A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Contrast In Human Mentality

The Play: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, by William Shakespeare offers a wonderful contrast in human mentality. Shakespeare provides insight into man’s conflict with the rational versus the emotional characteristics of our behavior through his settings. The rational, logical side is represented by Athens, with its flourishing government and society. The wilder emotional side is represented by the fairy woods. Here things do not make sense, and mystical magic takes the place of human logic. Every impulse may be acted upon without and forethought to there outcome. The city of Athens represents the epitome of civilized man.

Ruled by the laws of man and kept in check by society’s own norms. The human struggle to suppress its unrestrained and irrational tendencies, still being undertaken today, discourages the civilized’ man from making rash and foolish actions. Thus every action should have a sound and logical purpose, based on the social norms. In the play, Egeus, the father of Hermia, has thoughtfully chosen what he considers an acceptable mate to wed his daughter. Egeus most likely based his decision on economic, political, and social factors in his choosing of Demetrius. He is making a reasonable decision based on Hermia’s future in their ociety.

Unfortunately Hermia is smitten by Lysander and vice versa. Although her father may have made his decision with every good intension, keeping with the traditional customs of his day, and even perhaps taking into consideration such things as attractiveness, he failed to foresee the desires of his daughter. The young Lysander, who like most young men, cares little for the rules of society, is willing to break tradition and flee Athens to obtain Hermia. Therefore they must leave the rational Athens to enjoy their irrational love. Theseus, the king of Athens, is the highest symbol of law and order in his kingdom.

After winning a war with another kingdom, he chooses to marry their queen, Hippolyta. His decision may very well have been inspired by love, but the political ramifications of their marriage is a more plausible rationale. In fact Theseus’ apparent love for Hippolyta seems almost as an added reward to an already beneficial partnership. Whether any attraction was there or not probably would not have made a difference. As king, Theseus must place the kingdom before his own feelings. It simply comes with the position. In short Athens represents the desire to suppress feelings and impulses and to make decisions based on logic.

Thus it does not give the power of raw emotion the true respect it requires, for man is both emotional and rational. Love never has, and never will, be predictable. The fairy world represents man’s undisciplined emotional quality. Here the laws of man do not apply and things simply need not make sense. Attributes like adventure, romance, fear, foolishness, and mockery are all things suppressed by Athens and welcomed by the fairy woods. The fairies respect the untamed heart and they understand the power love holds. These creatures embrace the unruly craziness that passion brings, they live for the moment and are pure t heart.

Along with love and passion the fairy world is also susceptible to other emotions running wild. Jealousy, anger, and humor at the expense of others are all abound here. Oberon, king of the fairies, is the quintessential symbol of human impulsiveness. He obviously loves his queen, Titania, very much and is instantly jealous of her love for a indian child. He rashly devises a plan to snatch up the child for himself and at the same time have a little amusement at Titania expense. His plan is to cast a magic spell over her with a love flower’ causing her to fall in love with the first person, or creature, she sees.

There is no rational reason for Oberon’s actions, for jealousy is irrationality at it’s most basic level. Robin Goodfellow, or puck, is Oberon’s fairy servant, and perhaps the most irrational person in the play. He is the essence of wild and untamed foolishness. He pleases himself by performing his fairy magic on unsuspecting travelers, and simply devotes his time to mischief. He is the one that Oberon entrusts with his plan to inflict Titania with the love spell, and also gives him an extra chore as a bonus. This ends up to be a disastrous, yet entertaining event.

Shakespeare successfully contrasts the duality of man’s nature by using wo settings with opposite characteristics. Whether this was the entire purpose of the play is doubtful, but is remains an interesting and well paralleled feature. The people of Athens, struggling to understand the illogical fairy world, and at the same time exhibiting the same behavior. Perhaps Shakespeare seeing the era of logic and reason obtaining new highs, wished to remind us all of our other side. The emotional quality of mankind may get him into trouble, but it is also what makes life so thrilling and bearable. Like the ying-yang, one cannot live without the other.

Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena

In Shakespeare’s “” the mortal teenage characters fall in love foolishly, and the character Bottom states, “O what fools these mortals be”. They are foolish because they act like children. Although Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena appear grown-up, when they are in love they act foolishly. The four teenage lovers are fools. Demetrius is a fool because he is unaware that his love changes through out the play. At the start of the play Demetrius does not love Helena. (II ii,line 188)

Demetrius says, “I love thee not, therefore pursue me not. II ii,line 194) “Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more. ” In III ii, Demetrius after being juiced begins to love Helena. (III ii,line 169-173) Demetrius says, “Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none. If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone. My heart to her but as guest- wise sojourned, And now to Helen is it home returned, There to remain. ” This proves he is a fool, because he is not aware of his changing love for Helena. Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her but she still persists in chasing him. Demetrius shows no love for Helena.

II i,line 227-228) Demetrius says, “I’ll run from thee, and hide me in the brakes, And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. ” (II i,line 199-201) “Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth Tell you I do not, nor I cannot love you? ” Demetrius clearly illustrates to Helena that he has no interest, but Helena persists. (II i,line 202-204) Helena says, “And even for that do I love you the more. I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius, The more you beat me, I will fawn on you. ” (II i,line 220-222) “Your virtue is my privilege.

For that It is not night when I do see your face, Therefore I think I am not in the night;” This proves that Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her, but she still persists. Lysander is a fool because he persuades Hermia to avoid death and run away with him. Hermia must marry Demetrius or she will be put to death. (I i,line 83-88) Theseus says, “Take time to pause, and, by the next new moon- The sealing-day betwixt my love and me, For everlasting bond fellowship- Upon that day either prepare to die For disobedience to your father’s will, Or else to wed Demetrius, as he would,” Hermia does not love Demetrius.

I i,line 140) Hermia says, “O hell! To choose love by another’s eyes. ” Hermia loves Lysander. (I i,line 150-155) “If then true lovers have been ever crossed, It stands as an edict in destiny. Then let us teach or trial patience, Because it is a customary cross, As due to love, as thoughts and dreams and sighs, Wishes and tears, poor fancy’s followers. ” Lysander has an alternative idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, “I have a widow aunt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child; *From Athens is her house remote seven leagues.

“Steal forth thy father’s house tomorrow night, And in the wood, a league without the town. ” Lysander is a fool because he convinces Hermia to risk death and run away with him. Hermia is a fool because she risks death for love. Hermia is to marry Demetrius, or be put to death. (I i,line 95-98) Egeus says, “Scornful Lysander, true, he hath my love, And what is mine my love shall render him. And she is mine, and all my right of her I do estate unto Demetrius. ” Lysander suggests an idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, “A good persuasion. Therefore her me, Hermia.

I have a aunt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child;” Hermia agrees with the idea. (I i,line 168-169) Hermia says, “My good Lysander, I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow,” (I i,line 178) “Tomorrow truly will I meet thee. ” Hermia is a fool because she is risking death for the love of Lysander. Therefore this proves, the four teenage lovers are fools. (VI i, Theseus states) “Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. ” William Shakespeare’s A Midsummers Night’s Dream shows how childishly foolish lovers can be.

Midsummer Nights Dream And Romeo And Juliet

Certain parallels can be drawn between William Shakespeare’s plays, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, and “Romeo and Juliet”. These parallels concern themes and prototypical Shakespearian character types. Both plays have a distinct pair of ‘lovers’, Hermia and Lysander, and Romeo and Juliet, respectively. Both plays could have also easily been tragedy or comedy with a few simple changes. A tragic play is a play in which one or more characters have a moral flaw that lead to his/her downfall. A comedic play has at least one humorous character, and a successful or happy ending.

Comparing these two plays is useful to find how Shakespeare uses similar character types in a variety of plays, and the versatility of the themes which he uses. In “Romeo and Juliet”, Juliet is young, “not yet fourteen”, and she is beautiful, and Romeo’s reaction after he sees her is: “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear Beauty to rich for use, for the earth too dear! ” Juliet is also prudent, “Although I joy in thee, I have no joy in this ontract tonight. It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden.

She feels that because they have just met, they should abstain from sexual intercourse. Hermia is also young, and prudent. When Lysander suggests that “One turf shall serve as a pillow for both of us, One heart, one bed, two bosoms, and one troth,” Hermia replies “Nay, good Lysander. For my sake, my dear, Lie further off yet; do not lie so near. ” Although this couple has known each other for a while (Romeo and Juliet knew each other for one night when the above uote was spoken), Hermia also abstains from even sleeping near Lysander even though she believes he does not have impure intentions.

Romeo’s and Juliet’s families are feuding. Because of these feuds, their own parents will not allow the lovers to see each other. In the a differnet way Hermia is not allowed to marry Lysander. Hermia’s father Egeus says to Theseus, Duke of Athens: “Full of vexation come I, with complaint Against my child, my daughter Hermia. Stand fourth, Demetrius. My noble lord, This man hath my consent to marry her. Stand forth, Lysander. And, my gracious Duke, This man hath bewitched the bosom of my child.

Egeus tells the Duke that his daughter can marry Demetrius, not Lysander. Hermia replies “. . . If I refuse to wed Demetrius,” Egeus replies “Either to die the death, or to abjure for ever the society of men. ” If Hermia does go against her father’s wishes, and weds Lysander, she will either be put to death, or be forced to become a nun. Both pairs of lovers also seek help from another. Juliet and Romeo seek Friar Lawrence, and Lysander and Hermia seek Lysander’s aunt, who lives in the woods near Athens.

Both sets of youths have the same character type. They are young, their love is prohibited, both women are prudent, and both seek the help of an adult. Yet they have their subtle differences. For example, Lysander, never mentioned a love before Hermia. Romeo loved Rosaline, before he loved Juliet. Hermia’s family and Lysander’s family were not feuding, whereas the Montagues’ and Capulets’ feude was central to the plot of the play. The stories of “Romeo and Juliet” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” are very different however.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is a comedy. Oberon, king of the fairies, sends a mischievous imp named, Puck, to play a trick on the queen of the fairies, Titania, and on a pair of Athenian youth. Puck turns Nick Bottom’s head into that of an ass (Nick Bottom is the man in the play production within “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”; he tried to play every part), and places an herb on Titania that causes her to fall in love with him. This is quite humorous. However, at the end of the play all the couples are back together, with the ones they love.

Thus Lysander and Hermia do get married. If Egeus had showed up at the wedding, he could have killed her. Egeus’ dominate nature is his ‘flaw’, and if he would have attended the wedding, and killed his daughter, this play could have been a tragedy. Likewise, “Romeo and Juliet”, could have been a comedy. The first two acts of this play qualifies it as a comedy. In act I, Sampson and Gregory, servants of the Capulets, “talk big about what they’ll do the Montagues, make racy comments, and insult each other as often as they insult the Montagues. (“Barron’s, 45).

In act II, Romeo meets Juliet. All is going well until Tybalt, a Capulet kills Romeo’s best friend, Mercutio. Things go continue to go wrong from here, until at the end of the play Romeo, thinking that Juliet is dead (she is in fact alive, she took a drug to fake her death), drinks poison, and when Juliet awakens from the spell of the drug, seeing her dead lover, stabs herself. If the families’ pride had not been so great that they would murder one another, or prohibited true love, this play could have been a comedy.

This play is a tragedy, not because one character has flaw, but both families have a flaw- pride. Prohibited love, romance, controlling families, both plays have it all. With a few simple modifications, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” could have been a tragedy, and “Romeo and Juliet” could have been a comedy. Shakespeare however, uses many of the same character types, young, prudent, rebellous lovers, and controling family members, in both comedies and tragedies. The end results are character molds, along with theme molds that can be easily translated into almost any plot, in any play.

Shakespearean Comedy Essay

Shakespeare wrote many plays during his lifetime. Some of his plays have similar comedic characteristics and then other plays are the exact opposite of comedy. Shakespeare wrote tragedies, romance, history, comedy and problem plays all with great success. During the performance of these plays there was no scenery so great time was taken when developing the characters and the plot so the plays would be entertaining. A Midsummers Night’s Dream and Much Ado About Nothing are just two of the comedies Shakespeare wrote.

These two plays have many things in common where as Measure for Measure is a problem play with a totally different tone. Comparing and contrasting these three plays will help us to understand what Shakespeare thought comedy was in the 1600’s and to see if our views on comedy are the same today. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a festive comedy. The play takes place in June and this is a bewitched time. In the spring the custom is to celebrate the return of fertility to the earth. During this time the young people spend the night in the woods to celebrate. Shakespeare uses the greenworld pattern in this play. The play begins in the city, moves out to the country and then back o the city.

Being in the country makes things better because there is tranquility, freedom and people can become uncivilized versus when they are in the city and have to follow customs and laws and behave rationally. Comedies contain blocking figures and in this play it is Egeus. If he was not in the way, Hermia could marry Lysander. Since he is causing problems in his daughters life by trying to make her marry Demetrius, this begins the journey into the woods. Egeus threatened Hermia with death if she were to marry Lysander so she thinks the only way they can be together is to run away.

One strange element is why Egeus was so set on Hermia marrying Demetrius. Lysander came from as good a family as Demetrius. Both were well possessed with property and money so Egeus’s power is made to seem senseless. The play moves into the woods which is haunted by fairies who are there to bless the wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta. The quarreling between Oberon and Titania over the changeling boy leads to the king wanting to embarrass Titania with the love juice by making her fall in love with a monster. The first person she sees is Bottom and she falls violently in love with him. Oberon is making a spectacle of Titania and Bottom.

It is ridiculous that she is in love with him because he is from such a lower class than her, he is human and she is a fairy, and he has the head of an ass. She is also a queen and he is an uneducated working man and a match like this would never happen. Bottom has such a problem with language. He speaks in malapropisms. He tries to say one word but always comes up with the wrong one. He is a working man who tries to act more educated that he really is . Through Bottom and Titania we see that love is blind. Also, while Titania is under the influence of the love juice she releases the changeling boy to Oberon so he did accomplish his goal.

The confusion between Lysander, Hermia, Helena, and Demetrius because of the love juice is full of funny occurrences. When Lysander wakes up and thinks he is in love with Helena, Hermia is ignored and treated badly by Lysander. Then not only was Lysander saying he loved Helena, Demetrius was also treating Hermia badly. This left poor Hermia so upset but we as the audience know this is a prank and soon the spell will be lifted. The main characters in the play are all developed to a point here the audience can identify with them. We learn things about them individually so we can feel happy or sad when things happen in their life.

I felt sad for Hermia when she was jolted by Lysander because their love for each other had seemed so strong and she was so confused by his behavior. Even though the audience knows the truth it is easy to feel sad for her. As the play nears the end, Oberon lifts the spell and everyone seems to believe they have had a rare vision and then their lives go on just as if none of this had happened. The play brings closure to the reader by having the traditional ending of a comedy. They usually end in weddings and a feast which is exactly what happens in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Lysander and Hermia, Helena and Demetrius, and Theseus and Hippolyta all get married which signifies a new beginning. The working men end the play with a Bergomask dance and the fairies join in the dance and bless the marriages. A Midsummer Night’s Dream contains many elements of a comedy. The most important ones to me are that the play ends happily, it is funny and it made me laugh. Shakespeare wrote Much Ado About Nothing which is also a comedy, but it is a different type of comedy than A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Although these two plays share some common elements, they also have differences.

Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy of intrigue. It involves suspense, question and has a detective story element. Within the comedy of intrigue, there is social comedy involving Beatrice and Benedick. Through this couple and Claudio and Hero, the play explores the was people interact with each other. Shakespeare shows that love can be very logical but also very passionate. Claudio and Hero have a love that is soft, delicate and logical. Beatrice and Benedick on the other hand, are very assionately in love with each other and show this by quarreling constantly. Claudio’s obsession with Hero is from a distance.

He worships her and is astonished with her beauty. His love for her is very shallow because he does not know her as a person. Claudio is being logical about marriage by inquiring about Hero’s financial state and social standing. After finding out she is an only child, he agrees to let Don Pedro woo Hero in his favor so she would be his wife. When Claudio and Don Pedro put their plan into action at the masked ball, Don John appears. He acts as a blocking figure in his play and causes many problems. He tells Claudio that Don Pedro wants Hero for himself, which is a lie, but Claudio acts like “easy come easy go”.

He is not very upset that he just lost his soon to be bride. When the truth comes out, the wedding day is set and the planning begins. Don John is once again planning to ruin things. He is a jealous, sour and unhappy person. The greenworld is also used in this play but not for festive activities. It is used for plotting bad things that will hurt people. After Claudio is led to believe Hero was cheating on him, he becomes malicious and wants revenge. Claudio disgraces Hero at the wedding. He refuses to marry her in front of all the guests and accuses her of already having sex with someone else.

This serious act of revenge causes the audience to feel sorry for not only Hero, but her family as well because we know that was not her kissing Borachio. The audience may have felt worse for Hero if her character had been more fully developed but she hardly ever spoke even when agreeing to marry Claudio. We can feel sorry for her but not really identify with her because we do not know her very well. Hero is made a spectacle of for no truthful reason and disgraces her family. After Hero faints at the wedding, Beatrice is furious. She wants revenge against Claudio.

Finally she and Benedick declare their love for each other which was made possible by being under tension and emotional stress and she was finally able to let down her guard. She feels out of control because she needs a man to kill Claudio. She is usually able to take care of things herself but not this time. Thankfully Benedick will not kill Claudio and the truth comes out because of Dogberry and Verges. When the night watchmen overhear Borachio talking about the scheme Dogberry and Verges bring him and his comrade to their uperior. It is funny this watchmen could catch anyone doing anything wrong.

The watchmen are like Bottom and are comical. They have the same problem as Bottom and have great difficulty communicating. After the truth is out that Claudio was fooled into thinking that Hero was cheating on him, he is full of grief because he believes Hero is dead. He agrees to marry Leonato’s niece, who is supposed to look just like Hero, to make up his terrible mistake to he family. After he marries the masked bride, he is happy to see it is Hero. This certainly is a marriage of convenience. He did ot know Hero anyway so it would not have mattered if he knew the bride to be.

In a sense, Hero was resurrected from the dead and Claudio ends up being a very lucky guy. Most of the characters are fully developed, except Hero, so we can identify with their grief and then their joy. As the play comes to an end everything is wrapped in a neat package. Don John is captured and brought back to be punished, Claudio and Hero, and Beatrice and Benedick are married and the dance and the feast begin. Measure for Measure is a play that is very different from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The comedy in this play is very raw. The atmosphere of the two plays are different but they both deal with the same issue of sexuality.

After the Duke has left the city in Angelo’s hands, he wants to show his power by condemning Claudio to death because he got Juliet pregnant. Angelo is not being reasonable because he has let the power go to his head. Angelo has also had sex out of wedlock, he just did not get Mariana pregnant. In this play sex is portrayed as much more dangerous than it has been in the other two plays. After Claudio is jailed, he makes a plea to his sister, Isabella , to help him obtain a pardon for his offense. Isabella ad not yet taken her vows to become a nun so she agrees to help him.

Isabella and Angelo are parallel characters. Both live with great restraint. After Isabella pleads with Angelo to pardon her brother, he comes up with the idea of an exchange for Claudio’s freedom. He wants Isabella to sleep with him so he could have her virginity and then he would pardon Claudio. Angelo is a very cold person with no feelings and has restrained himself tremendously throughout his life. He has a problem with women and he is tempted more by a virtuous woman than a frivolous one. In a soliloquy, he talks to himself and tries to nderstand his lust for Isabella.

He has a violent image of sex with her because he wants to destroy her virtue. Angelo is very cruel. He is going to torture and kill Claudio and he is getting pleasure by controlling Isabella. this play is dealing with power and who has the most. After the Duke, disguised as the Friar, over hears Isabella telling Claudio she will not sleep with Angelo, he comes up with a plan. Isabella would agree to meet Angelo at midnight and they would send Mariana instead because the two of them were supposed to have been married before but her dowry was lost at sea and Angelo ad backed out on the marriage.

The plan works but Angelo goes back on his word and orders Claudio’s head delivered to him at once. The Friar helps keep Claudio in hiding so everyone would think he was dead. The Friar then returns as the Duke and Angelo’s world begins to unravel. He is publicly exposed so everyone will know what king of a person he is. He has been tricked into marriage and is now a very miserable person. Although he had the ultimate power for a brief time, heabused it and now has to suffer the consequences for a lifetime. After Claudio is produces and allowed to marry Juliet, the

Duke asks for Isabella’s hand in marriage. The satire in this play looks at the two extremes and the audience tries to believe something in the middle. The language used in this play is crude when they are discussing sex. The men in the city talk about sex in a nasty ways discussing how many diseases they have gotten from the hoars. Sex is portrayed as a vile and nasty thing. Measure for Measure is visually unlike other plays. There is insistence on laws that are very extreme. People are being measured in judgement. It shows that you should be reasonable and weigh things out before actions are taken.

These three plays all have different messages which are told in various ways. As a writer, Shakespeare was so talented he could write different types of stories with such grace. These three plays are just a few examples of the different extremes he was capable of. Writing and defining comedy can be very difficult. Many elements of comedy are in his plays and this makes they very enjoyable reading. Comedy helps me to identify with stories since I like happy endings much better than tragic endings. After finishing a book, I like to have a feeling of closure and in these comedies my need is fulfilled.

Midsummer Night’s Dream

Character Analysis Hermia When we first meet Hermia she is the typical girl in love against her fathers wishes. Obviously we see from the start that she is very devoted to Lysander, her love, and she does not like to be forced to do things that she does not want. She does not want to marry Demetrius even though her father has pretty much told her it is that or death. Yes, she could always go live in a nunnery or live a life of chastity but who really wants that. So from the start we see that she is very adamant and very in love. Before going into Hermias inner self I must address her physical appearance.

She is Egeus daughter and she is a tiny woman with a dark completion. She is often mocked for this like when Helena and her were quarreling in the woods Hermia says this in regards to height “Now I perceive that she hath made compare between our statures: she hath urged her height, And with her personage, her tall personage, Her height, forsooth, she hath prevailed with him. ” (Act III Scene 2 Line 292). So obviously she is aware of her lack in height and it seems to cause her a bit of pain. Though Helena is taller than Hermia even she admits that Hermia has “sparkling eyes and a lovely voice”.

Hermia is very set in what she wants from the very first scene. She has eyes only for Lysander. So obviously she is very faithful. Even when faced with the decision her father gave her she did not waver for a second in her love for him. Throughout the story Hermias emotions were kind of tossed around and at one point she even says, ” Am I not Hermia? Are you not Lysander? (Act III Scene 2 line 274). So we see that she gets a little confused and a bit hurt when hurt feelings we cast aside. At that point in the story I think she lost a part of her self.

She had put a part of er self in side Lysander a he had just brushed it away. So when Lysander came back to her she then became herself again. So in that we see that she has intrusted herself in Lysander and had no doubt that he loved her. Boy did she get a slap in the face. Hermia is a very key figure in the story so she has relations with almost all the characters in the story. The first and most important relationship Hermia had was with the man she loved, Lysander. From the start we see that Hermia loved Lysander with all her heart and he loved her the same in return.

The only time that there was a flaw in their relationship was hen Puck put the magic into Lysander’s eyes and he fell in love with Helena. Hermia had very right to be mad and to feel rejected. But once Puck straightened out his goof up their relationship went back to the euphoric state like before. The next relationship is that of Helenas and Hermias. These two grew up together and were probably extremely close all their life. Then they hit womanhood and there it went crazy. Hermia was loved by everyone including Demetrius, the one Helena wanted. So obviously Helena was jealous and she had a right to be.

So at this point in their lives there was a major strain in their elationship. In the end though it all turns out all right. Both of them are with who they want to be with. Hermia and Egues relationship is that of a typical father-daughter relationship. Egues only wants the best for is daughter and Hermia is only thinking about her own welfare. She loves Lysander and her father does not think he is the best man to marry his little girl. So as for that their relationship is completely healthy. Hermia just says ” I would my father looked but with my eyes. ” (Act I Scene 1 line 56). But fathers can definitly be that way at times.

They see what they want to see. Hermia and Demetrius are only but members in the same love triangle. There is truly no hope that Hermia will ever love Demetrius in return unless Puck comes along with his magic flower. So as far as that goes unless magic is involve there is really no hope. Hermia is very sure of who she loves. Overall Hermia was very true to her emotions. She new what she wanted and eevn in the face of losing the love of her life she stayed strong yet hot tempered about the whole thing. Amazingly enough through out all the confusion Hermia stayed very much in control.

Women In Shakespeare Writings

Often in literature, parallels are used to accentuate certain things. William Shakespeare utilizes this tool in both The Taming of the Shrew and A Midsummer Nights Dream. In both of these comedic plays, there is a set of women who are at odds with each other. These relationships can be compared and contrasted in different aspects. In Shakespeare’s, “The Taming of the Shrew” the relationship between the sisters Katherine and Bianca appears to be strained with rampant jealousy.

Both daughters fight for the attentions of their father. In twisted parallel roles, they take turns being demure and hag-like. Father of the two, Baptista Minola, fusses with potential suitors for young Bianca and will not let them come calling until his elder, ill-tempered daughter Katherine is married. The reader is to assume that meek, mild-mannered, delicate Bianca is wasting away while her much older, aging, brutish sister torments the family with her foul tongue.

Katherine seems to hold resentment toward Bianca. Her father favors Bianca over Katherine and keeps them away from eachothers’ torment. When gentlemen come calling, Bianca cowers behind her father and Katherine speaks up for herself. “I pray you sir, is it your will to make a stale of me amongst these mates?” (1.1.57-58) Bianca and Katherine dislike each other feverishly. Katherine torments Bianca with words and physical harm. She binds her hands, pulls her hair then brings her forth to her father and the gentlemen callers.

Bianca denies liking any of the visitors and portrays herself an innocent that merely wants to learn and obey her elders. She says, “Sister, content you in my discontent to your pleasure humbly I subscribe. My books and instruments shall be my company, on them to look and practise by myself.” (1.1.80-84) Because Katherine speaks freely and asserts herself she is labeled as “shrewish.” When Hortensio describes her to Petruccio, he spouts that she is “renowned in Padua for her scolding tongue.” ( 1.2.96)

He gilds the lily further by explicitly telling of her fair fortune if suitable man comes courting and wins her hand in marriage. Petruccio sees dollar signs and rushes forth in grand dress and eloquent mannerisms to court the gracious “Kate.” When he first begins his ritual of winning the family and Katherine to his love, he is seeking his fortune in her dowry. The mention of her being at all undesirable does not put rocks in his path. He speaks of “One rich enough to be Petruccio’s wife, as wealth is burden of my wooing dance be she as foul as was Florentius’ love, as old as Sibyl, and as curst and shrewd as Socrates’ Xanthippe or a worse, she moves me not or not removes at least affection’s edge in me, were she as rough as are the swelling Adriatic Seas.” (1.2.65-71)

Petruccio comes calling for the older sister, and Bianca in turn sneaks about with Lucentio who is dressed in scholars clothing. They pretend to be working on Latin and fool her father with disguises and books while romancing the entire time. Katherine is honest in her words and deeds. She does not wish to be teased or tormented and flees from Petruccio’s twisted words. Kate and Bianca trade roles at this time and the dainty, controlled sister is Kate. The bolder, out-spoken Bianca woos her Lucentio in the courtyard of the Minola home. At the Sunday wedding gathering of Petruccio and Katherine, the groom grabs the reins of control and demands that he and his bride leave the festivities before they have begun.

He offers Bianca and Lucentio the bedroom and party that they must leave behind. This symbolizes the transfer of attitude in the two sisters. Kate has to follow her new husband out of the home and leaves Bianca free roam over the wedding party. When the sisters are brought together again, it is at the wedding festivities of Bianca and Lucentio as well as the Widow and Hortensio. Katherine is called a “shrew” yet again by the Widow and Bianca flirts openly with Petruccio. The three new brides leave the dining table and make for the sitting room with the other women.

The three men are left to discussion and after dinner music. Petruccio offers a wager against the thought that the wives in turn should come to their husbands when called. The Widow and Bianca are foul and refuse to come seeking their husbands and throw out the servant both times. When Katherine is called to come to her husband she does so with grace and quiet obedience. She is then asked to bring forth the two disobedient wives. During this entire play the label of “shrew” is misplaced with dear Kate and should be rightfully placed in the lap of Bianca.

Kate brings out the two women and scolds them while maintaining her own dignity and elegant grace. She shows them that indeed her husband got the better end of the marriage contract. At this Petruccio kisses his Kate in front of everyone and they leave the gaping mouths of the crowd. In Shakespeares A Midsummer Nights Dream, Hermia and Helenas relationship changes greatly after the intervention of Puck with the love potion. Once best friends, they have become each others enemies, and all for the love of Lysander and Demetrius. Hermia and Helena were best friends when they were at school. All school-days friendship, childhood innocence? (3. 2. 201)

They had complete trust in each other, telling each other their deepest secrets. Is all the counsel that we two have shared, The sisters vows, the hours that we have spent, (3. 2. 198  199) They worked together on everything they did including sewing and singing. Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key, (3. 2. 205  206) To some people, Helena and Hermia became the same person, saying the same things, thinking the same thoughts and having the same morals and principles. As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds Had been incorporate.

So we grew together, (3. 2. 207-208) Behaving in the same way, they spent as much time as possible together. This time passed quickly, whilst the time spent apart was slow and seemed pointless. When we have chid the hasty-footed time For parting usO, is all forgot? (3. 2. 200  201, Helena) Although Helena and Hermia were two separate people, they were, a union in partition, compared to a double cherry. Two lovely berries moulded on one stem. (3. 2. 211) Their friendship was so strong that they seemed to be connected, the same person in two different bodies.

So with two seeming bodies, but one heart, (3. 2. 212) This had lasted all their lives until the intervention of Lysander and Demetrius. The strong friendship between Helena and Hermia quickly disintegrated when they became involved with the two men. The love potion was meant to help, but Pucks mistake managed to completely reverse the relationship. When both Demetrius and Lysander were under the influence of the love-in-idleness flower, Helena believed that both were mocking her. You both are rivals and love Hermia And now both rivals, to mock Helena. (3. 2.155 -156) When Hermia seems to take the same attitude, even though she doesnt know whats going on, Helena accuses her of betraying all women by entering into it. Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it, (3. 2. 218)

Helena and Hermia quickly enter into a massive argument, accusing each other of stealing their love. You thief of love. What, have you come by night And stolen my loves heart from him? (3. 2. 283  284) Their childhood friendship is forgotten in an instant, completely torn apart by the two men. It is not the love potion, which has had this effect on the women directly; it is the performance of the two men, arguing over Helena who have caused the break up. This exhibition of feelings upsets and confuses both Helena and Hermia. Hermia feels cheated, and Helena is the first person she can find to blame. O me, you juggler, you canker-blossom, (3.2.282)

Helena, however, thinks everything is some kind of cruel trick against her, and remains slightly calmer than Hermia. Lo, she is one of this confederacy. Now I perceive they have conjoined all three To fashion this false sport in spite of me. (3.2.192 194) As she is taller than Hermia, she calls her a puppet. Fie, fie, you counterfeit, you puppet, you! (3. 2. 288) Hermia takes this insult as though it is the reason that Lysander doesnt love her anymore. Her height, forsooth, she hath prevailed with him. (3.2.293) She goes on to call Helena a painted maypole and is obviously very worked up and angry. And with her personage, her tall personage, (3 2. 292) Helena is afraid of what Hermia might do to her, and Hermia is not short of threats in her vicious mood. How low am I? I am not yet so low, But that my nails can reach unto thine eyes. (3. 2. 297  298)

Helena does not want to fall out and does not understand why their past was so quickly forgotten. Good Hermia, do not be so bitter with me. I evermore did love you Hermia, Did ever keep your counsels, never wronged you  (3. 2. 306  308) Hermia, however, feels hard done by. She feels that Helena has caused her true love to turn against her, and if Helena disappeared, everything would be fine. Why, get you gone. Who ist that hinders you? (3. 2. 317) Helena also has the solution of running away, but cant as she foolishly still loves Demetrius. Helena and Hermias relationship has changed completely, entirely because of the effect of the love potion on Lysander and Demetrius. The friendship shown before the argument contrasts greatly to the hostility afterwards. The change has been for the worse, completely destroying the womens trust in each other, and all because of a fight between two men, caused by a mischievous spirit.

Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

In Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” the mortal teenage characters fall in love foolishly, and the character Bottom states, “O what fools these mortals be”. They are foolish because they act like children. Although Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena appear grown-up, when they are in love they act foolishly. The four teenage lovers are fools. Demetrius is a fool because he is unaware that his love changes through out the play. At the start of the play Demetrius does not love Helena. (II ii,line 188)

Demetrius says, “I love thee not, therefore pursue me not. II ii,line 194) “Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more. ” In III ii, Demetrius after being juiced begins to love Helena. (III ii,line 169-173) Demetrius says, “Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none. If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone. My heart to her but as guest- wise sojourned, And now to Helen is it home returned, There to remain. ” This proves he is a fool, because he is not aware of his changing love for Helena. Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her but she still persists in chasing him. Demetrius shows no love for Helena.

Demetrius says, “I’ll run from thee, and hide me in the brakes, And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. ” (II i,line 199-201) “Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth Tell you I do not, nor I cannot love you? ” Demetrius clearly illustrates to Helena that he has no interest, but Helena persists. (II i,line 202-204) Helena says, “And even for that do I love you the more. I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius, The more you beat me, I will fawn on you. ” (II i,line 220-222) “Your virtue is my privilege. For that It is not night when I do see your face, Therefore I think I am not in the night;” This proves that Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her, but she still persists.

Lysander is a fool because he persuades Hermia to avoid death and run away with him. Hermia must marry Demetrius or she will be put to death. (I i,line 83-88) Theseus says, “Take time to pause, and, by the next new moon- The sealing-day betwixt my love and me, For everlasting bond fellowship- Upon that day either prepare to die For disobedience to your father’s will, Or else to wed Demetrius, as he would,” Hermia does not love Demetrius.

I i,line 140) Hermia says, “O hell! To choose love by another’s eyes. ” Hermia loves Lysander. (I i,line 150-155) “If then true lovers have been ever crossed, It stands as an edict in destiny. Then let us teach or trial patience, Because it is a customary cross, As due to love, as thoughts and dreams and sighs, Wishes and tears, poor fancy’s followers. ” Lysander has an alternative idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, “I have a widow aunt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child; >From Athens is her house remote seven leagues. (I i,line 164- 165) “Steal forth thy ather’s house tomorrow night, And in the wood, a league without the town. ”

Lysander is a fool because he convinces Hermia to risk death and run away with him. Hermia is a fool because she risks death for love. Hermia is to marry Demetrius, or be put to death. (I i,line 95-98) Egeus says, “Scornful Lysander, true, he hath my love, And what is mine my love shall render him. And she is mine, and all my right of her I do estate unto Demetrius. ” Lysander suggests an idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, “A good persuasion. Therefore her me, Hermia.

I have a unt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child;” Hermia agrees with the idea. (I i,line 168-169) Hermia says, “My good Lysander, I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow,” (I i,line 178) “Tomorrow truly will I meet thee. ” Hermia is a fool because she is risking death for the love of Lysander. Therefore this proves, the four teenage lovers are fools. (VI i, Theseus states) “Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. ” William Shakespeare’s A Midsummers Night’s Dream shows how childishly foolish lovers can be.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Theseus as the Voice of Reason

In his play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Shakespeare, clearly establishes the feelings of Theseus with respect to love. Theseus expresses his doubt in the verisimilitude of the lover’s recount of their night in the forest. He says that he has no faith in the ravings of lovers- or poets-, as they are as likely as madmen are to be divorced from reason. Coming, as it does, after the resolution of the lovers’ dilemma, this monologue serves to dismiss most of the play a hallucinatory imaginings.

Theseus is the voice of reason and authority but, he bows to the resulting change of affection brought about by the night’s confused goings on, and allows Hermia, Lysander, Helena and Demetrius to marry where their hearts would have them. This place where the line between dream and reality blurs is an important theme of the play. Theseus is also a lover, but his affair with Hippolyta is based upon the cold reality of war, “Hippolyta, I wooed thee with my sword, And won thy love doing thee injuries… “(I,i,16-17).

He is eager to wed Hippolyta and marriage is the place where reason and judgment rule. He wins the hand of his bride through action not through flattery, kisses and sighs inspired by her beauty. In lines 4-6 of his monologue he dismisses the accounts of lovers and madmen on the grounds that they are both apt to imagine a false reality as being real. When, in I,i,56, Hermia tells Theseus, “I would my father looked but with my eyes”, Theseus responds, “Rather your eyes must with his judgment look. “(57). Theseus has a firm belief that the eyes of lovers are not to be trusted.

That the eye of the lover “… Sees Helen’s beauty in a brow of Egypt… “(11) is, to him, proof of this. It precisely by enchanting the eyes of the lovers that the faeries manage to create so much mayhem: “Flower of this purple dye, hit with cupid’s archery, sink in apple of his eye! When his love he doth espy, let her shine as gloriously as the Venus of the sky. “(III,ii,101-7) Puck doesn’t change Helena’s nature, nor does he change her features. When Lysander wakes, he beholds the same Helena that he’s always despised and suddenly he is enthralled.

For Theseus this is merely caprice and in no means grounded in reality. Theseus doubts even the existence of the faeries, believing the lovers have, at a loss to explain the inexplicable changes of heart they’ve experienced, dreamed them up: “And as imagination bodies forth the forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen turns them into shapes and gives to airy nothing a local habitation and a name. “(14-17) A trick of the light, an abundance of shadows, lack of sleep, an overactive imagination or any one of these or million other causes are the most likely explanation.

In equating lovers, poets and lunatics Theseus gets into interesting territory and serves to elevate lovers while he denounces them. The lunatic “… sees more devils than vast hell can hold.. while the poet’s eye “… Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven… “(9-13); thus this same imagination is responsible for both mad ravings and great art. The concrete reality of earth co-exists with both heaven and hell as the Faerie world co-exists with the mortal world. A poet could, just as easily, be a lunatic depending on the nature of his visions.

That lover’s are often (bad) poets, is prime example of this interchangeability. “Such tricks hath strong imagination, that, if it would but apprehend a joy, it comprehends some bringer of that joy; or in the night imagining some fear, how easy is a bush supposed a bear! “(18-22) Theseus describes the faulty and incomplete reasoning employed by poets and lovers alike. Given evidence of some thing, conclusions are made as to the nature of that thing. This usually incorrect conclusion, having been reached, is followed by madcap mix-ups and hilarity- at least for the audience.

While distrusting the nature of love and its effect on people, Theseus also recognizes the salutary effect it has, as Demetrius and Lysander, once bitter foes, present themselves to him as friends. He allows the lovers to marry according to their affection and betrays his own affection and appreciation for the intoxicating draught called love, “Here come the lovers, full of joy and mirth. Joy, gentle friends, go and fresh days of love accompany your hearts! “(V,i,28-30)

Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

In Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” the mortal teenage characters fall in love foolishly, and the character Bottom states, “O what fools these mortals be”. They are foolish because they act like children. Although Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena appear grown-up, when they are in love they act foolishly. The four teenage lovers are fools. Demetrius is a fool because he is unaware that his love changes through out the play. At the start of the play Demetrius does not love Helena. (II ii,line 188) Demetrius says, “I love thee not, therefore pursue me not.

“Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more. ” In III ii, Demetrius after being juiced begins to love Helena. (III ii,line 169-173) Demetrius says, “Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none. If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone. My heart to her but as guest- wise sojourned, And now to Helen is it home returned, There to remain. ” This proves he is a fool, because he is not aware of his changing love for Helena. Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her but she still persists in chasing him. Demetrius shows no love for Helena.

Demetrius says, “I’ll run from thee, and hide me in the brakes, And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. ” (II i,line 199-201) “Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth Tell you I do not, nor I cannot love you? ” Demetrius clearly illustrates to Helena that he has no interest, but Helena persists. (II i,line 202-204) Helena says, “And even for that do I love you the more. I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius, The more you beat me, I will fawn on you. ” (II i,line 220-222) “Your virtue is my privilege. For that It is not night when I do see your face,

Therefore I think I am not in the night;” This proves that Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her, but she still persists. Lysander is a fool because he persuades Hermia to avoid death and run away with him. Hermia must marry Demetrius or she will be put to death. (I i,line 83-88) Theseus says, “Take time to pause, and, by the next new moon- The sealing-day betwixt my love and me, For everlasting bond fellowship- Upon that day either prepare to die For disobedience to your father’s will, Or else to wed Demetrius, as he would,” Hermia does not love Demetrius.

Hermia says, “O hell! To choose love by another’s eyes. ” Hermia loves Lysander. (I i,line 150-155) “If then true lovers have been ever crossed, It stands as an edict in destiny. Then let us teach or trial patience, Because it is a customary cross, As due to love, as thoughts and dreams and sighs, Wishes and tears, poor fancy’s followers. ” Lysander has an alternative idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, “I have a widow aunt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child; From Athens is her house remote seven leagues. (I i,line 164- 165)

“Steal forth thy ather’s house tomorrow night, And in the wood, a league without the town. ” Lysander is a fool because he convinces Hermia to risk death and run away with him. Hermia is a fool because she risks death for love. Hermia is to marry Demetrius, or be put to death. (I i,line 95-98) Egeus says, “Scornful Lysander, true, he hath my love, And what is mine my love shall render him. And she is mine, and all my right of her I do estate unto Demetrius. ” Lysander suggests an idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, “A good persuasion.

Therefore her me, Hermia. I have a unt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child;” Hermia agrees with the idea. (I i,line 168-169) Hermia says, “My good Lysander, I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow,” (I i,line 178) “Tomorrow truly will I meet thee. ” Hermia is a fool because she is risking death for the love of Lysander. Therefore this proves, the four teenage lovers are fools. (VI i, Theseus states) “Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. ” William Shakespeare’s A Midsummers Night’s Dream shows how childishly foolish lovers can be.

Waking Up from a Midsummer Nights Dream

As with every play we read this quarter, we started A Midsummer Night s Dream with only a text. Reading the script is the foundation of Shakespeare, and the least evolved of the ways that one can experience it. There is no one to interpret the words, no body movement o! r voice inflection to indicate meaning or intention. All meaning that a reader understands comes from the words alone. The simplicity of text provides a broad ground for imagination, in that every reader can come away from the text with a different conception of what went on.

The words are merely the puzzle pieces individuals put together to bring coherence and Although we all read generally the same words, we can see that vastly different plays arise depending on who interprets them. By interpreting the word-clues that Shakespeare wrote into the script to direct the performance of the play, we were able to imagine gestures, expressions, and movements appropriate to the intention of the playwright. An example of this can be seen in the different Romeo and Juliets: Luhrman clearly had a more modern vision after reading the script than did Zeffirelli did only 18 years before.

The live performance at the CalPoly theatre also carried ! with it a very ifferent feel less intense, more child-like and sweet with nearly the same words. Reading also affects our experience in that without the text, we would most likely not be able to enjoy Shakespeare at all; having the text makes Shakespeare widely accessible (available for free on the web) to all that desire it. Once the script is obtained, anyone can perform Shakespeare even everyday, non-actor citizens put on Shakespeare whether it be in parks, at school, or in a forest.

My experience reading Shakepearean plays has shown me that reading is necessary and fundamental part of grasping the fullness of the works. I had wanted to read A Midsummer Night’s Dream for quite some time. Besides being a play by Shakespeare, I believe my desire to do so came from seeing bits and pieces of it done in Hollywood movies like Dead Poet’s Society. I didn’t realize how much small exposures like! those could cause me to prejudge the actual text; after I had read the play for myself I was surprised at how much the text differed from my expectations.

Not knowing the whole of the plot, but rather only bits and pieces, I expected a play filled with fairy dust and pixy-women toe-dancing, laughing, with flowers everywhere, or something like Hylas nd the nymphs. What I did not expect was a group of rag-tag laborers putting on a play, young females catfighting over their men, or Titania being “enamored of an ass. ” (Act IV, Scene i, MND) Even with surprises, though, the text by itself held little detail and richness in my mind.

I thought it a decent play, but certainly nothing like I had hoped, and I didn’t feel involved in it or connected to it in any way. One of the things that did impressed me, though, was finding out for myself how accessible Shakespeare actually is. When it came time for me to learn my lines for Philostrate (MND), I copied them from a site on the nternet which posted the text in its entirety. I realized the! n how lucky we are that plays like these survived through the ages, sometimes probably making it from one hand to the next in a form no better than the paperback I carried in my bag.

Through my reading, the importance of the text was impressed upon me, and I feel that I have gained a new appreciation for the lasting and foundational qualities of pure script. Viewing a play adds a kind of second dimension to a textual reading. While our primary impressions of a Shakespearean play are established with the initial reading, those impressions are challenged hen we come into contact with a play performed. At this point we have a first hand contrast between how we felt and how someone else felt about the same play.

Once we have sampled another’s interpretations we necessarily question ourselves on what we would have done differently, had we directed the play. Perhaps something we expected to see on stage was omitted; perhaps! something unusual was added. We might even sample the same play dozens of times, all performed by different companies; it is common, it is even expected, that none of the twelve interpretations will be much the same. Unlike with reading, with viewing we are not llowed to sample the play in whatever manner we want. As the audience, our experiences are directed.

We must resign ourselves to be the two-hour subject of another’s whims and methods. is usually very enlightening, bringing new thoughts and perspectives where we would otherwise have only our own. These new thoughts and perspectives often materialize in the form of visual and auditory details, mostly because the script stays generally the same. Viewing an actual performance adds depth and detail to what was before only words. We are given scenery, costumes, voices, faces, body movements, and other orms of physical (rather than verbal) expression that contribute to a particular feel.

These types of details are in reality just instances of the direct! or s influence, interpretations and preferences that cause us to challenge our initial ideas, and accept us a possibly richer taste of Because I was involved in two scenes of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, viewing this play on film held particular interest for me. I often found myself looking to the films for ideas on how to play a character, or a scene. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately, for originality’s sake), neither of the films we reviewed portrayed A Midsummer Night’s

Dream in a way that particularly struck me. The 1935 Reinhardt edition seemed to me overdone in nearly every respect. The characters were much too Roman, the actresses quite over-dramatic, the fairies and black-winged bats far too many in number, and the movie, in general, way too long. The author of “Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle’s A Midsummer Night s Dream” described it well as, “a vast! balletic-operatic extravaganza with huge casts, elaborate scenery, and lavish costumes. (37, Jorgens)

Overall it was a very large film. The BBC version, on the other hand, erred in the opposite. It was slow, elatively unemotional, and somewhat difficult to watch. After viewing both these versions, I realized that my perceptions of the text were much different than either of the films. I wanted something more normal, less mystical, more possible however, the time for me to voice This third dimension of experiencing Shakespeare comes only when a reader-turned-viewer decides to become the actor.

This aspect of the Shakespearean experience is nearly the only of the three mentioned that supports and encourages open creativity and self-expression. Now our questions of, “what would I have done differently” have a chance to be nswered. It is in the acting that the text becomes less detached from us, becoming more our own. We are no longer in ! the passive mode, but the active. Now, we wait for no one, cut lines if we like, say it fast, draw it out. There are few, if any, limits to how a play can be done.

Performing brings one’s original, textual conceptions in synergy with those viewed of others, creating a play that is both wholly collage, and wholly new. The play begins to conform to what we, as individuals, perceive to be the best or most right interpretation of the text. After viewing the two film versions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, I envisioned something much more casual and lighthearted, even funny, for our own performance of Act III, Scene ii. Because of this, and probably because of the nature of the cast in general, our group took on a more youthful, somewhat ridiculous approach to the play.

Demetrius was played by a woman, Lysander dressed in ruffles and knickers, Helena victimized and “shrewish” to the extreme, and Hermia was more often than not stepping into violen! ce. Nevertheless, in some ways we found ourselves doing exactly the things that we saw in the films. For example, once performing, it was not difficult to see elements of the haracters we play in us; specifically, we more often than not felt and appeared like the “Rude Mechanicals. ”

We were not unlike them, coming together with nothing but a script, none of us actors. Heather the Grant Writer, Tricia the Administrator, Giselle the Grader, Matt the Director, all of us students. ) Beginning with nothing but bare Shakepearean text, we assigned roles, gave out scripts, rehearsed, and At Swanton Ranch, “The Dream Team” stood in a forest to practice our play, hearing Puck recite, “A crew of patches, rude mechanicals, that work for bread upon Athenian stalls, were met together o rehearse a play. ” (Act III, Scene ii, MND) We were much the same. We even had some hard-hat rude mechanicals accidentally appear in the background as we spoke!

Even before we arrived, though, a place was sought out f! or us, our director no doubt having thoughts much like these: “Pat, pat; and here’s a marvail’s convenient place for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our stage, this hawthorn brake our tiring house. ” (Act III, Scene i, MND) Once done, like the lovers in the scene, we return to the real world, away from the forest, back to the realities of work and school: “When they next wake, all this erision shall seem a dream and fruitless vision, and back to Athens shall the lovers go. ” (Act III, Scene ii, MND) And so we did.

Although we for the most part succeeded in building our own version of the play, some similarities like these could not be escaped: I could not help but notice that the actions taken in the play were mirroring what Through Shakespeare s ability to create a-play-within-a-play-within-a-play, I found being a rude mechanical broadening to my overall impressions of the play-buildi! ng experience. Seeing our forest performance on film gave an entirely different perspective still. Some members of the faculty, some friends, and some strangers came to our screening to see the fruit of our creative weekend in Swanton Ranch.

We put a lot of time and practice into our scene, making sure that we had our lines, that they flowed right, that we looked right. We brought the scenes from just a text, clear through to performance, and were now able to look back over the whole creative process. In the theatre, however, just before our showing, our “performance” somehow seemed less serious to me. I was so afraid that we were all going to embarrass ourselves! The lines I said when I was Philostrate suddenly came back to me. No, my noble lord, it is not for you.

I have heard it over, and it is nothing, nothing in the world; unless you can find sport in their intents, extremely stretched and conned with cruel pain, to do you service. (Act V, Scene i, MND) Much like Bottom’s company, we were good not because of any phenomenal talent, but because we tried, because we were simple people trying to do Shakespeare. Like them, we were not actors, but were still able to experience the fullness of the creative process, bringing to fruition our own comedic rendition of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

I believe that it is not by accident that our play turned out as t did. It could not be but that Shakepeare intended for us, the actors, to relate to Bottom s company, to everyone who ever put on A Midsummer Night s Dream or any other production. This is part of Shakepeare s genius: to be able to write into the play a reflection of ourselves, to see our own creative processes being mirrored by those of the characters we coarsely attempt to play.

Even now, when the actual performance of our scene is over, I look back through the t! xt and still see my group in it: when I read the word, Demetrius, I no longer picture the old Demetrius I first imagined, or even those I saw n film. Now I see Tricia in her funny pseudo-masculine hat. The play has somehow become ours. Even if we hadn t put on the play, though, and felt none of it for ourselves, reading about the rude mechanicals and their creative process gives a reader valuable insight. Shakespeare did not just hand down to us a script, expecting the layman to figure out how to make it happen.

Instead, it is as if he included his own little instruction manual in the play, teaching all who will learn to bring it from the mere green text to the ripe fruit of performance. The class in retrospect was a very good experience. Before the uarter began, when I first learned that our class would be taking a field trip together, I was hesitant. I wasn’t sure that I wanted to spend a weekend away from home, in ! a cabin in the hills with my Shakespeare class. I was not convinced that it would be more than an uncomfortable experience.

I didn’t at all expect what actually came out of it, something that I praise God so much for, which had virtually nothing to do with Shakespeare at all. The contact that I had with my group has become invaluable to me this quarter. I got to know people that weekend that I otherwise would hardly have talked to had I not been equired to spend so much time outside of class with them. Tricia, Giselle, Matt and I are good friends; how could we be otherwise when we rehearsed together so often, rode 8 hours in the car together, left Matt’s clothes behind, shopped the sales together at Macy’s, ate meals, and hiked 20 minutes into the forest together?

I learned about three people who share my faith, shared a candy bar with Joel, and did my classmates’ dishes. I saw them from morning to evening in lights and places so different from the norm. They seem to me pe! ople now, and friends, not just bodies with mouths in chairs. par Besides being urely social, going to Swanton Ranch really opened up my educational experience. Although our actual film isn’t going to win any Academy Awards, it felt like we were doing something real, and not just commenting on everyone else’s work.

The air was great, the change was great, and bringing a play from text to performance gave me a whole new attitude towards theatrics in general. I learned how much work goes into doing even just a scene, how many elements there are to look after, and how much effort it takes to make everything look somewhat believable and real. Being at the end of the process now, being able to see where e started from clear through to the finish, I feel like my understanding of Shakespeare has really broadened.

Not so much Shakespeare himself, of course, but rather what he did, what he tried to accomplish; I have a much greater sense of what all actors and crew go through to put a play together, text to performance, start to ! finish. There is a small part of me that wants to keep doing Shakespeare, to do all of the play, or at least do it again. Another part of me, the more persuasive and logical part, wants to just keep it all right where it is in my mind, remembering it fondly, as A Dream.

Midsummer Nights Dream And Love

What Makes Us Love? What makes us love? This question has been studied for centuries by philosophers, scientists, and even writers in search of a sensible answer. Shakespeare, for one, explored many ideas to justify love. In his play, A Midsummers Night Dream, he lists various thoughts on what he thinks causes people to love. Some are overwhelmingly ridiculous, while others make some sense. One of his far-fetched answers as to how people fall in love was Cupid. He believed Cupid would shoot his arrows of love into individuals, and they would magically fall for the next person they saw. Cupid all armed.

A certain aim he took/At a fair vestal throned by the west,/ and loosed his love-shaft smartly from his bow (2. 1. 163-65). After the shot, the person wouldnt know what hit them. He intertwines this thought with the concept that one falls in love after looking in anothers eyes. After missing a shot, one of Cupids arrows hit a flower, tainting it with his powers to make people fall in love. When placed in a persons eyes, they will be infatuated with the next thing they see. For example, after being placed in his Lysanders eyes, is immense love for Hermia grows weak with just one look into Helenas eyes.

Shakespeares thought here is that eyes have all the power over who we fall for. Do not misunderstand him, though. His usage of this enchanting juice is not to be taken seriously. He is trying to make a point, and at that, a good one. Looking into someones eyes had a certain power over ones feelings. You just get a strong feeling in your heart. It is uncontrollable, and sometimes, it truly is one of the main reasons we fall in love. However, he contradicts himself in act one when Helena says, Love looks not with the eye, but with he mind (1. 1. 240).

He now states that the mind is what the person falls in love with, and not the eyes. It is true, however; you have to love a persons thoughts and ideas before you can feel that special passion for them. That is the key to true love. Although he had extremely different thoughts on the reasons we fall in love, they all made some sense. By contradicting his explanations, he, in my opinion, is making a point. Hes pointing out the fact that he, too, doesnt really know the answer to the question of what makes us love. And he knows that no one ever will.

“A Midsummer Nights Dream” Character Analysis

When we first meet Hermia she is the typical girl in love against her fathers wishes. Obviously we see from the start that she is very devoted to Lysander, her love, and she does not like to be forced to do things that she does not want. She does not want to marry Demetrius even though her father has pretty much told her it is that or death. Yes, she could always go live in a nunnery or live a life of chastity but who really wants that. So from the start we see that she is very adamant and very in love. Before going into Hermias inner self I must address her physical appearance.

She is Egeus daughter and she is a tiny woman with a dark completion. She is often mocked for this like when Helena and her were quarreling in the woods Hermia says this in regards to height “Now I perceive that she hath made compare between our statures: she hath urged her height, And with her personage, her tall personage, Her height, forsooth, she hath prevailed with him. ” (Act III Scene 2 Line 292). So obviously she is aware of her lack in height and it seems to cause her a bit of pain. Though Helena is taller than Hermia even she admits that Hermia has “sparkling eyes and a lovely voice”.

Hermia is very set in what she wants from the very first scene. She has eyes only for Lysander. So obviously she is very faithful. Even when faced with the decision her father gave her she did not waver for a second in her love for him. Throughout the story Hermias emotions were kind of tossed around and at one point she even says, ” Am I not Hermia? Are you not Lysander? (Act III Scene 2 line 274). So we see that she gets a little confused and a bit hurt when hurt feelings we cast aside. At that point in the story I think she lost a part of her self.

She had put a part of her self in side Lysander a he had just brushed it away. So when Lysander came back to her she then became herself again. So in that we see that she has intrusted herself in Lysander and had no doubt that he loved her. Boy did she get a slap in the face. Hermia is a very key figure in the story so she has relations with almost all the characters in the story. The first and most important relationship Hermia had was with the man she loved, Lysander. From the start we see that Hermia loved Lysander with all her heart and he loved her the same in return.

The only time that there was a flaw in their relationship was when Puck put the magic into Lysander’s eyes and he fell in love with Helena. Hermia had very right to be mad and to feel rejected. But once Puck straightened out his goof up their relationship went back to the euphoric state like before. The next relationship is that of Helenas and Hermias. These two grew up together and were probably extremely close all their life. Then they hit womanhood and there it went crazy. Hermia was loved by everyone including Demetrius, the one Helena wanted. So obviously Helena was jealous and she had a right to be.

So at this point in their lives there was a major strain in their relationship. In the end though it all turns out all right. Both of them are with who they want to be with. Hermia and Egues relationship is that of a typical father-daughter relationship. Egues only wants the best for is daughter and Hermia is only thinking about her own welfare. She loves Lysander and her father does not think he is the best man to marry his little girl. So as for that their relationship is completely healthy. Hermia just says ” I would my father looked but with my eyes. ” (Act I Scene 1 line 56). But fathers can definitly be that way at times.

They see what they want to see. Hermia and Demetrius are only but members in the same love triangle. There is truly no hope that Hermia will ever love Demetrius in return unless Puck comes along with his magic flower. So as far as that goes unless magic is involve there is really no hope. Hermia is very sure of who she loves. Overall Hermia was very true to her emotions. She new what she wanted and eevn in the face of losing the love of her life she stayed strong yet hot tempered about the whole thing. Amazingly enough through out all the confusion Hermia stayed very much in control.

Love in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Love is defined as a strong affection, attachment, or devotion to a person or persons. Many people tend to think that if you are young , you cannot possibly be in love at thee same time. It is believed that especially when you are in your teenage year that you are too young to know whether or not you are really in love, but who can really say that they know the true meaning of love whether they are young or old. Despite all of this, there are still those people out there that believe in love at first sight and love being blind.

In William Shakespears play A Midsummer Nights Dream he tells the story of four young Athenian teens who fall in love with each other, the queen of the fairies who falls in love with a man who has the head of a donkey, and the queen of the Amazons who falls in love with the duke of Athens who captures her from the rest of the Amazons. Sight plays a significant role to the to all of these circumstances that occur within the story. Demetrius, Helena, Lysander, and Hermia are the for young teens of the story. At the beginning of the play it is Lysander and Helena who are madly in love, and are planning to to escape from Athens to elope.

Helena is in love with Demetrius, and Demetrius cared for Helena and liked her a lot but was not in love with her. As soon as Demetrius sees Hermia he immediately stops having any feelings for Helena whatsoever and is deeply in love with Hermia. Demetrius thought that he had fallen in love at first sight, but Helena was determined to show him differently. Demetrius: Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit,/ For I am sick when I do look on thee. Helena: And I am sick when I look not on you. (Act II, sc. lines 218-220)

This piece of dialogue shows how much Demetrius is now in love with Hermia from just seeing her, and how disgusted he feels when he looks upon Helena who he used to care about. Helena is simply just expressing how much she is love with Demetrius and how bad she feels that he is treating her in such a manner of hatred. Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind;/ And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind. / Nor hath Loves mind of any judgment taste. / Wings, and no eyes, figure unheedy taste. (Act I, sc. i, lines 240-243) Helena is implying here that since Cupid is blind that automatically makes love blind.

When Oberon tries to make Demetrius fall back in love with Hermia he orders his servant Puckto pour the nectar of the flower into Demetrius eyes to make him fall in love with the first thing that he sees. Puck ends up putting the juice in Lysanders eyes, and has to then correct things by adding the nectar juice into Demetrius eyes and then reapplying it to Lysanders eyes. Applying the nectar juice into the eyes of these young Athenians is interfering with their vision to make them believe that they are really in love with the first thing that they see. And with the juice of this Ill streak her eyes/ And make her full of hateful fantasies.

When Oberon is saying this to Puck he is telling him what the flower juice does to the persons eyes which whom it is anointed on. He is saying that he wants Puck to anoint Titania with the nectar juice to make her have hateful fantasies with the first ugly animal that comes along. Titania falling in love with Bottom who had the head of a donkey is showing the effect that the nectar juice has, how it made her blind and she was able to fall in love with bottom no matter what he looked like. In this play A Midsummer Nights Dream William Shakespeare makes the significance of sight to become so important within the story.

I believe that the reason for this is because the first time you meet a person, your first impression of them is what you see with your eyes. I think that Shakespeare was trying to show us that there is no real such thing as love at first sight unless there is some type of magic involved. This goes back to what the definition of love is, how could anybody possibly be attached to a person so much, and be willing to devote themselves entirely to a person that they have only seen, and you know nothing about their personality. Love is something that develops over time is something that she cherished and not taken advantage of once it is gained.

Character Analysis of Demetrius in A Midsummer Nights Dream by William Shakespeare

A Midsummer Nights Dream is one of Shakespeares most read plays this romantic comedy illustrates how complicated love ties can be. Thesis: In this play one of the characters that catches the eye of the reader is Demetrius, his character is really difficult to identify except by his relation to the one he loves, or even more, to the one who loves him. Helena the character in love with Demetrius and her unjustified pursue for his love is the only clue or mark for his character.

Under the undesirable pressure of this unwanted charm that she has for his love, he turns violent and threatens her with bodily harm, coming off as not quite the loving person he truly means to be. It is easy to perceive how he is distracted from the one he loves Hermia because of Helenas hard headed actions in the beginning. He could be a gentle loving man if he truly desired, but he takes satisfaction being put in his place by others. In the end, still under the spell of fairy magic and therefore not seeing with true eyes, he seems a bit imbecilic launching at the acted “lovers” in the play.

He doesnt realize it, but he is in a play of its own. Likewise, as with the other characters, what happens to him is far more interesting than the sort of character he is. His character is very limited during the first act, this means that he cant stand up for himself, also displays lack of self confidence, insecurity perhaps because of the presence of his father. The reader may implies that Demetrius thoughts were that because he had the approval of the duke Egeus, Hermia should give herself up to him and disapprove Lysander, the one she loves.

Demetrius took advantage of his social stature by claiming Hermia as the one for him, which truly portrays his instability. At the same time, this showed that he loves Hermia. It is know that he is supported by Egeus because of the relationship with Demetrius dad, hateful Lysander opposes saying that she loves him and no other. Egeus decides that Demetrius is the one that deserves Hermia at this point, his ego shows uplifted and looks down on to Lysander projecting an inferior state.

