively). Creon is in such a position because he allowed hubris to cloud his judgement. While Creon did not directly kill his family, his foolish pride did, “I have killed my son and wife. ” (Scene, 5 Line 135).

Antigone committed suicide because her situation, which was dictated by Creon, seemed hopeless, “hanged herself… father had stolen her away… ” (Scene 5, Line 60). His hubris had led to the destruction of all he loved. Creon is the representation of all humanity and his misfortunes were brought about through hubris, which eventually leads to unhappiness, demise, and or destruction. Sophocles presented this idea to his audience over two centuries ago, and it is still a subject of much conversation. His plays have influenced past works and they will continue to affect literary works to come.

Antigone And Creon

Issue of male authority and challenges to that authority in the play “Antigone”. In the play “Antigone” by Sophocles, Creon and Antigone have distinct conflicting values. Antigone first demonstrates feminist logic when she chooses to challenge a powerful male establishment. This establishment is personified by her uncle Creon, who is newly crowned as the King of Thebes. Creon poses to be a major authority figure in a patriarchal society. Creon’s regard for the laws of the city causes him to abandon all other beliefs. He feels that all should obey the laws set forth by him, even if other beliefs, moral or religious, state therwise.

Antigone, on the other hand, holds the beliefs of the gods in high reverence. She feels that the laws of the gods should be obeyed above all others, especially when in respect to family. The bold, tradition-braking character of Antigone clearly clashed with the overpowering patriarchal dominance of Creon. This collision between characters gives rise to the conflict between the sexes in Sophocles’ “Antigone. ” The denial of burial to Polynices strikes directly at her family loyalty. This enormous sense of loyalty leads to her simultaneous violation and observance to the duty of women of the ime.

It is precisely this loyalty that makes her an active rather than a static figure. Antigone herself represents the highest ideals of human life — courage and respect for the gods. She believed that the law of the gods, which dictates that a body be given proper burial rights, was more important than the law of the King. Throughout the play, Antigone amazingly retains the traditional role of women, while at the same time boldly challenges this depiction. The challenge occurs as both a defiance of Creon’s laws in Antigone’s burying Polynices and as a direct verbal assault on Creon himself.

Creon becomes angry that a woman questions his sovereignty and condemns her to death even though she was the daughter of his sister, Jocasta. Creon believes that if he does not follow through on his word the people of Thebes will not respect his authority as king. Thus Creons patriotic values clash with Antigones ethical values to make conflicting roles. Creon, being a new king, wants to prove his abilities as a firm and strong administrator. Creon wants to be respected and feared as a king because this will prove him to be the ultimate authorative figure in Thebes.

He stands for obedience to the State. Surely it is his voice the townspeople should obey. Creon abuses his power to force others to accept his point of view. This extreme dominance conflicts head-on with Antigone’s bold unwomanly challenge to Creon’s authority. Creon made many convictions insulting womenkind. His convictions seemed true a large population of men. He uses her to set an example for the entire city of Thebes, for Antigone is the first person to ever deliberately disobey Creon’s order not the bury her late brother, who has been declared a traitor of the city.

Imagine it: I caught her naked rebellion, the traitor, the only one in the whole city. / I’m not about to prove myself a liar,/ not to my people, no, I’m going to kill her! “( 94,ll. 731-734). Creon refuses to compromise or humble himself before others especially women. He states ” Better to fall from power, if fall we must,/at the hands of a man-never to rated/ inferior to a woman, never” (94, ll. 759-761 ). Antigone does not give Creon additional respect either because he is a man in a patriarchal society or because he is king. In such way, she argues an equality of the sexes, as well as equality under God.

In the prologue, Antigone tells Ismene that she will take action pertaining to their brother, whether or not Ismene agrees . Antigone, persuades her to help bury their brother, “He is my brother and-deny it as you will-/ your brother too(61, ll. 55-56). ” The two sisters argue, but in the end their differences in opinions stand out. Ismene being too weak is afraid to defy the king. On the other hand, Antigone is brave enough to go ahead with her decision. Even without her sister’s help, she is willing to risk her life to give her brother what he deserves and what the gods say should be done, despite Creon’s edict.

Thus unlike her sister, Ismene efuses to challenge the male authority, even if it means to not fulfill her duties as a sister. Ismene states: “Remember we are women,/ we’re not born to contend with men. Then too,/ we’re underlings, ruled by much stronger hands,/ so we must submit in this, and things still worse” (62, ll. 74-77). These words stated by Ismene, express her extreme fear for and subordination to man. Her view of the inferiority to men came from the many laws restricting the lives of women. After Antigone carries out the deed, Ismene now feels responsible to die with Antigone.

This sense of responsibility is probably the result of Antigone’s earlier pleas for help and Ismene’s fear of being without any family. When speaking to his son, Haemon, about his fiance’s act, Creon strongly emphasizes the important relationship and obligation of a man to his father rather than to his wife. Moreover, he emphasizes the importance of males in decision making by stating, Oh Haemon, never loose your sense of judgement over a woman (93, l. 723). Haemon’s defiance to his father lead Creon to proclaim him a “woman’s slave,” a man who is unfortunately sided with a woman.

According to Creon, this act was close to committing a sin. Had Antigone been born the son of Oedipus, rather than his daughter, it would not be his place to decide, as his crown would rest upon Antigone’s head. And even if Creon were king, and Antigone a male, her opinion on the matter of Polynices’ burial would likely have been taken more into his consideration. Antigone’s gender made her situation even more difficult than it already was, as the King totally disregarded Antigone’s judgement over the matter. In conclusion, Antigone in Sopocles’s Antigone demonstrates feminist thoughts in several ways.

She first challenges a powerful male establishment headed by her own uncle. Creon is devoted to his laws, while Antigone is loyal to her beliefs. Antigone as a woman acting out of obligation and duty, to the gods, her family and her conscience is the exemplum for her society. Antigone did not run from her death sentence suggest an inherent bravery and obstinacy which the chorus recognizes before her departure to her death. Her legacy will live on, and inspire many other rebels to stand up for their beliefs. Antigone’s strong feminist stance in defying a patriarchal tyrant shows how individualistic ideas and actions can be very effectual.

