The Adventures Of Huck

Huck is very responsive to the beauty of the natural world about him. He uses vivid imagery to describe nature in a peculiar way, which one can even consider out of character for him. His word choice, general attitude, use of literary devices, and the use of words which describe the sounds as they happened, all add to his vivid description of the summer storm. Huck’s reaction is unusual because up to this point in the story the impression of Huck that the reader has is one of a wild, uneducated boy running away from home.

The reader does not expect Huck to analyze nature by using thought provoking similes Huck’s use of action words contribute greatly to the descriptiveness of his account of the summer storm. These words add to the thrust and movement of his description. “Directly it begun to rain… rained like all fury… never see the wind blow so” (43). “… and the rain would thrash along by so thick…. blast of wind.. ” (43+44). These descriptions keep the description moving and keeps the interest of the reader.

They invoke common experiences that everyone has experienced. After reading these action words, the reader begins to develop a image of what it was like to be Huck at that point. This image is further aided by other factors. The other factors that influence the image the reader perceives are: word use, literary devices, allusions to common experiences, and specific details. Some of the specific details include use of color and descriptions of the environment.

Vivid descriptions such as, It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves; and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild; and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest — fst!

It was as bright as glory, and you’d have a little glimpse of treetops a-plunging about away off yonder in the storm, hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as sin again in a second, and now you’d hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rumbling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down-stairs — where it’s long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know” (44).

That one sentence encompasses all of the techniques and provides an excellent description. It uses personification, alliteration, allusions, personification, and others. Huck uses several onomatopoeias in his description of the storm. In addition to painting a picture in the readers mind, because of his use of onomatopoeias, the reader can also experience and hear the scene and the storm as if he/she were actually there. Huck uses four words to describe how thunder sounded.

The first is fst, “… when it was just about the bluest and blackest – fst! It was as bright as glory… ” (44). The other three are: rumbling, grumbling, and tumbling. “… and now you’d hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rumbling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world… ” (44). Huck then uses one simile in paricular to further exemplify the sound of the thunder and to create a better scene for the reader. “… mbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down-stairs — where it’s long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know” (44).

This simile enhances this description of the storm in a few ways. The last part, “… you know” (44) adds more character to the description. It is beginning to sound more like a child, Huck. Also, anyone can imagine what rolling barrels down a long set of stairs sound like and when the reader really thinks about it, he/she realizes that, that is what thunder sounds like.

Huck’s vivid description of thunder, both visually and audibly, add to his personality and allows the reader to experience a different side of Huck. Huck is not just a naive child who is oblivious to natural wonders. He is responsive to the beauty of the natural world about him. There is more to him then meets the eye. Huck shows the reader this by his choice of words and the way in which he describes the summer storm. His uses literary devices to his advantage and to further his points. Huck shows he is not a shallow character and can be serious if he wants to.

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn – The Struggle Between Good And Evil

On important theme within The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn is the struggle between good and evil as experienced when Huck’s personal sense of truth and justice come in conflict with the values of society around him. These occurrences happen often within the novel, and usually Huck chooses the truly moral deed. One such instance occurs when Huckleberry realizes that he is helping a runaway slave. His moral dilemma is such that he is uncertain whether he should or should not turn this slave, named Jim, over to the authorities. Society tells him that he is aided a criminal, and that is against the law.

However, he has grown quite attached to Jim, and is beginning to realize that Jim is a really good person. He would also never hurt him. This illustrates the concept and symbolism of Jim’s freedom and societies influence on Huck. At one point, Huck convinces himself that the nest opportunity he receives, he will turn Jim in, and clear his conscience. The opportunity became available when slave hunters meet them on the river. Huck had an absolutely perfect chance to turn him over. However, he made up a story that his father was sick and needed help and asked the slave hunters for help.

They immediately assumed that his father had smallpox, and he wanted nothing to do with Huck or his father. Thus, he had saved Jim, and actually felt good about it. Further along in the book, Jim becomes a slave again. Huckleberry, with the aid of Tom Sawyer, free’s Jim. Once again, Jim’s escape and freedom are more important to Huck than societies viewpoint. The river is also important. The river is symbolic of freedom. It is also symbolic of good. When Jim and Huck are rafting down the river, they are free of society. They have no laws.

This is not to say that they are lawless, however, the laws they obey are there own. This is in direct contrast to being on land, where society reigns supreme. Land is evil. This contrast also seems to make the river a character in itself. It’s at time’s calm and relaxed, and at other times fast and dangerous, and sometimes foggy and confusing. However, it’s always moving. Always taking Huck and Jim to new adventures, and to new places. It is their backbone. So you see, that the concepts of escape and freedom within the book and the ways in which these concepts are symbolized are extremely important.

The book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

I have read the book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn up to chapter fourteen. I have found one thing I don’t like, the language which is used is straight out of the 1800’s. An example of this can be found on every page in the book. Twain shows one of these examples when he writes, “I took to it again because pap hadn’t no objections. ” This language is not acceptable in modern English, it should really be, “I took to it again because pap had no objections. ” When Tom and Huckleberry were outside and ran out of candles and needed more of them, I thought it was good of Tom to leave money for the candles he stole.

Twain shows this when he writes, “But Tom wanted to resk it; so we slid in there and got three candles, and Tom laid five cents on the table for pay. ” This shows that though it was wrong of Tom to steal the candles it honest of him to leave pay for the candles. I think that Tom and Huck are very smart boys, when Huck snuck out of the house Tom pretended that he was a cat to get Hucks attention. If he hadn’t done this the widow might have caught them leaving in the middle of the night. Twain shows their resourcefulness when he writes, “Directly I could just barely hear a me-yow! me-yow! down there.

That was good! Says I, me-yow! me-yow! as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window on to the shed. ” This shows the boys resourcefulness and intelligence. I think it is sick that the group of boys made their own gang. The gang planned to rob people, kill people and take people for ransom. Twain illustrates this when he writes, “We ain’t burglars. That ain’t no sort of style. We are highwaymen. We stop stages and carriages on the road, with masks on and kill the people and take their watches and money. ” I find it horrible that some young school boys would plan to kill people.

Twains novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is by any means a classic. However, there are several flaws. First of all the coincidence that everything happens with in my mind detracts some from the story. The other major problem is that the book seems to drag on and on the closer you get to the end, as if Twain had a page quota to fill and was not worried about the story. The other problem brought up on our hand-out was Hucks lack of seriousness in what was a very serious situation for Jim. As for the coincidence part, it appears most obviously as you read towards the end.

For example Huck ends up at Aunt Pollys, and I was thinking, yeah… right those chances are about one in a million. And then after Huck tells Aunt Polly that he is Tom, Tom shows up… uh-huh, I bet. It is things such as those I just mentioned that make it very difficult for me to read a book without becoming frustrated. It is probably because I am used to real life and like it or not real life is just not that perfect. My other gripe was that Twain seems to ramble on and on and on an….. To me it seems as if the story that he was writing became faint shortly after the time when Huck says, Its me.

George Jackson, sir(pg. 95). I do have to give him that the feud was interesting filler, but you can only take so much filler. Then when John Wayne (The Duke) and Elvis (The King) come along there seem to be four or five stops along the river that except for one little detail, are the same. Please excuse the jump back, but how coincidental is it that you have a Duke and a King on the same raft in the middle of the Mississippi river (yes I do know they are not really royalty but that does not matter)?

Even during all of this complaining I have done I did find humor in such things as when Huck was observing some local loafers and their discussions about borrowing and lending chewing tobacco. Here, gimme back the chaw and you take the plug. (pg. 138). I can just picture four or five guys laying around chewing tobacco with spit/tobacco juice running down their chins, probably in dirty overalls with no shirts on underneath and boots, to complete the look, three or four days of beard waiting to be shaved, and oh yeah, a nice old straw hat. The picture of this I have in my head is just so vivid that it disgusts me now.

I think that is one of the reasons this is such a great book, the imagery. The final thing mentioned was Hucks lack of seriousness or that he was too humorous or too wrapped up in fantasy for the situation both he and Jim were in. Here as opposed to the things I attacked above I will have to be on the side of the defense. My foremost reason is that I do not think Huck realizes the seriousness of the predicament. Huck is a boy that lives in Hannibal, MO during the times of the Civil War, he probably does not know any other ways to deal with anyone who is a slave or is trying to escape.