During the love trial Demetrius demoralizes Helena by almost laughing at her deep ridicule feelings she has for him: Ill run from thee and hide me in the breaks and leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. (Demetrius, 2. 1. 234-235) Helena could crash on her bike and die on the very next moment and he would not care about it. Thorough the whole play he takes advantage of any situation that he thinks may benefit him everything like when Lysander was missing: I had rather give his luck to my hounds ………… and if I could, what should I get there for says to Hermia, A privileged never to see more.

And from thy hated presence I see me no more, whether he be dead or no. (Hermia, 3. 2. 81-83). This awful conversation shows that he has a very demoralizing personality and disrespects Lysander he doesnt realize that at this point Hermia doesnt feel comfortable with any aspect of his personality she dislikes him and doesnt want to see him ever again, inadvertly he comes across as the main reason why Lysander is missing, Hermia automatically thinks of him as the murderer of Lysander: It cannot be but thou hast murdered him.

So should a murderer look, so dead so grim. (Hermia, 3. 2. 58-59). During these events Helena still persists in gaining Demetrius love, instead he still lowers her, but this time he drowns her and she cannot surface again: You do impeach your modesty too much to leave the city and commit yourself into the hands of one that loves you not, to trust the opportunity of night and the ill counsel of a desert place with the rich worth of your virginity. (Demetrius, 2. 1. 221-226). Helena blinded thinking in a different way accepts.

Demetrieus loves the external beauty ignoring what feelings are he is only concerned with sexual feelings on the other hand Lysander is more concerned with inner feelings beauty. Demetrius enjoys fighting with women it makes him feel flattered by the attraction during the fight this can be due to the relationship with his dad which is not really touched but only in the beginning of act I, he also makes reference to his high political stature and states and that because of this Hermia is his, in contrast Lysander is emotional with pure feelings. III Demetrius personality and emotions

Helena and Demetrius meet more than once, the second time in the woods this time it seems that he is trying to put an end to his situation regarding her: Stay, though thou kill me, sweet Demetrius. Demetrius: I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus. Helena: O, wilt thou darkling leave me? Do not so. Demetrius: Stay on thy peril. I alone will go. (2. 2. 90-93) It is really doubtful that he loved Helena while trying to get Hermias love. He tears her heart showing a heartless personality: I love thee not; therefore pursue thee not… Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more.

Tell you I do not, nor I cannot love you? (Demetrius, 2. 1. 195-208) Demetrious is a less poetic and romantic figure, which is based on his perception of women, violent and unchivalrous. When he shakes off Helena, he portrays a person without charm: Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth… Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit, for I am sick when I do look on thee. (Demetrius, 2. 1. 206-219). Hermia completely erased him out of her life this makes him really feel sorrow so he decides no to peruse her anymore so he decides to give some time thinking that she would miss him.

Demetrius under a spell does a complete 360* and the effect of this love spell now shuts Hermia completely out of his life: Lysander, keep thy Hermia. I will none. If I loved her, all that love is gone. My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourned, and now to Helen is it home returned, there to remain. (Demetrius, 3. 2. 172-176). Demetrius immediately becomes extremely violent toward lysander: I say I love thee more than he can do. (Demetrius,3. 2. 261) he has no reason because he now loves Hermia so Helena asks him to prove him self: If thou say so withdraw and prove it too. (Lysander, 3. 2. 2) this finally makes Demetrius follow his instincts and he finally realizes that he really wanted Hermia but couldnt stand high enough to be her loved one.

In conclusion Demetrius personality is the type that when wants something will do anything to get it, even if it includes manipulating, hurting or going over every obstacle until achieving it. In this play he experiences reality and illusion, change and transformation and it keeps the reader in close attention of his character. He is an important part of this play without his character the play would be dull and the plot unflavorfull.

Shakespeare’s Comedy vs. Tragedy

Certain parallels can be drawn between William Shakespeare’s plays, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, and “Romeo and Juliet”. These parallels concern themes and prototypical Shakespearian character types. Both plays have a distinct pair of lovers’, Hermia and Lysander, and Romeo and Juliet, respectively. Both plays could have also easily been tragedy or comedy with a few simple changes. A tragic play is a play in which one or more characters is has a moral flaw that leads to his/her downfall. A comedic play has at least one humorous character, and a successful or happy ending.

Comparing these two plays is useful to find how Shakespeare uses similar character types in a variety of plays, and the versatility of the themes which he uses. In “Romeo and Juliet”, Juliet is young, “not yet fourteen”, and she is beautiful, and Romeo’s reaction after he sees her is, “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear Beauty to rich for use, for the earth too dear! ” Juliet is also prudent, “Although I joy in thee, I have no joy in this contract tonight. It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden.

She feels that because they have just met, they should abstain from sexual intercourse. Hermia is also young, and prudent. When Lysander suggests that “One turf shall serve as a pillow for both of us, One heart, one bed, two bosoms, and one troth,” Hermia replies “Nay, good Lysander. For my sake, my dear, Lie further off yet; do not lie so near. ” Although this couple has known each other for a while (Romeo and Juliet knew each other for one night when the above quote was spoken), Hermia also abstains from even sleeping near Lysander even hough she believes he does not have impure intentions.

Romeo’s and Juliet’s families are feuding. Because of these feuds, their own parents will not allow the lovers to see each other. In the a differnet way Hermia is not allowed to marry Lysander. Hermia’s father Egeus says to Theseus, Duke of Athens, “Full of vexation come I, with complaint Against my child, my daughter Hermia. Stand fourth, Demetrius. My noble lord, This man hath my consent to marry her. Stand forth, Lysander. And, my gracious Duke, This man hath bewitched the bosom of my child. ”

Egeus tells the Duke that his daughter can marry Demetrius, not Lysander. Hermia replies “. . . If I refuse to wed Demetrius,” Egeus replies “Either to die the death, or to abjure for ever the society of men. ” If Hermia does go against her father’s wishes, and weds Lysander, she will either be put to death, or be forced to become a nun. Both pairs of lovers also seek help from another. Juliet and Romeo seek Friar Lawrence, and Lysander and Hermia seek Lysander’s aunt, who lives in the woods near Athens. Both sets of youths have the same character type.

They are young, their love is prohibited, both women are prudent, and both seek the help of an adult. Yet they have their subtle differences. For example, Lysander, never mentioned a love before Hermia. Romeo loved Rosaline, before he loved Juliet. Hermia’s family and Lysander’s family were not feuding, whereas the Montagues’ and Capulets’ feude was central to the plot of the play. The stories of “Romeo and Juliet” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” are very different however. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is a comedy.

Oberon, king of he fairies, sends a mischievous imp named, Puck, to play a trick on the queen of the fairies, Titania, and on a pair of Athenian youth. Puck turns Nick Bottom’s head into that of an ass (Nick Bottom is the man in the play production within “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”; he tried to play every part), and places an herb on Titania that causes her to fall in love with him. This is quite humorous. However, at the end of the play all the couples are back together, with the ones they love. Thus Lysander and Hermia do get married.

If Egeus had showed up at the edding, he could have killed her. Egeus’ dominate nature is his flaw’, and if he would have attended the wedding, and killed his daughter, this play could have been a tragedy. Likewise, “Romeo and Juliet”, could have been a comedy. The first two acts of this play qualifies it as a comedy. In act I, Sampson and Gregory, servants of the Capulets, “talk big about what they’ll do the Montagues, make racy comments, and insult each other as often as they insult the Montagues. ” (“Barron’s, 45). In act II, Romeo meets Juliet.

All is going well until Tybalt, a Capulet kills Romeo’s est friend, Mercutio. Things go continue to go wrong from here, until at the end of the play Romeo, thinking that Juliet is dead (she is in fact alive, she took a drug to fake her death), drinks poison, and when Juliet awakens from the spell of the drug, seeing her dead lover, stabs herself. If the families’ pride had not been so great that they would murder one another, or prohibited true love, this play could have been a comedy. This play is a tragedy, not because one character has a flaw, but both families have a flaw- pride.

The Realm of Imagination

In A Midsummer Nights Dream, Shakespeare uses the green world and its inhabitants as a symbol of imagination. The characters flee from reality to escape the laws that govern everyday life in Athens. The importance of imagination reveals itself when the constraints of everyday life are lost in this realm. The fact that actors fall asleep multiple times reinforces Shakespeares allusion to an escape from reality. Fairies playfully create a magical scene creating a suspension of disbelief for the actors as well as the audience.

The problems that these characters face are remedied because of the ability of the mind to create this mythical world. Harmony is restored to the characters lives because of their ability to bring fantasy into reality. Shakespeare portrays the power of the imagination as humanitys most divine quality because it allows one to embrace a realm outside of this world and allows one envision fantasy. In Athens, laws of the society threaten the characters freedom. The sharp Athenian law pursues these characters and causes them to escape into the forest.

Lysander states, From Athens her house remote seven leagues;/ And she respects me as her only son. /There, gentle Hermia, may I marry thee, /And to that place the sharp Athenian law/ Cannot pursue us. (I. i. 156) Here, Lysander suggests to Hermia that the two of them retreat from society to escape from the law that binds them. Shakespeare uses the forest to represent the human imagination, which is manifested in the ability to dream. He focuses upon the abilities of the human mind to temporarily escape the harsh rules of society. The rules of society do not govern their actions as long as they are in the forest.

Helena and Demetrius retreat into the woods, yet these characters are not led into the realm of imagination to escape the persecution of society. Unlike Hermia and Lysander, Demetrius and Helena retreat into the forest because of their infatuation with others. Helena is infatuated with Demetrius, who is infatuated with Hermia. Helena lures Demetrius into the forest by telling him about Hermia and Lysanders plans. Helena states, I will go tell him of Hermias flight. /Then to the wood will he tomorrow night /Pursue her(I. i 246) Both characters flee into imagination because their love is not returned to themselves.

They flee into the forest into the realm of chaos and dreams where everything is possible. The elements created within the forest bring the characters into harmony with each other. The fairies rule in the realm of imagination. They are mythical, elusive figures of the forest, responsible for creating illusion and fooling the humans. Oberon, the king of the fairies, is referred to as the king of shadows. This reference shows the elusive nature of the fairies, and their being. They are only a shadow of reality again the forest and fairies are seen elements of imagination.

Puck is a character referred to as a hobgoblin responsible for fooling humans to jest for Oberon. These characters enjoy the trickery done unto the humans, which can be used as a metaphor for imagination. Ones imagination is sometimes responsible for fooling ones self. The fairies are used to represent this aspect of imagination. A fellow fairy recognizes Puck and describes him as he /That frights maidens of the villagery, and sometimes labor in the quern, /And bootless make the breathless huswife churn, /And sometimes make the drink to bear no barm, /Mislead night wanderers, laughing at their harm.

II. i. 32) Puck is responsible for misleading humans and plays on their minds. The actions Puck is conducting are referred to as figments of imagination for which the fairies are said to be responsible. The fairies here bring magic to the humans in the forest when lovers become crossed in their paths. In the minds of the characters, the fairies in all of these cases have brought life to what is fantasy. The fairies, like dreams, have been able to create an alternate harmonious state for the characters by bringing life to the ordinary and mundane.

Though fairies exist in a world within the forest while the humans live in Athens on the outside of imagination, the lines between reality and imagination become blurred towards the end of the play. The fairies brought into the Athenian world to show its importance. Towards the close of the play, Thesius states, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact One sees more devils than hell can hold; That is the madman. The lover, all as frantic, Sees Helens beauty in a brow of Egypt. The poets eye, in a fine frenzy rolling,

Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poets pen Turns then to shapes and gives airy nothing A local habitation and a name. (V. i. 6) Here Shakespeare shows the importance of imagination with in society. Intense states of mentality possessed by people allow the outside world to be seen differently. Monotonous every day occurrences or appearances are shifted to become radical. Imagination is responsible for love, poetry, and madness, all of which create an essence of a different realm in society.

Imagination in A Midsummer Nights Dream allows an escape from society into fantasies. Dreams are what allow people to escape into heaven or hell, and therefore are ones most divine quality. Shakespeare portrays this to his audience by allowing the forest to represent the human ability to escape from the coldness of the world into the warmth and majesty of dreams. The ability of imagination is responsible for tricking people and leading one into tricking ones self. When imagination is recognized, monotony is lost and ones mind is brought to life.

The epic tale Midsummer Nights Dream

William Shakespeare intensifies the emotion of love and foolishness in the epic tale of four lovers and an enchanted forest in his classic Midsummer Nights Dream. Early in this work, we learn of two young maidens, Hermia and Helena, and their unfulfilled passions. Hermia, the daughter of a gentleman, is cast into the burden of marrying a suitor, Demetrius, chosen by her father for which she does not love. Instead, she has fallen for Lysander. To agitate further, Helena is madly in love with Demetrius, who treats her as if she does not exist.

As a result, Helenas emotions can be shared by everybody: infatuation, betrayal, ealousy, and spite. Therefore, it is Helenas character that answers to comedy as a tortured soul among lovers in fairyland. Everywhere in the play, Helena plays the victim of Demetrius apathy. We find pity for poor Helena when she finally catches up to Demetrius in the forest and says Ill follow thee and make a heaven of hell, to die upon the hand I love so well (336).

In desperation, Helena cries we cannot fight for love, as men may do; we should be wood and were not made to woo (336). So unrequited is her love that she begs him Stay, though thou kill me, sweet Demetrius (340). Helenas ealousy of her friend Hermia emerges from her soliloquy Happy is Hermia, wheresoeer she lies, for she hath blessed and attractive eyes (340). When she finally receives the attention and affection from Demetrius, she becomes mortified at the thought that Hermia and Demetrius have plotted to humiliate her even further by mocking her.

Helena vehemently protests O spite! O hell! I see you all are bent to set against me for your merriment (345). When she finally encounters Demetrius and Hermia, she questions the decency of their motives Have not set Demetrius, who even but now did spurn me with his foot, o call me goddess, nymph, divine and rare, precious, celestial? (346). Her torment is so real that she slowly embraces the fate of her existence. But fare ye well.

Tis partly my own fault, which death, or absence, soon shall remedy (346). Fortunately, as with all comedies during the Elizabethan era, the play ends and everything turns out exceptionally well (327). With the help of the fairies, Demetrius pairs with Helena and she becomes a tortured soul no more. The only question left to ponder is the view of humanity as seen in this play a just view of love or that of infatuation, lust, and merriment?

A Midsummer Night’s Dream character, Demetrius

A Midsummer Night’s Dream character, Demetrius is very difficult to identify except by his relation to the one he loves, or, more particularly, to the one who loves him. Helena’s ridiculous chasing after him and his irritation with her are the primary marks of his character. While in this uncharmed state, he even begins to threaten Helena with bodily harm, coming off as not quite the gracious courtly lover he truly means to be. It’s simple to discover his unchivalrous character by how easily his eye was distracted from Helena by Hermia in the beginning.

He could be a gentle, loving man if he truly desired, but he takes atisfaction being put in his place by others. In the end, still under the spell of fairy magic and therefore not seeing with true eyes, he seems a bit imbecilic laughing at the acted “lovers” in the play. He doesn’t realize it, but he is in a play of his own. Likewise, as with the other characters, what happens to him is far more interesting than the sort of character he is. I. Demetrius’ unwelcome deceit and shrewdness and what is discovered A.

Since Demetrius only has two lines throughout the entire first act, it shows that he can’t stand up for himself, likewise, this lack of speech displays his lack of self-confidence nd image: Relent, sweet Hermia, and, Lysander, yield Thy crazed title to my certain right. (Demetrius, 1. 1. 93-94) Demetrius believes that since he has Egeus’ approval, that Hermia should relinquish to him and states that Lysander is going against his privilege. B. Demetrius takes advantage of his stature by claiming Hermia as a right, which truly portrays his instability, but, at the same time shows that in true he loves Hermia.

It is absolutely obvious that he is well supported by Egeus: Scornful Lysander, true, he hath my love; And what is mine my love shall render him. And she is mine, and all my right of her I do estate unto Demetrius. (Egeus, 1. 1. 97-100) He depends on Egeus to display his affection and Egeus concludes by actually enforcing Demetrius’ love upon her. C. Initially in love with Hermia, he uses rudeness to ward off Helena’s “spaniel” affection, being very ruthless towards the feelings of Helena: I’ll run from thee and hide me in the brakes And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. Demetrius, 2. 1. 234-235)

He cares nothing even for her life and just absolutely crushing her dear emotions. D. It always seems that he is usually taking advantage of the ituations he is in, like when he tries to pursue Hermia due to Lysander’s absence, but uses harsh words: I had rather give his [Lysander] carcass to my hounds . . . . . . . . . . An if I could, what should Iget therefor? (Demetrius, 3. 2. 66,80) A privilege never to see me more. And from thy hated presence part I [so. ] See me no more, whether he be dead or no. Hermia, 3. 2. 81-83)

Demetrius displays his awful characteristics with such demoralizing words and complete disrespect for Lysander. He will desire any hopes of attaining her affection. She scorns him after hearing these words, never wanting him to see her again. E. Since Demetrius had indeed made some convincing threats of violence against his unwanted love, Hermia automatically suspects him for murdering Lysander: It cannot be but thou hast murdered him. So should a murderer look, so dead, so grim. (Hermia, 3. 2. 58-59)

Helena is so true to Demetrius, but he denounces her to a point of no return, threatening to rape her: You do impeach your modesty too much To leave the city and commit yourself Into the hands of one that loves you not, To trust the opportunity of night And the ill counsel of a desert place With the rich worth of your virginity. Demetrius, 2. 1. 221-226) This is such a tremendous insult and Helena accepts by “Your [Demetrius] virtue is my privilege. ” II. The Analogous, Yet Similar: Lysander and Demetrius A. Demetrius and Lysander are somewhat alike, lacking in individuality, virtually indistinguishable.

B. Demetrius only seems to love the external beauty of the women and doesn’t recognize the inner-beauty with true feelings. As opposed to from Lysander’s luring manner, which is based on internal emotions and tries his best to express with passionate words: How now, my love? Why is your cheek so pale? How chance the roses there do fade so fast? . . . . . . . . . . . The course of true love never did run smooth. (Lysander, 1. 1. 130-136) On the contrary, Demetrius is only sensitive to physical affection: An if I could, what should I get therefor? Demetrius, 3. 2. 80)

He is only concerned with what he can receive (SEX) from the pitiful relationship. C. These statements have also altered due to the circumstances of the characters. When Lysander and Hermia are in the woods alone, all he can think about is getting Hermia to come to bed with him. It is not as compulsive as desperate Demetrius, ut he gets put back in his place: Lysander: So that but one heart we can make of it; Two bosoms interchained with an oath– So then two bosoms and a single troth.

Then by your side no bed-room me deny, For lying so, Hermia, I do not lie. Hermia: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . But, gentle friend, for love and courtesy, Lie further off in human modesty. Such separation, as may well be said, Becomes a virtuous bachelor and a maid. So far be distant; and good night, sweet friend. Thy love ne’re alter till thy sweet life end! (2. 2. 51-66) Demetrius, even though under the influence of fairy magic, displays that he can e poetic and romantic, with a bit of a stretch: … O, how ripe in show Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!

That pure congealed white, high Taurus’ snow, Fanned with the eastern wind, turns to a crow When thou hold’st up the hand… (Demetrius, 3. 2. 142-146) D. Hollindale explains Demetrius’ unique characteristics, “Demetrius, in accepting the pattern of audible rhythmic completions, is participating with Helena in this quarrel. (2. 2. 90-93). This shows that he enjoys fighting with women and is somewhat flattered by their attraction to him! ” E. In Demetrius’ only in Act one, he refers to his laims to the public nature of Athenian citizenship.

He points out the political stature of his being that constitutes Hermia as his. Lysander’s affection, on the contrary, is a more purified, emotional one with true feelings flourishing. III. Demetrius’ Personality and Emotions (Not Under the Fairy Magic Flower) A. When Helena and Demetrius appear in the wood for the second time, their brief dialogue is a diminutive display of imploring and rejecting, meeting and parting, opening and closing of physical space. These lines reflect the movement of action: Helena: Stay, though thou kill me, sweet Demetrius. Demetrius: I harge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.

Helena: O, wilt thou darkling leave me? Do not so. Demetrius: Stay, on thy peril. I alone will go. (2. 2. 90-93) B. Demetrius couldn’t possibly love Helena while in his quest for Hermia. He results to severely degrading her, portraying his callous side: I love thee not; therefore pursue thee not . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more… Tell you I do not, [nor] I cannot love you? (Demetrius, 2. 1. 195-208) C. Demetrius is a less poetic and romantic figure which is based on his (doggish) perception of women, violent and unchivalrous.

D. A rude colloquial dismissiveness towards unwanted comes more naturally to Demetrius. When he shakes off Helena, he portrays a “terse and charmless candour”(Mcleish): Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth . . . . . . . . . . . . Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit, For I am sick when I do look on thee. (Demetrius, 2. 1. 206-219) E. Shown through Demetrius’ hostile passages toward Helena are: typical lovers’ speeches, where apparently thin, formal and declamatory verbal gestures which contain more than they seem to. Loutro)

F. After Hermia had completely shut him out of her ife, Demetrius actually felt some true, real emotion. He sees no reason to pursue Hermia any further while she is in such a state, and he decides to fall asleep, hoping this will lighten the effect of the sorrow: So sorrow’s heaviness doth heavier grow For debt that bankrout [sleep] doth sorrow owe, Which now in some slight measure it will pay, If for his tender here I make some stay. (Demetrius, 3. 2. 81-89) G. ” ‘Pyramus and Thisbe’ evokes to tears of laughter rather than sorrow in the lovers (false) eyes.

Lyricism and comedy distance, the passionate quarrels between Demetrius and Lysander, Hermia and Helena. It lludes to the tragic possibilities of a conflict between love and opposition”(Belsey). Demetrius, like all the others, is mocking the play by the rude mechanicals: It is the wittiest parition that ever I heard discourse, my lord . . . . . . . . . . . . No remedy, my lord, when walls are so williful to hear without warning. (Demetrius, 5. 1)

The love juice has done it’s work, and its work is utterly to abolish the conscious interval between one romantic loyalty and another. Demetrius change of love is marked by exaggerated rticulary the moment his eyes open: O Helen, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine! To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne? (Demetrius, 3. 2. 140-141) B. He affection toward Hermia had all but withered and he cared nothing for her anymore and replies to Lysander: Lysander, keep thy Hermia. I will none. If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone.

The themes of waking and dreaming, reality and illusion, reason and imagination, change and transformation are all experienced by Demetrius to a great extent, especially with his lovers and enemies. His vile, yet sensitive personality really kept the reader examining what he could change into next, which the seem as if they were more than just a single character. Demetrius, as a character, is essential to the play, for a backbone and plot.

A Midsummer Nights Dream by William Shakespeare

Everyone thinks they will fall in love or be in love with someone else at one point in there life. Love is a very strong word, in A Midsummer Nights Dream by William Shakespear, it was used to its full potential. It could be true love or jus an infatuation that you think is love but it really isn`t. First there was the love between Theseus and Hippolyta, which lasted though out the whole play. Then Lysander and Hermia were in love but Demitrius also loved Hermia but that as change later by Oberon.

Later Demetrius falls back in love with Helena but only because he was put under a spell. In this play there were many relationships between all the charaters. I think the play A Midsummer Nights Dream reflects deep truths about love and relationships. In Norrie Epstiens essay there were many good points. Most of them were about how all the chatacters were interchangable and how they fell in love. Her most important point was how love becomes a spell.

Love dose become a spell or at least seems like one because you dont function right when your in love. That happens alot in this play with Helena and Lysander. Like when Lysander is told that he can not marry Helena he tries to do whatever he can to try to get the duke to let them marry. He even was gonna try to sneak out of athens with Helena jus so they can be together and that makes the reader think that he would not do that if they weren`t in love.

Another good point that Epstien had was that love transforms a mortal into a rarety of imperfection. When people are in love with each other they try to act perfect so that don`t make a bad impression. The person thinks that if they act perfect around the person they think they love that they will start to fall in love with each other. That isn`t how it works every time though so you are doing all that work for nothing. This is what is meant by transforming and it happens a lot in real life and in the play.

Humor in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Shakespeare uses many ways to portray humor and make his plays a success because of it. He created a careful mix of love with humor to create a success called “A Midsummer Nights Dream. ” The focus of this paper is to describe how Shakespeare uses humor in his play. One way that Shakespeare uses humor in this play is by using plain humor that need not be interpreted in any way. He did this by creating the artisans. The artisans, obviously are not intelligent at all, but try to be.

They mess up grammar, spelling, and everything that the author of “Pyramus and Thisby” had wanted for his play. For instance, when Bottom says “Thisbe, the flowers of odious savors sweet,”82 he was supposted to say odors instead of odious in the sentence. Odors means “fragrant smells,” while odious means “repulsive. ” A simple mistake by someone that is low in the society, but totally changes the meaning of the sentence. This humor is obvious to everybody watching that Bottom had made a mistake. This type of humor, while obvious, sometimes doesnt portray the meaning correctly.

Inferred humor is sometimes more suited for this. Shakespeare used something like inferred humor to get across some other meanings that added to the play. One good example is the character of Puck. Puck is a hyperactive child that gets into a lot of mischief. His attitude toward his tasks is sort of a light and airy one. He does not take life seriously, he only does what is fun. This type of character is totally different than everyone else in the play; they are in a serious tone, while Puck is just dancing around pulling pranks on everyone.

One good example of a prank that Puck created was putting an Ass head on Bottom. It was unnecessary, just fun. What made him funny was these sort of pranks, and the contrast of his attitude toward the other ones in the story. For example, Lysander is bound up in love for Hermia and Helena, depending on what part of the play. He is very serious and sad because Hermia is being forced to marry Demetrius. Sort of equivalent to a tragedy. Puck is just creating mischief and having fun.

Another way that Shakespeare uses humor is that he uses examples that would never happen in real life. For example, after Lysander and Demetrius had been led around the kings oak for a long time, they fell down and went to sleep. This contains no logic whatsoever, because they are trying to kill each other, and it is impossible to use defense when a person is sleeping. There is humor in that because everyone took it in stride, so to say. In the play, it is interpreted that that is supposed to happen. Another example is when Titania awakens after being in love with Bottom.

She knows that Oberon did it, but shes not angry at the fact that he did, or the fact that Oberon used the time to capture the Indian boy. It makes no sense, but it is funny. That is what Shakespeare intended. In “A Midsummer Nights Dream,” there is a lot of humor in it, which creates an excellent play and a fabulous comedy. He was obviously a master at his work, which is prominent in this play. Humor is the largest reason for the success of this play; the careful mix of all types of humor make this play a nice potpourri of tragedy and comedy.

Four Ladies of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

In Williams Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” many of the play’s female characters have strong similarities and differences among one another. Although many of the main female characters in the play come from dissimilar backgrounds, their similarities are brought together by common problems associated with society and love. Of the four main female characters, Hippolyta, Titania, Helena, and Hermia, both Hippolyta and Titania are royalty while Helena and Hermia are commoners.

However, a common theme associated with Hippolyta, Titania, Helena, and Hermia, regardless of their social caste, is their similarities and differences in dealing with love in a patriarchal society. Nevertheless, the patriarchal society in which Hippolyta, Titania, Helena, and Hermia live in struggles to hinder the feelings and attitudes which provide them with a distinct conception for love in a male dominated society. Hippolyta is a strong yet silent amazonian beauty who is the love of Theseus, Duke of Athens.

Although Hippolyta is largely silent in her dealings with love in the patriarchal society, her physical presence speaks for the untold voice she might profit from. Of the four main female characters Hippolyta is the more silent of the four. However, since Hippolyta is the maiden of Theseus she bears heavy in the decisions Theseus makes about the love quarrels within the play. From the words of Theseus the reader can associate that Hippolyta has a strong impact on the actions he takes when dealing with love and marriage: For you, fair Hermia, look you arm yourself To fit your fancies to your father’s will,

Or else the law of Athens yeilds you up-… To death or to vow of a single life. Come, my Hippolyta. What cheer my love? I must employ you in some business Against our nuptial, and confer with you Of something nearly that concerns yourselves. (1. 1. 117-127) Although Hippolyta has few lines in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” the expressions and reactions the reader gets from Theseus tell how Hippolyta is able to persuade the actions Theseus takes, as in the quote above. The main difference between Hippolyta and the other three female characters is her ability to speak with her actions instead of her words.

Although Hippolyta shares similarities with Hermia and Helena, the association with royalty connects Titania and Hippolyta on a closer level. Titania is a strong willed fairy who is dedicated to herself rather than her lover Oberon. However, Tatiania is more outspoken about the wrongs a patriarchal society has on love. Titania is royalty, therefore, being royalty helps to insure a greater influence toward a less patriarchal society and movement toward a society in which love is governed by a couples choice rather than a man’s choice.

Unlike Hippolyta, Titania is more verbally outspoken to her husband, taking the role of a present day feminist: Oberon. Why should Titania cross her Oberon? I do but beg a little changeling boy His mother was a vot’ress of my order,… But she, being mortal, of that boy did die; And for her sake do I rear up her boy, And for her sake I will not part with him. Titania. Not for thy fairy kingdom. (2. 1. 119-144) The way Titania handles Oberon is very dissimilar from the way Hippolyta handles differences with Theseus.

Although both women sway the actions their men take, Titania is more direct in her course than is Hippolyta. Hermia and Helena, however, act different in the way they approach love’s gridlock within the patriarchal society. Hermia, the true love of Lysander, is an outspoken rebel against the marriage law’s of the patriarchal society of Athens. However, Hermia is very vocal, like Titania, when it comes to sharing her opinion of love in a patriarchal society. Hermia expresses her opinion of marriage in a vocal manner to Theseus:

Theseus. What you say, Hermia? Be advised, fair maid. To you your father should be as a god-… I do entreat Your Grace to pardon me…. The worst that may befall me in this case Theseus. Either to die the death or to abjure Hermia. So will I grow, so live, so die, my lord, Ere I will yield my virgin patent up (1. 1. 46-80) Hermia is genteel when it comes to asserting her opinion of Athen’s marriage laws. The patriarchal society which has made Hermia unable to marry Lysander only makes Hermia fight more for her right to free love.

The obvious differences between Hermia and Helena do not prevent them from defying the patriarchal law’s of Athens. The similarities between Helena and Hermia are only conveyed by the extreme discrepancies they possess within their personalities. Both Hermia and Helena want what is best for true love to flourish within the constraints of a patriarchal society. Both women feel it is the women’s right to choice her opinion for the man she will love in marriage Helena, the shunned lover of Demetrius, is a quiet, forgiving, and wholehearted young women.

Helena is assertive at opposing marriage laws, which govern love in Athens, yet in a modest and uncommon manner for 16th century Athens. Instead of verbalizing her opinion of love constraints the Athenian laws dictate, Helena’s actions of female wooing provide her with the defiance a patriarchal society places on women. Helena is in love with Demetrius, however, Demetrius wants nothing to do with Hermia. Therefore, Hermia defies the role of a female in 16th century Athens and tries to romance her love, knowing Demetrius will never court her himself.

Helena tries to win Demetrius’s love: Demetrius: Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth Tell you I do not nor I cannot love you the? Helena. And even for that do I love you the more. I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius, The more you beat me I will fawn on you. (2. 2. 199-204) Although Helena fails at wooing Demetrius, the fight for Demetrius’s love is not hidden behind the patriarchal community of Athen’s. Both Hippolyta and Titania, as well as Hermia and Helena, share common interest in defying the laws of a patriarchal society.