Antigone – Selfish Essay

Through the many centuries and numerous civilizations, men have clearly taken the role as dominator. For many generations of men, their names and property pass down to an eligible male member of the family. Those men that favor these hierarchical systems are Patriarchies. Patriarchy refers to a social situation where men are dominant over women in wealth, status and power. Antigone, a Greek tragedy by Sophocles, is a classic example of patriarchy. The drama tells of how a daughter of Oedipus, Antigone, rebels against the civil law of a single man, Creon. Every word and action Antigone makes affects the system of patriarchy.

In the tragedy, Antigone egoistically violates Creons law, causing her own disrepute downfall. In the beginning Scene, Antigone relates her plans of burying her brother, Polyneices, to her sister. No person was to bury Polyneices for the penalty was a public stoning to death. Ismene, Antigones sister, pleads Antigone to refrain from her he plans for they were only women. When Antigone declines her sisters begging, Ismene claims that she will keep it secret. However, Antigone unkindly informs Ismene that she wants Ismene to tell, Oh tell it! Tell everyone! Think how theyll hate you when it comes out (1024).

Because of Ismenes refusal to help, Antigone unfairly turns against her own sister. Antigone thought only of her own desires. Antigones cruelty sealed Ismenes fate the moment that she told her. After giving Polyneices a decent burial, Antigone was caught and taken to see Creon. Creon was surprised that a women, let alone Antigone, would break his decree. Creon and Antigone argue back and forth about who is vindicated. Antigone stubbornly would not give into Creons reasoning. She was so derogatory, she thought she thought she should be honored, I should have praise and honor for what I have done.

All these men here would praise me (1036) Antigone foolishly believed that she could gain the support of the people, but as Antigone herself said, the people were too afraid of the law. Antigone believed she was above the law of man, when the law of man states that she was below them. Antigone was too sure that she would win over the law, but then her plan failed her. Creon sentenced Antigone to imprisonment, to live alone until starvation eventually kill her. After all that Antigone argued for, she contradicted her actions by pleading to be set free.

She even cried out to for her shameful death to gain support, Now sleepy death summons me down to Acheron, that cold shore (1047) Antigone wanted others to pity her and morn for her. Antigone spoke as if it was not her own doing that set forth the untimely demise of her sister, her fiance, and herself. Unwilling to except her outcome and in her final effort to defy Creon, Antigone hung herself. In the End Creon would come to except Antigone, but it was already too late. Antigone proved unwise and stubborn until the end. Patriarchy was too strong a force for Antigone overcome. Systematically mans law won over that of a women.

The Death of Antigone

the people of Thebes, but she was not concerned with the laws that mortals had made. Antigone saw the divine laws of the gods to be much more important than those of mortals. She felt that if she died while upholding the laws of the gods, that her afterlife would be better than if she had not. Our lives on this earth are so short, that to see a good afterlife over the horizon will make people go against the laws of humans. Early in the play, Antigone felt dying for her brother was a noble action. Death to her was not an ending, but a new beginning in a better place.

Antigones family had been cursed for ages; death was something that followed at their heels. The people of Thebes would always look at her with suspicious eyes. Her father, Oedipus, had caused these looks to be placed on her family forever. Then her brothers killed one another on the same day; her life in Thebes was not good. With such a bad life in Thebes, an honorable death must have looked very appealing to Antigone. In most societies, as well as Thebes, the afterlife is taught to be much more important than your mortal life. The problem is that we do not know what is waiting on the other side for us.

Antigone thought that if she were to please the gods in her life that she could only expect good things in the afterlife. The burial of Polyneices was her ticket to a good afterlife. The afterlife is eternal, and life is just a small spec, compared to the time spent in death. Antigone welcomed death at the time of burying her brother; she was not concerned with the consequences. She saw her actions as being true to the gods and religion. I myself will bury him. It will be good to die, so doing. I shall lie by his side, loving him as he loved me; I shall be a criminal but a religious one.

To Antigone, the honor of her brother, and her family was all that was important. She may be going against Creon, but if her actions were true in her heart then the gods would see her in a good light. Antigone felt her actions to be so just that she called upon her sister, Ismene, to tell Thebes of what she had done. Oh, oh, no! Shout it out. I will hate you still worse for silence — should you not proclaim it to everyone (Antigone, lines 98-100) She did not fear death one bit, she wanted the punishment of death for her actions.

Death would make her name live forever; she would be a martyr. After Antigone had been caught burying Polyneices, she still proclaimed the deed she had done. She would not let down, she had a death wish. Although her death would come by Creons hand, she simply wanted to die. If I shall die before my time, I count that a profit. How can such as I, that live among such troubles, not find a profit in death. (Antigone, lines 506-508) Her life was so horrible that she did not see any reason for continuing with the pains of life.

Even at this time, Antigone still stood fast next to her belief that the gods wanted all of the dead to be buried. It does not matter if the person was wicked in their mortal life; they still have the rights to a religious burial. She believed in this 100%, The god of death demands these rights for both. (Antigone, line 569) The god of death, Hades, is the one that she will please, by defying Creons orders not to bury her brother. If Hades is pleased by her actions in life, she has insured herself a good afterlife. At the time of her sentence, Antigone lacked the strength she had shown earlier.

She was still very proud of her actions, but she began to see what had been sacrificed. When the deed was originally done, the only consequence she could see was the loss of life. She failed to see the potential life had to offer until the bitter end. Antigone did not consider her husband to be, Haemon, but she did realize they could have had a life together. In this, time of remorse, she says, My husband is to be the Lord of Death. (Antigone, line 877) The defiant Antigone changed her view of death; she no longer welcomes it with open arms.

She regrets not being able to have a family of her own. Some of her last words are of her wish to have a family and children. unbedded, without bridal, without share in marriage and in nurturing of children; as lonely as you see me; without friends; with fate against me I go to the vault of death while still alive. (Antigone, lines 974-978) She failed to see the potential life has to offer. The lack of friends and family allowed her to have a death wish, but that went away once she looked death in the eyes. She simply had no friends and Ismene was the only family member still living.

Antigone no longer accepted Ismene as her sister because she refused to help with the burial of Polyneices. In her end all is what she wanted was friends and family, it was hard watch her views on death change so quickly at the end. The dishonor of her father had killed most of the family. Her punishment for honoring Polyneices in death would end their royal line. She wanted to bring a little bit of light to her families dark history. The choice to bury her brother was correct in the eyes of the gods, but the family line ended.