Put yourself in his shoes once and think of the trouble you might have. Then think how you would deal with these problems. Would it be in the way many kids do, with a bit of fun to try to alleviate some of the tension? Take the time when Jim thinks Huck is dead and he shows up scaring Jim to the point of carrying out a conversation with a ghost. Jim says I alwuz liked dead people, en done all I could for em… (pg. 40). Read that section over and see if it does not seem to be in good taste, if you can call anything done by Huck tasteful.

I think it does. My final task is to come up with a new ending. I think my ending goes like this: Huck and Jim find the mouth of the Ohio river as planed and venture upstream by any means available. As they continue up the river the bond between the two runaways becomes ever stronger. When they reach the free states and Jim is officially free. After waiting around a while the two begin to get money in any way they can. When it is enough Jim buys his wife and children out of slavery, and Huck takes a cut (not too much, just enough to get home).

Once home Huck starts all over with his ever interesting plots (not without the help of Tom Sawyer). Time passes and over the years Huck misses Jim and eventually embarks on a quest. The quest to find Jim. This journey would be much like the journey he and Jim took just a few years ago. This time though, there is no John Wayne and Elvis to make the story drawn out and boring towards the end. Then Huck finds Jim, meets the wife and kids, and goes back home to lead a normal (or as normal as can be) life working as little as possible and living off his $6000.

The Advantures Of Huck Fin

Books are known for teaching lessons. In Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain satirically presents the situation of how people of different color were treated unjustly, while at the same time amusing his readers. Isnt it ironic that the character that grows on you most is Jim, the black runaway slave, who society looks down upon most during the time period of this book? Jim is treated poorly as a slave and as a person. For one, he is separated from his parents and children amongst different slave owners. On top of this, he is about to be sold for $800 to another owner even more far away from his family, which leads to his escape.

Despite these situations, he remains a loyal, loving, father-like figure, and most importantly, he remains a great friend to Huckleberry. Society, even today, often puts children down by saying that they do not contain values. Well, Huck closes the door to this statement. Whenever Huck is challenged to make a decision on impact concerning the safety of Jim, such as the incident when the men are looking for blacks, his heart always seems to pilot him to the direction of Jims benefit, even though almost all of the rest of society would object to his decisions during this period of time.

You can also see Hucks distress and sorrow for the fact that Jim has to buy his family back in order to see them again. This absolutely breaks Hucks heart. Back in the 1800s, blacks were considered property, and whites were always the superior race. In Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain purposely makes Jim the best character in the book, in that he is the most compassionate, caring, and most appreciated by Huck, the main character in the book. At the same time he makes Pap, the white dead-beat father of Huck, the most detested, disrespected, low down character of this book.

Twain causes his readers to contemplate of how foolish it is that a person can be judged on his outside appearance, rather than who the individual is on the inside. In conclusion, the lesson to be taught by Mark Twain is that people often pre-judge others based on their exterior and not what counts on the interior. He does this satirically by making Jim an irresistibly lovable character because of how deep his feelings are, making the reader feel these insights as well. This is a lesson that can unquestionably be applied in todays world as well.

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

“You don’t know about me, without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” but that ain’t no matter. that book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There were things which he streched, but mainly he told the truth. That ain’ nothing. I never seen anybody but lied, one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybr Mary. Aunt Polly-Tom’s Aunt Polly, she is-and Mary, and the Widow Douglas, is all told bout in that book-which is mostly a true book; with some, as I said before.

Any way I am here to tell you somethings bout this man that has write ll these things bout our adventures. So listen an maybe you might even learn a little something bout this man. Now let me think…. oh ya, now I recall it. I reckon it was a warm November ju’s like any other, the 30th to be exact. But that ain’t how Sam’s Pa spoke of it. He had to go maki’n big, fancy speeches and things of that sort at the party. But after all that mubl’in we had a purdy good time. As a matter of fact as I recall that day it was almost pur’fect.

If it warn’t for me drunk Pa gettin arrested by the Sheriff that morn, it woudda’ been real pur’fect. Course I reckon a boy’s gota have a good time t his best friend’s bert’day party. I was at Sam’s house. Course I warn’t de only one dare. His Pa, Judge Clemens and Ma, Miss Jane Lampton, till she married of course, was dare and I reckon his whole ‘tire family must da been at dat house, can’t barely remember it was only his fourth birthday back in 1839 (Howard 1). Ya, me and Sam been friends ever since he moved here, best friends too, he was born an lived in Florida, Missouri prior to now. He moved here at the start of this year.

See lots of people don’t give me much thought cause me bein uneducated and havin a Pa like I do an all. That all changed though, Sam was the type dat even liked the niggers, so I be surprised if he thought of me differently than any other (Paine 4). Sam’s family had’nt got that much money either but his Pa sure was one of them educated types. He was a lawyer and a judge and people looked up to him for jus dat (Howard 5). Actually, speakin of money I had some myself, bout 6,000 dollars. Ya, I was rich ever since Tom and I had gotten them bandits. Tell ya the truth, money did’nt really mean much to me anyways cause I liked livin simple an all.

But some people spend all their time day dreamin bout the stuff. Sam’s Pa and Sam certainly had somethin in common then cause Judge Clemens is always thinkin of all these ways to be prosper. And Sam jus day dream bout what ever he could think of (Howard 11). Guess I would do the same if I was forced to sit in a school house some days myself. Now your probably thinkin why I said most in sted of all weekdays, well Sam did’nt care for his schoolin much and often played hooky (Paine 14). Ya see, cause of Sam’s funny personality he was often switched. Ol’e Mrs. Elizabeth Horr could never forget that mam’s name.

Ya see dat was Sam’s teacher, he did’nt think of her as that though. In Sam’s mind Mrs. Elizabeth was a jail keeper (Eaton 27). So we use ta go in sit at the port. Hannibal, Mississippi was where we lived, an it was a big river town (Encarta 1994). Sam loved them steam boats, he could sit dare an look it em all day, and he usually did. Course me bein his best of friends was always there wit em, did’nt care for em much myself so Sam would always make up stories, and adventures to says we was doin, when all we was really doin was lookin at boats, and missin school of course. Sam had many of brothers and sisters.

I reckon he was never the lonely type cause he had many of siblins. There was Pamela, who was eight years older han ourselves. She was well schooled and all, I reckon she even liked it! (Howard 5). Orion was eight years older too. Then there was Benjamin, never got to know him well cause he died at only ten and there was the little brother, Henry (Paine 16). Anyways, our schoolin continued, dull as ever. Well before we known it we had ourselves out that school. So Sam was not really sure bout what he wanted to do with em’self, so to make some money he followed his brother, Orion (Encarta).

Ya see Orion had ju’s bought himself a local printin press. The only article prior to the Hannible Press was the Courier so now Hannible had tself two papers (Howard 115). Now durin this time Sam had been workin for a Mr. Ament, another local printer, for round two years. So Sam worked under his older brother bein the printer for the paper (115). Well it was most unfortunate that they seems to be carryin some bad luck on their shoulders from the beginn’in. The press caught on fire, it was only a small one but them fire fighters did’nt help the problem much when they doused the water all over the equipment.

Anyways that there was the least of their problems. Back around that time an epidemic struck the Mississippi. Cholera struck hard and devastated many of people. Now cause people could’nt work they had to make trades for goods, and barterin did’t do much good for Sam and Orion (117). But they were no quitters, they stuck to it and Sam started gettin bored of write’in the same ol’e things so he turned a little creative. Sam bein born funny, started slippin jokes in the paper and made up names to call himself (119). Well Orion wanted a proper, ol’e fashioned kinda paper.

This caused for some quarrel’in in between the two and I reckon Sam could’n stand for it no longer, so he grab himself his belongings and left for St. Louis to visit his sister Elizabeth and find himself a job. He did’t plan on stay’in there for long though. Sam only wanted to make enough money to go to New York (Paine 52). Well Sam’s plans did not exactly go as he reckoned they would. He had many print’in jobs cross the whole country. Dur’in this time Sam met a fella named Burruogh. He was in to literature and was a well read man. He had quite the influence on Sam and turned him on to read’in.

Eventually, Sam returned back in St. Louis and worked for the Evening News. Well by this time it was spring and Orion got himself a wife and moved to Iowa. Sam came to visit his brother in Iowa and found Henry, his younger brother, now 17, there too. Well life was like ol’e times for a while. The three brothers lived together in Orion’s house. This is the period of time when Sam was turned on to music. It happened after a music teacher, who lived on the floor below, was flat out sick and tired of be’in the focus of Sam’s noise and pranks that they would play on him.