The foremost problem associated with a male dominated society in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” was love. Therefore, a common focus associated with Hippolyta, Titania, Helena, and Hermia, in spite of their social standing, is their likenesses and contrasts in handling the idea of love in a patriarchal society. Still, the patriarchal society in which Hippolyta, Titania, Helena, and Hermia reside in strives to impede the feelings and attitudes which make up their idea of what love should become in a patriarchal society.

Critical Analysis Of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

William Shakespeare, born in 1594, is one of the greatest writers in literature. He dies in 1616 after completing many sonnets and plays. One of which is “A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ” They say that this play is the most purely romantic of Shakespeare’s comedies. The themes of the play are dreams and reality, love and magic. This extraordinary play is a play-with-in-a-play, which master writers only write successfully. Shakespeare proves here to be a master writer. Critics find it a task to explain the intricateness of the play, audiences find it very pleasing to read and watch.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is a comedy combining elements of love, fairies, magic, and dreams. This play is a comedy about five couples who suffer through love’s strange games and the evil behind the devious tricks. This play begins as Theseus, the Duke, is preparing to marry Hippolyta. He woos her with his sword. Hermia is in love with Lysander. Egeus, Hermia’s father, forbids the relationship with Lysander and orders her to marry Demetrius. Demetrius loves Hermia, but she does not love him. On the other hand, Helena is in love with Demetrius.

To settle the confusion, Theseus decides that Hermia must marry Demetrius or become a nun. In retaliation to her father’s command, Hermia and Lysander run away together. Amidst all the problems in the human world, Titania and Oberon, the fairy queen and king, continually argue about their various relationships that they have taken part in. (Scott 336) Titania leaves Oberon as a result of the arguments. Oberon is hurt and wants revenge on Titania. So he tells Puck, Oberon’s servant, to put a magic flower juice on her eyelids while she is sleeping.

This potion causes the victim to desperately in love with the first creature that they see. Oberon’s plan is carried out, but the potion is also placed on Lysander’s eyes. Lysander awakes to see Helena, who is aimlessly walking through the woods, and instantly falls in love with her. She thinks that he is making fun of her being in love with Demetrius, so she leaves and Lysander follows. This leaves Hermia to wake up alone. Puck now has journeyed to the area where several actors are rehearsing. He uses his magic to turn one of them into a donkey, in hopes that Titania will awake to see it.

Just as planned, she awakes and falls in love with the donkey. Oberon and Puck overhear Demetrius and Hermia arguing about their relationships and realize that they had made a mistake. In hopes of solving the problem, Puck places magic juice on Demetrius while he is sleeping. He awakes to Helena, who now has two men in love with her. Hermia is devastated because Lysander does not love her anymore. Helena and Hermia argue because Helena thinks that Hermia is in on the men’s “joke. ” All four argue and leave. Puck persuades them to sleep all together and more of the antidote is placed on the eyes of Lysander.

Titania also receives another dose of the potion, and awakes to her husband Oberon. A triple wedding is planned and everyone is happy. (thinkquest. com 1-3) Throughout the play there are many references to the gender and sex roles of the characters. As described in the critical essay by Shirley Nelson Garner, the dominating male power and strange sex roles of the characters is fluent throughout the play. The ordering of the fairy, human, and natural worlds is a movement toward satisfying men’s psychological needs; but it also disrupts women’s bonds with each other.

The argument between Titania and Oberon arises from Titania’s focus of attention toward a stolen Indian boy. Oberon uses his authority to force Titania to give up the boy, and he is shocked when she disobeys him and leaves. Her attachment to the boy is erotic, because she treats him similar to Bottom after she falls in love with him by a spell. The underlying reason for Oberon’s complaint of Titania and the boy’s relationship is that he secretly wants the boy for himself. Oberon takes action because his power is threatened by Titania’s love for the boy.

He needs her too, so he wins the boy for himself to make her feel inferior. In other words, Titania gave up something that she loved to make her husband happy. This is seen in everyday life, women give up their wants to make their men happy. Titania’s sacrifice for Oberon cost her to lose both her Indian boy and his mother, her women lover. When men don’t make women happy, they turn to their friends for what they need, whatever it may be. (Scott 370-373) Male domination not only exists between husband and wife, but also between father and daughter. Theseus will not allow Hermia to marry Lysander.

Theseus wants her to marry Demetrius. Egeus, a ruler, will force Hermia to become a nun unless she marries Demetrius. In retaliation to his demands, Lysander and Hermia run away together. Hermia is scolded by Egeus for being in love with the man she chooses. This suggests that men cause women to feel forced and obligated to do as they say. (Scott 373) Another example of male domination is the marriage of Theseus and Hippolyta. Theseus’ first wife was frail and yielding, and he divorced her. Hippolyta has been a warrior, and Theseus’ victory over her makes her unable to resist.

By conquering the female warrior and marrying her, he fulfills his need for the exclusive love of a woman while satisfying his homoerotic desires. Close bonding fulfills this homoerotic desire with a male companion, such as Demetrius and Egeus. (Scott 373-373) Male jealousy and need for dominance ruins women’s relationships with friends and also turns to brutality. Hermia and Helena were once intimate friends, but Helena is suspicious of Hermia’s involvement in the men’s “joke. ” Bonds between women are just as important as men’s bonds with each other, but jealousy leads to the end of women’s happiness.

When Helena pursues Demetrius, his male brutality is revealed when he rejects her for another woman, insults her, and threatens to rape her. Also, when the men fall in love with her, she feels like the “butt of a joke. ” This stirs female insecurity and pain, again caused by previous abuse from men. The submissive nature of women enables Hermia and Helena to bear their lover’s abuse. (Scott 374-376) The reconciliation between Titania and Oberon, at the end of the play, brings blessing to the human world. This suggests that the happiness of the world depend on the amount of love between couples.

The problems caused suggest the heterosexual bonding is best. Just as women have insecurities, men feel that if women joined together there will be no need for men, possibly excluding them or preferring the friendship and love between women to a man-woman relationship. This fear is partially based on reality, but also by projection. Since men have stronger bonds with each other, they exclude women from participation in tings in which they care about; they assume that woman, if granted the opportunity would do the same.

Men’s main belief is that separating and conquering women is the only way to keep their power. (Scott 376) The essay written by George A. Bernard shows the fantasy and reality issues in the play. The fantasy world and real world exist apart from each other, never meeting at any point. The inhabitants of the fairy world are unreal in the sense that they lack feelings and intelligence. The dream world, beyond mortal’s comprehension, strongly influences the entire realm of ordinary life. By nature of their humanity, Oberon’s power causes vulnerability in the human world.

This fairy kingdom is essentially a dream, which appears whenever reason goes to sleep, and during this time Oberon controls all things. Such illusions and dreams, created by Oberon, can be dangerous if they block out human’s perception of reality. As the play proves, these dreams perform an important function in life. (Scott 381) Fairies, part of the fantasy world, live in the kingdom in the vague, dream-like East. In this area, legends, myths, and impossible stories originate. This placed is more commonly called “the dream world.

The East exists both during and after sleep. The fairies bring the stories to you from the East. The fairies never think and love, which explains all of the deceit and odd events that go on during the play. This is acceptable in their world, because all the laws that govern the world of reality have no existence in the dream world. The lover’s fall between these two worlds and are affected by both. The fairies make fools of the lovers, because humans are no accustomed to the fairy’s realm. In the real world, Hermia is sensible and Lysander is reasonable.

They want to be together even against Egeus’ commands, which is reasonable thinking. As soon as the two are alone, imagination takes control of them and they are blinded as to the misfortunes that are bound to cross the course of true love. This causes them to run away. (Scott 382-385) Mark van Doren explains the language and poetry in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” as an immense expanse of Shakespeare’s extraordinary poetic imagination. This imagination is vast enough to house fairy realms and the world of reality, including all the peculiar manifestations of either place.

Also the ability to describe the separate and often quite dissimilar regions of the play’s universe by drawing on the rich resources of poetry. The words moon and water dominate the poetry of the play. (McIntosh 3) “…four happy days bring in another moon: but, O, me thinks, how slow. This old moon wanes! She lingers my desires” (McIntosh 1-3). As a result of their enormous allusive potential, these images engender am entire network of interlocking symbols that greatly enrich the text. The moon, water, and wet flowers conspire to extend the world of the play until it is as large as all imaginable life.

The moon and water also explain the play’s mystery and naturality. The lover’s fall in and out of love like dolls, and like dolls they will go to sleep as soon as they are laid down. (McIntosh 3-4) Since the world is very large, there is plenty of room for mortals and fairies. Both are at home and sometimes seem to have exchanged functions with one another. Also, both mortals and fairies move freely in their own “worlds. ” In this world, the moon governs. (McIntosh 4) The choice of ballad emphasizes the enormous difference between the intellectual and cultural assumptions of Bottom, the author and the audience.

Meanwhile the definite movement from spiritual transformation to dream is referred to as art. This mirrors the informing structure design of the play as a whole. The art form now becomes a way containing and triumphing over unbearable reality. “Consider, then, we come but in despite. We do not come, as minding to content you, Our true intent is all for your delight, we are not here. ” (McIntosh 5) “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is a play concerned with dreaming. Shakespeare reverses the categories of reality and illusion, sleeping and waking, art and nature, to touch upon the central theme of dreams.

Dreams are truer than reality because it has a transforming power. Dreams are a part if the fertile, unbounded world of imagination. The Athenian lover’s flee to the wood and fall asleep, entering a charmed of dream. After their eyes were anointed, the world of supernatural at once takes over the stage, controlling their lives in a way they cannot guess at. The dreams come true, but are made to appear “fruitless. ” Without knowing the dimension of dream in our lives, there can be no real self-knowledge. (Garber 59-62) Delusion is the prelude to illusion.

Lysander should produce this speech at a point when his actions are completely supernaturally or subconsciously controlled without the slightest hint of either reason or will. Reason has no place in the dream state, and when characters attempt to employ it, they frustrate their own ends. (Garber 62-63) The memory of the dream itself is vague, because as the mind tries to rationalize what has been dreamed it only distorts the image. The instinct of the mind sets boundaries, while the process of dream blurs and obliterates those boundaries.

The pattern of the play is controlled and ordered by a series of vital contrasts: the conflict of the sleeping and waking states, the interchange of reality and illusion, reason and imagination, and the disparate spheres of the influence of Theseus and Oberon. All is related to the portrayal of the dream state. (Garber 65-72) In this dramatic world where dreams are a reliable source of vision and insight, consistently truer than reality, they seek to interpret and transform. (thinkquest. com 1) The imagery establishes the dream world in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

The night creates a mysterious mood. At night, the fairy realm takes control. These fairies are brainless and deceitful, which leads to controversy between the mortals. The two worlds, united by moonlight, are active during their respectable times of the day. In the play, the fairy world is dominant, because there is only one scene containing daylight. The sounding of the horns while the sun rises announces the return of mortal sanity. The setting is imagery itself. The forest, with flowers, water, and the rest of nature seems to be away from the human world. This is a necessary setting for the dream world.

The main theme in the play is dreams. As discussed before, dreams are truer than reality because they are part of the unbounded world imagination. (Magill 26) The fairies control the dreams; therefore they control your state of mind. Also a love-madness theme weaves together unrelated portions of the play. Shakespeare creates unity by flooding the play with moonlight. (Kenneth 29) Irony is a large element in the play. Many of the situations are ironic. Instead of attracting and falling in love with a gentlewoman, Theseus won Hippolyta with his sword.

Also, Helena’s affection for Demetrius seems to make him hate her, but the hatred eventually turns to love. Helena constantly pursues Demetrius, just as deer chase tigers in the dream forest. Demetrius’ cruel treatment ironically compels her to love him more. The fairy world has greater impact than the real world. This is ironic because the fairies have no intelligence or emotions like mortals. (Dutton 32-34) “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is said to be the most romantic of Shakespeare’s comedies. The fantasy world and erotic nature of the play draws interest to the play.

This interest leads to the making of several different movies, and countless number of theater performances. The viewing of the play adds to its dramatic nature, allowing first hand contrast between how we felt and how someone else felt about the text. (Dutton 147-150) Shakespeare’s masterpiece, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” parallels with “Romeo and Juliet. ” The similarity in characters and the plot suggest that “Romeo and Juliet” was written before “A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ” This play is a natural reaction of Shakespeare’s mind to Romeo because of his attitude toward love and life.

The similarities between the beginning of the Dream and the main situation of Romeo and Juliet are obvious. The forbidden love, deceit, and pain are all elements in the comparison. This suggests that Shakespeare borrowed and condensed material from “Romeo and Juliet. ” The two fathers, Capulet and Egeus, give the same orders to their daughters. Capulet: “An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend. An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets. ” Egeus: “As she is mine, I many dispose her: Which shall be either to this gentleman or to her death.

Egeus is less brutal, but just as threatening as Capulet. Lysander and Hermia’s artificial complaint of love, the first in a series of hindrances in the course of true love. This is evidently a recollection of “Romeo and Juliet. ” Mercutio’s description of Queen Mab seems to have clearly been borrowed from “A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ” It has exquisite delicacy and daintiness of the Dream, but is not an integral part of “Romeo and Juliet. ” One element shared between the two plays directly is the moon. In “Romeo and Juliet,” the moon brings the two star-crossed lovers together at night.

The Moon unites the mortal and spiritual worlds in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ” The two catastrophes are almost identical, making it strange that he wrote a serious play directly after the comedy. (Magill 74-76) Many people, due to its “magical” plot, read “A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ” Shakespeare wonderfully combines mystery, love, disaster, and comedy into one play. This play is the most romantic and intricate plays written by Shakespeare. Many people, past and present, find it to be popular due the interesting elements and storylines in the play.

Shakespearean Comedy Essay

Shakespeare wrote many plays during his lifetime. Some of his plays have similar comedic characteristics and then other plays are the exact opposite of comedy. Shakespeare wrote tragedies, romance, history, comedy and problem plays all with great success. During the performance of these plays there was no scenery so great time was taken when developing the characters and the plot so the plays would be entertaining. A Midsummers Night’s Dream and Much Ado About Nothing are just two of the comedies Shakespeare wrote.

These two plays have many things in common where as Measure for Measure is a problem play with a totally different tone. Comparing and contrasting these three plays will help us to understand what Shakespeare thought comedy was in the 1600’s and to see if our views on comedy are the same today. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a festive comedy. The play takes place in June and this is a bewitched time. In the spring the custom is to celebrate the return of fertility to the earth. During this time the young people spend the night in the woods to celebrate. Shakespeare uses the greenworld pattern in this play. The play begins in the city, moves out to the country and then back o the city.

Being in the country makes things better because there is tranquility, freedom and people can become uncivilized versus when they are in the city and have to follow customs and laws and behave rationally. Comedies contain blocking figures and in this play it is Egeus. If he was not in the way, Hermia could marry Lysander. Since he is causing problems in his daughters life by trying to make her marry Demetrius, this begins the journey into the woods. Egeus threatened Hermia with death if she were to marry Lysander so she thinks the only way they can be together is to run away.

One strange element is why Egeus was so set on Hermia marrying Demetrius. Lysander came from as good a family as Demetrius. Both were well possessed with property and money so Egeus’s power is made to seem senseless. The play moves into the woods which is haunted by fairies who are there to bless the wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta. The quarreling between Oberon and Titania over the changeling boy leads to the king wanting to embarrass Titania with the love juice by making her fall in love with a monster. The first person she sees is Bottom and she falls violently in love with him. Oberon is making a spectacle of Titania and Bottom.

It is ridiculous that she is in love with him because he is from such a lower class than her, he is human and she is a fairy, and he has the head of an ass. She is also a queen and he is an uneducated working man and a match like this would never happen. Bottom has such a problem with language. He speaks in malapropisms. He tries to say one word but always comes up with the wrong one. He is a working man who tries to act more educated that he really is . Through Bottom and Titania we see that love is blind. Also, while Titania is under the influence of the love juice she releases the changeling boy to Oberon so he did accomplish his goal.

The confusion between Lysander, Hermia, Helena, and Demetrius because of the love juice is full of funny occurrences. When Lysander wakes up and thinks he is in love with Helena, Hermia is ignored and treated badly by Lysander. Then not only was Lysander saying he loved Helena, Demetrius was also treating Hermia badly. This left poor Hermia so upset but we as the audience know this is a prank and soon the spell will be lifted. The main characters in the play are all developed to a point here the audience can identify with them. We learn things about them individually so we can feel happy or sad when things happen in their life.

I felt sad for Hermia when she was jolted by Lysander because their love for each other had seemed so strong and she was so confused by his behavior. Even though the audience knows the truth it is easy to feel sad for her. As the play nears the end, Oberon lifts the spell and everyone seems to believe they have had a rare vision and then their lives go on just as if none of this had happened. The play brings closure to the reader by having the traditional ending of a comedy. They usually end in weddings and a feast which is exactly what happens in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Lysander and Hermia, Helena and Demetrius, and Theseus and Hippolyta all get married which signifies a new beginning. The working men end the play with a Bergomask dance and the fairies join in the dance and bless the marriages. A Midsummer Night’s Dream contains many elements of a comedy. The most important ones to me are that the play ends happily, it is funny and it made me laugh. Shakespeare wrote Much Ado About Nothing which is also a comedy, but it is a different type of comedy than A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Although these two plays share some common elements, they also have differences.

Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy of intrigue. It involves suspense, question and has a detective story element. Within the comedy of intrigue, there is social comedy involving Beatrice and Benedick. Through this couple and Claudio and Hero, the play explores the was people interact with each other. Shakespeare shows that love can be very logical but also very passionate. Claudio and Hero have a love that is soft, delicate and logical. Beatrice and Benedick on the other hand, are very assionately in love with each other and show this by quarreling constantly. Claudio’s obsession with Hero is from a distance.

He worships her and is astonished with her beauty. His love for her is very shallow because he does not know her as a person. Claudio is being logical about marriage by inquiring about Hero’s financial state and social standing. After finding out she is an only child, he agrees to let Don Pedro woo Hero in his favor so she would be his wife. When Claudio and Don Pedro put their plan into action at the masked ball, Don John appears. He acts as a blocking figure in his play and causes many problems. He tells Claudio that Don Pedro wants Hero for himself, which is a lie, but Claudio acts like “easy come easy go”.

He is not very upset that he just lost his soon to be bride. When the truth comes out, the wedding day is set and the planning begins. Don John is once again planning to ruin things. He is a jealous, sour and unhappy person. The greenworld is also used in this play but not for festive activities. It is used for plotting bad things that will hurt people. After Claudio is led to believe Hero was cheating on him, he becomes malicious and wants revenge. Claudio disgraces Hero at the wedding. He refuses to marry her in front of all the guests and accuses her of already having sex with someone else.

This serious act of revenge causes the audience to feel sorry for not only Hero, but her family as well because we know that was not her kissing Borachio. The audience may have felt worse for Hero if her character had been more fully developed but she hardly ever spoke even when agreeing to marry Claudio. We can feel sorry for her but not really identify with her because we do not know her very well. Hero is made a spectacle of for no truthful reason and disgraces her family. After Hero faints at the wedding, Beatrice is furious. She wants revenge against Claudio.

Finally she and Benedick declare their love for each other which was made possible by being under tension and emotional stress and she was finally able to let down her guard. She feels out of control because she needs a man to kill Claudio. She is usually able to take care of things herself but not this time. Thankfully Benedick will not kill Claudio and the truth comes out because of Dogberry and Verges. When the night watchmen overhear Borachio talking about the scheme Dogberry and Verges bring him and his comrade to their uperior. It is funny this watchmen could catch anyone doing anything wrong.

The watchmen are like Bottom and are comical. They have the same problem as Bottom and have great difficulty communicating. After the truth is out that Claudio was fooled into thinking that Hero was cheating on him, he is full of grief because he believes Hero is dead. He agrees to marry Leonato’s niece, who is supposed to look just like Hero, to make up his terrible mistake to he family. After he marries the masked bride, he is happy to see it is Hero. This certainly is a marriage of convenience. He did ot know Hero anyway so it would not have mattered if he knew the bride to be.

In a sense, Hero was resurrected from the dead and Claudio ends up being a very lucky guy. Most of the characters are fully developed, except Hero, so we can identify with their grief and then their joy. As the play comes to an end everything is wrapped in a neat package. Don John is captured and brought back to be punished, Claudio and Hero, and Beatrice and Benedick are married and the dance and the feast begin. Measure for Measure is a play that is very different from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The comedy in this play is very raw. The atmosphere of the two plays are different but they both deal with the same issue of sexuality.

After the Duke has left the city in Angelo’s hands, he wants to show his power by condemning Claudio to death because he got Juliet pregnant. Angelo is not being reasonable because he has let the power go to his head. Angelo has also had sex out of wedlock, he just did not get Mariana pregnant. In this play sex is portrayed as much more dangerous than it has been in the other two plays. After Claudio is jailed, he makes a plea to his sister, Isabella , to help him obtain a pardon for his offense. Isabella ad not yet taken her vows to become a nun so she agrees to help him.

Isabella and Angelo are parallel characters. Both live with great restraint. After Isabella pleads with Angelo to pardon her brother, he comes up with the idea of an exchange for Claudio’s freedom. He wants Isabella to sleep with him so he could have her virginity and then he would pardon Claudio. Angelo is a very cold person with no feelings and has restrained himself tremendously throughout his life. He has a problem with women and he is tempted more by a virtuous woman than a frivolous one. In a soliloquy, he talks to himself and tries to nderstand his lust for Isabella.

He has a violent image of sex with her because he wants to destroy her virtue. Angelo is very cruel. He is going to torture and kill Claudio and he is getting pleasure by controlling Isabella. this play is dealing with power and who has the most. After the Duke, disguised as the Friar, over hears Isabella telling Claudio she will not sleep with Angelo, he comes up with a plan. Isabella would agree to meet Angelo at midnight and they would send Mariana instead because the two of them were supposed to have been married before but her dowry was lost at sea and Angelo ad backed out on the marriage.

The plan works but Angelo goes back on his word and orders Claudio’s head delivered to him at once. The Friar helps keep Claudio in hiding so everyone would think he was dead. The Friar then returns as the Duke and Angelo’s world begins to unravel. He is publicly exposed so everyone will know what king of a person he is. He has been tricked into marriage and is now a very miserable person. Although he had the ultimate power for a brief time, heabused it and now has to suffer the consequences for a lifetime. After Claudio is produces and allowed to marry Juliet, the

Duke asks for Isabella’s hand in marriage. The satire in this play looks at the two extremes and the audience tries to believe something in the middle. The language used in this play is crude when they are discussing sex. The men in the city talk about sex in a nasty ways discussing how many diseases they have gotten from the hoars. Sex is portrayed as a vile and nasty thing. Measure for Measure is visually unlike other plays. There is insistence on laws that are very extreme. People are being measured in judgement. It shows that you should be reasonable and weigh things out before actions are taken.

These three plays all have different messages which are told in various ways. As a writer, Shakespeare was so talented he could write different types of stories with such grace. These three plays are just a few examples of the different extremes he was capable of. Writing and defining comedy can be very difficult. Many elements of comedy are in his plays and this makes they very enjoyable reading. Comedy helps me to identify with stories since I like happy endings much better than tragic endings. After finishing a book, I like to have a feeling of closure and in these comedies my need is fulfilled.

Shakespeare – Comedy

Shakespeare wrote many plays during his lifetime. Some of his plays have similar comedic characteristics and then other plays are the exact opposite of comedy. Shakespeare wrote tragedies, romance, history, comedy and problem plays all with great success. During the performance of these plays there was no scenery so great time was taken when developing the characters and the plot so the plays would be entertaining. A Midsummers Night’s Dream and Much Ado About Nothing are just two of the comedies Shakespeare wrote. These two plays have many things in common where as Measure for Measure is a problem play with a totally different tone.

Comparing and contrasting these three plays will help us to understand what Shakespeare thought comedy was in the 1600’s and to see if our views on comedy are the same today. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a festive comedy. The play takes place in June and this is a bewitched time. In the spring the custom is to celebrate the return of fertility to the earth. During this time the young people spend the night in the woods to celebrate. Shakespeare uses the greenworld pattern in this play. The play begins in the city, moves out to the country and then back to the city.

Being in the country makes things better because there is tranquility, freedom and people can become uncivilized versus when they are in the city and have to follow customs and laws and behave rationally. Comedies contain blocking figures and in this play it is Egeus. If he was not in the way, Hermia could marry Lysander. Since he is causing problems in his daughters life by trying to make her marry Demetrius, this begins the journey into the woods. Egeus threatened Hermia with death if she were to marry Lysander so she thinks the only way they can be together is to run away.

One strange element is why Egeus was so set on Hermia marrying Demetrius. Lysander came from as good a family as Demetrius. Both were well possessed with property and money so Egeus’s power is made to seem senseless. The play moves into the woods which is haunted by fairies who are there to bless the wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta. The quarreling between Oberon and Titania over the changeling boy leads to the king wanting to embarrass Titania with the love juice by making her fall in love with a monster. The first person she sees is Bottom and she falls violently in love with him. Oberon is making a spectacle of Titania and Bottom.

It is ridiculous that she is in love with him because he is from such a lower class than her, he is human and she is a fairy, and he has the head of an ass. She is also a queen and he is an uneducated working man and a match like this would never happen. Bottom has such a problem with language. He speaks in malapropisms. He tries to say one word but always comes up with the wrong one. He is a working man who tries to act more educated that he really is . Through Bottom and Titania we see that love is blind. Also, while Titania is under the influence of the love juice she releases the changeling boy to Oberon so he did accomplish his goal.

The confusion between Lysander, Hermia, Helena, and Demetrius because of the love juice is full of funny occurrences. When Lysander wakes up and thinks he is in love with Helena, Hermia is ignored and treated badly by Lysander. Then not only was Lysander saying he loved Helena, Demetrius was also treating Hermia badly. This left poor Hermia so upset but we as the audience know this is a prank and soon the spell will be lifted. The main characters in the play are all developed to a point where the audience can identify with them. We learn things about them individually so we can feel happy or sad when things happen in their life.

I felt sad for Hermia when she was jolted by Lysander because their love for each other had seemed so strong and she was so confused by his behavior. Even though the audience knows the truth it is easy to feel sad for her. As the play nears the end, Oberon lifts the spell and everyone seems to believe they have had a rare vision and then their lives go on just as if none of this had happened. The play brings closure to the reader by having the traditional ending of a comedy. They usually end in weddings and a feast which is exactly what happens in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Lysander and Hermia, Helena and Demetrius, and Theseus and Hippolyta all get married which signifies a new beginning. The working men end the play with a Bergomask dance and the fairies join in the dance and bless the marriages. A Midsummer Night’s Dream contains many elements of a comedy. The most important ones to me are that the play ends happily, it is funny and it made me laugh. Shakespeare wrote Much Ado About Nothing which is also a comedy, but it is a different type of comedy than A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Although these two plays share some common elements, they also have differences.

Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy of intrigue. It involves suspense, question and has a detective story element. Within the comedy of intrigue, there is social comedy involving Beatrice and Benedick. Through this couple and Claudio and Hero, the play explores the was people interact with each other. Shakespeare shows that love can be very logical but also very passionate. Claudio and Hero have a love that is soft, delicate and logical. Beatrice and Benedick on the other hand, are very passionately in love with each other and show this by quarreling constantly. Claudio’s obsession with Hero is from a distance.

He worships her and is astonished with her beauty. His love for her is very shallow because he does not know her as a person. Claudio is being logical about marriage by inquiring about Hero’s financial state and social standing. After finding out she is an only child, he agrees to let Don Pedro woo Hero in his favor so she would be his wife. When Claudio and Don Pedro put their plan into action at the masked ball, Don John appears. He acts as a blocking figure in this play and causes many problems. He tells Claudio that Don Pedro wants Hero for himself, which is a lie, but Claudio acts like “easy come easy go”.

He is not very upset that he just lost his soon to be bride. When the truth comes out, the wedding day is set and the planning begins. Don John is once again planning to ruin things. He is a jealous, sour and unhappy person. The greenworld is also used in this play but not for festive activities. It is used for plotting bad things that will hurt people. After Claudio is led to believe Hero was cheating on him, he becomes malicious and wants revenge. Claudio disgraces Hero at the wedding. He refuses to marry her in front of all the guests and accuses her of already having sex with someone else.

This serious act of revenge causes the audience to feel sorry for not only Hero, but her family as well because we know that was not her kissing Borachio. The audience may have felt worse for Hero if her character had been more fully developed but she hardly ever spoke even when agreeing to marry Claudio. We can feel sorry for her but not really identify with her because we do not know her very well. Hero is made a spectacle of for no truthful reason and disgraces her family. After Hero faints at the wedding, Beatrice is furious. She wants revenge against Claudio.

Finally she and Benedick declare their love for each other which was made possible by being under tension and emotional stress and she was finally able to let down her guard. She feels out of control because she needs a man to kill Claudio. She is usually able to take care of things herself but not this time. Thankfully Benedick will not kill Claudio and the truth comes out because of Dogberry and Verges. When the night watchmen overhear Borachio talking about the scheme Dogberry and Verges bring him and his comrade to their superior. It is funny this watchmen could catch anyone doing anything wrong.

The watchmen are like Bottom and are comical. They have the same problem as Bottom and have great difficulty communicating. After the truth is out that Claudio was fooled into thinking that Hero was cheating on him, he is full of grief because he believes Hero is dead. He agrees to marry Leonato’s niece, who is supposed to look just like Hero, to make up his terrible mistake to he family. After he marries the masked bride, he is happy to see it is Hero. This certainly is a marriage of convenience. He did not know Hero anyway so it would not have mattered if he knew the bride to be.

In a sense, Hero was resurrected from the dead and Claudio ends up being a very lucky guy. Most of the characters are fully developed, except Hero, so we can identify with their grief and then their joy. As the play comes to an end everything is wrapped in a neat package. Don John is captured and brought back to be punished, Claudio and Hero, and Beatrice and Benedick are married and the dance and the feast begin. Measure for Measure is a play that is very different from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The comedy in this play is very raw. The atmosphere of the two plays are different but they both deal with the same issue of sexuality.

After the Duke has left the city in Angelo’s hands, he wants to show his power by condemning Claudio to death because he got Juliet pregnant. Angelo is not being reasonable because he has let the power go to his head. Angelo has also had sex out of wedlock, he just did not get Mariana pregnant. In this play sex is portrayed as much more dangerous than it has been in the other two plays. After Claudio is jailed, he makes a plea to his sister, Isabella , to help him obtain a pardon for his offense. Isabella had not yet taken her vows to become a nun so she agrees to help him.

Isabella and Angelo are parallel characters. Both live with great restraint. After Isabella pleads with Angelo to pardon her brother, he comes up with the idea of an exchange for Claudio’s freedom. He wants Isabella to sleep with him so he could have her virginity and then he would pardon Claudio. Angelo is a very cold person with no feelings and has restrained himself tremendously throughout his life. He has a problem with women and he is tempted more by a virtuous woman than a frivolous one. In a soliloquy, he talks to himself and tries to understand his lust for Isabella.

He has a violent image of sex with her because he wants to destroy her virtue. Angelo is very cruel. He is going to torture and kill Claudio and he is getting pleasure by controlling Isabella. this play is dealing with power and who has the most. After the Duke, disguised as the Friar, over hears Isabella telling Claudio she will not sleep with Angelo, he comes up with a plan. Isabella would agree to meet Angelo at midnight and they would send Mariana instead because the two of them were supposed to have been married before but her dowry was lost at sea and Angelo had backed out on the marriage.