They will always be remembered for the scars that Oedipus had put in their history. The tarnished family history is also why Antigone fought her fate in the end, because she saw that that continuing the family line could have helped its reputation change. She showed the same nearsightedness that her father did; neither of them could see the consequences of their actions. This hubris that disguises itself as strength in them, is what killed their family. They were unwilling to see what the future truly held for them.

Antigones end was not as grand as she expected; Creon simply banished her to a cave to starve. She wanted something much more, a public execution, but there would be no onlookers at her death. But my fate claims no tears no friend cries for me. (Antigone lines 933-944) In the cave she became anxious for death and she was once again accepting her fate. Her fate was to die, but she did not want to wait for starvation, instead she killed herself. The means by She wanted to join her family in the afterlife. Curse or no curse, Antigone still has a family waiting for her with Hades.

Sophocles play Antigone

Do what you believe is right. This is a phrase common to us all, brought to our attention by parents, reinforced by teachers, and preached by leaders. But how does one define what is right? Is it what we believe in our hearts, or is it what we know is acceptable? This is a predominant dilemma that can be traced throughout society, and is the main focal point of Sophocles play Antigone. Written in 441 B. C. , Antigone is one of the earliest records of the conflict between Natural law and Positive law.

Sophocles deftly exposes these two philosophical standpoints and their respective moral and political aspects by way of the two main characters, Antgone and Kreon. Antigone is a champion of Natural law, while Kreon practices the Positivist approach. Both characters deem their behavior superior towards the other, and both assume religious justification for their actions. Sophocles ultimately proves that with so much support for each philosophical standpoint, a solution to the dilemma is hardly in sight. Natural law can be considered the morally correct approach to authority and justice.

It is the idea that one should make decisions based upon what they deem morally appropriate within themselves. Antigones support of this approach is apparent in her refusal of Kreons order when she buries Polyneices anyway. She loves Polyneices and believes in her heart that there is no other alternative. She is aware that by burying him she would be breaking the law and risking her own life for it. I will bury him myself. If I die for doing that, good: I will stay with him, my brother; and my crime will be devotion (87-90). To her this is the only morally acceptable solution.

Her support of Natural law resolves her to perform what she believes in her heart to be right, casting aside any social and political upholding that prove to be opposition. Positive law can be considered the politically correct approach to authority and justice. It encompasses the idea of a society and community with laws, and that those laws are necessary for everyones well-being. Kreon evokes a Positivist attitude by shunning any morally appropriate notions brought on by his kinship with Polyneices, and pursuing a stance that he sees as politically necessary for the good of the society.

This is the underlying reason for his decision to forbid the burial of his nephew. He believes that if he succumbs to feelings of love, then he will be deemed weak and therefore weaken his city-state. This position becomes apparent when he utters the lines if I see disaster marching against our citizens I shall not befriend the enemy of this land. For the state is safety. When she is steady, then we can steer. Then we can love (224-229). This ultimately sums up the Positive law belief that society always comes before self, that once the society is safe, then you are permitted to allow for yourself.

With each philosophy located at opposite ends of the social spectrum, a dilemma is unavoidable when the two face each other. This is the backbone for the entire plot of Antigone. On one side is Antigone, who pursues her self-righteous beliefs whole-heartedly and without question. On the other side is Kreon, who acts in response to what he believes is best for the society. Both characters are justified in their behavior. It is their motives that set them apart from each other. Antigone knows that she will suffer personal anguish if she does not carry out her actions.

But if I had let my own brother stay unburied I would have suffered all the pain I do not feel now. And if you decide what I did was foolish, you may be fool enough to convict me (572-574). She acts in her own personal interest, concerned for her well-being. She believes that her motive is one that should be accepted, that love for a brother could never be viewed as foolish. Kreon, on the other hand, makes his decisions as a king rather then an uncle. He is concerned with keeping the city-state in order, and his public perception untarnished. I caught her in open rebellion, her alone out of all the nation.

I wont be a leader who lies to his people. No: I will kill herIf I rear a disorderly family, I am feeding general disorder (798-802). He cannot let feelings like love and kindness for Antigone prohibit him from ruling a nation. Both Antigone and Kreon believe the gods support their positions. Antigone believes that by Kreon denying Polyneices a proper burial, he is denying him a right granted by the gods: The living are here, but I must please those longer who are below; for with the dead he will stay foreverthese principles which the gods themselves honor (92-100).

She believes that he will not be granted life after death if he is not buried, and that the gods permit all a chance at immortality. Antigone also assumes the approval of Zeus, the king of gods, by believing he granted her justice to break the law: I did not believe that Zeus was the one who had proclaimed it (the denial of burial); neither did JusticeThe laws they have made for men are well marked out (550-555). These lines state that she believes it is apparent that Kreon denying the burial of her brother is deemed unlawful by the gods, therefore justifying her Naturalist behavior as not only acceptable but necessary.

Kreon believes that Zeus has granted him power as king and permits his Positive law rulemaking. Zeus who sees all will see I shall not stay silent if I see disaster marching against our citizens (223-224). Kreon considers support for a rebel (Polyneices) as a disaster to his city-state. He also assumes that Zeus will support his decision against any disaster of his community. This is why he implicates the rule against Polyneices burial. He sees him as a traitor and anyone showing support for him would be one as well.

This is an obvious detriment to the good of his society and he assumes power granted by the gods to prevent it. This justification shows the gods supporting Positive law action as the social norm and fueling the decisions that Kreon makes. With both characters assuming religious approval for their actions, it is impossible to exploit any mistakes that may exist within the two philosophies, making a conclusion that much more difficult. When two dissenting viewpoints such as Positive law and Natural law convene amongst a central issue, there is hardly ever a just conclusion.

Throughout the play, each character rattles off the reasons for their actions. Both also justify their actions religiously, believing they are the ones acting accordingly by the gods. The entire plot is a construction of conflict between personal and social motives, a scene not uncommon in todays society. Sophocles attempts to answer the debate by ultimately showing that the gods approved of Antigones motives and that Kreon should have buried his nephew.