He would come upstairs to reprimand them. Sam would usually reply with one of his regular wise cracks but one day Sam tried som’in a bit out the ordinary. In an attempt to be funny he was overly polite to the teacher. To his surprise, the man was nice back and before you could blink your own eye Sam was a musician (60). He was bout 20 years of age now and was quite the ladie’s man. But don’t think for a second that Sam was close to a gentleman. The ladie’s along with everybody else liked Sam for his outgo’in personality.

Although he was a partier dur’in the sun’s hours at night you could predict that the only place he would be found was in his bed, propped up by a pillow, smok’in his pipe and read’in a book (61). Life was good for the boys and not a day passed without a laugh. Unfortunately good things can only last so long. Orion’s paper was not mak’in him enough to cover his expenses. After much struggl’in he wrote home in istraught to his mama, who was now liv’in with Pamela. The note told of an adventure that Orion would go on in the Amazon (62). His interest was sparked after read’in a book by Lynch and Henderson.

The book told of the riches that could be found there in the mines of the rain forest. Now if you have’nt gotten the idea that Sam was the adventurous type, you have’nt been listen’in proper, cause thats what he lived for! If you think that Sam would miss a chance to not only ride on a steam boat to South America but also go on an adventure in the Amazon you are beyond fix’in (64). Anyway it took him round a year to raise nough money to go to the Amazon but he finally had it and set forth on the Paul Jones down the Mississippi to New Orleans.

Sam reckoned the voyage would take bout a week of time but his foresee’in was more than just a bit off (70). Horace Bixby was cap’tn of the boat. I reckon his day started off jus as any other, that is until he met Sam of course. It all happened when Horace spotted that a man, now 21 years of age, had been star’in at him for hours. When Horace’s shift was over he left the pilot house. As soon as he opened that door Sam was in his face ask’in questions bout his job and how liked it. Their onversations and friendliness kept for the rest of the trip. But at the end Sam left it jus like all the other passengers.

Sam noticed an ol’e dock hand lean’in up against a pole. Sam was down right puzzled when the man laughed at Sam’s question. He replied There have never been no steamers sail’in to the Amazon round here! It was then and there when Sam realized that the Mississippi was his river and that pilot’in it had been his biggest dream. So Sam went search’in for Bixby and found em too. He asked him if he could be a cub on the boat and Bixby had no problem with it cause Sam had been so friendly and all. So Sam worked the river for four years and ventually became himself a cap’tn (Howard 122).

Word got around that Sam was one of the best cap’tns on that river. Mr. Bixby was proud and Sam loved that river more than life it’self and planed to spend it on the Mississippi (133). I’m sure he woulda done it till he was able to but someth’in came up. One night there was a horrible accident. There was a ship who’s had them selves a boiler explosion. Henry was on that boat and went to swim to a nearby shore. But Henry heard scream’in and went back to save people. He never made it and drowned. This was not the only thing that made Sam depressed these days (Paine 91).

Unfortunately when Sam turned 26 years of age boats were halted go’in up and down the river cause of the war. Ya see the Yankees has been on us bout how slaves are immoral and all, and them plantation owners would’n got no notes if it warn’t for their niggers (133). So as anyone coulda guessed the country broke out into an all out brawl over the matter. Course this meant dat any man worthy of any respect at all was go’in to fight for em selves and their good ol’ e south, so for a short period of time he did but Sam thought that slavery was rong.

He felt for it so strong that he woulda joined emself en the Yank’s side but he would be fightin his friends and neighbors (Howard 134). By this time Orion’s print’in business had failed. But Orion’s second cousin was a rich boy. He was able to fix up Orion with a proper job. Nevada was a new territory and it needed itself a Territorial Secretary. This job was much like be’in a governor and was considered a real honor. There was one problem left to resolve. It would take Orion all of one-hundred and fifty dollars. Well that was no problem that Sam could’nt solve cause he had himself hree-hundred dollars right in his own pocket.

Now if I am do’in my math proper this would mean that two people would have themselves a ticket to Nevada. Well I must to done it right cause they did jus’ that. Sam’s plan to make money would be to mine silver (135). Well Sam’s luck at min’in was not very prosper. He barely made enough to survive the winter. But although times were tough he was always able to make his colleagues and himself laugh dur’in the worst of times. Dur’in this period Sam would write humorous letters to Orion. Well Orion knew of his li’l brothers problems. In an attempt to help him he showed Sam’s letters to the local paper.

The owner of the Territorial Enterprise found exactly what he wanted (137). It was August when Sam started writ’in for the paper. But prior to writ’in a stitch Sam wanted to create a name for himself that would stick. He thought long and hard, think’in how great life used to be on the Mississippi. Suddenly his eyes took on a glare and his face was perplexed. He had a big smile on his face and through his smil’in mouth came the words Mark Twain. It was a river term that told the cap’tn how deep the water was (15). Well Sam though he had good ideas bout write’in so he set off o be a free lance writer. To make money in between he mined for gold.

One day while sitt’in on a rock next to the mountain side he heard some men talk’in of frog races. This took Sam’s mind to the past, his uncle use to have a pet frog. So he started write’in what came to mind and before he coulda known it himself he had a completed story in front of his eyes (142). Sam sent his story to a local newspaper. Well The Bullfrog Of Calaveras County was the talk of the town! Before he known it himself Sam stories were be’in published all over the country (143). I reckon it was late May of 1864 when Sam left for the West coast. Twain’s reason for leav’in Nevada for California was because of a duel.

The duel was really somewhat of a publicity stunt. It was arranged in between Sam and a rival paper to the Call, the paper that Sam was write’in for (Paine 137). When Sam got there he found the city filled wit beautiful flowers and roll’in green hills. Sam found the location perfect for his write’in. He was relaxed here and could concentrate (Eaton 143). Sam’s job was to venture out into the city’s night life. It was filled with shows and entertainment! Sam’s job was to report and critique the shows he attended, he loved it at first but soon got ick of all the lights and glamour (145). But Sam kept at it.

He had one reason for wak’in up every day. You see Sam joined a literary group, it was his moment of sunshine dur’in an otherwise dismal day (146). But Sam could barely take the his monotonous job for another day, he was bout to quit when BOOM. Now I have never been to the West myself but Sam told me out there they have these happen’ins they call earthquakes. It must be strange to be in one. Everything shakes and whole build’ins can fall down! Anyways for Sam this earthquake brought bout much to write about. For many days he made reports bout what appened to people and their homes and things of the sort.

But eventually California got themselves some carpenters to fix everyth’in and that was the end of that topic (146). So I reckon you believe how happy Sam was when he got word from Joe Goodman to rejoin the Enterprise. Sam would act as their Western reporter and would free to write bout what ever he chose (147). Well every thing was go’in fine until Sam’s friend and roommate Steve Gillis almost killed a barkeeper! He was put in jail for attempted murder. So be’in the kind that Sam was, he posted his friend’s bail. Well the word got out that this barkeeper was friends ith the Sheriff.

This meant that Steve had no chance of gett’in a fair trial. So like any man would, Steve fled to Virginia. Well when he did’nt show up in court they went after Sam’s bail money. But no worry, cause Sam got word of it before they found him. Steve’s brother Jim came to town and told Sam that he could stay with him in his cabin in the Tuollumne hills (148). Jim was what was called a pocket miner. These people were miners that would look for gold in abandoned mines. So Sam learned the trade of pocket min’in. They roamed area which is now Yosemite park scout’in for gold. Sam did this for weeks mak’in enough to urvive (149).

Eventually Sam’s short attention span caught up with him. Like every thing else Sam got sick of min’in and be’in so far away from, well, everything! So he set down his pails and headed back to San Fransico (150). Upon his return Sam was contracted by the Sacremento Union to write some stories bout the Hawaiian group. Well within moments Sam had himself on a boat to the islands. He would often refer to his time on the islands as one of the best in his whole, ttire life, a golden memory as he put so himself . Sam was in his 30s, his prime and was filled with adventure and energy.