The plan works but Angelo goes back on his word and orders Claudio’s head delivered to him at once. The Friar helps keep Claudio in hiding so everyone would think he was dead. The Friar then returns as the Duke and Angelo’s world begins to unravel. He is publicly exposed so everyone will know what king of a person he is. He has been tricked into marriage and is now a very miserable person. Although he had the ultimate power for a brief time, heabused it and now has to suffer the consequences for a lifetime. After Claudio is produces and allowed to marry Juliet, the Duke asks for Isabella’s hand in marriage.

The satire in this play looks at the two extremes and the audience tries to believe something in the middle. The language used in this play is crude when they are discussing sex. The men in the city talk about sex in a nasty ways discussing how many diseases they have gotten from the hoars. Sex is portrayed as a vile and nasty thing. Measure for Measure is visually unlike other plays. There is insistence on laws that are very extreme. People are being measured in judgement. It shows that you should be reasonable and weigh things out before actions are taken.

These three plays all have different messages which are told in various ways. As a writer, Shakespeare was so talented he could write different types of stories with such grace. These three plays are just a few examples of the different extremes he was capable of. Writing and defining comedy can be very difficult. Many elements of comedy are in his plays and this makes they very enjoyable reading. Comedy helps me to identify with stories since I like happy endings much better than tragic endings. After finishing a book, I like to have a feeling of closure and in these comedies my need is fulfilled.

Love In A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Love? Is love controlled by human beings who love one another or is love controlled by a higher power? There are many people who believe that a higher power has control over love. An example of a higher power would be a cupid, a flying angel-type creature who is supposed to shoot arrows at people to make them fall in love. There are other people who reject the idea that a higher power controls love and that the people who experience love can control it. In the play, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, by William Shakespeare, several examples of love’s association with a higher power are presented.

Examples like: Thesius arranging a marriage between himself and Hippolyta, Egeus choosing who Hermia should marry and the fairies who have the ability to control love in the Enchanted Forest. In the story, Thesius, the supreme ruler of Athens, ends up marrying Hippolyta, the Queen of the Jungle. However, during the whole story, Hippolyta never throughly discusses her feelings and ideas about the marriage. She acts as if she has no choice but to marry Thesius. This can be proven by examining Hippolyta’s position in the relationship between herself and Thesius.

Thesius captured Hippolyta during battle and Thesius intimidates Hippolyta into marrying him since he is a supreme ruler and she was defeated by him. Thesius reveals that he captures Hippolyta in battle in the following quote, “I wood thee by my sword, and won thy love doing thee injuries” (Act I,). The above quote and the fact that Hippolyta never discusses her feelings about the wedding leads the reader to believe that she doesn’t really love him but is forced into the marriage due to his authority.

Thesius’ authority is the higher power in this example and her love (in marriage) is controlled by the duke’s authority by forcing her to marry him. Another example of a higher power controlling one’s love can be seen when the relationship between Egeus and his daughter Hermia, is observed. In Act 1, when Hermia confesses her love for Lysander to her father, Lysander, Helena, Demetrius and Thesius, her father Egeus is very upset. Egeus is upset because Hermia is defying his wishes for her to marry the man that he chose, Demetrius.

When Hermia objects to her father’s wishes, Egeus starts to threaten her life in an attempt to get her obedience, “As she is mine, I may dispose of her which shall be either to this gentlemen or to her death, according to our law Immediately provided in that case” (Act I,). In this example, the higher power position is assumed by Egeus, Hermia’s father who is frustrated because his daughter won’t marry the man of his choice but a man that she chose, Lysander. Her father’s anger causes Lysander and Hermia to run away, and be followed by Helena and Demetrius.

The couples then end up in the Enchanted Forest where a whole series of events ends up confuses the lovers. After everything returns to normal, the couples return to Athens. Interestingly, Lysander and Hermia end up marrying. The fact that Lysander and Hermia got married proves that love can also defeat a higher power. Hermia defied her father, the higher power and still ended up marrying the man that she wanted. The most interesting parts of the story takes place in an environment known as: The Enchanted Forest. In the Enchanted Forest, numerous numbers of creatures exist with the addition of fairies.

These fairies, for example Oberon, Titania and Puck, have the ability to use magic that can change the feelings of love in people. Since the couples wandered into the Enchanted Forest, they end up getting mixed up in a series of events where Puck changes the feelings of the couples by using a love potion on Lysander. After waking with the love potion in his eyes, Lysander ends up falling in love with Helena. On the other hand, Helena is still in love with Demetrius, who is in love with Hermia. Finally, Hermia is in love with Lysander.

Basically, Puck changes the couples around because he applied the potion to Lysander instead of Demetrius. Fortunately, the situation is solved and the couples get back together. The higher power in this case proved to be the fairies because of their ability to use magic to change the feelings of love in people. This proves that a higher power can control the feelings of love in people. The fairies have the power to control peoples love towards one another and control love. People are falling in love, getting their heart broken, and falling in love again.

Oberon, the king of the fairies, didnt have the best relationship with his wife and lover Titania. They always seemed to bicker and rant about each other but they still had an undying love for each other. Being the king of the fairies Oberon could do anything he pleased and anyone would do it for him. Oberon convinced Puck to make Titania fall in love with a hideous creature. Puck turned a mortal into an ass and then made Titania fall in love with them. After realizing what he had done Oberon reversed the spell and realized that he really did love Titania.

The higher power in this situation is the flower that created this spell, because it was controlling all the love and dislike that was going on in the Enchanted Forest. A higher power in definition is any being or group of beings that have direct control over the actions of another being. Two of the examples showed how a higher power can control love and one of the examples showed how love can defy a higher power and prevail. In any case, it has been proven that a higher power does exist when dealing with love. Many people have wondered what love really is and how love develops between people.

The Mixed up Troubles of Love

A Midsummer’s Night Dream is one of Shakespeare’s romantic/comedy plays. This play is about love and all the troubles that it brings to people. It also has a side story about a pompous actor who has a mysterious dream in the forest. The four main characters are all trying to find love with one another and when magic is involved it causes more cause between the four than it does to help. The play is set in Monte Athena, Italy in the nineteenth century. The main characters are the four lovers Hermia, Lysander, Helena and Demetrius.

The Duke and his fiance Queen Hipolyta, Puck the mischievous creature who is half man half goat, the Fairy King Obecca and the Fairy Queen Titania. It starts out as Egeus, a wealthy Athenian, brings a problem upon Duke Theseus. Egeus wants to marry his daughter Hermia off to Demetrius, but she refuses because she is in love with Lysander, who her father does not approve of. Because Hermia is disobeying her father by not wanting to marry Demetrius, whom she does not love, she will either have to marry Demetrius or die. The other alternative the Duke gives Hermia is to become a prioress for the rest of her life.

The couple leaves the meeting with the Duke and they decide to run off together to another town, where they can be wed and live in happiness. The only person they tell about their plan is Helena. Helena agrees to help because she is in love with Demetrius, although he does not return the love for her. She was once seduced by him but he was through with her after their little affair. She follows him everywhere and will not leave him be. So Helena decides to tell Demetrius of Hermia and Lysander’s so she can follow him into the woods and be with him.

In another part of Athena a sign is posted of a dramatic competition with a rewarded prize for the winner. The winners will have to perform their play for the Duke and his wife on their wedding day. Here we are introduced to Nick Bottom the weaver who is a very dramatic pompous actor, who runs away from his wife frequently to flirt with the young damsels. His theatrical group decides to put on the play Pyrimus and Thisby, where Bottom is given the part of Pyrimus. Yet he wants to play every part in the play, trying to show off.

The group decides to meet in the woods that night, which is the same night the couple will be running away. That night Demetrius leaves to find Hermia and Lysander and stop them from getting away. But without his consent Helena follows him the whole way out there, pestering and bothering him. They go off into the forest where Shakespeare brings us to a party all the fairies, spirits and mystical creates are drinking wine and frolicking around. Here we are introduced to the mischievous troublemaker Puck, who is half goat half man. He is the creature who scares maids in the sleep and frightens wives at night.

The Fairy Queen Titania soon appears in front of The Fairy King Obecca. They quarrel over a special child that is left in to the queen and she leaves. The King tells Puck to find him a special flower that cupid launched his arrow at. When the dew of this flower is placed into a sleeping creature’s eyes the first person they see when they awake they will fall in love with. He wants to put this dew into the queen’s eyes to teach her a lesson by making her fall in love with a hideous creature. When Puck leaves, the king spies Helena bothering Demetrius again.

He hears her profess her love to him as he denies his love to her and instead professes his hatred to her. The king decides that he wants to help this poor, pitiful mortal girl by making Demetrius fall in love with her. Puck then returns with the flower and brings it to the king. While the king goes to put the dew on the Fairy Queen’s eyes he tells Puck of the two mortals, Demetrius and Helena, and tells him to help her by making Demetrius fall in love with her. Puck finds Lysander and Hermia sleeping in the forest and mistakes them for Demetrius and Helena.

So Puck puts the flower’s dew on Lysander’s eyelids. Helena happens to be passing by and sees Lysander lying on the ground. She thinks he is dead and tries to wake him, doing so he awakens and falls madly in love with her. He then forgets all about his love for Hermia and chases after Helena. Hermia then awakes and frightened that Lysander is gone, thinking that he is either harmed or dead. Then the theatrical group comes to rehearse their play in a spot in the forest, which is coincidently right under the basket that the Fairy Queen is sleeping in.

While Nick Bottom goes off from the group to practice his lines Puck puts a spell on him and transforms him into a donkey. When the other men see him they run off. He then starts talking to himself, which wakes up the Fairy Queen. He is then the first person she sees when she wakes up, which makes her fall in love with him. The Queen captures him and makes the other fairies serve him and give him all that he desires. Hermia finds Demetrius and goes off with him to find Lysander. The king watches them and realizes that Puck has put the spell on the wrong person.

He then sends him to correct the mistake and put things back to normal. He then puts the flower on Demetrius’ eyes while he sleeps which makes him fall in love Helena as well. Lysander still thinks he is in love with Helena and tells Hermia he does not love her any longer and he hates her. The two boys fight over Helena, but Helena thinks they are mocking her and they are just trying to make her feel bad. Hermia then becomes insanely jealous and angered that Lysander’s love is now only for Helena. She pushes Helena into the muddy water and the girls begin to fight and role around in the mud.

The King, watching all of this, gets an herb that will reverse the love spell. Puck has the four kids running around the forest trying to find each other; they then pass out from exhaustion. The four land in the same spot of the forest with out knowing. While sleeping, the king puts the new herb onto Lysander’s eyes; reversing the love spell and bring him back to his true love for Hermia. Back at the Fairy Queen’s place she falls asleep with Nick Bottom and the King puts the herb on her eyes, which makes her see her true love. She awakes to see him and is horrified to see a donkey lying next to her.

The next morning the Duke is off riding with Hippolyta and they discover the two couples lying in the tall grass nude. The couples awaken not knowing exactly what happened the night before. The Duke makes them stand up to explain themselves. Lysander and Hermia confess to their plan to run away. Hermia’s father is they’re telling her she must marry Demetrius. Demetrius then professes his love for Helena; tell Hermia’s father he can no longer marry Hermia. The Duke talks with his fianc and they decide to have a triple wedding. The father is not pleased with the idea, but goes along with it.

Nick Bottom then awakens in another part of the forest. He is back to his usual self, with his usual clothing. He then concludes that the entire affair with Fairy Queen must have all been a dream and then it couldn’t have possibly occurred. His theatrical group is worried that he will not show up; but he astonishes them all by coming to their rescue. As they prepare for their performance, everyone else in the castle are preparing for the wedding of the three couples. The couples then celebrate their marriages to their loves and dine outside.

The Duke’s assistant then presents him with a list of acts that he can choose from. This act will then perform in front of the entire party. The chosen act is Pyrimus and Thisby, which is Nick Bottom’s play. The couples watch the tragedy play, which turns into more of a comedy. At the end of the play the entire party viewing gave the group a standing ovation. The Duke gave them approval and the group won their prize. The three couples go to their bedrooms to make love all night long. As they lay there with their lover the fairies fill the rooms and watch over them. They bring the couples peace and happiness.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream Shakespeare

As with every play we read this quarter, we started A Midsummer Night s Dream with only a text. Reading the script is the foundation of Shakespeare, and the least evolved of the ways that one can experience it. There is no one to interpret the words, no body movement or voice inflection to indicate meaning or intention. All meaning that a reader understands comes from the words alone. The simplicity of text provides a broad ground for imagination, in that every reader can come away from the text with a different conception of what went on.

The words are merely the puzzle pieces individuals put together to bring coherence nd logic to the play. Although we all read generally the same words, we can see that vastly different plays arise depending on who interprets them. By interpreting the word-clues that Shakespeare wrote into the script to direct the performance of the play, we were able to imagine gestures, expressions, and movements appropriate to the intention of the playwright. An example of this can be seen in the different Romeo and Juliets: Luhrman clearly had a more modern vision after reading the script than did Zeffirelli did only 18 years before.

The live performance at the CalPoly theatre also carried ! ith it a very different feel less intense, more child-like and sweet with nearly the same words. Reading also affects our experience in that without the text, we would most likely not be able to enjoy Shakespeare at all; having the text makes Shakespeare widely accessible (available for free on the web) to all that desire it. Once the script is obtained, anyone can perform Shakespeare even everyday, non-actor citizens put on Shakespeare whether it be in parks, at school, or in a forest.

My experience reading Shakepearean plays has shown me that reading is ecessary and fundamental part of grasping the fullness of the works. I had wanted to read A Midsummer Night’s Dream for quite some time. Besides being a play by Shakespeare, I believe my desire to do so came from seeing bits and pieces of it done in Hollywood movies like Dead Poet’s Society. I didn’t realize how much small exposures like! those could cause me to prejudge the actual text; after I had read the play for myself I was surprised at how much the text differed from my expectations.

Not knowing the whole of the plot, but rather only bits and pieces, I expected a play filled with fairy dust and pixy-women oe-dancing, laughing, with flowers everywhere, or something like Hylas and the nymphs. What I did not expect was a group of rag-tag laborers putting on a play, young females cat fighting over their men, or Titania being “enamored of an ass. ” (Act IV, Scene i, MND) Even with surprises, though, the text by itself held little detail and richness in my mind. I thought it a decent play, but certainly nothing like I had hoped, and I didn’t feel involved in it or connected to it in any way.

One of the things that did impressed me, though, was finding out for myself how accessible Shakespeare actually is. When it came time for me to learn my lines for Philostrate (MND), I copied them from a site on the internet which posted the text in its entirety. I realized the! n how lucky we are that plays like these survived through the ages, sometimes probably making it from one hand to the next in a form no better than the paperback I carried in my bag. Through my reading, the importance of the text was impressed upon me, and I feel that I have gained a new appreciation for the lasting and foundational qualities of pure script.

Viewing Viewing a play adds a kind of second dimension to a textual reading. While our primary impressions of a Shakespearean play are established with the initial reading, those impressions are challenged when we come into contact with a play performed. At this point we have a first hand contrast between how we felt and how someone else felt about the same play. Once we have sampled another’s interpretations we necessarily question ourselves on what we would have done differently, had we directed the play. Perhaps something we expected to see on stage was omitted; perhaps! omething unusual was added.

We might even sample the same play dozens of times, ll performed by different companies; it is common, it is even expected, that none of the twelve interpretations will be much the same. Unlike with reading, with viewing we are not allowed to sample the play in whatever manner we want. As the audience, our experiences are directed. We must resign ourselves to be the two-hour subject of another’s whims and methods. This kind of challenge is usually very enlightening, bringing new thoughts and perspectives where we would otherwise have only our own.

These new thoughts and perspectives often materialize in the form of visual and auditory details, mostly because the cript stays generally the same. Viewing an actual performance adds depth and detail to what was before only words. We are given scenery, costumes, voices, faces, body movements, and other forms of physical (rather than verbal) expression that contribute to a particular feel. These types of details are in reality just instances of the direct! or s influence, interpretations and preferences that cause us to challenge our initial ideas, and accept us a possibly richer taste of the play.

Because I was involved in two scenes of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, viewing this play on film held particular interest for e. I often found myself looking to the films for ideas on how to play a character, or a scene. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately, for originality’s sake), neither of the films we reviewed portrayed A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a way that particularly struck me. The 1935 Reinhardt edition seemed to me overdone in nearly every respect. The characters were much too Roman, the actresses quite over-dramatic, the fairies and black-winged bats far too many in number, and the movie, in general, way too long.

The author of “Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle’s A Midsummer Night s Dream” described it ell as, “a vast! balletic-operatic extravaganza with huge casts, elaborate scenery, and lavish costumes. ” (37, Jorgens) Overall it was a very large film. The BBC version, on the other hand, erred in the opposite. It was slow, relatively unemotional, and somewhat difficult to watch. After viewing both these versions, I realized that my perceptions of the text were much different than either of the films. I wanted something more normal, less mystical, more possible however, the time for me to voice those desires had not yet come.

Performing This third dimension of experiencing Shakespeare comes only when a eader-turned-viewer decides to become the actor. This aspect of the Shakespearean experience is nearly the only of the three mentioned that supports and encourages open creativity and self-expression. Now our questions of, “what would I have done differently” have a chance to be answered. It is in the acting that the text becomes less detached from us, becoming more our own. We are no longer in ! the passive mode, but the active. Now, we wait for no one, cut lines if we like, say it fast, draw it out. There are few, if any, limits to how a play can be done.

Performing brings one’s original, textual onceptions in synergy with those viewed of others, creating a play that is both wholly collage, and wholly new. The play begins to conform to what we, as individuals, perceive to be the best or most right interpretation of the text. After viewing the two film versions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, I envisioned something much more casual and lighthearted, even funny, for our own performance of Act III, Scene ii. Because of this, and probably because of the nature of the cast in general, our group took on a more youthful, somewhat ridiculous approach to the play.

Demetrius was played by a woman, Lysander dressed in ruffles and nickers, Helena victimized and “shrewish” to the extreme, and Hermia was more often than not stepping into violen! ce. Nevertheless, in some ways we found ourselves doing exactly the things that we saw in the films. For example, once performing, it was not difficult to see elements of the characters we play in us; specifically, we more often than not felt and appeared like the “Rude Mechanicals. ” We were not unlike them, coming together with nothing but a script, none of us actors. Heather the Grant Writer, Tricia the Administrator, Giselle the Grader, Matt the Director, all of us students. )

Beginning with nothing but bare Shakepearean text, we assigned roles, gave out scripts, rehearsed, and performed. At Swanton Ranch, “The Dream Team” stood in a forest to practice our play, hearing Puck recite, “A crew of patches, rude mechanicals, that work for bread upon Athenian stalls, were met together to rehearse a play. ” (Act III, Scene ii, MND) We were much the same. We even had some hard-hat rude mechanicals accidentally appear in the background as we spoke!

Even before we arrived, though, a place was sought out f! or us, our director no doubt having thoughts much like these: “Pat, pat; nd here’s a marvail’s convenient place for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our stage, this hawthorn brake our tiring house. ” (Act III, Scene i, MND) Once done, like the lovers in the scene, we return to the real world, away from the forest, back to the realities of work and school: “When they next wake, all this derision shall seem a dream and fruitless vision, and back to Athens shall the lovers go. (Act III, Scene ii, MND)

And so we did. Although we for the most part succeeded in building our own version of the play, some similarities like these could not be escaped: I could not help but notice that he actions taken in the play were mirroring what was going on in reality. Through Shakespeare s ability to create a-play-within-a-play-within-a-play, I found being a rude mechanical broadening to my overall impressions of the play-buildi! ng experience. Seeing our forest performance on film gave an entirely different perspective still.

Some members of the faculty, some friends, and some strangers came to our screening to see the fruit of our creative weekend in Swanton Ranch. We put a lot of time and practice into our scene, making sure that we had our lines, that they flowed right, that we looked right. We brought the scenes from just a text, clear through to performance, and were now able to look back over the whole creative process. In the theatre, however, just before our showing, our “performance” somehow seemed less serious to me. I was so afraid that we were all going to embarrass ourselves!

The lines I said when I was Philostrate suddenly came back to me. No, my noble lord, it is not for you. I have heard it over, and it is nothing, nothing in the world; unless you can find sport in their intents, extremely stretched and conned with cruel pain, to do you service. Act V, Scene i, MND) Much like Bottom’s company, we were good not because of any phenomenal talent, but because we tried, because we were simple people trying to do Shakespeare. Like them, we were not actors, but were still able to experience the fullness of the creative process, bringing to fruition our own comedic rendition of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Shakespeare I believe that it is not by accident that our play turned out as it did. It could not be but that Shakepeare intended for us, the actors, to relate to Bottom s company, to everyone who ever put on A Midsummer Night s Dream or any other production. This is part of Shakepeare s genius: to be able to write into the play a reflection of ourselves, to see our own creative processes being mirrored by those of the characters we coarsely attempt to play.

Even now, when the actual performance of our scene is over, I look back through the t! xt and still see my group in it: when I read the word, Demetrius, I no longer picture the old Demetrius I first imagined, or even those I saw in film. Now I see Tricia in her funny pseudo-masculine hat. The play has somehow become ours. Even if we hadn t put on the play, though, and felt none of it for ourselves, reading about the ude mechanicals and their creative process gives a reader valuable insight. Shakespeare did not just hand down to us a script, expecting the layman to figure out how to make it happen.

Instead, it is as if he included his own little instruction manual in the play, teaching all who will learn to bring it from the mere green text to the ripe fruit of performance. Personal Notes The class in retrospect was a very good experience. Before the quarter began, when I first learned that our class would be taking a field trip together, I was hesitant. I wasn’t sure that I wanted to spend a weekend away from home, in ! cabin in the hills with my Shakespeare class. I was not convinced that it would be more than an uncomfortable experience.

I didn’t at all expect what actually came out of it, something that I praise God so much for, which had virtually nothing to do with Shakespeare at all. The contact that I had with my group has become invaluable to me this quarter. I got to know people that weekend that I otherwise would hardly have talked to had I not been required to spend so much time outside of class with them. Tricia, Giselle, Matt and I are good friends; ow could we be otherwise when we rehearsed together so often, rode 8 hours in the car together, left Matt’s clothes behind, shopped the sales together at Macy’s, ate meals, and hiked 20 minutes into the forest together?

I learned about three people who share my faith, shared a candy bar with Joel, and did my classmates’ dishes. I saw them from morning to evening in lights and places so different from the norm. They seem to me pe! ople now, and friends, not just bodies with mouths in chairs. par Besides being purely social, going to Swanton Ranch really opened up my educational experience. Although our actual film isn’t going to win any Academy Awards, it felt like we were doing something real, and not just commenting on everyone else’s work.

The air was great, the change was great, and bringing a play from text to performance gave me a whole new attitude towards theatrics in general. I learned how much work goes into doing even just a scene, how many elements there are to look after, and how much effort it takes to make everything look somewhat believable and real. Being at the end of the process now, being able to see where we started from clear through to the inish, I feel like my understanding of Shakespeare has really broadened.

Not so much Shakespeare himself, of course, but rather what he did, what he tried to accomplish; I have a much greater sense of what all actors and crew go through to put a play together, text to performance, start to ! finish. There is a small part of me that wants to keep doing Shakespeare, to do all of the play, or at least do it again. Another part of me, the more persuasive and logical part, wants to just keep it all right where it is in my mind, remembering it fondly, as A Dream.

Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

In Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” the mortal teenage characters fall in love foolishly, and the character Bottom states, “O what fools these mortals be”. They are foolish because they act like children. Although Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena appear grown-up, when they are in love they act foolishly. The four teenage lovers are fools. Demetrius is a fool because he is unaware that his love changes through out the play. At the start of the play Demetrius does not love Helena. (II ii,line 188) Demetrius says, “I love thee not, therefore pursue me not.

“Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more. ” In III ii, Demetrius after being juiced begins to love Helena. (III ii,line 169-173) Demetrius says, “Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none. If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone. My heart to her but as guest- wise sojourned, And now to Helen is it home returned, There to remain. ” This proves he is a fool, because he is not aware of his changing love for Helena. Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her but she still persists in chasing him. Demetrius shows no love for Helena.

Demetrius says, “I’ll run from thee, and hide me in the brakes, And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. ” (II i,line 199-201) “Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth Tell you I do not, nor I cannot love you? ” Demetrius clearly illustrates to Helena that he has no interest, but Helena persists. (II i,line 202-204) Helena says, “And even for that do I love you the more. I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius, The more you beat me, I will fawn on you. ” (II i,line 220-222) “Your virtue is my privilege.

For that It is ot night when I do see your face, Therefore I think I am not in the night;” This proves that Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her, but she still persists. Lysander is a fool because he persuades Hermia to avoid death and run away with him. Hermia must marry Demetrius or she will be put to death. (I i,line 83-88) Theseus says, “Take time to pause, and, by the next new moon- The sealing-day betwixt my love and me, For everlasting bond fellowship- Upon that day either prepare to die For disobedience to your father’s will, Or else to wed Demetrius, as he ould,” Hermia does not love Demetrius.

I i,line 140) Hermia says, “O hell! To choose love by another’s eyes. ” Hermia loves Lysander. (I i,line 150-155) “If then true lovers have been ever crossed, It stands as an edict in destiny. Then let us teach or trial patience, Because it is a customary cross, As due to love, as thoughts and dreams and sighs, Wishes and tears, poor fancy’s followers. ” Lysander has an alternative idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, “I have a widow aunt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child; >From Athens is her house remote seven leagues. (I i,line 64- 165) “Steal forth thy father’s house tomorrow night, And in the wood, a league without the town. ”

Lysander is a fool because he convinces Hermia to risk death and run away with him. Hermia is a fool because she risks death for love. Hermia is to marry Demetrius, or be put to death. (I i,line 95-98) Egeus says, “Scornful Lysander, true, he hath my love, And what is mine my love shall render him. And she is mine, and all my right of her I do estate unto Demetrius. ” Lysander suggests an idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, “A good persuasion. Therefore her me, Hermia.

I have a aunt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child;” Hermia agrees with the idea. (I i,line 168-169) Hermia says, “My good Lysander, I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow,” (I i,line 178) “Tomorrow truly will I meet thee. ” Hermia is a fool because she is risking death for the love of Lysander. Therefore this proves, the four teenage lovers are fools. (VI i, Theseus states) “Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. ” William Shakespeare’s A Midsummers Night’s Dream shows how childishly foolish lovers can be.

William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream is very unique because there is a play within a play. Shakespeare uses the interesting qualities of the characters to narrate the play. The characters can be divided into four groups: The Athenian Court (The Duke, Hippolyta, Egeus, and Philostrate); the young lovers (Hermia, Lysander, Helena, and Demetrius); the fairy kingdom (Oberon, Titania, Puck, and the lesser fairies); and the workmen (Bottom, Quince, Flute, Snout, Starveling, and Snug).

The Athenian court is the obvious upper class division of scoiety in Athens. Theseus is head of the Athenian state and his role is to maintain justice. Hippolyta is Theseus’s new bride and shows sympathy to the young lovers. Both Theseus and Hippolyta are classified as legendary characters and collectively show their maturity and commitment to marriage. Egeus is a stubborn father whose character loses worth toward the end of the plot, while Philostrate’s part is short and undeveloped.

Despite being a group, the young lovers are more interesting than the Athenian court. The male young lovers are somewhat similar in qualities. They are young and fall in and out of love quickly. For example Demetrius and Lysander both reject a girl they once loved; they fight over a one girl and then over the other. On the other hand, Hermia and Helena are not as similar because Hermia is short and Helena is tall. These characters are more interesting than the Athenian court because they provide the theme of commitment and being unfaithful.

The young lovers are touched by magic by the fairy kingdom members. A member of the fairy kingdom, Oberon is resentful and generous at that the same time. Case in point, Oberon is resentful toward Titania refuses to hand over her boy, and generous in his attempt to make things go well for the the young lovers. Titania is a strong individual and stands up for herself against Oberon. But Titania too also is generous showing love for Bottom. Lastly, Puck is as servant for Oberon and does exactly what he says.

Unfortunately he does not do everything correctly. For instance, Oberon requests that Puck use magic on Demetrius to return Helena’s love, however he employs the magic upon Lysander instead. Puck means well but isn’t necessarily given the respect due to him. Another group that is not given respect is the workmen. The workmen are known to be rather stupid. The most important workmen, Bottom is the star in the play. He is not paired off at the end of the play and is more important as an individual.

Bottom is a comical character who is just not matchable. The characters display interesting qualities that make the play enjoyable. The four groups of characters are necessary to tell the story and the play. Although there is resistance between the characters at times, there is a happy ending and the impression that is given is that the characters mended their friendship. The qualities of each character allows the reader to be a part of the group.

Midsummer Nights Dream And Love

What Makes Us Love? What makes us love? This question has been studied for centuries by philosophers, scientists, and even writers in search of a sensible answer. Shakespeare, for one, explored many ideas to justify love. In his play, “A Midsummers Night Dream”, he lists various thoughts on what he thinks causes people to love. Some are overwhelmingly ridiculous, while others make some sense. One of his far-fetched answers as to how people fall in love was Cupid. He believed Cupid would shoot his arrows of love into individuals, and they would magically fall for the next person they saw. Cupid all armed.

A certain aim he took/At a fair vestal throned by the west,/ and loosed his love-shaft smartly from his bow (2. 1. 163-65). ” After the shot, the person wouldnt know what hit them. He intertwines this thought with the concept that one falls in love after looking in anothers eyes. After missing a shot, one of Cupids arrows hit a flower, tainting it with his powers to make people fall in love. When placed in a persons eyes, they will be infatuated with the next thing they see. For example, after being placed in his Lysanders eyes, is immense love for Hermia grows weak with just one look into Helenas eyes.

Shakespeares thought here is that eyes have all the power over who we fall for. Do not misunderstand him, though. His usage of this enchanting juice is not to be taken seriously. He is trying to make a point, and at that, a good one. Looking into someones eyes had a certain power over ones feelings. You just get a strong feeling in your heart. It is uncontrollable, and sometimes, it truly is one of the main reasons we fall in love. However, he contradicts himself in act one when Helena says, “Love looks not with the eye, but with he mind (1. 1. 240).

He now states that the mind is what the person falls in love with, and not the eyes. It is true, however; you have to love a persons thoughts and ideas before you can feel that special passion for them. That is the key to true love. Although he had extremely different thoughts on the reasons we fall in love, they all made some sense. By contradicting his explanations, he, in my opinion, is making a point. Hes pointing out the fact that he, too, doesnt really know the answer to the question of what makes us love. And he knows that no one ever will.

Shakespeare’s Comedy vs. Tragedy

Certain parallels can be drawn between William Shakespeare’s plays, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, and “Romeo and Juliet”. These parallels concern themes and prototypical Shakespearian character types. Both plays have a distinct pair of lovers’, Hermia and Lysander, and Romeo and Juliet, respectively. Both plays could have also easily been tragedy or comedy with a few simple changes. A tragic play is a play in which one or more characters is has a moral flaw that leads to his/her downfall. A comedic play has at least one humorous character, and a successful or happy ending.