But with so much unnecessary bloodshed committed at the end of the story, it is impossible to believe that this is the final decision. The two contrary perceptions, Positive and Natural, are so built up against each other that violence is practically unavoidable. This is hardly a solution to the debate, the fact that everyone dies. Rather, it is a sign that the debate will live on for all of eternity. The Positive law and the Natural law philosophies have been traced throughout history, and as this play suggests, hardly a conclusion has been made.

It is much like a Socialist-Capitalist debate in many respects. Even though America is viewed as a Capitalist society and evokes Natural law morale, there are still people who preach the ways of Communism and Positivism. It is just the opposite in other countries such as China, where Communism and Positive law are rulers and people there fight for Natural rights. The debate will always be there, with people conflicting over actions done for themselves, and those done for the good of society.

Antigone was the first public display of the two dissenting philosophies. That is why it holds so much more importance then just a good piece of writing. Antigone should be viewed as one of the first politically powerful works created. It defines the notion of acting for individualism against pressures to conform. To view it as something ancient would be a costly mistake, it sets the stage for radical thinking and rebellion, issues that will play a role in the future of our society.

The story of Antigone

The story of Antigone is about Antigones brother whose body has been left unburied because of crimes against the state. The sight of her brother being unburied drives Antigone to go against the law and bury her brother regardless of the consequences. The concept of the Greek afterlife was far more important and sacred than living itself. Everything they did while they were alive was to please the many gods they worshipped. They built temples for their gods, made statues to symbolize them as well.

They had different gods to explain things we now say are an act of God or Mother Nature. Antigone knew her actions were right and Creon, the King thought them to be against the law. This story is on who is right. The fact is Antigone did the right thing. She was acting out of love and dedication to her brother. Since divinity and humanity are shown to be colliding forces where divinity out weighs humanity in ancient Greece. Antigone was justified in her action. Antigone was following her heart and walking with what was right. While Creon followed the law of the state.

Her brothers afterlife was so important to Antigone that she was willing to give up everything to ensure her brothers happiness and future afterlife. This supported in the play by the way she was so outspoken about what she had done after she was caught and while she was being questioned. She said, Why should I be ashamed of my loyalty to my brother? Creon didnt like her speaking in the manner such as this because it shows him that she has no remorse for disobeying his orders. Furthermore, it damages Creons incredible pride.

Creons pride is so great that his son Haimon cant even sway him. Haimon asks his father to take his advice and not have Antigone killed, but because of Creons stubbornness for the law of the state, He gets very upset and makes the situation worse than it already was. He was way too proud to take advice from someone younger. While still being very upset Creon had Antigone killed in front of Haimon. Creon said Just understand: You dont insult me and go off laughing. Bring her here! Let me see her. Kill her here, besides her bridegroom.

This is too much for Haimon to take, and he runs out of the room yelling her death will destroy others Blinded by his pride and arrogance, Creon takes the remark as a threat to himself, afterwards Haimon killed himself. Once Creons wife heard the news she killed herself as well. Creon may have been viewed as justicified in his actions as well. He states that the gods would be unhappy if a traitor to the earth were to be buried. Someone that was a traitor to the gods land would not be taken care of. The gods would agree that the person should be punished.

Creon had the power to change the laws but he did not want to appear weak in front of others. This type of thing goes on in todays society; we too must follow laws we do not like. Or go to jail or be punished some sort of way for not following the rules. In the story Creon was referred to as a tyrant. In sixteenth and seventeenth centuries B. C. E. in one city after another and tyrant by which the Greeks meant someone who held the power contrary to the established traditions of the community In other words by defining Creon as a tyrant in the book, they meant that he was a dictator who took control and changed the laws of the land.

That makes his laws absolute and unjust in the first place. The morals that Antigone had since the day of her birth are what caused her to see above Creons tyranny. Her morals conscious could not allow her brother not to be buried. She was a woman standing up to a king. Back then women did not have any more rights than slaves did and to be talked to in such a powerful way by a woman was just not heard of especially to a king. Only strong willed woman with divine law in her corner could hope to accomplish a goal like standing up to a tyrant such as Creon.

Creon had a chance to make amends. Many people told him of his stupidity. All mankind is subject to error once a mistake is made it is wise of him to make amends and not be stubborn in his ways. Stubbornness is stupidity. Teiresias, an old man who could accurately tell the future, told Creon those words. Creon was still unwilling to change. He had a big ego. Antigones actions were justified. But the heroism of her actions can only be viewed when set against the background of the time period. A strong woman was unheard of in ancient Greece.

Hero Antigone or Creon

In the play of Antigone there are two choices of tragic heroes or figures. By many of Antigones actions I feel that she is the one who fits this description perfectly. A tragedy is a play in which a central character, called a tragic hero or protagonist suffers some serious misfortune which isnt accidental and therefore meaningless, but is significant in that the misfortune is logically connected with the heroes actions. I feel that this definition fits Antigone perfect. Antigone made a huge decision, which put her and er sister Ismenes life on the line and that was to bury her brother polyneices.

It was very important to Antigone that her brother and any other family members get an honored burial. However, if this didnt occur than she would give up her own life in the place of her brother. Antigone very well knew that this was against the law, yet that didnt stop Antigones motivation was purely about the honor she wanted for herself and her family. However, Ismene at first, didnt want anything to do with this because she knew the consequences of breaking the law.

Although Ismene just wanted to have the credit for helping Antigone, she didnt have the courage to complete such a tragic cause. In many cases Creon could have been the protagonist in this story, yet he himself didnt realize this until the end of the story. Creon believed that everything he did was always right, but he never had anything to back it up with. Despite the fact that Antigone broke the law, I felt that Creon handled this problem without even thinking what he might have done. Creon was a very strong king and always stuck to what he said, though he ever thought about others feelings.

Until the end, Creon doesnt recognize that some of the things he did were wrong and that he should be punished for what he did. When he does realize it, he feels he should die for his wrong doing. From both of these characters actions you can tell that they both fit the definition of a tragic hero, nonetheless it was Antigone who kept her beliefs the same all throughout this tragic story. Both of these characters are very strong and willful and by sticking to their beliefs they prove that they are protagonists.