He traveled all ver the island and sent back detailed reports (Paine 148). California and Sam himself were both amazed with the write’in that Mark Twain was creat’in. Sam wanted to refine his skills and better himself. His first step toward his goal was to return to California (150). Sam begun to give lectures, at the start of it they were refined to San Fransisco and then to the state. The results were amazing. I don’t think I have ever seen so many of people in one room before! Well cause of these results Sam ventured out to many big cities of the country.

Now if you were to pick one place where the most people were would come to see Sam’s lectures were would you go? New York, New York of course (160). The lectures that Sam gave in New York were probably what kicked off his pathway to national fame (162). Dur’in his travels Sam met a man named Charles Langdon. They became good friends. Sam spent Christmas in New York with Charles. It is here where he met Olivia Langdon (Eaton 178). It was love at first sight, I must say she was a mighty fine woman, she was! The two stared at each other through out dinner at the Langdon’s house.

Olivia found Sam the most interest’in person she had ever met (179). They saw each other again on New Year’s Day and became even ore friendly with each other, even more than prior (182). Duty called Sam to Washington, where he would give two speeches. At this point Sam’s life took a turn. He realized that he was not meant to be a reporter but an author (183). He started write’in quickly, his goal was to finish a manuscript as soon as possible (184). The result was The Innocent Abroad Sam’s first novel. The story told of Sam’s trip on the Quaker , a large sailboat, with six other men.

He was on the ship to tour Europe and lecture in the some of the big cities (163 Paine). In the meantime Sam was invited to spend two days with the Langdon amily. Everyone was happy to see him. For two days he tried to lure Olivia towards engag’in her in some personal conversation (186 Eaton). Within a short period of time Sam had convinced Olivia into marry’in him (187). February 2, 1870 was the day that Sam finally got married, well I can say it was bout time! He did not want to separate the Langdon family so Sam decided to move nearby to Olivia’s home town, Elmira, so Sam and his new wife moved to Buffalo, New York (190).

Almost as soon as the couple moved in they experienced themselves some problems. Olivia’s father passed away leav’in her grief stricken. Olivia got erself into a state of depression, mak’in her weak and confined her to her bed. In November the couple had a premature baby boy named Langdon. But instead of bring’in the family joy it worsened them. Because the baby was born early it was weak and sickly, not to good. How could a man possibly concentrate in such a mess? Well he simply could’nt! Sam noticed that ever since they moved to Buffalo his wife and himself were not the happy people they used to be (192).

So when Sam received the invitation to spend the summer at Quarry Farm from Mrs. Crane there was no doubt in his mind to accept. Mrs. Crane was the sister of Olivia’s mama. She lived on a farm that had huge views of roll’in green hills which helped to inspire Sam an his write’in (186 Paine). By the end of the summer, Sam had finished his book, Roughing It. It was bout his adventures out in the western territory. At the summer’s end the family chose on mov’in to Hartford, Connecticut, a thriv’in city that was filled with literary publishers and clubs of that sort (Paine 189).

1872 was a year of change for Sam and his family. In March his second child was born Susy Clemens. But three months later Langdon died of a heavy cold (198). Later that year Sam’s adventures spanned to England, his mission as to collect information bout their customs for a new book that he planned to start. He returned in November that same year. His plans changed, Sam abandoned his idea and started a new fiction book called The Gilded Age. It was well known and loved by many people, jus like all of his other write’ins of course. Lov’in England so much, Sam returned there with his family.

He stayed himself there for a complete two years. Dur’in this time he had met with many famous authors and lectured all over England (199). On his arrival home Sam started write’in Tom Sawyer. It was bout his child hood :grow’in up on the Mississippi. It was to be one of his most famous books (200). I guess he must ‘ av been feel’in mighty high spirited cause Sam continued on write’in. He wrote Sketches New and Old which would have been a tremendous seller if it were by any other author, but for Sam it was a relatively small potatoes (209). Sam’s next big accomplishment was The Prince and the Pauper , his first play.

The story was bout Henry VIII. Sam got the idea after read’in The Prince and the Page, a well known story (219). By now Sam had himself three children Susy, Clara and Jean (Howard 157). It was at this time when Sam decided to write The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Eaton 217). Now Sam wrote many a books but this was by far the most excellent thing that was ever written, and I can’t help lik’in the name of it! It sold like a madman, bring’in Sam tons of letters and comments bout his novel. After write’in many famous books Sam did someth’in he had been long’in for. Sam returned to the Mississippi.

There he met up with some ole friends and saw ole sites. For a moment Sam was liv’in his child hood. Everybody he knew had read all of his books and the all the people decorated their town for Sam’s return. As Sam stepped off the boat he said Has Missouri changed the date of the 4th of July? Howard 166). The next day Sam was invited to attend the christen’in of a new steam boat. The champagne bottle cracked and the wooden planks that held it in place slipped off the ship reveal’in the name MARK TWAIN (168). Years later Sam laid in his bed. He was now an old man with only Clara left.

His whole family had died. He sat in bed remember’in how he had seen Halley’s comet when he was little. Now 77 years later Sam saw the comet again on the night of April 21, 1910. This was one of the lasts things he saw. Cause that night Sam passed into a long sleep that still has yet to end (173). I went on bein’ a sheriff in Montana. But this story ain’t bout myself, it’s bout my friend Sam. -Tom Blankenship a. k. a. : Huckleberry Finn Note: This paper was written in a dialect used by Huck. There are many spelling and grammatical errors but all are intessional (just kidding, bout –).

They are there to represent the dialogue of Huck. I have edited it many times to be sure ALL the errors now in the paper are intentional! I have sat through my spell check alerting me that almost every word was spelled wrong just to eliminate unintentional errors. The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn II In the novel The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn the setting has a large nfluence on Huck’s character. The period of time that Huck lived in was a distinct era. The country was changing rapidly. During this period steam engines enabled rivers to be used as mass transportation, an idea that had never been explored until now.

Waterways were the first way in which large amounts of goods could be transported efficiently. This drastically changed much of the nation’s economy. Huge factories were built in the north and southern plantations tripled their production by using machines. There were many traits of this era that can be seen by looking at the components of Huck’s character, his language, actions and thoughts. Some of these traits are sutle and can be easily missed but others are very obvious and powerful. This period of change was the setting of Huck’s childhood. One trait that is indicative of the era is the social class of Huck and Huck’s language.

It is greatly affected by his social class and setting. The broken English is a sign of Huck’s low social class. In addition it also shows that he is from a southern river town. This can be seen from his expressions and accent. The language of the novel also assists the reader to get into the laid back, southern mood of the book. By doing so the story is brought to life. It seems as if someone were to bring you back to the time when the novel and the events in it occurred. Because of the rules of the time that Huck’s character is governed upon, Huck was never educated.

During the early 1800s there was no law that required children to go to school, therefore his low intellect has a strong impact on Huck’s character. It gives him a plain and simple outlook on life, this trait can been seen throughout the book in Huck’s character. One specific area it affects is Huck’s plans for his future. Huck only thought about what he was going to do for present. Huck had an incapable father. He was thought of as he town drunk, and would often come home intoxicated and abuse Huck. At one point his father locked Huck up in a small room without food or water for days.

The setting is important here because if Huck’s father were to treat his son in an abusive manner today, he would lose custody of his child. A good example of Huck’s unloving relationship was Huck’s reaction to his father’s death. When notified of his death he was relieved and felt safe! This detail can be used to illustrate the abuse that Huck went through in the beginning of the book, while living with his father. Because of Huck’s father’s irresponsible actions, Huck an away at a young age in the hope that someday he would find freedom from his father and society. By running away Huck saved himself from abuse and being taken advantage of.

One of the things Huck saved himself from was having 6,000 dollars, that Huck was awarded for the capture of two criminals in Tom Sawyer, being stolen from him by his father. Huck’s separation from his father is also the reason for his free thinking, responsibility and innocence. These times of hardship formed him into a mature person and helped contribute to his independent personality. Without the influence of the setting Huck would have never been able to achieve the reedom that he had by being independent. When Huck ran away he joined up with Jim, who was also running away, but from something different.

Jim was fleeing from slavery, a common practice of the time. Huck’s relationship with Jim contributed to Huck’s non-prejudice thinking. Another factor that gave Huck a understanding of how the slaves must have felt was the prejudice that he experienced himself , being part of the lower class. Huck was infuriated when people looked down upon him for something that was no fault of his, he was born into the class because of his father’s social status. For these reasons Huck always treated Jim as an equal, making Huck ahead of his time. Jim knew that Huck respected him, as a result Jim risked his own life to save Huck.