Comparing these wo plays is useful to find how Shakespeare uses similar character types in a variety of plays, and the versatility of the themes which he uses. In “Romeo and Juliet”, Juliet is young, “not yet fourteen”, and she is beautiful, and Romeo’s reaction after he sees her is, “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear Beauty to rich for use, for the earth too dear! ” Juliet is also prudent, “Although I joy in thee, I have no joy in this contract tonight. It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden. She eels that because they have just met, they should abstain from sexual intercourse.

Hermia is also young, and prudent. When Lysander suggests that “One turf shall serve as a pillow for both of us, One heart, one bed, two bosoms, and one troth,” Hermia replies “Nay, good Lysander. For my sake, my dear, Lie further off yet; do not lie so near. ” Although this couple has known each other for a while (Romeo and Juliet knew each other for one night when the above quote was spoken), Hermia also abstains from even sleeping near Lysander even though she believes he does not have impure intentions.

Romeo’s and Juliet’s families are feuding. Because of these feuds, their own parents will not allow the lovers to see each other. In the a differnet way Hermia is not allowed to marry Lysander. Hermia’s father Egeus says to Theseus, Duke of Athens, “Full of vexation come I, with complaint Against my child, my daughter Hermia. Stand fourth, Demetrius. My noble lord, This man hath my consent to marry her. Stand forth, Lysander. And, my gracious Duke, This man hath bewitched the bosom of my child.

Egeus tells the Duke that his daughter can marry Demetrius, not Lysander. Hermia replies “. . . If I refuse to wed Demetrius,” Egeus eplies “Either to die the death, or to abjure for ever the society of men. ” If Hermia does go against her father’s wishes, and weds Lysander, she will either be put to death, or be forced to become a nun. Both pairs of lovers also seek help from another. Juliet and Romeo seek Friar Lawrence, and Lysander and Hermia seek Lysander’s aunt, who lives in the woods near Athens.

Both sets of youths have the same character type. They are young, their love is prohibited, both women are prudent, and both seek the help of an adult. Yet they have their subtle differences. For example, Lysander, never mentioned a love before Hermia. Romeo loved Rosaline, before he loved Juliet. Hermia’s family and Lysander’s family were not feuding, whereas the Montagues’ and Capulets’ feude was central to the plot of the play. The stories of “Romeo and Juliet” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” are very different however.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is a comedy. Oberon, king of the fairies, sends a mischievous imp named, Puck, to play a trick on the queen of the fairies, Titania, and on a pair of Athenian youth. Puck turns Nick Bottom’s head into that of an ass (Nick Bottom is the man in the play production within “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”; he tried to play every part), and places an herb on Titania that causes her to fall in love with him. This is quite humorous. However, at the end of the play all the couples are back together, with the ones they love.

Thus Lysander and Hermia do get married. If Egeus had showed up at the wedding, he could have killed her. Egeus’ dominate nature is his flaw’, and if he would have attended the wedding, and killed his daughter, this play could have been a tragedy. Likewise, “Romeo and Juliet”, could have been a comedy. The first two acts of this play qualifies it as a comedy. In act I, Sampson and Gregory, servants of the Capulets, “talk big about what hey’ll do the Montagues, make racy comments, and insult each other as often as they insult the Montagues. (“Barron’s, 45).

In act II, Romeo meets Juliet. All is going well until Tybalt, a Capulet kills Romeo’s best friend, Mercutio. Things go continue to go wrong from here, until at the end of the play Romeo, thinking that Juliet is dead (she is in fact alive, she took a drug to fake her death), drinks poison, and when Juliet awakens from the spell of the drug, seeing her dead lover, stabs herself. If the families’ pride had not been so great that they would murder one another, or prohibited true love, this play could ave been a comedy.

This play is a tragedy, not because one character has a flaw, but both families have a flaw- pride. Prohibited love, romance, controlling families, both plays have it all. With a few simple modifications, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” could have been a tragedy, and “Romeo and Juliet” could have been a comedy. Shakespeare however, uses many of the same character types, young, prudent, rebellous lovers, and controling family members, in both comedies and tragedies. The end results are character molds, along with theme molds that can be easily translated into almost any plot, in any play.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream written by William Shakespeare

Anything written by William Shakespeare is very confusing, but always an interesting read. Particularly confusing is his famous comedic play: A Midsummer Night’s Dream. This story is very confusing (Almost to the point of being soporific, and vapid. ); starting with the title, and going to the last word! After reading this play, the reader is more confused about what happened within its unwieldy covers than before he started! This book receives a red light due to these characteristics. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is just that, a dream, or is it? There are three main plots in the play.

The first and the most exercised plotline was that of four lovers who cannot seem to find the correct mate between them. Throughout the play the characters’ loves and hates are switched around numerous times while they are in fairyland, a place that they accidentally wandered into while traveling in the woods. The second plotline is that of the Fairy Queen and King. The Queen does not pay enough attention to the King, and he becomes jealous of a little servant boy of hers, whom she loves very much and is of importance to the king. The last and most comedic plotline is of four actors who are attempting to put on a play.

They mix up lines, roles, and words of their play in many ways and cause much laughter. The main theme of this play is how love can confuse people and make us do strange, stupid, or sometimes dangerous things for love. A Midsummer Night’s Dream receives a red light. This is not because it is a bad read, on the contrary, it has many good points. One of these good points is the way that the author makes his characters talk and socialize in a very realistic and authentic way. Another good quality is that the book is very funny in places. The worst about this play is how it was very hard to understand.

The character’s names were hard to pronounce and remember. There are many unnecessary characters, who make the book only more confusing. Another bad thing about this book is that little or no description of the scene is given, and the reader has no idea where the action is happening. Lastly, the characters are quite underdeveloped. They do not seem to have any direction or plans that they have for themselves, and this makes them seem fake and hollow. This book is very unique and different from most books that one would read on a regular basis. First of all, it is written as a play, which is unusual for readers in modern times.

Next, the way that the people talk is Elizabethan and hard to follow. It rhymes in strange ways in places, using contractions of words to create rhyming schemes. The book gives no description of local scenery, and this makes it harder to understand. Lastly, this play is very different from another one of Shakespeare’s most famous works, Romeo and Juliet. Romeo and Juliet is a tragic story of how two lovers are torn apart, while A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a funny story of how love makes people crazy. All in all, William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a romantic comedy that is very, very hard to follow.

This book reverberates of confusion, and its logic is amorphous. It was a very good try on Shakespeare’s part, but he needed to put a little more effort into it. Perhaps Shakespeare was not as sedulous and erudite as some history and English teachers would like students to think. If A Midsummer Night’s Dream was to be graded on a curve against some of Shakespeare’s other works, it would be graded somewhere around a 40%. This book should not be one to rush out and buy, but it is one that should be read, or at least given a chance. This is a good book to borrow from a friend to read.

Transformation in A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Throughout each of Shakespeare’s dramas, the thematic inclusion of mistaken identities, hidden identities, and deceptive identities permeates many of the conflicts between the characters. While many times these characters experience a transformation in identity, be it physical, emotional, or spiritual, these transformations reflect the concept of an ever-changing society. As I once heard, “nothing is constant except change itself” – a phrase that is undeniably indicative of all of Shakespeare’s dramas.

Shakespeare’s dramas are filled with points of view, ideas, and notions that cause its audiences to question their points of view, experience other points of view and possibly, to “transform” their points of view accordingly. A Midsummer Night’s Dream assimilates this concept of transformation with images of vision and appearance, dreams, and that of a fantasy world that augments and characterizes the transformation of a particular character, scene, or the entire play.

Appearance and physical vision plays one of the most important roles in defining this play and its characters. A Midsummer Night’s Dream begins with Hermia wishing that her “father look’d but with [her] eyes. ” Although this reference to eyes mainly eludes to her father looking at Lysander in the way that she looks at him, – such at with the heart and soul – this reference to eyes seem to possess materialistic implications.

With reference to Egeuses accusations against Lysander in which Lysander supposedly has “stol’n the impression of [Hermia’s] fantasy with bracelets of thy hair, rings, gawds, conceits, knacks, trifles, nosegays, sweetmeats – messengers of strong prevailment in unhardened youth”; it seems Egeus has a fetish for materialism; he does not see these gifts as love tokens as does Hermia but merely as love bribes. He sees with his physical eyes what is on the outside instead of looking also on the inside with emotional eyes.

In trying to force Hermia’s submission to his ideas of love and seemingly sustain his superego, it may be that Egeus is experiencing a conflict in his identity causing his conflict to pour over into other identity conflicts, such as the confused “love square” consisting of Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and “helpless little” Helena. While I would not afford much to faith into Egeuses concepts of love, Theseus and Demetrius seem to conform to his standards of marriage, which is based not on true love, but merely manly materialism and social status.

This is shown when Lysander feels he must compete materialistically by saying, “I am, my lord, as well deriv’d as he, as well possess’d; my love is more than his. ” This statement seems to imply that Egeus prefers Demetrius because of his assumed materialistic endowments and his social status and thus, Lysander must compete with the physical, such as possessions and status, but not love. This scene furthers the implication that everyone struggles with the conflict between that they feel and what they see. In the end as nature would have it, true love dominates false pretenses.

From the very first scene and conversation in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the notion of dreams foreshadows the major underlying concept of the play, the suggestion that it is all merely a dream. Hippolyta and Theseus are conversing about their excitement over their wedding and their wedding night and how difficult it is to “pass the time. ” Hippolyta encourages them by saying, “Four nights will quickly dream away the time. ” There’s that word “dream. ” Hippolyta seems to use the word dream here as a medicine, a way of coping with their impatience.

Just as it helps the king and queen’s impatience, it is also the healing source that brings about the balance of love among the humans. Through the “healing” power of dreams, identity transformations occur, not once, but many times throughout the play, first, with Theseus and Hippolyta, then within the “love square” when all of them “dream away” their confused love for one another. Furthermore, Puck alludes to the play as a dream when he says, “If we shadows have offended, think but this, and all is mended, that you have but slumb’red here while these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, no more yielding but a dream.

Again, Puck reinforces the dream’s role as a “medicine” by asking the possibly offended audience to pretend that they had simply fallen asleep and “visions did appear” in their dreams. Here, it seems the audience’s identity is defined, not as patrons of the play, which in reality they are, but simply as dreamers. Not only do the dreams seem to relieve confusion, but Shakespeare’s use of “dreamy” language also renders a poetic and dreamy sensation that alleviates the identity confusion throughout the play. As part of the fantasy world, the fairies are the tools for which Shakespeare intertwines this dreamy, poetic language.

Shakespeare uses language to work upon the imagination of the audience and thereby, bringing about a kind of magic upon the stage: “I must go seek some dewdrops here,” one fairy says, “And hang a pearl in every cowslip’s ear. ” The fairies conjure many of the play’s most evocative images: Oberon, for instance, describes having “heard a mermaid on a dolphin’s back uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath that the rude sea grew civil at her song and certain stars shot madly from her their spheres to hear the sea-maid’s music.

Certainly, Shakespeare chose to incorporate this poetic distinctly through the fairies to complement the play’s dreamy atmosphere. Shakespeare introduces the concept of a fantasy world into the plot beginning with ACT II. He introduces the fairies and their realms into the plot to instigate somewhat of a romantic confusion that, in the end, restores balance in the conflicts of identities and love.

While the fairies play an influential role in manipulating within the “confused triangle,” – consisting of the court, the tradesmen, and the fairies – the fairies are designed to contrast heavily with the young lovers and the craftsmen; whereas the lovers are earnest and serious, Puck and the other fairies are merry and full of laughter; whereas the craftsmen are bumbling, earthy, and engage in methodical labor, the fairies are delicate, airy, and indulge in effortless magic and enchantment. This painted picture is simply an idea of the mixed identities present at the ignition of the play.

While the play begins with these characters fulfilling their roles as “commonly” defined, one will notice that by the conclusion of the play, many of these characters will have experienced a transformation in their characters and their identities. For instance, from the very beginning of the play, Egeus vows against the marriage of Lysander and Hermia proclaiming that Demetrius has his “consent to marry her. ” Egeus detests Lysander, and if Hermia chooses not to follow his wishes exclaiming, “As she is mine, I may dispose of her; which shall be to [Demetrius] or to her death….

Theseus concurs with Egeus by saying giving Hermia two options: either prepare to die, or wed Demetrius. Naturally, true love outweighed materialism, and Hermia did not compromise her true feelings. Though Egeus expresses a vehement desire for Hermia to consent to this wishes, he seems to have to concede his position near the end of the play when they find the four happily paired off, and Theseus says, “Fair lovers, you are fortunately met… Egeus, I will overbear your will.

While this situation seems to imply that Egeus must give rise to an identity transformation due to Thesuses commandment, Theseus also seems to give rise to an obvious identity modification by conceding to true love rather than to the starchiness and strictness of his previous notion of how to conduct “love” affairs, or any affair for that matter. Considering the relationship between Helena and Demetrius at the beginning of the play, Helena’s remark that “love looks not with the eyes but with the mind” seems to be the major transformation that takes place in all of the characters.

In addition to Theseuses transformation, another major instance is the transformation of Demetrius. How ironic it is that Demetrius, the one who absolutely despised Helena in the beginning, does exactly what Helena had said before; he finally begins (with the help of the fantasy world, of course) to look with his imagination. The fantasy world is the most crucial ingredient in forming a balance of love within the entire play.

Through Theseus’ change in manner of his ruling (i. from what the law says, or what is apparently obvious, to what nature and love demand and being able to “see” with his heart and not with his eyes), Demetrius’ identity transformation, the fact that all of the characters seem to experience “dreamy” sensations that give rise the resolution to their identity crises, and with the help of a “fantasy world,” the “love square” finds a balance in their world and in their identities.

Midsummer Night’s Dream, Questions and Answers

1. What does Shakespeare accomplish by setting most of the action at night and in the wood? Explain thoroughly. Use examples.

Setting most of the action at night and in the woods creates a dreamlike world. There is no other place that holds more myth than the forest. Obernon makes clear that nighttime is fairies’ time. Theseus, who is present during the daylight, represents reason.The visions of fairies and magic are all related to the nighttime forest setting. Shakespeare was interested in how dreams worked, in how the events in the play transpired, and how time seems to change and loses track.

Throughout the entire play, the young lovers are overcome by the magical power of the woods. They are put into a situation that is unrealistic which leads to bizarre mishaps. Even uncanny incidents happen to the fairies of the woods. Titania is put under a love spell and falls in the love with the ass-headed Nick Bottom. Puck reminds us in the end that if the play has offended anyone, they should simply remember it as being a dream. This helps make the play an incredible occurrence, rather than an intense drama.

2. Explain how Theseus represents the voice of reason and moderation. Be specific. Use examples and quotes (include act and line numbers)

Theseus represents the voice of reason and moderation in the play because he seems to be the only normal character left. He only appears in the play during the daytime, when nothing magical occurs. He is the only character who shows complete sanity in the dreamlike fantasy world around him. He is the Duke of Athens so many people come to him with their problems.

When Egeus comes to Theseus about the problem he is having with his daughter, Hermia, Theseus takes power over the situation. He explains to Hermia that if she goes against her father’s rules, by his words, she will be sentenced to death or sent to a convent. (Act 1, Scene 1, Pages 4 and 5, Lines 30-34). He states, “For you, fair Hermia, look you arm yourself to fit your fancies to your father’s will; Or else the law of Athens yields you up,- which by no means we may extenuate,- to death, or to a vow of single life.”

Hermia is so in love that she can not make a reasonable decision, so she runs off into the imaginative woods with Lysander. After Theseus finds the young lovers and listens to their crazy story of mishaps, he does not readily believe them. Hippolyta tries to reassure him that they are telling the truth.

Theseus states, “More strange than true: I never may believe these antique fables, nor these fairy toys. Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, such shaping fantasies, that apprehend more than cool reason ever comprehends (Act V, Scene 1, Page 54, lines 2-5). He believes that the darkness of love has a way of exciting the imagination, making things hard to follow and undoubtedly insane. He does not believe in fantasy, but takes things from knowledge of truth, and for him, seeing is believing.

3. What precipitates the quarrel between Obernon and Titania? How does their quarrel affect the outside world? Be specific. Use examples and quotes (include act and line numbers)

The quarrel between Obernon and Titania begins when Titania refuses to let Obernon make a henchman out of an Indian Prince (Act II, Scene 1). When he sends Puck into the woods to find the love-potion flower, Puck cast a spell over the young lovers in to woods (Act II, Scene II, Page 23, Line 9 and 10). Puck states, “Churl, upon thy eyes I throw all the power this charm doth owe.” This causes Lysander and Demetrius to fall in love with Helena accidentally. Helena is utterly confused when Lysander falls in love with her for she cries, “Do not say so, Lysander; Say not so.

What though he love your Hermia?” (Act II, Scene II, Page 24, Line 6 and 7.) Lysander replies, “Not Hermia, but Helena I love.” (Act II, Scene II, Page 24, Line 11) Believing she is being ridiculed, Helena says, “Wherefore was I to this keen mockery born?” (Act II, Scene II, Page 24, Line21.) Puck does the same thing to Demetrius, causing him to fall in love with Helena (Act III, Scene II.) “O Helen, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine! To what, my love, shall I compare thine eye,” (Act III, Scene II, Page 35, Line 26 and 27).

This is what Demetrius says to Helena after he discovers his love for her. Helena, again feeling she is being made fun of says, “O spite! O hell! I see you all are bent in merriment to set against me for you merriment. But you must join in souls to mock me too?”(Act III, Scene II, Page 35 and 36, Line 34, 35, and 3). This causes most of the difficulty in love during the play for it sends the young lovers on a wild goose chase after each other in the woods.

Near the end of the play Theseus and Egeus must all go into the woods to search for the young lovers. However, the quarrel also affects Titania and Nick Bottom. When Puck turns Nick Bottom’s head into that of an ass (Act III, Scene 1), Titania awakes to him and having been cursed with the love potion, immediately falls in love with him. She says, “On the first view to say, to swear, I love thee” (Act III, Scene 1, Page 30, Line 1.) After this occurs, Bottom’s fellow thespians are in desperation when they can not find him.” This leads to most of the comical sense of the play.

Romeo And Juliet With Midsummer Nights Dream

“Lord, What fools these mortals be… ” That’s what Robin Goodfellow from the book “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” remarked. It is inevitably the truth. The aspect of love can mar the human mind. It’s hard to explain and hard to fit into mere words. Three main kinds of love seen most often in literature are romanticism, family, and friendship love. An example would be heartily clarified using the books “Romeo and Juliet” along with “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” by Shakespeare. Most often, the romanticism is greatly appreciated by the audience.

Tales of chivalry intrigue the human mind, making it yearn for more. This kind of love is between a man and a woman who most often wish to be bonded by marriage. Hermia and Lysander can be compared to Romeo and Juliet. They were both fanatical for eachother, and madly doted on one another with such fervor. Though there were some small contrasts, Hermia and Lysander’s love was tampered with by magic, while Romeo and Juliet’s was their complete facination with one another.

That is romanticism. Family love is a warm feeling of being protected by the one that you were birthed to, or has taken care of you the majority of your life. In the case of these books, we’ll use Egeus and Hermia. It’s possible that Egeus might have actually loved Hermia, unlike Lord Capulet towards Juliet. Capulet didn’t sincerely care about Juliet’s feelings; it was only pertinent for the political value to him that Juliet could have brought with her marriage to Paris.

It doesn’t mention Hermia’s mother, but Juliet’s mother is quite detached and uncaring. This most surely arises from the fact that Juliet’s mother was so young when she gave birth to Juliet. Friendship love is completely different from family or romantic love. you can depend on friends to help you through things that people who are too close, like family or ignificant others who cannot help. To Helena she was Hermia’s best friend, and Romeo to Mercutio. Yet, Romeo and Mercutio stayed true to eachother, whiel Helena betrayed Hermia.

Of course, different insights lead to different views. Love is something that will live through out ages, not only in literature but also in people’s hearts. Love is hard to simply be depleted. Now, there are far more categories of love than these three. To take them all into consideration would mean you’d have to become immortal. While all three of these contrast greatly, there is some mutual feeling between them, which is basic love, no matter how you look at it.

Shakespeare Finds Love on a Midsummer Night

The forest outside Athens is filled with changelings, magic, and ancient myth: in other words, the stage is set. The night is silent and still as four mortals alternately hate and love, monarchs of the faerie world clash wills, and the mischief of one irrepressible woodland sprite weaves a spell over all. The breath of the darkness is lit with the glow of foxfire; hearts are broken and mended within the span of short hours. In the bower of the Faerie Queen a man transformed by magic slumbers peacefully.

The pen of William Shakespeare has captured the imagination and hearts of audiences and readers alike across the world and through the decades, but his classic romantic comedy, A Midsummer Nights Dream, offers something much more profound. Shakespeare has found insight into the heart, and, through his verse, best exemplifies the complicated and capricious emotions found there. The play, much like reality, is sprinkled throughout with gems of humor, and it will continue to fascinate as long as there is love.

Shakespeares characters are certainly the most important part of A Midsummer Nights Dream. All action must be carried out through them; all ideas must be transported to the audience through their moves and dialogue. The first and most obvious characters are the four mortal lovers. The women, Helena and Hermia, are respectively tall and fair, short and dark; there are no other notable differences between them. The men, Lysander and Demetrius, have no differences in personality that are remarked upon in the text of the play.

Outside the walls of Athens, inside the enchanted forest, the courts of Oberon, king of the faeries, and Titania, his queen, hold sway. The two magistrates quarrel often, but know they are meant for each other, no matter how they scowl. Their adventures include Bottom, a town actor turned into an ass by Oberon to seek revenge on Titania. The last major role in Dream is Robin Goodfellow, more commonly known as Puck. He is mischievous and playful; his role in the faerie court is to entertain Oberon and run his errands, as he tells the faeries in Act 2 when he is introduced.

In human nature and all its facets, there is a certain amount of inherent mirth, including sarcasm, and Shakespeare does not neglect this mirth in his writing. First, humor is used as a sort of release valve. When the emotional tension begins to run too high, one of the characters will utilize this humor, as does Lysander to Demetrius in a heated exchange over the hand of Hermia: Lysander You have her fathers love, Demetrius; Let me have Hermias, do you marry him. This keeps the action interesting but not overly dramatic.

The queen of the faeries, Titania, is one of the most dignified characters in the play. Shakespeare arranges for her to fall in love with Bottom, transformed into an ass. The acting group to which Bottom belongs before and after his transformation is performing their own modified version of “Pyramus and Thisbe,” a folktale that Shakespeare has changed to suit his purposes, and the great mess they make of it in front of the duke Theseus on his wedding day is one of the most famous comic moments in history.

This performance is given at the end of the play, after everything is righted, and encourages the audience to laugh and understand that all can be good. Without the laughter, the play could not have had a truly happy ending. When in love, people are inclined to withdraw their fancies from the reach of reason and rational thinking. William Shakespeare lets his characters deliver this message in several different manners. The four lovers show no distinguishing features or personalities.

By presenting the lovers as interchangeable, Shakespeare displays and probes the mysteries of how lovers find differences- compelling, life-shaping differences- when there seem to be only likenesses. Helena and Hermia differ only in height and complexion, and both are thought to be beautiful: Helena How happy some oer other some can be! Through Athens I am thought as fair as she. Helena remarks, commenting on her sad situation when Demetrius forsakes her for Hermia. The male lovers are so devoid of description, be it of personality or physical traits, that they may as well be bald, bad-tempered midgets.

However, this serves Shakespeare very well. At the beginning of the plot, three of the lovers have created a triangle with Hermia at the apex and Helena excluded. Both men worship the ground Hermia walks on, though Helena is in every way her equal. As the story progresses, the triangles shift magically, and none of the participants notice. In life, people are often blind to the fact that reason had nothing to do with their decisions. Lysander, when he falls in love with Helena, attributes it to the fact that his heart was immature when he loved Hermia.

The Age of Shakespeare

The second half of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th are sometimes called in England “The Age of Shakespeare”. William Shakespeare’s the greatest English poet and dramatist and an indisputed world figure in literature. Altought his works (37 play, 154 sonnets and two long poems) are well knwnall over the world we know little about his life. Shakespeare was born on 23 April 1564, at stratford -upon-Avon, a little town in the heart of England. He was educated at the local grammarschool but as his father’s business went from bad to worse, he had to leave school and begin to earn his living.

We next hear of him when were eighteen and a married man. At the age of twenty-one, he set off to seek his fortune in the gratuity of London. There, he was inturn a horse-keep, a stage-boy, a play mender and finally a play-Wright. Shakespeare spent the last years of his life at Stratford, where he died on the 23rd of April 1616. William Shakespeare was a great humanist. His interes in the life and the people of his time made him watch with an observant eye the scenery of his native country, men and women in all walks of life, their appearance, habits and speech.

He was familiar with the traditions of English folklore and showed deep concern for his people and his county’s destiny. which are caracterized by a more serene atmosphere. Altought Shakespeare’s language is very difficult, almost evry word combination forms a picture. To understand Shakespeare (both his language and his ideas), we have not “to read” but “to study” his works as our great poet Mihai Eminescu said. The apeat compilation of stiles from the comical group of William Shakespeare has a tipical example in A Midsummer Nigt’s Dream.

In this opera, the “Mask”-specific for this time joins to the popular medieval theatre elements, represented by the guilds & english folklore. (The place of conventional cupidon has been taken by the elf Puck, known by the people as Robyn Good Fellow. Using elements from the world of popular tales the fantastic of Shakespeare is realist, elfs & fairys has human characteristics. By noticing the real life, shakespeare found the main characteristics of this dramatical “fraek”: the victory of human sentiments against the lows of an old century.

But, this victory is not complete; the poet remarks the conventionalism of happy-end trought the voice of actor handicrafts man, who used to say so often the truyh A Midsummer Night’s Dream (c. 1595-1596). Its fantasy-filled insouciance is achieved by the interweaving of several plots involving two pairs of noble lovers, a group of bumbling and unconsciously comic townspeople, and members of the fairy realm, notably Puck, King Oberon, and Queen Titania. These three worlds are brought together in a series of encounters that veer from the magical to the absurd and back again in the space of only a few lines.

In Act III, for example, Oberon plays a trick on Titania while she sleeps, employng Puck to anoint her with a potion that will causeher to fall in lowe whit the first creature she sees on waking. As luck would have it, she opens her eyes to the sight of Bottom the weaver; himself adorned by Puck with an ass’s head. Yet the comic episode of the Queen of the Fairies “enamoured of an ass” (4. i. 76) echoes the play’s more profound concerns with the nature of the real.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare wrote many plays during his lifetime. Some of his plays have similar comedic characteristics and then other plays are the exact opposite of comedy. Shakespeare wrote tragedies, romance, history, comedy and problem plays all with great success. During the performance of these plays there was no scenery so great time was taken when developing the characters and the plot so the plays would be entertaining. A Midsummers Night’s Dream and Much Ado About Nothing are just two of the comedies Shakespeare wrote. These two plays have many things in common where as Measure for Measure is a problem play with a totally different tone.

Comparing and contrasting these three plays will help us to understand what Shakespeare thought comedy was in the 1600’s and to see if our views on comedy are the same today. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a festive comedy. The play takes place in June and this is a bewitched time. In the spring the custom is to celebrate the return of fertility to the earth. During this time the young people spend the night in the woods to celebrate. Shakespeare uses the greenworld pattern in this play. The play begins in the city, moves out to the country and then back to the city.

Being in the country makes things better because there is tranquility, freedom and people can become uncivilized versus when they are in the city and have to follow customs and laws and behave rationally. Comedies contain blocking figures and in this play it is Egeus. If he was not in the way, Hermia could marry Lysander. Since he is causing problems in his daughters life by trying to make her marry Demetrius, this begins the journey into the woods. Egeus threatened Hermia with death if she were to marry Lysander so she thinks the only way they can be together is to run away.

One strange element is why Egeus was so set on Hermia marrying Demetrius. Lysander came from as good a family as Demetrius. Both were well possessed with property and money so Egeus’s power is made to seem senseless. The play moves into the woods which is haunted by fairies who are there to bless the wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta. The quarreling between Oberon and Titania over the changeling boy leads to the king wanting to embarrass Titania with the love juice by making her fall in love with a monster. The first person she sees is Bottom and she falls violently in love with him. Oberon is making a spectacle of Titania and Bottom.

It is ridiculous that she is in love with him because he is from such a lower class than her, he is human and she is a fairy, and he has the head of an ass. She is also a queen and he is an uneducated working man and a match like this would never happen. Bottom has such a problem with language. He speaks in malapropisms. He tries to say one word but always comes up with the wrong one. He is a working man who tries to act more educated that he really is . Through Bottom and Titania we see that love is blind. Also, while Titania is under the influence of the love juice she releases the changeling boy to Oberon so he did accomplish his goal.

The confusion between Lysander, Hermia, Helena, and Demetrius because of the love juice is full of funny occurrences. When Lysander wakes up and thinks he is in love with Helena, Hermia is ignored and treated badly by Lysander. Then not only was Lysander saying he loved Helena, Demetrius was also treating Hermia badly.

This left poor Hermia so upset but we as the audience know this is a prank and soon the spell will be lifted. The main characters in the play are all developed to a point where the audience can identify with them. We learn things about them individually so we can feel happy or sad when things happen in their life.

I felt sad for Hermia when she was jolted by Lysander because their love for each other had seemed so strong and she was so confused by his behavior. Even though the audience knows the truth it is easy to feel sad for her. As the play nears the end, Oberon lifts the spell and everyone seems to believe they have had a rare vision and then their lives go on just as if none of this had happened. The play brings closure to the reader by having the traditional ending of a comedy. They usually end in weddings and a feast which is exactly what happens in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Lysander and Hermia, Helena and Demetrius, and Theseus and Hippolyta all get married which signifies a new beginning. The working men end the play with a Bergomask dance and the fairies join in the dance and bless the marriages. A Midsummer Night’s Dream contains many elements of a comedy. The most important ones to me are that the play ends happily, it is funny and it made me laugh. Shakespeare wrote Much Ado About Nothing which is also a comedy, but it is a different type of comedy than A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Although these two plays share some common elements, they also have differences.

Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy of intrigue. It involves suspense, question and has a detective story element. Within the comedy of intrigue, there is social comedy involving Beatrice and Benedick. Through this couple and Claudio and Hero, the play explores the was people interact with each other. Shakespeare shows that love can be very logical but also very passionate. Claudio and Hero have a love that is soft, delicate and logical. Beatrice and Benedick on the other hand, are very passionately in love with each other and show this by quarreling constantly. Claudio’s obsession with Hero is from a distance.

He worships her and is astonished with her beauty. His love for her is very shallow because he does not know her as a person. Claudio is being logical about marriage by inquiring about Hero’s financial state and social standing. After finding out she is an only child, he agrees to let Don Pedro woo Hero in his favor so she would be his wife. When Claudio and Don Pedro put their plan into action at the masked ball, Don John appears. He acts as a blocking figure in this play and causes many problems. He tells Claudio that Don Pedro wants Hero for himself, which is a lie, but Claudio acts like “easy come easy go”.

He is not very upset that he just lost his soon to be bride. When the truth comes out, the wedding day is set and the planning begins. Don John is once again planning to ruin things. He is a jealous, sour and unhappy person. The greenworld is also used in this play but not for festive activities. It is used for plotting bad things that will hurt people. After Claudio is led to believe Hero was cheating on him, he becomes malicious and wants revenge. Claudio disgraces Hero at the wedding. He refuses to marry her in front of all the guests and accuses her of already having sex with someone else.