Sophocles True Tragic Hero Creon

There has always been a great debate over who is the true tragic hero in Sophocles Antigone. Many scholars would stake claim to Antigone possessing all the necessary characteristics of a true tragic hero, but many others would argue that Creon holds many qualities as well. It is hard to discount Antigone as a tragic hero, because in fact, the play bears her name, but from careful reading, Creon meets Aristotles criteria exactly and fits perfectly into the role.

In order to determine whether or not Creon is the true tragic hero, one must answer the question: What is a Tragic Hero? In Aristotles Poetics, he discusses the basic criteria regarding a tragic hero. Aristotle states that tragic heroes must have a high status or social position; characters must not be perfect, although, the character is pre-eminently good; they must have a single flaw that brings about their own demise and that of the others around them. Aristotle also mentions another quality of a tragic hero, which is that the character arouses pity in the audience usually because the punishment exceeds the crime and the hero is alive to face his suffering in order to achieve some self-recognition.

After reviewing all these critera, it should be clear that Creon is the true tragic hero. First, Aristotle suggests that a tragic hero must occupy a high status position, but must also possess nobility and virtue as part of the heros character. Creon fits this description quite accurately. At the beginning of the play; in the Time and Scene section, it says that, Creon, is now king of Thebes. This quote shows that he occupies a strong status position and stature of nobility. Creon also proves that his character embodies virtue and honor.

He shows that he would put his country above all else, when speaking to the Chorus at the beginning of the play. Creon said, … And whoever places a friend above the good of his own county, he is nothing: I have no use for him. (203-205). Again, his high standards and honor for his country are shown in great detail: I could never stand by silent, watching destruction march against our city, putting safety to rout (207-208). Creon shows a high sense of morality when he properly buried Eteocles, and then is showing his noble character by not burying Polyneices, who attacked Creons country; again his value of his country is shown.

Creon is a good ruler because he like any king would punish evil and reward good. Creon is seen by the chorus to have goodness and leadership. (Lines 691). The chorus praises Creon for his loyalty to the country after the great war, they look forward to his kingly rule and nobility in the future by saying, . . . Creon, the new man for the great new day(Lines 173). Love of his country and his punishment of Polyneices show this great nobility and loyalty talked about by the chorus.

Clearly Creon qualifies under the first criterion of being a tragic hero. The second criterion for being a tragic hero is that one is neither purely evil nor pre-eminently great. Although Creon possesses many good kingly qualities, as far a honor and nobility, his imperfection lies in his excessive pride and hubris, as well as his self indulgence as King of Thebes. Creon shows his power and pride when talking to Antiogone and Ismene. Creon is putting himself on the level of the gods, by showing how easy he can take and give people their lives.

This pride is shown when Ismene and Antigone speak to Creon, Ismene says, How can I live alone, without her? (638) And Creon responds by saying, Her? Dont even mention her – she no longer exists. (Lines 639-640). When Haemon, Creons son, tries to convince his father not to kill Antigone, Creons ego and pride come into full context when he says, So, men our age, were to be lectured, are we? – schooled by a boy his age? (Lines 812 -814). Creon is showing that he can in no way learn or profit from the wisdom of his son or any others.

This pride is also shown in the same conversation between him and his son. Haemon declares, The whole city of Thebes denies it, to a man; (820) this is dealing with what the city has said about Creon wanting to kill Antigone, but Creon lashes out by saying, And is Thebes about to tell me how to rule?……. The city is the kings – thats the law. (Lines 821-825). Creons major tragic flaw is his hubris, and unknowing to him, it brings about his demise. Thirdly, for Creon to be a tragic hero, he must have a flaw that brings about his own doom as well as that of others.

This character flaw is where Creon stakes claim to his title of the tragic hero. Clearly, Creons pride was his downfall and his major flaw, and it is this pride, which will bring the ruins of his family. Creons pride blinds him from doing what is right and burying Polyneices, this is seen in his speech with Teiresias, when he claims, Youll never bury that body in the grave, not even if Zeus eagles rip the corpse and wing their rotten pickings off to the throne of god! Never, not even in fear of such defilement will I tolerate his burial, that traitor.

Creons excessive pride and arrogance in this speech are in full force, because Creon is putting himself on the same level of the gods, basically saying that no human or god is going to stop him from doing what he thinks he should do. Creon, in his mind, is the final decision maker, he is the ruler of himself and the country. The profit Teiresias predicts on Creons future because of his horrid deeds by saying, … before you have surrendered, one born of your own loins, your own flesh and blood, a corpse for corpse given in return.

Creon, faced with his true prophecy, refuses to yield on his word and actions. Because of his hubris, the prophecy is true and his son Haemon kills himself when he discovers Antigone has hung herself. Later, Creons wife suffers the same fate as the others and Creon is left with the thought of losing two loved ones because he was too proud to admit his wrong. After Creon understands that the prophecy was correct and that his son was dead, he finally starts to recant his actions and achieve some self-knowledge and self-discovering.

Another important characteristic is that the hero is alive to face their suffering and discover their wrongs, in other words, their fall is not of pure loss. Creon, only after the deaths of his family members, achieves a moment of recognition. Teiresias leaves Creon to his thoughts, and only now does Creons hubris and arrogance begin to dissolve as his judgment arises. Creon begins to apologize for his actions toward Antigone, and he sees the errors of his ways, by saying, Oh Ive learned(1404) and Take me away, quickly, out of sight. I dont even exist – Im no one.

Creon before his judgment, says to let everyone know that he understands that he is responsible for the deaths of Antigone, Haemon, and his wife that he is, … so senseless, so insane. . . my crimes, Look at us, the killer, the killed, father and son, the same blood – the misery! My plans, my mad fanatic heart, Ai, dead, lost to the world, not through your stupidity, no, my own. (Lines 1394-1401) Creon looks at himself as a senseless, insane man who was blinded by pride and arrogance, and the inability to admit his wrong doings.

When Creon calls himself the killer he reaches his ultimate peak of enlightenment and understands he was wrong. Another key critera which Creon meets is that he arouses a sense of pity in the audience because many feel that his punishment exceeded his crime. Although Creon admits his fault and although he is at fault, he is forced, by punishment, to live a lonely life and in turn is hated by the people who once loved him. Teiresias predicts Creons fate by saying that all the cities will stir in hatred against [Creon]. (1105).