Huck’s independence and lack of education resulted in a mind that was never influenced by adult’s beliefs. This allowed Huck to have thoughts based on what he believed in, not traditions that are simply carried on by messengers of the past’s beliefs. Although traditions are often good they prevent new ideas from entering people’s minds. This made Huck original, this individuality could be seen with his relationship with Jim. During this period f American history slaves were looked down upon, but Huck, being an independent thinker, looked up to Jim for who he was, not for the color of his skin.

This was made obvious by their moon lit conversations on the raft. On the raft Huck and Jim talked about their past and future, friends and how they planned to avoid trouble that could result from their next adventure. From the raft conversations the reader was able to see how Jim longed for freedom and had feelings just like everyone else, especially Huck. As the novel progressed Huck’s relationship with Jim grew stronger. In the beginning of the book Huck often called Jim Nigger Jim. This was not because of any hatred that Huck had towards Jim.

It was only a term commonly used to refer to blacks. But by the end of the book Huck would only call Jim by his name. This change in dialogue clearly illustrates how the relationship grew stronger during their adventures. By the end of the novel Huck risked his own life to free Jim in the final escape attempt. This happened when Huck and Tom freed Jim from a holding cell. They were spotted, chased and then shot at by the men who had captured Jim. If the story were to take place in another time, where slavery did not exist, it could have hid Huck’s individuality that slavery hed light on.

During the river adventures that Huck and Jim shared Huck realized that because of his economic status he was dependent on the river to survive. This can clearly be seen by looking at the origin of his name Huckleberry. He was given this name because at a young age he had been eating huckleberries. His dependence made him loyal to the Mississippi River. The personification of the river that Huck uses clearly shows his feelings and thankfulness to the river. The personification also helped show how important the river was to not only Huck but to all of the river towns.

Huckleberry Finn – Social And Literary Aspects

Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel about a young boys coming of age in Missouri of the mid-1800s. The main character, Huckleberry Finn, spends much time in the novel floating down the Mississippi River on a raft with a runaway slave named Jim. Before he does so, however, Huck spends some time in the fictional town of St. Petersburg where a number of people attempt to influence him. Before the novel begins, Huck Finn has led a life of absolute freedom. His drunken and often missing father has never paid much attention to him; his mother is dead and so, when the novel begins, Huck is not used to following any rules.

The book’s opening finds Huck living with the Widow Douglas and her sister, Miss Watson. Both women are fairly old and are really somewhat incapable of raising a rebellious boy like Huck Finn. Nevertheless, they attempt to make Huck into what they believe will be a better boy. Specifically, they attempt, as Huck says, to “civilize” him. This process includes making Huck go to school, teaching him various religious facts, and making him act in a way that the women find socially acceptable. Huck, who has never had to follow many rules in his life, finds the demands the women place upon him constraining and the life with them lonely.

As a result, soon after he first moves in with them, he runs away. He soon comes back, but, even though he becomes somewhat comfortable with his new life as the months go by, Huck never really enjoys the life of manners, religion, and education that the Widow and her sister impose upon him. Huck believes he will find some freedom with Tom Sawyer. Tom is a boy of Huck’s age who promises Huck and other boys of the town a life of adventure. Huck is eager to join Tom Sawyers Gang because he feels that doing so will allow him to escape the somewhat boring life he leads with the Widow Douglas.

Unfortunately, such an escape does not occur. Tom Sawyer promises much but none of his promises comes to pass. Huck finds out too late that Toms adventures are imaginary, that raiding a caravan of “A-rabs” really means terrorizing young children on a Sunday school picnic, that stolen “joolry” is nothing more than turnips or rocks. Huck is disappointed that the adventures Tom promises are not real and so, along with the other members, he resigns from the gang. Another person who tries to get Huckleberry Finn to change is Pap, Huck’s father. Pap is one of the most astonishing figures in all of American literature.

He is completely antisocial and wishes to undo all of the civilizing effects that the Widow and Miss Watson have attempted to instill in Huck. Pap is a mess: he is unshaven; his hair is uncut and hangs like vines in front of his face; his skin, Huck says, “Is white like a fish’s belly or like a tree toads. ” Pap’s savage appearance reflects his feelings as he demands that Huck quit school, stop reading, and avoid church. Huck is able to stay away from Pap for a while, but Pap kidnaps Huck three or four months after Huck starts to live with the Widow and takes him to a lonely cabin deep in the Missouri woods.

Here, Huck enjoys, once again, the freedom that he had prior to the beginning of the book. He can smoke, “laze around,” swear, and, in general, do what he wants to do. However, as he did with the Widow and with Tom, Huck begins to become dissatisfied with this life. Pap is “too handy with the hickory” and Huck soon realizes that he will have to escape from the cabin if he wishes to remain alive. As a result of his concern, Huck makes it appear as if he is killed in the cabin while Pap is away, and leaves to go to Jackson Island a remote island in the Mississippi River.

It is after he leaves his father’s cabin that Huck joins yet another important influence in his life: Miss Watson’s slave, Jim. Prior to Huck’s leaving, Jim has been a minor character in the novel he has been shown being fooled by Tom Sawyer and telling Huck’s fortune. Huck finds Jim on Jackson’s Island because the slave has run away. He has overheard a conversation that he will soon be sold to a slave owner New Orleans. Soon, after joining Jim on Jackson’s Island, Huck begins to realize that Jim has more talents and intelligence than Huck has been aware of.

Jim knows “all kinds of signs” about the future, people’s personalities, and weather forecasting. Huck finds this kind of information necessary as he and Jim drift down the Mississippi on a raft. Huck feels a comfort with Jim that he has not felt with the other major characters in the novel. With Jim, Huck can enjoy the best aspects of his earlier influences. As does the Widow, Jim allows Huck security, but Jim is not as confining as the Widow. Like Tom Sawyer, Jim is intelligent but his intelligence is not as intimidating or as imaginary as is Toms.

Similar to Pap, Jim allows Huck freedom, but he does it in a loving, rather than an uncaring, fashion. Thus, early, in their relationship on Jackson’s Island, Huck says to Jim, “This is nice. I wouldn’t want to be nowhere else but here. ” This feeling is in marked contrast with Huck’s feelings concerning other people in the early part of the novel where he always is uncomfortable and wishes to leave them. At the conclusion of chapter 11 in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck and Jim are forced to leave Jackson’s Island because Huck discovers that people are looking for the runaway slave.

Prior to leaving, Huck tells Jim, “They’re after us. ” Clearly, the people are after Jim, but Huck has already identified with Jim and has begun to care for him. This stated empathy shows that the two outcasts will have a successful and rewarding friendship as they drift down the river as the novel continues. (Twain, Mark) Mark Twain and racism almost always appear together in critics articles yet is racism really the problem? There is a major argument among literary critics whether Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, is or is not a racist novel.

The question boils down to the depiction of Jim, the black slave, and the way Huck and other characters treat him. The use of the word “nigger” is also a point raised by some critics, who feel that Twain uses the word too much and too loosely. Mark Twain never presents Jim in a negative light. He does not show Jim as a drunkard, as a mean person, or as a cheat. This is in contrast to the way Huck’s (white) father is depicted, whom Twain describes using all of the above characterizations and more. We see Jim as a good friend, a man devoted to his family and loyal to his companions.

He is, however, very naive and superstitious. Some critics say that Twain is implying that all blacks have these qualities. When Jim turns to his magic hairball for answers about the future, we see that he does believe in some foolish things. But all the same, both blacks and whites visit Jim to use the hairballs powers. This type of naivete was abundant at the time and found among all races as the result of a lack of proper education. So the depiction of Jim is not negative in the sense that Jim uneducated and in this aspect of the story clearly there is no racism intended.

It is next necessary to analyze the way white characters treat Jim throughout the book. Note that what the author felt is not the way most characters act around Jim, and his feelings are probably only shown through Huck. (Concord Library) In the South during that period, black people were treated as less than humans, and Twain needed to portray this. The examples of the way Jim is denigrated: by being locked up, having to hide his face in the daytime and how he is generally derided are necessary for historical accuracy. Therefore, Mark Twain had to display Jim’s treatment in this manner, even if it is not the way he felt.

