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2001: A Space Odyssey: Film Analysis Essay

The dystopian film, 2001: A Space Odyssey by Stanley Kubrick journeys the galaxy during the commencement of the earth. During this enthralling journey comes the development of apes, which ignite the idea of the evolution of the most insolent species to ever roam the planet—humans. Now man has to prepare for the evolution of extreme intelligence—technology. Hal is an artificial intelligence that was created by Dave and Frank to help man with tasks easier and efficiently in the spaceship Discovery, but soon this evolution is a regression of man, and Kubrick’s ideas change the course of mankind. The technological advancements from the beginning as a single stick excel to practically computerized DNA, which in return creates a dehumanized man and…

Their temperaments are portrayed as bland and boring, and they do their activities with blank expressions. Hal 9000—the most advanced artificial intelligence and an onboard computer of the spaceship Discovery is similar to Dave and Frank by the similar monologue dialect they share, but are very different; Dave and Frank seem like good men, but are bottled up and hushed when discussing information about the mission. On the other hand, Hal seems malevolent, especially in the scene where he is conversing with Dave, and the close up is of a mechanical creature with a piercing red eye. Hal represents the further evolution of technology, but he also displays a warning of what could happen when man creates artificial life and intelligence. Hal evolves into that of a human when he begins displaying human characteristics of emotions, and soon becomes an individual similar to the evolution of the apes. Hal’s human-like characteristics are seen when he begins disobeying orders, and begins to defend himself to continue his existence as a motionless computerized human. In a way, Hal is more humanized than Frank and Dave; he exhibits more human emotion and expressions than Frank and Dave. The disconnection and death of Hal is a form of dehumanizing him; as each program is unplugged, Hal becomes less emotional and more…

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