Creon is punished in another way, because the death of his son and wife happen suddenly, thus in fact, killing the spirits and heart of Creon. Creon was making a decision that he thought was right and for this he lost his son, wife, and the country which he favored with all of his heart. Creon is doomed to live in this country with people who hate him. Some would say that Creon was a harsh ruler and should be punished in the same matter that he ruled. Creon made a choice, a choice he thought was the right one. It turned out that this choice warranted an unjustly punishment.

Creons punishment exceeds the crime; is one who has excessive pride and arrogance, like many of us, to suffer a lonely and hated life? Should we pity him? Creon fits all of Aristotles criteria to perfection. He is a good king with a high stature, although he is not perfect in his actions. The excessive pride sets the stage for his major flaw. This pride leads to his downfall and that of his family. Creon reaches a period of recognition for his actions. Lastly, his punishment was overly harsh compared to his crime. According to Aristotle, Creon is a striking match to fit the role of a tragic hero.

Family is very important to Antigone

After filling up your gas-guzzling SUV, you walk into the convenience store to pay for the gas and buy a soda. Reaching for the Diet Coke, your eye catches on something as a man walks past you. It is a shine, or a shimmer. Just the light bouncing off the keys, you think. You grab the soda and shut the door that is now fogged up due to the warm air. As you turn around, chaos breaks through the quiet, and everybody is leaping for the ground. Quite puzzled, you just stand there, looking at everybody, wondering what the hell is going on. And then you see it.

The man that walked by you has a gun in his hands and is waving it around like a baton. Fortunately, he hasnt seen you standing due to the high shelves. He aims the gun right at the cashier. It is at this moment when you must decide whether you are brave or a coward. You have to decide whether you can do something about this situation or if you are just going to lay on the floor with everyone else. Being brave is tough. It takes a lot of courage and strength to do something that people would notice, to be an individual. Sophocles develops a character in his play Antigone that is the definition of brave and courageous.

Her name is Antigone. She is an individual because she stands up for what she believes is right, even though it may go against the laws created by man. Antigones uncle, Creon, has declared that Polynices, Antigones dead brother, may not be buried or mourned due to the fact that he fought against his home civilization. And anyone that defies this law will be punished by death. Antigone, however, firmly believes that her brother deserves the proper burial and ceremony that any soldier would receive. Hes my brother. Yours too, in case you have forgotten.

Nobody is going to be able to say I betrayed my own brother (36). Despite the consequence of death, Antigone follows through with her beliefs and gives her brother the proper ceremony for a dead soldier. By carrying through with her beliefs, Antigone not only shows her strength and courage, but also her commitment to her family. Family is very important to Antigone, especially since the death of her father and mother. And now that her two brothers are dead, all that is left is her sister. Sister, remember what happened to our father! Think about the fact that were all thats left of our family (41, 46-47).

The fact that Antigone is now alone with her sister only makes her desire to honor her family even stronger. She has a very passionate spirit that cannot and will not be crushed by mans law or the consequences. Antigone posses an ability that enables her to follow her heart and that makes her a very strong and able character. You decide to be brave and courageous and to stop the gunman before he can hurt anyone. You realize how dangerous guns can be and the corollary of being shot. The thought that you could be hurt or even die from your actions crosses through you mind.

But you feel as if you need to do this. Your pride tells you that you can do it, that you should do it. So you do, you try to stop the gunman. Pride can be a very powerful feeling that drives people to do things that they dont really want to do. Antigones pride is her characteristic downfall. At the beginning of the play, she talks with her sister, Ismene, about giving their dead brother a suitable burial. Antigone asks for Ismenes help and explains to Ismene the consequences of breaking the law for burying their brother. At this point, however, Antigone doesnt fully realize the reality of the situation.

Her pride is overtaking her and telling her to die with honor. Honor is the key word, as that is what Antigone thinks will come of going through with this act. Im not afraid. If I must die, at least I wont die the worst of deaths a death without honor (82-85). Towards the end of the play, however, she feels self-pity and helplessness when the death sentence is actually given. I am summoned to the dark. There will be no wedding song for me, no flowers strewn upon my marriage bed. Its Death I wed (611). At this point, her pride is damaged and she weeps to the people of the state, to make sure that they know what she did.

She cries to them, asking them to have pity for her. The overall feeling at this point is irony. We see Antigone at the beginning of the play as a selfless and giving person. She is willing to give her life just so her brother could have a dignified and apposite burial. Now that her penalty has become a reality, however, she turns selfish, taking any and all of the praise that is given to her for her actions. Theres no need to die. One death is plenty, and if theres any honor attached to it, that honors mine (401-403). She also becomes conceded, trying to let everyone know what she did and gain his or her sympathy.

Antigone defies the law because of her pride. But it is also her pride that blinds her from the true meaning of the consequences due to her actions. Because of this blindness, she turns selfish and pities herself when reality hits and her death sentence is carried out. Though Antigone may have a strong will, that will is driven by pride and pride leads to her demise. You start walking over to the gunman, still hidden by the tall shelves. A feeling rises up in you. It is a feeling of determination, of power and strength. Once you start going, you feel like you could tackle anything.

It is a strong feeling, one that makes you feel like a leader. This feeling of leadership is a very prominent feature in Sophocles character Creon. After his brothers death, Creon assumes control over the land. For the most part, divine law rules the land. There is one law, however, that Creon proclaims that goes against the divine law set forth by the gods. That law prohibits the burial of Antigones brother because he acted against his native country. It is the gods law that all soldiers have an appropriate and honorable burial. Although Creons law contradicts the gods, he sticks to his beliefs and does not alter them.

Even when his niece, Antigone, defies his law, he carries through with the punishment, which is death. she is a traitor and must die, or else Id be a traitor too, and I will not break my promise to the state. I suppose shell claim that as my niece she should not be put to death, but if I exempt my family from the law, why should anyone else be subject to it? Its important to people to know that their leaders house is in order, because if its not, how can he be expected to keep their house in order? (479-448). Creon obviously has a strong sense of duty to his country.