Huck, however, does not treat Jim as most whites do. Huck looks at Jim as a friend, and by the end of their journey, disagrees with society’s notion that blacks are inferior. There are two main examples of this in the story. The first one is where Huck is disgusted by Jims plans to steal his own children, who are “someone else’s property. ” While Huck is still racist here, Twain has written the scene in a way that ridicules the notion that someone’s children can actually be the property of a stranger because the father is black.

The second example is where Huck doesn’t tell Jims whereabouts, which would return Jim to slavery, and instead chooses to “go to Hell” for his decision. This is again Twain making a mockery of Southern values, that it is a sin to be kind to black people. Another reason that is given to say this novel is racist is the use of the word “nigger. ” This is not a good reason because this is how blacks were referred to then. To use the word Negro or African-American would have taken away from the story’s impact.

If Twain wanted to write a historically accurate book, as he did, then the inclusion of this word is necessary. (Salwen, Peter) These claims that Huckleberry Finn is racist are not simply attempts to damage the image of a great novel. They come from people who are hurt by racism and don’t like seeing it in any context. However, they must realize that this novel and its author are not racist, and the purpose of the story is to prove black equality. (Concord Library) In recent years, there has been increasing discussion of the seemingly racist ideas expressed by Mark Twain in Huckleberry Finn.

In some extreme cases the novel has even been banned by public school systems and censored by public libraries. The basis for these censorship campaigns has been the depiction of one of the main characters in Huckleberry Finn, Jim, a black slave. Jim, is a “typical” black slave who runs away from his “owner” Miss Watson. At several points in the novel, Jim’s character is described to the reader, and some people have looked upon the characterization as racist. However, before one begins to censor a novel, it is important to separate the ideas of the author from the ideas’ of his characters.

It is also important not to take a novel at face value and to “read between the lines” in order to capture the underlying themes of a novel. If one were to do this in relation to Huckleberry Finn, one would, without a doubt, realize that it is not racist and is even anti-slavery. (Ed. Scott, Arthur Lincoln) On a superficial level Huckleberry Finn might appear to be racist. The first time the reader meets Jim he is given a very negative description of him. The reader is told that Jim is illiterate, childlike, not very bright and extremely superstitious.

However, it is important not to lose sight of who is giving this description and of whom it is being given. Although Huck is not a racist child, he has been raised by extremely racist individuals who have, even if only subconsciously, ingrained some feelings of bigotry into his mind. It is also important to remember that this description, although it is quite saddening, was probably accurate. Jim and the millions of other slaves in the South were not permitted any formal education, were never allowed any independent thought and were constantly maltreated and abused.

Twain is merely portraying by way of Jim, a very realistic slave raised in the South during that time period. To say that Twain is racist because of his desire for historical accuracy is absurd. Despite the few incidences in which Jim’s description might be misconstrued as racist, there are many points in the novel where Twain through Huck, voices his extreme opposition to the slave trade and racism. (Ed. Scott, Arthur Lincoln) In chapter six, Huck’s father fervently objects to the governments granting of suffrage to an educated black professor.

Twain wants the reader to see the absurdity in this statement. Huck’s father believes that he is superior to this black professor simply because of the color of his skin. In Chapter 15the reader is told of an incident, which contradicts the original “childlike” description of Jim. In chapter 15 the reader is presented with a very caring and father-like Jim who becomes very worried when he loses his best friend Huck in a deep fog. Twain is pointing out the connection, which has been made between Huck and Jim. A connection, which does not exist between a man and his property.

When Huck first meets Jim on the Island he makes a monumental decision, not to turn Jim in. He is confronted by two opposing forces, the force of society and the force of friendship. ( Ed. Kesterson, David B) Many times throughout the novel Huck comes very close to rationalizing Jim’s slavery. However, he is never able to see a reason why this man who has become one of his only friends, should be a slave. Through this internal struggle, Twain expresses his opinions of the absurdity of slavery and the importance of following one’s personal conscience before the laws of society. ( Kaplan, Justin)

By the end of the novel, Huck and the reader have come to understand that Jim is not someone’s property and an inferior man, but an equal. Throughout the novel society’s voice is heard through Huck. The racist and hateful contempt, which existed at the time, is at many times present. But, it is vital for the reader to recognize these ideas as society’s and to recognize that Twain throughout the novel disputes these ideas. Twain brings out into the open the ugliness of society and causes the reader to challenge the original description of Jim. In his subtle manner, he creates not an apology for slavery but a challenge to it.

The entire plot of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is rooted on intolerance between different social groups. Without prejudice and intolerance The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn would not have any of the antagonism or intercourse that makes the recital interesting. The prejudice and intolerance found in the book are the characteristics that make The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn great. (Wagennacht, Edward C. ) The author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is Samuel Langhorne Clemens, who is more commonly known by his pen name, Mark Twain.

He was born in 1835 with the passing of Haley’s comet, and died in1910 with the passing of Haley’s comet. Clemens often used prejudice as a building block for the plots of his stories. Clemens even said, “The very ink in which history is written is merely fluid prejudice. ” There are many other instances in which Clemens uses prejudice as a foundation for the entertainment of his writings such as this quote he said about foreigners in The Innocents Abroad, “They spell it Vinci and pronounce it Vinchy; foreigners always spell better than they pronounce.

Even in the opening paragraph of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Clemens states, “Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot. ” (Twain, Mark)(Kaplan, Justin) (The World Book) There were many groups that Clemens contrasted in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The interaction of these different social groups is what makes up the main plot of the novel.

For the objective of discussion they have been broken down into five main sets of antithetic parties: people with high levels of society and people with low levels of society, rednecks and scholarly, children and adults, men and women, and finally, the Sheperdson’s and the Grangerford’s. Whites and African Americans are the main two groups contrasted in the novel. Throughout the novel Clemens portrays Caucasians as a more educated group that is higher in society compared to the African Americans portrayed in the novel. The cardinal way that Clemens portrays African Americans as obsequious is through the colloquy that he assigns them.

Their dialogue is composed of nothing but broken English. One example in the novel is this excerpt from the conversation between Jim the fugitive slave, and Huckleberry about why Jim ran away, where Jim declares, “Well you see, it uz dis way. Ole missus-dats Miss Watson-she pecks on me all de time, en treats me pooty rough, but she awluz said she woudn sell me down to Orleans. ” Although this is the phonetic spelling of how some African Americans from the boondocks used to talk, Clemens only applied the argot to Blacks and not to Whites throughout the novel.

There is not one sentence in the treatise spoken by an African American that is not comprised of broken English. But in spite of that, the broken English does add an entraining piece of culture to the milieu. (Blair, Walter) The second way Clemens differentiates people in the novel of different skin color. Blacks in the book are portrayed as stupid and uneducated. The most blatant example is where the African American character Jim is kept prisoner for weeks while he is a dupe in a childish game that Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn play with him.

Clemens spends the last three chapters in the novel to tell the tale of how Tom Sawyer maliciously lets Jim, who known only unto Tom is really a free man, be kept prisoner in a shack while Tom torments Jim with musings about freedom and infests his living space with rats, snakes, and spiders. At the end of this chapter Tom even admits, “Why, I wanted the adventure of it” The next two groups Clemens contrasts are the rednecks and the scholarly. In the novel Clemens uses interaction between backwoods and more highly educated people as a vital part of the plot.

The main usage of this mixing of two social groups is seen in the development of the two very entertaining characters simply called the duke and the king. These two characters are rednecks that pretend to be of a more scholarly background in order to cheat people along the banks of the Mississippi. In one instance the king and the duke fail miserably in trying to act more studiously when they perform a “Shakespearean Revival. ” The duke totally slaughters the lines of Hamlet saying, “To be, or not to be; that is the bare bodkin. That it makes calamity of so long life.

For who farfel bear, till Birnam Wood do come to Dunshire, but that fear of something after death. ” (Blair, Walter) Thirdly Clemens contrasts adults and children. Clemens portrays adults as the conventional group in society, and children as the unconventional. In the story adults are not portrayed with much bias, but children are portrayed as more imaginative. The two main examples of this are when Huckleberry fakes his death, and when Tom and Huck “help” Jim escape from captivity. This extra imaginative aspect Clemens gives to the children of the story adds a lot of humor to the plot.

Fourthly in the novel Clemens contrasts women and men. Women in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn are portrayed as frail, while men are portrayed as more outgoing. The foremost example of a frail woman character in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is Tom Sawyer’s Aunt Sally. One example was when Tom and Huck were collecting wildlife to live in the shack that Jim is being held prisoner in they accidentally let loose some snakes in Aunt Sally’s house and Aunt Sally, “would just lay that work down, and light out.

