Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and … Read more

“Ozymandias”: A Close Reading

Percy Shelley’s sonnet “Ozymandias” (1818) is, in many ways, an outlier in his oeuvre: it is short, adhering to the fourteen line length of most traditional sonnets; its precise language, filled with concrete nouns and active verbs, contrasts against the circuitous, abstract language of “O World! O Life! O Time!” (1824); and, most saliently, it … Read more

Main Theme of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” and “Stanzas Written in Dejection, near Naples”

Amongst the ideas presented in the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Stanzas Written in Dejection, near Naples, the theme of isolation is prominent. Although Coleridge’s poem departs from Romantic stylistic tendencies, it exemplifies many of the ideas which defined the era, while Shelley uses a more typical Spenserian stanza form, manipulating this … Read more

The difference between “Ozymandias” by Percy Shelley and “My Last Duchess” by Robert Browning

The poems “Ozymandias” by Percy Shelley and “My Last Duchess” by Robert Browning are very different. However, they do have something in common – both poems are representations of their power. “Ozymandias” represents power as poem shows that human life is insignificant compared to the passing of time, even for egotistical kings such as Ozymandias, … Read more

Romantic Politics: Writing Politics in Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein’ and the Poetry of Percy Shelley

Revolution was a key idea to the philosophy of the Romantic writers, whether it be social, cultural or aesthetic. It is in the poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley, however, that the most overt revolutionary political statements are made while Frankenstein, the masterpiece novel by his wife Mary, interacts with politics through innumerable layers and allegory. … Read more

Romantic Poetry and Transcendentalism

Allegorical literature is employed by many great philosophers to explain the basic tenets of their philosophies. The ancient Greek philosopher Plato used the famous cave allegory to explain how the human mind interprets the ideal material world. The teachings of Jesus Christ in the Bible are metaphorical representations of God’s will. Likewise, philosophical representations are … Read more

“Ozymandias”: Shelley’s Investigation in Permanence Through the use of Diction and Juxtapositio

“My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;/ Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!” (10) demands the pedestal of the statue of the previously named ancient ruler. Out of context a casual passerby of the king’s shattered sculpted likeness might infer that Ozymandias was a powerful presence in the region, and that he had … Read more

Hymns and Habits: Examining Defamiliarization in Percy Bysshe Shelley’s “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty”

Percy Shelley uses defamiliarization in “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty” as a tool to dismantle religious belief systems. Defamiliarization is a literary technique used to make that which is known and familiar appear different and new. Viktor Shklovsky argues that one’s perceptions became habitual, and it is this habitualization that prevents one from sensing the object. … Read more

Comparative analysis of the poems Ozymandias by Percy Shelly and My Last Duchess by Robert Browning

“ The poem Ozymandias by Percy Shelly and My Last Duchess by Robert Browning are very different. However, they do have something in common, both poems represent power. Ozymandias represents power as poem shows that human life is insignificant compared to the passing of time, even for egotistical kings such as Ozymandias, time is very … Read more

The Romanticism of Wordsworth and Shelley: A Poetry of the “Happiest Moments?”

Wordsworth said that ‘poetry is passion, it is the history or science of feeling’. In conjunction with Shelley’s quote, this is a bold statement to make. Not only does Wordsworth name poetry as the ‘science’ of emotion –creating an authorial sense of logic –but also as the ‘history’ of feeling. This suggests that poetry has … Read more