He is committed to being fair among his people, which is a good trait for a leader to have. He knows and respects the fact that some people will not agree with his decisions or his rule, but he remains strong and continues to enforce his laws. Because Creon has a strong will, however, does not mean that he does not show humiliation. Towards the end of the play, after learning that he will push his son and niece to their deaths, Creon recoils himself and steps back from his leadership role. At the time when he needs to become passionate and morally responsible, he is able to do that.

Its hard to swallow my pride, but I will. Only an idiot tries to fight with fate. I buried her, I will set her free myself (838-839, 843-844). Creons character displays the typical leadership qualities that any principal needs to have to be considered a good leader. You pause behind a shelf that contains the candy bars. You are trying to figure out a way that you can surprise the man without letting him know you are there. Looking around, you see a young man lying next to you. He looks up at you and pleads with his eyes for you not to do anything. The look makes you have second thoughts. What are you doing?

Youre playing with a gift, with life, that can be taken away as quickly as it was given. But youve already come this far. Turning back now would look bad and damage your pride. So, you continue on, full of self-assurance and pride. You jump out into the clearing and plan to tackle the guy. But before you can jump the guy, he swivels around and fires. Youre blown backwards, hit by something so powerful that it knocks you down. Suddenly, everything looks dim and you realize that you cant breathe. Feeling your chest, you lift your hand to see dripping blood. Regret fills your thoughts before you fall into unconsciousness.

Like Antigone, pride gets the better of you. And like you, Creon has the same mind-set. Creon is extremely proud, proud about being king, proud about making his own laws, and proud that he doesnt budge on his ruling. Having pride can be a positive possession, if it is not abused. Creon, however, is too proud, and eventually it leads to his downfall, as it led to yours. This new law that Creon has passed, the forbidden burial of Antigones brother, goes against the divine law set by the gods. When Antigone breaks Creons law and Creon is made aware of it, he is stubborn.

He is not willing to listen to Antigones story about why she did what she did. He just ignores her opinion, and continues through with his ideas of punishment. He is stubborn and too proud to lower himself to her level. He thinks that as king, he cannot change his mind and must stick to what he initially believes in. His pride tells him to do something that he may not want to do. But he cant go back on his word, because he would look foolish and dumb. Or at least, so he thinks. It is his pride, however, that destroys him in the end. You so-called prophets are like archers, letting your arrows fly at me!

But what you truly are, is confidence men, trying to hustle me! Leave me in peace. Turn profit somewhere else, old man, speculate on the foreign exchange, wherever, I dont care; but even if Gods eagles bore the body of Oedipus son (Antigones brother) to the heavens, morsel by rotting morsel, I would not let you fool me into allowing his burial (753-762). No matter who tries to contradict Creon, whether it is the townspeople or Tiresias, a soothsayer, he just wont listen because he is too stubborn and proud to change his laws. In the end, however, it is Creons pride that causes the death of his son and of his niece, Antigone.

Being proud about something is good, but having too much pride to listen to family, friends, and common sense is destructive. Every person has another side. It is a side that most people do not see, but that some people are unfortunate enough to encounter. Sophocles develops two characters in his play Antigone that have another side, a side that is not so obvious from the beginning lines. Antigone, for example, is at first very strong-willed woman. Towards the end, however, when she realizes that she will definitely die, she turns soft and cries about the fact; even though she already knew about the consequences when she buried her brother.

Despite this fact, Antigone is looked upon as a heroine. She is an unusual female throughout this play because she stands up against males and sticks to what she believes in. She is not easily scared by Creons threats or the consequences. Anyone who is willing to die for their beliefs has strength and courage. And I admire that, because I know that I, myself, would not go through with something given that the penalty would be death. I do not have that kind of conviction, but Antigone does, and that is why she is considered a heroine.

Greek Tragedy Antigone

This poem is quite successful in getting the plot across to the reader. Unfortunatly, that is all he can get across because of his beleif that, “inside every fat book is a skinny book trying to get out. ” Sargoff cannot have character descriptions, themes, or any real detail in his “skinny book” because of his beleifs. Sargoff leaves off why Polynices should not be burried and why his brother, who is not even menchoned, can be burried. This is important to building the feelings of contempt towards Creon and an understanding of what Antigone is doing.

Also, because this is a “Humorous Distillation,” the tone of the play is lost. Instead of being a dramatic play about obeying a higher law, it is a comical, rhyming poem about what happened. This may cause it to lose the impact it had. Sargoff reduces important and pivotal points in the story to a sentence such as, “Creon wilts, and tries to bang a U-ee. ” This sentence does not tell of Creon’s attempt to repent for what he has done by burrying Polynices and then going to free Antigone. Even if Sargoff gets all of the plot across, that is not enough to tell the whole story.

Aristotelian Unities Yes, Antigone does follow the Aristotelian Unities. The play occurs in the same place and roughly the same time. Things that happened before the play or outside of the place, was told by a messenger or a character themself. The action was all centered around Antigone’s actions. Her actions were the sole cause of everything that happened. Greek Tragedy Antigone does follow the Greek definition of tragedy. Tragedy is a story or play that has a signifigant conflict of morals, with a noble protagonist displaying a tragic flaw that is their strength but leads to their downfall.

The exposition of the story is when Antigone is talking with her sister and we learn of what has happened. The turning point of this play is when Creon tries to mend his wrongs by burying Polynices and freeing Antigone. Antigone herself is the tragic hero because she dies for what she believes morally right. Antigone’s tragic flaw is that she has only sees her point of view which leads to her death. The denouement of this story is everybody dying and then Creon realizing what he has caused. The song of the story is attenden to throuhg the chorus’ comentating on what is happening or through direct dialog.

The thought of this play is wether it is right to follow heavenly laws or ones made by man. Antigone is the tool through which Sophocles tells th! at one should obey the law of the gods and human laws. The complication of the story is done through Creon misunderstanding what is happening. Creon thinks at one point that the guard has been bribed when actually he is telling the truth. Creon’s recognition is when he finaly sees what has been happening and that Antigone is innocent and that Polynices should be buried.

A Study of Mankind “Antigone”

We all make inadvertent or unsuitable decisions throughout our lives. It is the real-world hamartia of human character. The problem is, we often realize this all too late; learning from our mistakes as one would say. So naturally an individual learns as they he or she has been taught. Then again, what of those who never learn, or those who are so blind to this fact that they bring about events so avoidable it is laughable? These are the people that you meet for just an instance, say at a party, and then you realize that you are restraining yourself from punching a tooth down their throat.