This serious act of revenge causes the audience to feel sorry for not only Hero, but her family as well because we know that was not her kissing Borachio. The audience may have felt worse for Hero if her character had been more fully developed but she hardly ever spoke even when agreeing to marry Claudio. We can feel sorry for her but not really identify with her because we do not know her very well. Hero is made a spectacle of for no truthful reason and disgraces her family. After Hero faints at the wedding, Beatrice is furious. She wants revenge against Claudio.

Finally she and Benedick declare their love for each other which was made possible by being under tension and emotional stress and she was finally able to let down her guard. She feels out of control because she needs a man to kill Claudio. She is usually able to take care of things herself but not this time. Thankfully Benedick will not kill Claudio and the truth comes out because of Dogberry and Verges. When the night watchmen overhear Borachio talking about the scheme Dogberry and Verges bring him and his comrade to their superior. It is funny this watchmen could catch anyone doing anything wrong.

The watchmen are like Bottom and are comical. They have the same problem as Bottom and have great difficulty communicating. After the truth is out that Claudio was fooled into thinking that Hero was cheating on him, he is full of grief because he believes Hero is dead. He agrees to marry Leonato’s niece, who is supposed to look just like Hero, to make up his terrible mistake to he family. After he marries the masked bride, he is happy to see it is Hero. This certainly is a marriage of convenience. He did not know Hero anyway so it would not have mattered if he knew the bride to be.

In a sense, Hero was resurrected from the dead and Claudio ends up being a very lucky guy. Most of the characters are fully developed, except Hero, so we can identify with their grief and then their joy. As the play comes to an end everything is wrapped in a neat package. Don John is captured and brought back to be punished, Claudio and Hero, and Beatrice and Benedick are married and the dance and the feast begin. Measure for Measure is a play that is very different from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The comedy in this play is very raw. The atmosphere of the two plays are different but they both deal with the same issue of sexuality.

After the Duke has left the city in Angelo’s hands, he wants to show his power by condemning Claudio to death because he got Juliet pregnant. Angelo is not being reasonable because he has let the power go to his head. Angelo has also had sex out of wedlock, he just did not get Mariana pregnant. In this play sex is portrayed as much more dangerous than it has been in the other two plays. After Claudio is jailed, he makes a plea to his sister, Isabella , to help him obtain a pardon for his offense. Isabella had not yet taken her vows to become a nun so she agrees to help him.

Isabella and Angelo are parallel characters. Both live with great restraint. After Isabella pleads with Angelo to pardon her brother, he comes up with the idea of an exchange for Claudio’s freedom. He wants Isabella to sleep with him so he could have her virginity and then he would pardon Claudio. Angelo is a very cold person with no feelings and has restrained himself tremendously throughout his life. He has a problem with women and he is tempted more by a virtuous woman than a frivolous one. In a soliloquy, he talks to himself and tries to understand his lust for Isabella.

He has a violent image of sex with her because he wants to destroy her virtue. Angelo is very cruel. He is going to torture and kill Claudio and he is getting pleasure by controlling Isabella. this play is dealing with power and who has the most. After the Duke, disguised as the Friar, over hears Isabella telling Claudio she will not sleep with Angelo, he comes up with a plan. Isabella would agree to meet Angelo at midnight and they would send Mariana instead because the two of them were supposed to have been married before but her dowry was lost at sea and Angelo had backed out on the marriage.

The plan works but Angelo goes back on his word and orders Claudio’s head delivered to him at once. The Friar helps keep Claudio in hiding so everyone would think he was dead. The Friar then returns as the Duke and Angelo’s world begins to unravel. He is publicly exposed so everyone will know what king of a person he is. He has been tricked into marriage and is now a very miserable person. Although he had the ultimate power for a brief time, heabused it and now has to suffer the consequences for a lifetime. After Claudio is produces and allowed to marry Juliet, the Duke asks for Isabella’s hand in marriage.

The satire in this play looks at the two extremes and the audience tries to believe something in the middle. The language used in this play is crude when they are discussing sex. The men in the city talk about sex in a nasty ways discussing how many diseases they have gotten from the hoars. Sex is portrayed as a vile and nasty thing. Measure for Measure is visually unlike other plays. There is insistence on laws that are very extreme. People are being measured in judgement. It shows that you should be reasonable and weigh things out before actions are taken.

These three plays all have different messages which are told in various ways. As a writer, Shakespeare was so talented he could write different types of stories with such grace. These three plays are just a few examples of the different extremes he was capable of. Writing and defining comedy can be very difficult. Many elements of comedy are in his plays and this makes they very enjoyable reading. Comedy helps me to identify with stories since I like happy endings much better than tragic endings. After finishing a book, I like to have a feeling of closure and in these comedies my need is fulfilled.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream character, Demetrius

The Underpinning of Demetrius Thesis: A Midsummer Night’s Dream character, Demetrius is very difficult to identify except by his relation to the one he loves, or, more particularly, to the one who loves him. Helena’s ridiculous chasing after him and his irritation with her are the primary marks of his character. While in this uncharmed state, he even begins to threaten Helena with bodily harm, coming off as not quite the gracious courtly lover he truly means to be. It’s simple to discover his unchivalrous character by how easily his eye was distracted from Helena by Hermia in the beginning.

He could be a gentle, loving man if he truly desired, but he takes satisfaction being put in his place by others. In the end, still under the spell of fairy magic and therefore not seeing with true eyes, he seems a bit imbecilic laughing at the acted “lovers” in the play. He doesn’t realize it, but he is in a play of his own. Likewise, as with the other characters, what happens to him is far more interesting than the sort of character he is. I. Demetrius’ unwelcome deceit and shrewdness and what is discovered A.

Since Demetrius only has two lines throughout the entire first act, it shows that he can’t stand up for himself, likewise, this lack of speech displays his lack of self-confidence and image: Relent, sweet Hermia, and, Lysander, yield Thy crazed title to my certain right. (Demetrius, 1. 1. 93-94) Demetrius believes that since he has Egeus’ approval, that Hermia should relinquish to him and states that Lysander is going against his privilege. B. Demetrius takes advantage of his stature by claiming Hermia as a right, which truly portrays his instability, but, at the same time shows that in true he loves Hermia.

It is absolutely obvious that he is well supported by Egeus: Scornful Lysander, true, he hath my love; And what is mine my love shall render him. And she is mine, and all my right of her I do estate unto Demetrius. (Egeus, 1. 1. 97-100) He depends on Egeus to display his affection and Egeus concludes by actually enforcing Demetrius’ love upon her. C. Initially in love with Hermia, he uses rudeness to ward off Helena’s “spaniel” affection, being very ruthless towards the feelings of Helena: I’ll run from thee and hide me in the brakes And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. Demetrius, 2. 1. 234-235) He cares nothing even for her life and just absolutely crushing her dear emotions. D. It always seems that he is usually taking advantage of the situations he is in, like when he tries to pursue Hermia due to Lysander’s absence, but uses harsh words: I had rather give his [Lysander] carcass to my hounds .

An if I could, what should Iget therefor? (Demetrius, 3. 2. 66,80) A privilege never to see me more. And from thy hated presence part I [so. ] See me no more, whether he be dead or no. Hermia, 3. 2. 81-83) Demetrius displays his awful characteristics with such demoralizing words and complete disrespect for Lysander. He will desire any hopes of attaining her affection. She scorns him after hearing these words, never wanting him to see her again. E. Since Demetrius had indeed made some convincing threats of violence against his unwanted love, Hermia automatically suspects him for murdering Lysander: It cannot be but thou hast murdered him. So should a murderer look, so dead, so grim. (Hermia, 3. 2. 58-59) F.

Helena is so true to Demetrius, but he denounces her to a point of no return, threatening to rape her: You do impeach your modesty too much To leave the city and commit yourself Into the hands of one that loves you not, To trust the opportunity of night And the ill counsel of a desert place With the rich worth of your virginity. (Demetrius, 2. 1. 221-226) This is such a tremendous insult and Helena accepts by “Your [Demetrius] virtue is my privilege. ” II. The Analogous, Yet Similar: Lysander and Demetrius A. Demetrius and Lysander are somewhat alike, lacking in individuality, virtually indistinguishable. B. Demetrius only seems to love the external beauty of the women and doesn’t recognize the inner-beauty with true feelings. As opposed to from Lysander’s luring manner, which is based on internal emotions and tries his best to express with passionate words: How now, my love? Why is your cheek so pale? How chance the roses there do fade so fast?

The course of true love never did run smooth. (Lysander, 1. 1. 130-136) On the contrary, Demetrius is only sensitive to physical affection: An if I could, what should I get therefor? Demetrius, 3. 2. 80) He is only concerned with what he can receive (SEX) from the pitiful relationship. C. These statements have also altered due to the circumstances of the characters. When Lysander and Hermia are in the woods alone, all he can think about is getting Hermia to come to bed with him. It is not as compulsive as desperate Demetrius, but he gets put back in his place: Lysander: So that but one heart we can make of it; Two bosoms interchained with an oath– So then two bosoms and a single troth.

Then by your side no bed-room me deny, For lying so, Hermia, I do not lie. Hermia: But, gentle friend, for love and courtesy, Lie further off in human modesty. Such separation, as may well be said, Becomes a virtuous bachelor and a maid. So far be distant; and good night, sweet friend. Thy love ne’re alter till thy sweet life end! (2. 2. 51-66) Demetrius, even though under the influence of fairy magic, displays that he can be poetic and romantic, with a bit of a stretch: … O, how ripe in show Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!

That pure congealed white, high Taurus’ snow, Fanned with the eastern wind, turns to a crow When thou hold’st up the hand… (Demetrius, 3. 2. 142-146) D. Hollindale explains Demetrius’ unique characteristics, “Demetrius, in accepting the pattern of audible rhythmic completions, is participating with Helena in this quarrel. (2. 2. 90-93). This shows that he enjoys fighting with women and is somewhat flattered by their attraction to him! ” E. In Demetrius’ only in Act one, he refers to his claims to the public nature of Athenian citizenship.

He points out the political stature of his being that constitutes Hermia as his. Lysander’s affection, on the contrary, is a more purified, emotional one with true feelings flourishing. III. Demetrius’ Personality and Emotions (Not Under the Fairy Magic Flower) A. When Helena and Demetrius appear in the wood for the second time, their brief dialogue is a diminutive display of imploring and rejecting, meeting and parting, opening and closing of physical space. These lines reflect the movement of action: Helena: Stay, though thou kill me, sweet Demetrius. Demetrius: I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.

Helena: O, wilt thou darkling leave me? Do not so. Demetrius: Stay, on thy peril. I alone will go. (2. 2. 90-93) B. Demetrius couldn’t possibly love Helena while in his quest for Hermia. He results to severely degrading her, portraying his callous side: I love thee not; therefore pursue thee not . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more… Tell you I do not, [nor] I cannot love you? (Demetrius, 2. 1. 195-208) C. Demetrius is a less poetic and romantic figure which is based on his (doggish) perception of women, violent and unchivalrous.

D. A rude colloquial dismissiveness towards unwanted comes more naturally to Demetrius. When he shakes off Helena, he portrays a “terse and charmless candour”(Mcleish): Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth . . . . . . . . . . . . Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit, For I am sick when I do look on thee. (Demetrius, 2. 1. 206-219) E. Shown through Demetrius’ hostile passages toward Helena are: typical lovers’ speeches, where apparently thin, formal and declamatory verbal gestures which contain more than they seem to. Loutro) F. After Hermia had completely shut him out of her life, Demetrius actually felt some true, real emotion. He sees no reason to pursue Hermia any further while she is in such a state, and he decides to fall asleep, hoping this will lighten the effect of the sorrow: So sorrow’s heaviness doth heavier grow For debt that bankrout [sleep] doth sorrow owe, Which now in some slight measure it will pay, If for his tender here I make some stay. (Demetrius, 3. 2. 81-89) G. ” ‘Pyramus and Thisbe’ evokes to tears of laughter rather than sorrow in the lovers (false) eyes.

Lyricism and comedy distance, the passionate quarrels between Demetrius and Lysander, Hermia and Helena. It alludes to the tragic possibilities of a conflict between love and opposition”(Belsey). Demetrius, like all the others, is mocking the play by the rude mechanicals: It is the wittiest parition that ever I heard discourse, my lord . . . . . . . . . . . . No remedy, my lord, when walls are so williful to hear without warning. (Demetrius, 5. 1) IV. Demetrius’ Altered Personality and Emotions (Under the Spell of the Flower) Sensitivity A.

The love juice has done it’s work, and its work is utterly to abolish the conscious interval between one romantic loyalty and another. Demetrius change of love is marked by exaggerated articulary the moment his eyes open: O Helen, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine! To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne? (Demetrius, 3. 2. 140-141) B. He affection toward Hermia had all but withered and he cared nothing for her anymore and replies to Lysander: Lysander, keep thy Hermia. I will none. If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone.

My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourned, And now to Helen is it home returned, There to remain. (Demetrius, 3. 2. 172-176) C. Demetrius immediately becomes extremely violent toward Lysander: I say I love thee more than he can do. (Demetrius, 3. 2. 261) This is so ridiculous due to the fact that everything has shifted from Hermia to Helena: If thou say so withdraw and prove it too. (Lysander, 3. 2. 262) D. Even though he begins to notice that everything has totally altered with his relations, he goes with his instinct and heart(! : But like sickness did I loathe this food, But, as in health, come to my natural taste Now I do wish it, love it, long for it. And will forevermore be true to it. (Demetrius, 4. 1. 180-185) E. Demetrius, even though he seems so hopeless and deceitful, actually really yearned for the love of Hermia in the beginning, but just wasn’t stand enough to be her mate. Conclusion: Muir explains this with excellent views: It seems that his [Demetrius] personality (mood) is based on what he wants and to whom he needs to manipulate to attain the love he desires and perseveres for.

The themes of waking and dreaming, reality and illusion, reason and imagination, change and transformation are all experienced by Demetrius to a great extent, especially with his lovers and enemies. His vile, yet sensitive personality really kept the reader examining what he could change into next, which the seem as if they were more than just a single character. Demetrius, as a character, is essential to the play, for a backbone and plot.

Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

In Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream the mortal teenage characters fall in love foolishly, and the character Bottom states, O what fools these mortals be. They are foolish because they act like children. Although Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena appear grown-up, when they are in love they act foolishly. The four teenage lovers are fools. Demetrius is a fool because he is unaware that his love changes through out the play. At the start of the play Demetrius does not love Helena. (II ii,line 188) Demetrius says, I love thee not, therefore pursue me not.

II ii,line 194) Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more. In III ii, Demetrius after being juiced begins to love Helena. (III ii,line 169-173) Demetrius says, Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none. If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone. My heart to her but as guest- wise sojourned, And now to Helen is it home returned, There to remain. This proves he is a fool, because he is not aware of his changing love for Helena. Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her but she still persists in chasing him. Demetrius shows no love for Helena.

II i,line 227-228) Demetrius says, I’ll run from thee, and hide me in the brakes, And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. (II i,line 199-201) Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth Tell you I do not, nor I cannot love you? Demetrius clearly illustrates to Helena that he has no interest, but Helena persists. (II i,line 202-204) Helena says, And even for that do I love you the more. I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius, The more you beat me, I will fawn on you. (II i,line 220-222) Your virtue is my privilege.

For that It is not night when I do see your face, Therefore I think I am not in the night; This proves that Helena is a fool because Demetrius does not love her, but she still persists. Lysander is a fool because he persuades Hermia to avoid death and run away with him. Hermia must marry Demetrius or she will be put to death. (I i,line 83-88) Theseus says, Take time to pause, and, by the next new moon- The sealing-day betwixt my love and me, For everlasting bond fellowship- Upon that day either prepare to die For disobedience to your father’s will, Or else to wed Demetrius, as he would, Hermia does not love Demetrius.

I i,line 140) Hermia says, O hell! To choose love by another’s eyes. Hermia loves Lysander. (I i,line 150-155) If then true lovers have been ever crossed, It stands as an edict in destiny. Then let us teach or trial patience, Because it is a customary cross, As due to love, as thoughts and dreams and sighs, Wishes and tears, poor fancy’s followers. Lysander has an alternative idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, I have a widow aunt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child; *From Athens is her house remote seven leagues.

I i,line 164- 165) Steal forth thy father’s house tomorrow night, And in the wood, a league without the town. Lysander is a fool because he convinces Hermia to risk death and run away with him. Hermia is a fool because she risks death for love. Hermia is to marry Demetrius, or be put to death. (I i,line 95-98) Egeus says, Scornful Lysander, true, he hath my love, And what is mine my love shall render him. And she is mine, and all my right of her I do estate unto Demetrius. Lysander suggests an idea. (I i,line 157-159) Lysander says, A good persuasion. Therefore her me, Hermia.

I have a aunt, a dowager Of great revenue, and she hath no child; Hermia agrees with the idea. (I i,line 168-169) Hermia says, My good Lysander, I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow, (I i,line 178) Tomorrow truly will I meet thee. Hermia is a fool because she is risking death for the love of Lysander. Therefore this proves, the four teenage lovers are fools. (VI i, Theseus states) Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. William Shakespeare’s A Midsummers Night’s Dream shows how childishly foolish lovers can be.

Interpretating the Title of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

The title of the play A Midsummer Night’s Dream can have many interpretations. I will give you my thoughts on the relationship of the title to the different situations that take place in the play. These interpretations give insight and overall meaning to the thematic nature of Shakespeare’s work. Although I am only going to describe three interpretations of the title, there are many other meanings to the title.

The first interpretation of the title of the play that comes to my mind was the magical dream-like night in the woods, when Robin Goodfellow and Oberon, the king of the fairies, used several kinds of love potions, and messed everything up. When the lovers awoke in the morning they thought all of the ridiculous things that had happened or been said the night before had just all been a dream. However, if Oberon had been more specific in his directions to Robin, “a sweet Athenian lady is in love with a disdainful youth.

Anoint his eyes… thou shalt know the man by the Athenian garments he hath on,” all of this could have been avoided and everything would have been fine (page 53). This gives insight to the thematic nature of the work by setting a magical like atmosphere for the lovers to be in. The second interpretation could be of the dream Bottom thought he had when Titania, the queen of the fairies, had fallen in love with him when he looked like an ass.

He wasn’t sure whether it was a dream or real because “the eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man’s hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report what [his] dream was” (page 135). The thematic nature of this is that there is no real explanation for love. Even Bottom himself said, “Reason and love keep little company together nowadays” (page 79). The third interpretation could have been that the entire play had been a dream.

Shakespeare might have written down the play through the eyes of Robin Goodfellow. Since Robin was involved in almost all the scenes, maybe he had just fallen asleep one day in the woods and dreamed up all this love and magic. Just like he says at the end of the play, “that you have but slumbered here while these visions did appear” (page 171). As I mentioned previously there are many other ways to interpret the plays title. The above three interpretations are what struck me while I was reading A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

I feel that Shakespeare wanted the reader to come to his/her own conclusion thus giving the play it’s own personal effect. In closing, no matter what your interpretation of this play’s title is, be it the magical night in the woods, Bottom’s dream, or the entire play being a dream, it is a great story and has much Shakespearian thematic nature throughout it. Free Essays – Interpretating the Title of A Midsummer Night’s Dream Midsummer Night’s Dream Interpretating the Title of A Midsummer Night’s Dream The title of the play A Midsummer Night’s Dream can have many interpretations.

I will give you my thoughts on the relationship of the title to the different situations that take place in the play. These interpretations give insight and overall meaning to the thematic nature of Shakespeare’s work. Although I am only going to describe three interpretations of the title, there are many other meanings to the title. The first interpretation of the title of the play that comes to my mind was the magical dream-like night in the woods, when Robin Goodfellow and Oberon, the king of the fairies, used several kinds of love potions, and messed everything up.

When the lovers awoke in the morning they thought all of the ridiculous things that had happened or been said the night before had just all been a dream. However, if Oberon had been more specific in his directions to Robin, “a sweet Athenian lady is in love with a disdainful youth. Anoint his eyes… thou shalt know the man by the Athenian garments he hath on,” all of this could have been avoided and everything would have been fine (page 53). This gives insight to the thematic nature of the work by setting a magical like atmosphere for the lovers to be in.

The second interpretation could be of the dream Bottom thought he had when Titania, the queen of the fairies, had fallen in love with him when he looked like an ass. He wasn’t sure whether it was a dream or real because “the eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man’s hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report what [his] dream was” (page 135). The thematic nature of this is that there is no real explanation for love.

Even Bottom himself said, “Reason and love keep little company together nowadays” (page 79). The third interpretation could have been that the entire play had been a dream. Shakespeare might have written down the play through the eyes of Robin Goodfellow. Since Robin was involved in almost all the scenes, maybe he had just fallen asleep one day in the woods and dreamed up all this love and magic. Just like he says at the end of the play, “that you have but slumbered here while these visions did appear” (page 171).

As I mentioned previously there are many other ways to interpret the plays title. The above three interpretations are what struck me while I was reading A Midsummer Night’s Dream. I feel that Shakespeare wanted the reader to come to his/her own conclusion thus giving the play it’s own personal effect. In closing, no matter what your interpretation of this play’s title is, be it the magical night in the woods, Bottom’s dream, or the entire play being a dream, it is a great story and has much Shakespearian thematic nature throughout it.

The Underpinning of Demetrius Thesis: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

The Underpinning of Demetrius Thesis: A Midsummer Night’s Dream character, Demetrius is very difficult to identify except by his relation to the one he loves, or, more particularly, to the one who loves him. Helena’s ridiculous chasing after him and his irritation with her are the primary marks of his character. While in this uncharmed state, he even begins to threaten Helena with bodily harm, coming off as not quite the gracious courtly lover he truly means to be. It’s simple to discover his unchivalrous character by how easily his eye was distracted from Helena by Hermia in the beginning.

He could be a gentle, loving man if he truly desired, but he takes satisfaction being put in his place by others. In the end, still under the spell of fairy magic and therefore not seeing with true eyes, he seems a bit imbecilic laughing at the acted “lovers” in the play. He doesn’t realize it, but he is in a play of his own. Likewise, as with the other characters, what happens to him is far more interesting than the sort of character he is. I. Demetrius’ unwelcome deceit and shrewdness and what is discovered A. Since Demetrius only has two lines throughout the entire first act, it shows that he can’t stand up for himself, likewise, this lack of speech displays his lack of self-confidence and image:

Relent, sweet Hermia, and, Lysander, yield Thy crazed title to my certain right. (Demetrius, 1. 1. 93-94) Demetrius believes that since he has Egeus’ approval, that Hermia should relinquish to him and states that Lysander is going against his privilege. B. Demetrius takes advantage of his stature by claiming Hermia as a right, which truly portrays his instability, but, at the same time shows that in true he loves Hermia.

It is absolutely obvious that he is well supported by Egeus: Scornful Lysander, true, he hath my love; And what is mine my love shall render him. And she is mine, and all my right of her I do estate unto Demetrius. (Egeus, 1. 1. 97-100) He depends on Egeus to display his affection and Egeus concludes by actually enforcing Demetrius’ love upon her. C. Initially in love with Hermia, he uses rudeness to ward off Helena’s “spaniel” affection, being very ruthless towards the feelings of Helena: I’ll run from thee and hide me in the brakes And leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts. Demetrius, 2. 1. 234-235) He cares nothing even for her life and just absolutely crushing her dear emotions. D. It always seems that he is usually taking advantage of the situations he is in, like when he tries to pursue Hermia due to Lysander’s absence, but uses harsh words: I had rather give his [Lysander] carcass to my hounds.

An if I could, what should Iget therefor? (Demetrius, 3. 2. 66,80) A privilege never to see me more. And from thy hated presence part I [so. ] See me no more, whether he be dead or no. Hermia, 3. 2. 81-83) Demetrius displays his awful characteristics with such demoralizing words and complete disrespect for Lysander. He will desire any hopes of attaining her affection. She scorns him after hearing these words, never wanting him to see her again. E. Since Demetrius had indeed made some convincing threats of violence against his unwanted love, Hermia automatically suspects him for murdering Lysander: It cannot be but thou hast murdered him.

So should a murderer look, so dead, so grim. (Hermia, 3. 2. 58-59) F. Helena is so true to Demetrius, but he denounces her to a point of no return, threatening to rape her: You do impeach your modesty too much To leave the city and commit yourself Into the hands of one that loves you not, To trust the opportunity of night And the ill counsel of a desert place With the rich worth of your virginity. (Demetrius, 2. 1. 221-226) This is such a tremendous insult and Helena accepts by “Your [Demetrius] virtue is my privilege. ” II. The Analogous, Yet Similar: Lysander and Demetrius A. Demetrius and Lysander are somewhat alike, lacking in individuality, virtually indistinguishable.

B. Demetrius only seems to love the external beauty of the women and doesn’t recognize the inner-beauty with true feelings. As opposed to from Lysander’s luring manner, which is based on internal emotions and tries his best to express with passionate words: How now, my love? Why is your cheek so pale? How chance the roses there do fade so fast? . . . . . . . . . . . The course of true love never did run smooth. (Lysander, 1. 1. 130-136) On the contrary, Demetrius is only sensitive to physical affection: An if I could, what should I get therefor? Demetrius, 3. 2. 80) He is only concerned with what he can receive (SEX) from the pitiful relationship. C. These statements have also altered due to the circumstances of the characters. When Lysander and Hermia are in the woods alone, all he can think about is getting Hermia to come to bed with him. It is not as compulsive as desperate Demetrius, but he gets put back in his place: Lysander: So that but one heart we can make of it; Two bosoms interchained with an oath– So then two bosoms and a single troth.

Then by your side no bed-room me deny, For lying so, Hermia, I do not lie. Hermia:  But, gentle friend, for love and courtesy, Lie further off in human modesty. Such separation, as may well be said, Becomes a virtuous bachelor and a maid. So far be distant; and good night, sweet friend. Thy love ne’re alter till thy sweet life end! (2. 2. 51-66) Demetrius, even though under the influence of fairy magic, displays that he can be poetic and romantic, with a bit of a stretch: … O, how ripe in show Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!

That pure congealed white, high Taurus’ snow, Fanned with the eastern wind, turns to a crow When thou hold’st up the hand… (Demetrius, 3. 2. 142-146) D. Hollindale explains Demetrius’ unique characteristics, “Demetrius, in accepting the pattern of audible rhythmic completions, is participating with Helena in this quarrel. (2. 2. 90-93). This shows that he enjoys fighting with women and is somewhat flattered by their attraction to him! ” E. In Demetrius’ only in Act one, he refers to his claims to the public nature of Athenian citizenship.

He points out the political stature of his being that constitutes Hermia as his. Lysander’s affection, on the contrary, is a more purified, emotional one with true feelings flourishing. III. Demetrius’ Personality and Emotions (Not Under the Fairy Magic Flower) A. When Helena and Demetrius appear in the wood for the second time, their brief dialogue is a diminutive display of imploring and rejecting, meeting and parting, opening and closing of physical space. These lines reflect the movement of action: Helena: Stay, though thou kill me, sweet Demetrius. Demetrius: I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.

Helena: O, wilt thou darkling leave me? Do not so. Demetrius: Stay, on thy peril. I alone will go. (2. 2. 90-93) B. Demetrius couldn’t possibly love Helena while in his quest for Hermia. He results to severely degrading her, portraying his callous side: I love thee not; therefore pursue thee not . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hence, get thee gone, and follow me no more… Tell you I do not, [nor] I cannot love you? (Demetrius, 2. 1. 195-208) C. Demetrius is a less poetic and romantic figure which is based on his (doggish) perception of women, violent and unchivalrous.

D. A rude colloquial dismissiveness towards unwanted comes more naturally to Demetrius. When he shakes off Helena, he portrays a “terse and charmless candour”(Mcleish): Do I entice you? Do I speak you fair? Or rather do I not in plainest truth . . . . . . . . . . . . Tempt not too much the hatred of my spirit, For I am sick when I do look on thee. (Demetrius, 2. 1. 206-219) E. Shown through Demetrius’ hostile passages toward Helena are: typical lovers’ speeches, where apparently thin, formal and declamatory verbal gestures which contain more than they seem to. Loutro) F. After Hermia had completely shut him out of her life, Demetrius actually felt some true, real emotion. He sees no reason to pursue Hermia any further while she is in such a state, and he decides to fall asleep, hoping this will lighten the effect of the sorrow: So sorrow’s heaviness doth heavier grow For debt that bankrout [sleep] doth sorrow owe, Which now in some slight measure it will pay, If for his tender here I make some stay. (Demetrius, 3. 2. 81-89) G. ” ‘Pyramus and Thisbe’ evokes to tears of laughter rather than sorrow in the lovers (false) eyes.

Lyricism and comedy distance, the passionate quarrels between Demetrius and Lysander, Hermia and Helena. It alludes to the tragic possibilities of a conflict between love and opposition”(Belsey). Demetrius, like all the others, is mocking the play by the rude mechanicals: It is the wittiest parition that ever I heard discourse, my lord . . . . . . . . . . . . No remedy, my lord, when walls are so williful to hear without warning. (Demetrius, 5. 1) IV. Demetrius’ Altered Personality and Emotions (Under the Spell of the Flower) Sensitivity A.

The love juice has done it’s work, and its work is utterly to abolish the conscious interval between one romantic loyalty and another. Demetrius change of love is marked by exaggerated articulary the moment his eyes open: O Helen, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine! To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne? (Demetrius, 3. 2. 140-141) B. He affection toward Hermia had all but withered and he cared nothing for her anymore and replies to Lysander: Lysander, keep thy Hermia. I will none. If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone.

My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourned, And now to Helen is it home returned, There to remain. (Demetrius, 3. 2. 172-176) C. Demetrius immediately becomes extremely violent toward Lysander: I say I love thee more than he can do. (Demetrius, 3. 2. 261) This is so ridiculous due to the fact that everything has shifted from Hermia to Helena: If thou say so withdraw and prove it too. (Lysander, 3. 2. 262) D. Even though he begins to notice that everything has totally altered with his relations, he goes with his instinct and heart(! : But like sickness did I loathe this food, But, as in health, come to my natural taste Now I do wish it, love it, long for it. And will forevermore be true to it. (Demetrius, 4. 1. 180-185) E. Demetrius, even though he seems so hopeless and deceitful, actually really yearned for the love of Hermia in the beginning, but just wasn’t stand enough to be her mate. Conclusion: Muir explains this with excellent views: It seems that his [Demetrius] personality (mood) is based on what he wants and to whom he needs to manipulate to attain the love he desires and perseveres for.

The themes of waking and dreaming, reality and illusion, reason and imagination, change and transformation are all experienced by Demetrius to a great extent, especially with his lovers and enemies. His vile, yet sensitive personality really kept the reader examining what he could change into next, which the seem as if they were more than just a single character. Demetrius, as a character, is essential to the play, for a backbone and plot.

Waking Up From A Midsummer Night’s Dream

As with every play we read this quarter, we started A Midsummer Night s Dream with only a text. Reading the script is the foundation of Shakespeare, and the least evolved of the ways that one can experience it. There is no one to interpret the words, no body movement o! r voice inflection to indicate meaning or intention. All meaning that a reader understands comes from the words alone. The simplicity of text provides a broad ground for imagination, in that every reader can come away from the text with a different conception of what went on.

The words are erely the puzzle pieces individuals put together to bring coherence and logic to the play. Although we all read generally the same words, we can see that vastly different plays arise depending on who interprets them. By interpreting the word-clues that Shakespeare wrote into the script to direct the performance of the play, we were able to imagine gestures, expressions, and movements appropriate to the intention of the playwright. An example of this can be seen in the different Romeo and Juliets: Luhrman clearly had a more modern vision after reading the script than did Zeffirelli did only 18 years before.