The main reason that Clemens portrays women as less outgoing is because there are really only four minor women characters in the novel, while all major characters are men. Lastly Clemens contrasts two families engaged in a feud. The names of the two families are the Sheperdson’s and the Grangerford’s. The ironic thing is that, other than their names, the two factions are totally similar and even attend the same church.

Blair, Walter) This intolerance augments a major part to the plot because it serves as the basis for one of the escapades Huck and Jim get involved in on their trip down the Mississippi. In conclusion the entire plot of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is rooted on intolerance between different social groups. Without prejudice and intolerance The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn would not have any of the antagonism and intercourse that makes the novel interesting. Therefore making it not a racist novel, but historically accurate tail of life at that time. Mark Twain is innocent of all wrongdoing.

Intolerance Within The Novel

The entire plot of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is rooted on intolerance between different social groups. Without prejudice and intolerance The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn would not have any of the antagonism or intercourse that makes the recital interesting. The prejudice and intolerance found in the book are the characteristics that make The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn great. The author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is Samuel Langhorn Clemens, who is more commonly known by his pen name, Mark Twain.

He was orn in 1835 with the passing of Haleys comet, and died in 1910 with the passing of Haleys comet. Clemens often used prejudice as a building block for the plots of his stories. Clemens even said, The very ink in which history is written is merely fluid prejudice. There are many other instances in which Clemens uses prejudice as a foundation for the entertainment of his writings such as this quote he said about foreigners in The Innocents Abroad: They spell it Vinci and pronounce it Vinchy; foreigners always spell better than they pronounce.

Even in the opening paragraph of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Clemens states, Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot. There were many groups that Clemens contrasted in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The interaction of these different social groups is what makes up the main plot of the novel.

For the objective of discussion they have been broken down into five main sets of antithetic parties: people with high levels of elanin and people with low levels of melanin, rednecks and scholarly, children and adults, men and women, and finally, the Sheperdsons and the Grangerfords. Whites and African Americans are the main two groups contrasted in the novel. Throughout the novel Clemens portrays Caucasians as a more educated group that is higher in society compared to the African Americans portrayed in the novel.

The cardinal way that Clemens portrays African Americans as obsequious is through the colloquy that he assigns them. Their dialogue is composed of nothing but broken English. One example in the novel is this xcerpt from the conversation between Jim the fugitive slave, and Huckleberry about why Jim ran away, where Jim declares, Well you see, it uz dis way. Ole missus-dats Miss Watson-she pecks on me all de time, en treats me pooty rough, but she awluz said she woudn sell me down to Orleans.

Although this is the phonetic spelling of how some African Americans from the boondocks used to talk, Clemens only applied the argot to Blacks and not to Whites throughout the novel. There is not one sentence in the treatise spoken by an African American that is not comprised of broken English. The but in spite of that, the broken English does add an entraining piece of culture to the milieu. The second way Clemens differentiates people in the novel of different skin color is that all Blacks in the book are portrayed as stupid and uneducated.

The most blatant example is where the African American character Jim is kept prisoner for weeks while he is a dupe in a childish game that Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn play with him. Clemens spends the last three chapters in the novel to tell the tale of how Tom Sawyer maliciously lets Jim, who known only unto Tom is really a free man, be kept prisoner in a shack while Tom torments Jim with musings about freedom and infests his living space with rats, snakes, and spiders.

At the end of this charade Tom even admits, Why, I wanted the adventure of it The next two groups Clemens contrasts are the rednecks and the scholarly. In the novel Clemens uses interaction between backwoods and more highly educated people as a vital part of the plot. The main usage of this mixing of two social groups is seen in the development of the two very entertaining characters simply called the duke and the king. These two characters are rednecks who pretend to be of a more scholarly background in order to cozen naive people along the banks of the Mississippi.

In one instance the king and the duke fail miserably in trying to act more studiously when they perform a Shakespearean Revival. The duke totally slaughters the lines of Hamlet saying, To be, or not to be; that is the bare bodkin. That it makes clamity of so long life. For who fardel bear, till Birnam Wood do come to Dunshire, but that fear of something after death. Thirdly Clemens contrasts adults and children. Clemens portrays adults s the conventional group in society, and children as the unconventional.

In the story adults are not portrayed with much bias, but children are portrayed as more imaginative. The two main examples of this are when Huckleberry fakes his death, and when Tom and Huck help Jim escape from captivity. This extra imaginative aspect Clemens gives to the children of the story adds a lot of humor to the plot. Fourthly in the novel Clemens contrasts women and men. Women in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn are portrayed as frail, while men are portrayed as more outgoing. The foremost example of a frail woman character n The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is Tom Sawyers Aunt Sally.

One example was when Tom and Huck were collecting wildlife to live in the shack that Jim is being held prisoner in they accidentally let loose some snakes in Aunt Sallys house and Aunt Sally, would just lay that work down, and light out. The main reason that Clemens portrays women as less outgoing, is because there are really only four minor women characters in the novel, while all major characters are men. Lastly Clemens contrasts two families engaged in a feud. The names of the two families are the Sheperdsons and the Grangerfords.

The ironic thing is that, other than their names, the two factions are totally similar and even attend the same church. This intolerance augments a major part to the plot because it serves as the basis for one of the escapades Huck and Jim get involved in on their trip down the Mississippi. In conclusion the entire plot of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is rooted on intolerance between different social groups. Without prejudice and intolerance The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn would not have any of the antagonism and intercourse that makes the recital interesting.

Huck Finn – Mark Twain’s Views

Throughout the Mark Twain (a. k. a. Samuel Clemens) novel, The Adventures of HuckleBerry Finn, a plain and striking point of view is expressed by the author. His point of view is that of a cynic; he looks upon civilized man as a merciless, cowardly, hypocritical savage, without want of change, nor ability to effect such change. Thus, one of Mark Twain’s main purposes in producing this work seems clear: he wishes to bring to attention some of man’s often concealed shortcomings.

While the examples of Mark Twain’s cynic commentaries on human nature can be found in great frequency all through the novel, everal examples seem to lend themselves well to a discussion of this sarcastic view. In the beginning of the novel, it would seem that both Huck Finn and Jim are trapped in some way and wishing to escape. For Huck, it is the violence and tyranny of his drunken father. Kept in a veritable prison, Huck wishes desperately to escape.

Jim feels the need to escape after hearing that his owner, Miss Watson, wishes to sell him down the river-a change in owners that could only be for the worse. As they escape separately and rejoin by chance at an island along the river, they find themselves drawn to get as far as possible rom their home. Their journey down the river sets the stage for most of Mark Twain’s comments about man and society. It is when they stop off at various towns along the river that various human character flaws always seem to come out.

Examples of this would include the happenings after the bringing on of the Duke and King. These two con artists would execute the most preposterous of schemes to relieve unsuspecting townspeople of their cash. The game of the King pretending to be a reformed marauder-turned-missionary at the tent meeting showed that people are gullible and often easily led, articularly when in groups and subjected to peer pressure. The execution of the Royal Nonesuch showed another instance of people in society being subject to manipulation.

The fact that, after being taken by a poor show they sent rave reviews of it to their friends to avoid admitting they had been conned showed that people in groups are ever afraid of losing status, and will do nearly anything to protect such. Both the King and the Duke, also, showed such a ridiculous degree of corruptness that it is difficult to believe that all humans aren’t at least somewhat evil. Another point made by the author is that of most men being basically cowards. A good example of this was when Col.

Sherburn shot the drunk Boggs and the townsfolk came after Sherburn to lynch him. After Sherburn, one man with only a shotgun, held off the immense mob and made them disperse, it was obvious that no individual really had the courage to go through with the lynching. The idea that people are basically savages, confined for the moment by society, is shown in more than one instance, such as when the group was preparing to hang Huck and the King over their plot to defraud the aughters, or, more obvious, in the war between the Shephardsons and the Grangerfords.

The aspect of people being basically hypocrites is seen at the beginning when Miss Watson displays a degree of hypocriticality on insisting that Huck follow the Widow and become civilized, while at the same time deciding to sell Jim into a hard life down the river. A final point seems to be that Man is continually fleeing from something. At the end, Jim and Huck found themselves at the end of their journey, neither having anything left to run from as Huck’s father was dead and Jim was a free man.