Its that annoying feeling you get when a fly lands on your arm, you swat, it flies to your other, arm you swat, and the cycle continues. But these people cannot be swat away into the uninhabited portions of our minds as was done with the humble fly. Left unchecked their social blindness will trigger events whose results are seldom agreeable. This leads to question, Can we stop this psychological pandemic? A man can spend his life searching for a cure or even a treatment, and yield nothing. But he who claims to have unlocked the secret will be praised and worship. Yet in reverse isnt such a claim the result of the disease itself?

A man who claims to have achieved perfection of mind, of ego, isnt that the sort of declaration that is analogous to the very illness itself? I deem such miracles a ruse or fallacy. It is human nature to suffer from the same emotional disease, arrogance. Nothing has changed in regard to arrogance, nor will it ever. The memory of that brisk winter night pierces through my head like the stadium lights had done that same night. It was down to the wire; playoffs or next year. One pass determined that result. No quarterback likes this position; from pee wee to NFL, the feeling is mutual.

So I cannot imagine what Brice Cutter was thinking in the seconds prior to the ball being hiked into his hands, initiating the last and final play of the game, and possibly Brices career. The command was given and the play commenced. Needless to say the opposing teams defense was useless in providing a challenge. The cliffhanger was disposed of and our team walked of the field with thoughts of the state championship on their minds. Sports have a strange effect upon those who partake in its sweet intoxications. They have a strange way of changing a persons mood or even personality.

Win or lose; two words seemingly harmless, but are truly the prime examples of a double edged sword. A player attached his or herself to the game, devotes his or her life to the moment, the one kick, the one hit, the one score. After sitting behind Brice in homeroom for two years strait, Ive grasped such a concept quite tightly. Not to mention that I, being an athlete, have seen such effects amongst my teammates. The same could be said for positions of leadership. Creon, the king and protagonist in the tragedy of Antigone, has forgotten the laws of the gods worshipped by those he rules.

He becomes more concerned with the laws made by man. This is due to the fact that he desires perfect order and reform in his nation. Without his position of leadership his thoughts would have been more clear allowing him to see that a perfect synthesis of mans and gods laws is much more agreeable to the citizens. Regardless, Brice was worshiped. He had taken our team to the playoffs for the first time in years, and the town openly showed their approval. Even Josh Leland my, best-friend-for-ever, anti-everything, companion became interested in owning a piece of Brices attention.

He acquired what he sought. After the game Josh and Brice were going to the local club along with the rest of the members of the student who had half a sense of popularity. Naturally, I went along, not entirely willing however, yet still glad to be doing something. I arrived to an empty club; no DJ, no music. The doors were unlocked, the OPEN sign glowing bright red. It was a ghastly feeling. I had walked to the club in the opposite direction of where most of the kids would be coming from; the after-game party downtown. So I walked towards Main Street, the heart of our citys social congregations.

Sure enough I was greeted to sirens, moans, and screams. The scene of the accident was chilling. Two mangled cars on opposite ends of the road, a covered body on a stretcher, blood on the windshield of Brices car. I knew it was his as soon as a saw the now barely legible word spray painted on the side of his car: PLAYOFFS! The other car was a mini-van. I went pale as I realized that there were two empty car seats and no children running around to account for their emptiness. Brice was being given a breathalyzer test, and then he was placed in hand cuffs.

Then, the most disturbing memory of that night beckoned my eyes towards it; Josh in the remains of Brices car. The fire department had out saws attempting to cut out the metal surrounding his lifeless, mangled body. The next day the chain of events leading up to this premature tragedy were fleshed out to me. Brice, in an act of celebration, had decided to get completely inebriated. On the way to the club he smashed the passenger side of his car into the front of the mini van, instantly killing the mother and her two kids inside.

After the bodies were identified it was reported that the driver of the mini van was Brices mother with his two brothers. They were just returning from a trip to the lake. The resulting impact killed Josh, and incapacitated Brice. He would no longer be praised, he would no longer play football, he would no longer be loved or adored. His arrogance caused the death of a beloved friend and his own mother and brothers. He would be alone because in his mind he was untouchable. Everything was going perfectly for him. He had playoff hopes he had college offers from across the country, he could get any girl he chose.

Yet he chooses to throw it all away by fueling his ego in the temporary thrills of adrenaline. In the allegory of the cave, Brice was watching the shadow of his so called fame, and popularity. His fatal flaw was his arrogance, as was the case with Creon. The fire casting shadows along the walls of the cave is the celebration of the playoff qualifications. The reality he is unable to see is the chance of success if he had merely stayed sober. But even further, one could argue that such a thing as playoffs and the ritualistic celebrations of the playoffs holds no value in the scheme of a persons life.

Such materialistic values as winning and the spoils of victory are all exploits that do nothing to further the ability of an enslaved to see his or her reality; to discovering the truth of what is real. So after analysis it could be determined that Brices love of sports, coupled with his hamartia and his unrestrained celebration all blinded him and led him to see a false reality where he was adored and practically invulnerable. Brice and the situation he put himself into almost parallel that of Creon and his situation in a strange sense of irony. It was Creons arrogance that caused the death of his son, wife, and soon to be daughter in law.

Had Creon just listened to the voice of reason and realized that Antigones actions were done with justification he would have avoided the tragedy that befell him. Had Brice simply stayed sober he would be in the NFL with a wife and mansion buying things for his mother and teaching his brothers how to play football. But such is not the case. Both Creon and Brice suffer from the same emotional disease commonly known as arrogance. Both are presented with their mistakes in a irreversible manner that brings about drastic and afflicting changes to their lives.

Such is the result of unabridged arrogance. The problem is that all suffer from it. However the difference between the arrogance in the Creons or Brices of the world compared to the arrogance in the everyday intellectual man is that the intellectual man can comprehend, deal, and control his arrogance to the point that it is not detrimental to himself or his life. When arrogance becomes a hamartia is when the hero never realizes its there; a silent killer with the most simplistic of cures. Its a tragedy in and of itself.