The live performance at the CalPoly theatre also carried ! with it a very different feel less intense, more child-like and sweet with nearly the same words. Reading also affects our experience in that without the text, we would most likely not be able to enjoy Shakespeare at all; having the text makes Shakespeare widely accessible (available for free on the web) to all that desire it. Once the script is obtained, anyone can perform Shakespeare even everyday, non-actor citizens put on Shakespeare whether it be in parks, at school, or in a forest.

My experience reading Shakepearean plays has shown me that reading s necessary and fundamental part of grasping the fullness of the works. I had wanted to read A Midsummer Night’s Dream for quite some time. Besides being a play by Shakespeare, I believe my desire to do so came from seeing bits and pieces of it done in Hollywood movies like Dead Poet’s Society. I didn’t realize how much small exposures like! those could cause me to prejudge the actual text; after I had read the play for myself I was surprised at how much the text differed from my expectations.

Not knowing the whole of the plot, but rather only bits and pieces, I expected a play filled with fairy dust and pixy-women oe-dancing, laughing, with flowers everywhere, or something like Hylas and the nymphs. What I did not expect was a group of rag-tag laborers putting on a play, young females catfighting over their men, or Titania being enamored of an ass. (Act IV, Scene i, MND) Even with surprises, though, the text by itself held little detail and richness in my mind. I thought it a decent play, but certainly nothing like I had hoped, and I didn’t feel involved in it or connected to it in any way.

One of the things that did impressed me, though, was finding out for myself how accessible Shakespeare actually is. When it came time for me to learn my lines for Philostrate (MND), I copied them from a site on the internet which posted the text in its entirety. I realized the! n how lucky we are that plays like these survived through the ages, sometimes probably making it from one hand to the next in a form no better than the paperback I carried in my bag. Through my reading, the importance of the text was impressed upon me, and I feel that I have gained a new appreciation for the lasting and foundational qualities of pure script.

Viewing Viewing a play adds a kind of second dimension to a textual reading. While our primary impressions of a Shakespearean play are established with the initial reading, those impressions are challenged when we come into contact with a play performed. At this point we have a first hand contrast between how we felt and how someone else felt about the same play. Once we have sampled another’s interpretations we necessarily question ourselves on what we would have done differently, had we directed the play. Perhaps something we expected to see on stage was omitted; perhaps! omething unusual was added. We might even sample the same play dozens of times, all performed by different companies; it s common, it is even expected, that none of the twelve interpretations will be much the same. Unlike with reading, with viewing we are not allowed to sample the play in whatever manner we want. As the audience, our experiences are directed. We must resign ourselves to be the two-hour subject of another’s whims and methods. This kind of challenge is usually very enlightening, bringing new thoughts and perspectives where we would otherwise have only our own.

These new thoughts and perspectives often materialize in the form of visual and auditory details, mostly because the script stays generally the same. Viewing an actual performance adds depth and detail to what was before only words. We are given scenery, costumes, voices, faces, body movements, and other forms of physical (rather than verbal) expression that contribute to a particular feel. These types of details are in reality just instances of the direct! or s influence, interpretations and preferences that cause us to challenge our initial ideas, and accept us a possibly richer taste of the play.

Because I was involved in two scenes of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, viewing this play on film held particular interest for me. I often ound myself looking to the films for ideas on how to play a character, or a scene. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately, for originality’s sake), neither of the films we reviewed portrayed A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a way that particularly struck me. The 1935 Reinhardt edition seemed to me overdone in nearly every respect. The characters were much too Roman, the actresses quite over-dramatic, the fairies and black-winged bats far too many in number, and the movie, in general, way too long.

The author of Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle’s A Midsummer Night s Dream described it well as, a vast! alletic-operatic extravaganza with huge casts, elaborate scenery, and lavish costumes. (37, Jorgens) Overall it was a very large film. The BBC version, on the other hand, erred in the opposite. It was slow, relatively unemotional, and somewhat difficult to watch. After viewing both these versions, I realized that my perceptions of the text were much different than either of the films. I wanted something more normal, less mystical, more possible however, the time for me to voice those desires had not yet come.

Performing This third dimension of experiencing Shakespeare comes only when a eader-turned-viewer decides to become the actor. This aspect of the Shakespearean experience is nearly the only of the three mentioned that supports and encourages open creativity and self-expression. Now our questions of, what would I have done differently have a chance to be answered. It is in the acting that the text becomes less detached from us, becoming more our own. We are no longer in ! the passive mode, but the active. Now, we wait for no one, cut lines if we like, say it fast, draw it out. There are few, if any, limits to how a play can be done.

Performing brings one’s original, textual conceptions in synergy with hose viewed of others, creating a play that is both wholly collage, and wholly new. The play begins to conform to what we, as individuals, perceive to be the best or most right interpretation of the text. After viewing the two film versions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, I envisioned something much more casual and lighthearted, even funny, for our own performance of Act III, Scene ii. Because of this, and probably because of the nature of the cast in general, our group took on a more youthful, somewhat ridiculous approach to the play.

Demetrius was played by a woman, Lysander dressed in ruffles and knickers, Helena ictimized and shrewish to the extreme, and Hermia was more often than not stepping into violen! ce. Nevertheless, in some ways we found ourselves doing exactly the things that we saw in the films. For example, once performing, it was not difficult to see elements of the characters we play in us; specifically, we more often than not felt and appeared like the Rude Mechanicals. We were not unlike them, coming together with nothing but a script, none of us actors. Heather the Grant Writer, Tricia the Administrator, Giselle the Grader, Matt the Director, all of us students. Beginning with nothing but bare Shakepearean text, we assigned roles, gave out scripts, rehearsed, and performed. At Swanton Ranch, The Dream Team stood in a forest to practice our play, hearing Puck recite, A crew of patches, rude mechanicals, that work for bread upon Athenian stalls, were met together to rehearse a play. (Act III, Scene ii, MND) We were much the same. We even had some hard-hat rude mechanicals accidentally appear in the background as we spoke!

Even before we arrived, though, a place was sought out f! or us, our director no doubt having thoughts much like hese: Pat, pat; and here’s a marvail’s convenient place for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our stage, this hawthorn brake our tiring house. (Act III, Scene i, MND) Once done, like the lovers in the scene, we return to the real world, away from the forest, back to the realities of work and school: When they next wake, all this derision shall seem a dream and fruitless vision, and back to Athens shall the lovers go. (Act III, Scene ii, MND) And so we did.

Although we for the most part succeeded in building our own version of the play, some similarities like these could not be escaped: I could not elp but notice that the actions taken in the play were mirroring what was going on in reality. Through Shakespeare s ability to create a-play-within-a-play-within-a-play, I found being a rude mechanical broadening to my overall impressions of the play-buildi! ng experience. Seeing our forest performance on film gave an entirely different perspective still. Some members of the faculty, some friends, and some strangers came to our screening to see the fruit of our creative weekend in Swanton Ranch.

We put a lot of time and practice into our scene, making sure that we had our lines, that they flowed right, that we ooked right. We brought the scenes from just a text, clear through to performance, and were now able to look back over the whole creative process. In the theatre, however, just before our showing, our performance somehow seemed less serious to me. I was so afraid that we were all going to embarrass ourselves! The lines I said when I was Philostrate suddenly came back to me. No, my noble lord, it is not for you.

I have heard it over, and it is nothing, nothing in the world; unless you can find sport in their intents, extremely stretched and conned with cruel pain, to do you service. (Act V, Scene i, MND) Much ike Bottom’s company, we were good not because of any phenomenal talent, but because we tried, because we were simple people trying to do Shakespeare. Like them, we were not actors, but were still able to experience the fullness of the creative process, bringing to fruition our own comedic rendition of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Shakespeare I believe that it is not by accident that our play turned out as it did.

It could not be but that Shakepeare intended for us, the actors, to relate to Bottom s company, to everyone who ever put on A Midsummer Night s Dream or any other production. This is part of Shakepeare s genius: to be able to write into the play a reflection of ourselves, to see our own creative processes being mirrored by those of the characters we coarsely attempt to play. Even now, when the actual performance of our scene is over, I look back through the t! ext and still see my group in it: when I read the word, Demetrius, I no longer picture the old Demetrius I first imagined, or even those I saw in film.

Now I see Tricia in her funny pseudo-masculine hat. The play has somehow become ours. Even if we hadn t put on the play, though, and elt none of it for ourselves, reading about the rude mechanicals and their creative process gives a reader valuable insight. Shakespeare did not just hand down to us a script, expecting the layman to figure out how to make it happen. Instead, it is as if he included his own little instruction manual in the play, teaching all who will learn to bring it from the mere green text to the ripe fruit of performance.

Personal Notes The class in retrospect was a very good experience. Before the quarter began, when I first learned that our class would be taking a field trip together, I was hesitant. I wasn’t sure that I wanted to spend a weekend away from home, in ! a cabin in the hills with my Shakespeare class. I was not convinced that it would be more than an uncomfortable experience. I didn’t at all expect what actually came out of it, something that I praise God so much for, which had virtually nothing to do with Shakespeare at all.

The contact that I had with my group has become invaluable to me this quarter. I got to know people that weekend that I otherwise would hardly have talked to had I not been required to spend so much time outside of class with them. Tricia, Giselle, Matt and I are good friends; how could we be otherwise when we rehearsed together so often, rode 8 hours in the car together, left Matt’s clothes behind, shopped the sales together at Macy’s, ate meals, and hiked 20 minutes into the forest together?

I learned about three people who share my faith, shared a candy bar with Joel, and did my classmates’ dishes. I saw them from morning to evening in lights and places so different from the norm. They seem to me pe! ople now, and friends, not just bodies with mouths in chairs. par Besides being purely social, going to Swanton Ranch really opened up my educational xperience. Although our actual film isn’t going to win any Academy Awards, it felt like we were doing something real, and not just commenting on everyone else’s work.

The air was great, the change was great, and bringing a play from text to performance gave me a whole new attitude towards theatrics in general. I learned how much work goes into doing even just a scene, how many elements there are to look after, and how much effort it takes to make everything look somewhat believable and real. Being at the end of the process now, being able to see where e started from clear through to the finish, I feel like my understanding of Shakespeare has really broadened.

Not so much Shakespeare himself, of course, but rather what he did, what he tried to accomplish; I have a much greater sense of what all actors and crew go through to put a play together, text to performance, start to ! finish. There is a small part of me that wants to keep doing Shakespeare, to do all of the play, or at least do it again. Another part of me, the more persuasive and logical part, wants to just keep it all right where it is in my mind, remembering it fondly, as A Dream.

A Mid Summer Nights Dream Film Analysis

“A Mid summer Night’s Dream” is another entry into Shakespeare’s recent rebirth on film. Michael Hoffman’s film dose not stay true to the text, but he must take liberties to allow for this classic story to be entertaining to today’s audience. In this essay I will discuss the differences between the text vision and the film vision of this story from the historical setting, the time placement, Hoffman’s personal adaptations, and finally Hoffman’s character adaptations. In Michael Hoffman’s film of “William Shakespeare’s a Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Hoffman has made some changes to the location and historical aspects of the play.

Shakespeare drew upon classical mythology, English literature, English folklore and contemporary English life. So Hoffman had to try his best to update it to today’s views on mythology, folklore, and life. Hoffman’s film is set in Italy, instead of Greece like in the text. Hoffman may have chosen Italy instead of Greece, because Italy overall has a universal romantic feel to it. Also Hoffman may have chosen Italy because it is much more well know to the general moviegoers. Unlike today, in Shakespeare’s time Greece was the center of classical history, and would be know to most of the people of his day.

Hoffman did include a Greek theme when he invented the town of Monte Athena located in Tuscany. The town is made-up but still connects the text with Hoffman’s film. For the parts of the movie that would be filmed in the woods, they had the filming done indoors at a studio. They would need room to maneuver people and cameras, so the real outdoors would not do. The director would not have to deal with the weather, or having enough sun light. Also the indoor setting in allowed the fairies to observe the morals, in a believable setting. So now that I have show you the setting of the film, let me show you how time was a factor in Hoffman film.

In Michael Hoffman’s film the play took place in the turn of the century. Telling the story using the costumes of Shakespeare’s day would have alienated the viewer of the film. Also modern clothes would jar the mood, so the actors were costumed in clothes of the 1900’s. The turn of the century was far enough back to support romance views yet close enough so that the suits and dresses looked something like our clothes, and would feel “comfortable” to us. Unlike other films that copied the plot of Shakespeare’s work, but did not use Shakespearean language.

For example, the film “10 things I hate about you” that is a modern version of Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrews. ” Hoffman’s film follows the Shakespearean format, just like the last few Shakespearean films: Othello, Much Ado about Nothing, etc. In a historical context it was the middle of the suffrage movement. So the woman of the time were more independent then in Shakespeare’s day. Also in Michael Hoffman’s film the used bicycles as a form of transporting. The bicycle was a new invention that would allow anyone the freedom of movement. It was a liberating experience that was expressed by the main charters in the film.

So now that I have shown you how time was a factor in Hoffman’s film. Let me show you how Hoffman adapted the play to his liking. In Michael Hoffman’s adaptation of the play many of the long speeches were shortened or left out. It is possible that Hoffman had to get the film in a two-hour time frame that most modern film fit into. Any longer and filmgoers would get bored, and restless. Usually large audiences see ether the film version or the stage version of “A Mid Summer Night Dream. “While the film is seen on the screen, the play is seen in real time, live.

Although in the feel version Hoffman had the ability to use special effects to display he view on how the magic would look like, instead of walking off stage. Hoffman added a character of Nick Bottom’s wife. She had only a few lines, in which all were in Italian. Also Nick Bottom’s wife was looking for her no good husband in the beginning of the film, while Bottom was trying to be covert, and not be seen by her. I Hoffman possible added this character so have a conflict between Bottom and his wife, so when Titania falls in love with Bottom, there would be a cause of the “affair. In Hoffman’s film, when Bottom was transformed in to the ass.

Instead of putting a mask on Bottom, like in many plays had the ears, hair, and a few other changes so that you could still tell that it was Kline. Possibly Hoffman thought it would be good to have an n attractive figure of a man as Titania’s lover, even with an ass’s head. Also Kline was the perfect candidate to play Bottom. Other than Kline and the actor who played Oberon, all the other the players in the film seem to be struggling to say the Shakespearean lines.

So Hoffman instead of using classically trained actors, he allowed these stars like Calista Flockhart, Anna Friel, and Christian Bale to be in the film, too possibly to gain ticket sales. So now I have show you how Hoffman adapted his film from the play, let me talk about how he changed, and added characters into the play. In Hoffman’s film an older man plays Puck. In the play Puck has been played as a mischievous young child. It is possible that Hoffman did this so at the end of the play when Puck has his last statement for the audience, the audience will be more conformable with an older adult, than a young child.

Also Hoffman may have had the belief that the fairies are immoral, so how old someone looks isn’t important. Hoffman also incorporated the fairies into the film as secretive beings that live among use, but we do not notice them. Right at the beginning of the film, you can see these little people stealing everyday objects. They take the objects back to the fairy world, as wonders of the outside world. Hoffman possibly uses these film moments as a way to incorporate the faries into the real world, so the view will not just have these fairies pop out of no were in the film. At the end of the film the fairies go around and bless the wedding.

After the blessing one of the fairies who I believe it is Titania visits Bottom. It may be a way for Titania to say good bye, and that she stills has a place for him in her heart. Michael Hoffman’s film is a well done film, but is not in the class of great Shakespearean films like Kenneth Branagh’s Henry V, Richard III, and Much Ado About Nothing. Branagh who has made Shakespearean works accessible to a wider audience. Hoffman has made to many changes to this classic. Although it is a well-done movie, to the die-hard Shakespearean faithful, it would be to their best interest to see it done on a stage.

The overriding theme of the play “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” by William Shakespeare

The overriding theme of the play “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” by William Shakespeare deals with the nature of love. Though true love seems to be held up as an ideal, false love is mostly what we are shown. Underneath his frantic comedy, Shakespeare seems to be asking the questions all lovers ask in the midst of their confusion: How do we know when love is real? How can we trust ourselves that love is real when we are so easily swayed by passion and romantic conventions? Some readers may sense bitterness behind the comedy, but will probably also recognize the truth behind Shakespeare’s satire.

Often, love leads us down blind alleys and makes us do things we regret later. The lovers within the scene, especially the men, are made to seem rather shallow. They change the objects of their affections, all the time swearing eternal love to one or the other. In this scene Shakespeare presents the idea that both false love and true love can prevail.. Throughout Act III Scene II, many conflicts arise. However, the main conflict within the scene is the confusion the lovers face when their perceptions are altered.

This confusion enhances the central theme of true love versus false love. There are many aspects of the play that deal with this central theme, but it is most prevalent within this scene. The chaos reaches a climax causing great disruption among the lovers. However, the turmoil is eventually resolved by the character who is originally responsible for the confusion, Puck. Puck causes the disruption initially, when he intervenes in the lovers’ business. Jester and jokester, Puck, otherwise known as Robin Goodfellow, is like a wild, untamed member of the fairy clan.

Though fairy king Oberon tells him they are “spirits of another sort,” Puck, with his connection to English legend and folklore, seems related to a slightly more dangerous kind of sprite. Not that he is truly malevolent, but his tricks make people uncomfortable. However, they don’t seem to do any permanent damage. He casts an ironic eye on humanity. Thinking of people as fools, he loves to make fools of them. He expresses this idea when he states “What fools these mortals be” But laughter, not tears, is his aim. With his quickness, ventriloquism, and shape-changing ability, he clearly has magic fairy powers of his own.

Meddling in the affairs of lovers and administering Cupid’s love juice, clearly presents Shakespeare’s views on the nature of love. Puck’s mischievous ways may allow him to meddle within the affairs of the lovers, however, does this interference do more harm than good? This scene begins with Oberon encountering Puck in the middle of the woods. Puck, very excited, explains his actions. He tells Oberon how he caused Titania to fall in love with Bottom, who now has a donkey head. Puck also tells him that the Athenians had been placed under the spell causing them to fall magically in love.

Oberon is very pleased with Puck’s efforts, and agrees that the situation turned out better than expected. However, Oberon soon realizes Puck had made a mistake by causing the Athenian to fall in love with the wrong person. Oberon admonishes Puck for his mistake. Because of Puck, true love has been turned, “and not a false turned true. ” Puck replies that those are the rules of fate. For every man holding true love, a million fail, breaking their oaths again and again. This was not exactly what Oberon had in mind, he was hoping to remedy a situation, not make it worse.

Puck always tries to throw something extra into the situation; he enjoys complications. “Then fate o’er-rules, that, one man holding troth, A million fail, confounding oath on oath. ” By saying this, Puck makes it clear that the odds on finding true love are a million to one. It becomes clear that humans are going to need very accurate eyes to be able to see love clearly. Puck’s mischief turns a supposedly true love inside out. However, this is not necessarily a bad thing. This mistake is used for the benefit of both Helena and Demetrius.

Puck uses his magic to unite the lovers under a cloud of false love. This aspect of false love is what holds the lovers together, proving that false love can be just as strong as true love. The other aspect of the nature of love is that true love triumphs. This is proven through the characters Lysander and Hermia. Puck meddles within their lives as well, but their true feelings return in the end. While under Puck’s spell, Lysander falsely loved Helena, making him blind to his true feelings. He lashes out against Hermia, his true love, calling her names such as “dwarf, minimous, bead and acorn.

At one point, he even says that he hates her. “Although I hate her, I will not harm her so. ” Hermia quickly responds, “What, can you do me greater harm than hate? ” It is obvious that her heart has been broken. This also expresses Shakespeare’s ideas of the nature of love, with its twists and complexities. Love is a long hard road and cannot be reached by taking a straight, clear-cut path. Even though throughout the scene Hermia and Lysander are in constant conflict, a resolution is eventually reached. Hermia and Lysander remain in love, proving that true love can prevail.

In “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” William Shakespeare explains the difficulties of the nature of love. Both false love and true love prevail in the end, leading the reader to come to the conclusion that all types of love can triumph. Hermia and Lysander represent the existence of a “true love”, while Helena and Demertrius represent the opposite extreme. Shakespeare presents the idea that love is unpredictable and can cause great confusion. Love is something that cannot be explained, it can only be experienced. Shakespeare challenges us to develop our own idea of what love truly is.

Michael Hoffmans 1999 adaptation of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Michael Hoffmans 1999 adaptation of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream received more acclaim then most adaptations previous to it. The well-known cast of actors, as well as the incredible visual effects used are the two most likely reasons for the films appeal to the masses. Even though the films casting and special effects brought people into the theaters to see the film, it isnt what kept them there. Instead, fans and critics alike would have to agree that Hoffmans adaptation was not only cleverly directed, but accurate to Mr. Shakespeares intentions in the original text. It is clear that Hoffman has done his homework.

Hoffman seems to concern himself and this production with two major themes. The ideas of universal power of love and universal power of art are easily conveyed to the audience, conveniently enough, by one character. In the text, Bottom appears to us as a boisterous man dedicated to a passion of theater that will never be a realization; whose move through the social ranks is only because of a spell cast on the goddess. In Hoffmans adaptation, Bottom becomes the focal point, or rather our hero. First of all, Hoffman cast veteran actor Kevin Kline in the role, a far stretch from what bottom is normally cast as.

Bottom, as well as the other rude mechanicals, are normally character actors. They are commoners trying their hand at performing arts. Naturally, comic characters are cast with comic actors. Hoffman uses Kleins impeccable use of the language and his renowned acting ability to make us see Bottom as a hero, the heart and soul of Shakespeares writing. The first time we meet the mechanicals is after we are already introduced to our lovers and their strife. They meet to start rehearsing for the wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta. We can start to see Hoffmans idea of Universal power of art here, as Peter Quince passes out the parts.

Already cast as the brave Pyramis in the lamentable tragedy of Pyramis and Thisby, Bottom strives to be seen in all the parts of the play. BOTTOM -An I may hide my face, let me play Thisby too, I’ll speak in a monstrous little voice. ‘Thisne, Thisne;’ ‘Ah, Pyramus, lover dear! thy Thisby dear, QUINCE No, no; you must play Pyramus: and, Flute, you Thisby. QUINCE: Snug, the joiner; you, the lion’s part: and, I SNUG Have you the lion’s part written? pray you, if it be, give it me, for I am slow of study. QUINCE You may do it extempore, for it is nothing but roaring.

BOTTOM Let me play the lion too: I will roar, that I will do any man’s heart good to hear me; I will roar, that I will make the duke say ‘Let him roar again, QUINCE An you should do it too terribly, you would fright the duchess and the ladies, that they would shriek; and that were enough to hang us all. ALL That would hang us, every mother’s son. BOTTOM I grant you, friends, if that you should fright the ladies out of their wits, they would have no more discretion but to hang us: but I will aggravate my voice so that I will roar you as gently as any sucking dove; I will roar you an ’twere any

From the text, we can see that Bottom has a true love and passion for the performing arts, and wants nothing more then to ensure the success of this production. In Hoffmans production, the focus is on Bottom as Ive said before as the hero. It is important to point out two very important style notes of the performance. First of all costuming. The rude Mechanicals are all dressed in dark earthy browns and blacks, nothing fancy, just worn tweed. The cloths of the workingmen at the turn of the nineteenth century, the setting for Hoffmans adaptation. Bottom however, is a striking contrast all in a white suite, Sunday clothing.

This is probably a convention used to make bottom stand out from the rest of the mechanicals, and also heighten the embarrassment level at the end of the scene when an emphatic Bottom, reciting to the gathered crowd, becomes a mockery when two young boys poor a bucket of red wine over him. The second choice to be noted is having Bottom not only act for his fellow actors, but for the other people gathered in the center of town doing their daily business. Hoffman makes Bottom not only the focus of his friends, but of the town. Again, this makes it even more of an embarrassment for him when the pranksters pour the wine.

Hoffman shows us the very human side of Bottom first. By showing Bottoms strive for acceptance in as a higher citizen then he is, his passion for the arts, and his fall from his peak, just goes to show us that he isnt a two dimensional character placed in the text for comic sake. He is in fact a human, capable of feeling and failing in the way that only humans can. This is important to note, because as we will examine later, Bottom is turned into an ass, the crudest of all animals. Hoffman wants to make sure we understand Bottom the man, so when he becomes physically less appealing to the eye, we can still see that he is in fact human.

Hoffman added an interesting component to Bottoms character, that isnt at all called for in the text. We see Bottom return to his home, his white suite stained with the red wine. He is in despair. As he sits on his bed to remove his shoes, a women steps in to join him. We are to assume that she is his wife, Mrs. Bottom. She looks at him, and shakes her head despairingly before she leaves. This only goes to show how easily Bottom is misunderstood. Hoffman shows us he is in fact capable of embarrassment. Hoffman added the wife character to show us even further down Bottom is then he shows.

He realizes he is being made a mockery of throughout the town. Even his own wife is fed up with it. When he becomes the ass it is easy for him to accept this and use it because there isnt anyone making fun of him. He is being loved for what he is, not looked to as something he can never be. In the adaptation of the text, most of the lines of the lovers were either cut, or moved to a different place. Most of Bottoms lines were not. Hoffman did this not only for a cinematic effect, but to shift the main focus away from the lovers romp in the woods, to Bottom, which isnt the normal interpretation of the bards words.

He also uses the time of day as a major force in the film. All the scenes in Athene Italy, the films setting, are in the daylight, while the scenes in bottoms house, as well as those in the forest are in the dark. It further separates us from the actual and the fantasy, and places Bottom into both realms, like a small child in their daily innocence. In Act III scene I, we have the transformation of Bottom into an ass. Puck places the head of an ass onto bottom for his own sport, much like the children earlier who poured the wine all over Bottom. The underdog is always picked out.

The costuming for Klein as an ass wasnt exactly what we would have expected. Instead of gruesome and frightening, he appears to us as quite the endearing donkey, not even worth of being labeled an ass. Hoffman wants us to understand Titanias love for him, even if it is only because of a spell from Oberon. He has a very sweet-faced Kline, still handsome and endearing, sharing the tender moments with our fairy queen. The forest setting is so lush and green, with vines and flowers. Like Bottom, it appears to us as Magical instead of real. This is where Hoffman brings in his second theme, that of the universal power of love.

When you read the text, its difficult to imagine a handsome ass, or a fairy queen actually falling in love with one. It is a joke, brought about by Oberon and Puck, which is supposed to be vengeful towards Titania, and hurt the pride of Bottom. When watching Hoffmans adaptation, you actually begin to believe that these are two creatures, who met and fell in love in the magically world of the forest. To prove to us that Bottom is in fact still human, Hoffman uses human magic. Bottom sees that the Fairies have acquired a phonograph, which they dont understand how to use.

They wear the bell as a hat and use the records for plates. Bottom shows them how to actually use it, showing them that their magic isnt the only type that exists. Here, Titanias love for him grows. Hoffman is trying to show us that love can came in all forms, and it can cross all boundaries, but it is like air, it is in all of us, and needed by all of us. Hoffman uses beautiful cinematography to capture Bottom returning to his reality. The camera shows the record come to a stop. Then it zooms to pulleys, that appear to be attached to the bed where Bottom lies. Then suddenly, it is light, Bottom is no longer an ass.

He wakes upon the ground, his cart near, and recalls the events of his sleep. BOTTOM -[Awaking] When my cue comes, call me, and I will answer: my next is, ‘Most fair Pyramus. ‘ Heigh-ho! Peter Quince! Flute, the bellows-mender! Snout, the tinker! Starveling! God’s my life, stolen hence, and left me asleep! I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was: man is but an ass, if he go about to expound this dream. Methought I was–there is no man can tell what. Methought I was,–and methought I had,–but man is but a patched fool, if e will offer to say what methought I had.

The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man’s hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was. I will get Peter Quince to write a ballad of this dream: it shall be called Bottom’s Dream, because it hath no bottom; and I will sing it in the latter end of a play, before the duke: peradventure, to make it the more gracious, I shall During this speech, Bottom has found a nest, that has a tiny crown inside of it, like the one he wore upon his head in what he believes was a dream. Man is but an ass Bottom says.

Hoffman has been trying to show this to us the entire time, by having the children and townspeople mock Bottom, his wife not understand him. Its only in the fairy world, when he is an ass, that people dont act that way. If Bottom appeared to Titania as a human, he very possibly could have been mocked in the fairy world. But as an ass physically, he is a symbol to everything that he isnt in actuality. Puck says in an earlier scene what fools these mortals be. Its as if in this context, Bottom is immortal, for he is the least foolish of them all. Bottom returns home in the second scene of act four.

In the text it appears that his fellow mechanicals are more concerned they will not be able to perform then with Bottoms whereabouts. However, Hoffman gives love into these men for their friend. They are very concerned about him. When Bottom enters, it becomes a celebration. Once again, Hoffman is showing the theme of the universal power of love, this time through men of the same sex, and creatures of the same species for that matter. For the first time, Hoffman really stretches the text in Act IV. As it is writ, the performance is not a success, rather its a mockery. They mechanicals are laughed at, and dismissed.

Hoffman however, say this as an opportunity to prove that men are in fact asses. The prologue given by Peter Quince is omitted. This probably because it makes the play look like a failure before it begins, and since Hoffman wanted to convey s triumph by the lower class, he removed it. The play starts the same, Bottom is big and outdoes even himself, wall and moonshine are greeted in a crude manner, and Flute as Thisby of course is laughed at, because he is in a wig, dress and speaking in a high voice as a women would. Lion however, is held tenderly by the women, because Hoffman portrays Snug the joiner as being touched.

He is innocent, and there fore the women and the men hold no contempt toward him. They instead embrace him. When Bottom dies, twice, the reaction is how Shakespeare probably intended it. That of laughter and jouqularity, but Thisbys death is a different matter. This is where Hoffman brings together his themes of Universal power of love and the universal power of art. After attempting his speech twice in a high voice, flute drops to his own. The women start to take in what he is saying. Flute is remembering and using his experience when he thought just earlier this day that Bottom had truly died. About four lines in, he removes his wig.

This is when all the couples start to see and realize that love truly conquers all. It has absolutely no boundaries or limits. It is silent as Thisby dies. Hoffman cuts the following dialogue between Theseus and Hippolyta that make musings of the performance, for it would otherwise contradict the moment he had just captured. The mechanicals are dismissed, with honors. They are seen celebrating their success. One final topper Hoffman took to convey to us his theme of universal love and make us believe that the love between Bottom and Titania was real was by having them meet again, once the spell was removed, and Bottom was no longer an ass.

First upon entry to the palace, Bottom sees a statue of the goddess, which he walks up to and touches the face of. He isnt at the moment sure why it is familiar to him. Once he returns to his home after the celebration with the rest of the mechanicals, he removes the fairy crown from his pocket. Passing by the window, he notices what look a little like fire flies outside. One of them however is bigger and brighter then the rest. It hovers in the air as if looking at him while the others dance around it. After about five seconds, the whole menagerie flies away.

We are to assume this is Titania bidding him fair well. When we look at any performance, weather on stage or in film, that is based on Shakespeares text, we have got to count on visual aides to help us understand what is being said. The language is beautiful, though difficult to understand. Hoffman works with Shakespeare as if the man wee still alive and Collaborating with him on the project. As Franco Zeffirellis 1967 adaptation of Romeo and Juliet was a triumph in making movies out of Shakespeare, Hoffmans version of A Midsummer Nights Dream took us even a step further to embracing the words of the master.