It would seem, then that Huck and Jim had run a thousand miles down the river and ended up where they had started from. From the above examples, one can see some of the author’s point in producing ‘Huck Finn. ‘ It is apparent that Mark Twain wishes society to realize its shortcomings and the limitations imposed by human nature. He realizes that people will not change, but feels that they should be aware of who they are, of what comes with this thing we call humanity. That is Mark twain’s main purpose in writing this novel.

The Many Conflicts in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The conflict between society and the individual is a theme portrayed throughout Twain’s Huckleberry Finn. Huck was not raised in accord with the accepted ways of civilization. He practically raises himself, relying on instinct to guide him through life. As portrayed several times in the novel, Huck chooses to follow his innate sense of right, yet he does not realize that his own instincts are more moral than those of society. From the very beginning of Huck’s story, Huck clearly states that he did not want to conform to society; “The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me…

I got into my old rags and my sugar hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. ” When Pap returns for Huck, and the matter of custody is brought before the court, the reader is forced to see the corruption of society. The judge rules that Huck belongs to Pap, and forces him to obey an obviously evil and unfit man. One who drinks profusely and beats his son. Later, when Huck makes it look as though he has been killed, we see how civilization is more concerned over finding Huck’s dead body than rescuing his live one from Pap.

This is a society that is more concerned about a dead ody than it is in the welfare of living people. The theme becomes even more evident once Huck and Jim set out, down the Mississippi. Huck enjoys his adventures on the raft. He prefers the freedom of the wilderness to the restrictions of society. Also, Huck’s acceptance of Jim is a total defiance of society. Ironically, Huck believes he is committing a sin by going against society and protecting Jim. He does not realize that his own instincts are more morally correct than those of society’.

In chapter sixteen, we see, perhaps, the most inhumane action of society. Huck meets some men looking for runaway slaves, and so he fabricates a story about his father on the raft with smallpox. The men fear catching this disease and instead of rescuing him, they give him money and advise him not to let it be known of his father’s sickness when seeking help. These men are not hesitant to hunt slaves, yet they refuse to help a sick man. This is contrasted to Huck’s guilt felt for protecting Jim when he actually did a morally just action. Huck’s acceptance of his love for Jim is shown in chapter thirty-one.

Huck writes a letter to Miss Watson to return Jim, yet e ends up ripping the letter and wishes to free Jim. “‘All right, then, I’ll go to hell’- and he tore it up. ” Here, we see that Huck concludes that he is evil, and that society has been right all along. The ending is perhaps most disappointing because it seems as though through all the situations that it seemed he was growing up and accepting his innate ideas of right, he hasn’t grown at all. When he is re- united with Tom, he once again thinks of Jim as property(get quote). Huck functions as a much nobler person when he is not confined by the hypocrisies of civilization.

Mark Twain The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain wrote The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in the 1800s. During this time slavery was socially acceptable. Even in the church it was taught that there was nothing wrong with slavery. Black people were often referred to as niggers. Huck, even though he was a friend of Jim, didnt even think twice about calling a black person a nigger. Huck would say things like Give a nigger an inch and hell take an ell. (86) He didnt see anything wrong with using language like this. He didnt see anything wrong with it because he was taught to call black people niggers just like his dad did and everyone else around him did also.

During this period in history in the south, that is how people talked. I think the meaning of the word nigger was different then than it is now. The word nigger was used in this book because in the 1800s it was common language. It did not have the same impact on a person back then as it does today. Jim even uses the word nigger freely as if it does not have any meaning to it. He says, I wouldnt low no nigger to call me dat. (77) Jim does not seem to be offended by the word because he uses the word himself.

I think that the African Americans at this time are so prone to hearing this word used that they do not even think about what the meaning of the word nigger is. I do not think Huck really knew what the true meaning of the word nigger was. I think he just thought it was another name for a person that was black. If there is anyone in this novel that has an anti-racism attitude, it is Huck. He is the one who helped Jim escape to freedom when nobody else would have cared. Huck was Jims only friend and I think Jim knew it.

When Huck found Jim on Jackson Island, Jim trusted Huck enough to tell him what he had done. Jim said, you wouldnt tell on me ef I uz to tell you, would you Huck? (42) Although Huck often pondered about whether or not he should turn Jim in, he never did. Huck stuck by Jims side the whole time even though Jim was black. Huck looked beyond the color of Jims skin and saw that he was a real person and not just a nigger. It is kind if ironic that Miss Watson, a proper woman that attends church regularly who calls herself a Christian, owns a slave.

This just shows us that during this time people were taught that there was nothing wrong with slavery. The simple fact that Jim belonged to Miss Watson made it hard for Hucks conscience to help him escape from slavery. Huck knew it was wrong to help a slave run away. He always felt bad about helping Miss Watsons slave run away. He kept thinking, What had poor Miss Watson done to you that you could see her nigger go off right under your eyes and never say one single word? (85) But even knowing this, he helped Jim anyway. Huck had a caring heart, and he cared about Jim.

Hucks love and dedication to Jim helps us over look the frequent use of the word nigger. Huck does not pay attention to the fact that Jim is black, and a nigger, and he befriends him. He ignores what his society says at that time period in the 1800s about blacks. The only reason for the use of the nigger in this book is because of the vernacular in this area. Huck does not know that this word is bad because nobody ever told him it wrong to say it. He grew up hearing it used excessively and therefore he used the word nigger in his speech without even thinking twice about it.

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn – An Obvious Depiction Of Romanticism

Mark Twain used the contrast between the characters of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn to illustrate a romantic and realistic imagination. Tom is spectacularly imaginative in the boyish, romantic sense. Tom has filled his head with romantic adventure novels and ideas; this has shaped Tom’s worldview and feeds his fantasies, which he is constantly trying to act out. After reading about gangs and highwaymen, Tom decides to build a gang wishing to rob people and become successful highwayman. Tom’s gang would kill or ransom the men and get the women to love them.

Often times Tom’s romantic imagination is not just silly, but downright dangerous. An example of this dangerous romantic imagination was when Huck wanted to free Jim and Tom was enlisted to help. Tom, knowing full well that Ms. Watson had released Jim prior to her death, did not disclose this information to Huck; he wanted to have an adventure helping Jim “escape”. During the elaborate escape, Tom wanted Jim to train animals in his prison and have a coat of arms. Tom also sent Jim’s captors warning of the upcoming escape attempt. Tom didn’t know of the necessity to get Jim out now and not later.

Because of Tom’s dawdling, Jim’s life was put in danger when they finally did escape. As they were running away, bounty hunters were chasing them and shooting at them. Knowing the reader would be in need of a breathe of fresh air between Tom’s elaborate schemes, Twain created Huck. Huck’s desires are indeed remarkably few and simple. Huck wanted only to be wild and free. Huck often escaped from Ms. Watson by running to the woods and going exploring. Ms. Watson tried to “sivilize” him, but he didn’t like to learn about dead people or other such “nonsense”.

He saw no point to education other than to spite his father. Huck would rather be out fishing or playing in the woods. The final, and best, example of Huck’s desire to be free was the ending line in the book. “I reckon I got to light out for the territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she’s going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can’t stand it. I been there before. ” Huck hates to be oppressed by society and their views on life. This opinion reflects on Huck’s own realistic attitude and how it allows him to view people as equal.

Huck’s realistic view on life is evident when he tears up the letter he had written to Ms. Watson about helping Jim escape. He began to remember all of the times Jim had been at his side, being a father figure to him; He realized how they had suffered together and had fun together, Huck was not about to turn his own brother in because of his skin color. Huck tore up the letter and said he’d rather go to hell than to betray his friend. By reading about Huck and Tom and their contrasting views on life, allows the reader to have a breathe of fresh air in between the elaborate schemes of Tom.

The characters in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Ever since the human race has appeared on Earth, they have been striving to become superior to everything else, including other groups of humans. To this day, the power struggle continues. However, during a period of time in the 19th and 20th centuries, one race assumed the superior position, or so they thought. These groups of people were white supremacists who believed that they were above all other human races. Society itself, at this time, believed that these white people were superior to dark-skinned people and so, they enslaved them.

Most people followed what society and everyone else thought and went along with this thinking. The characters in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn were such people that followed the crowd. They have no mind or morality of their own; only a mob mentality. Their idea of success was to be well off as long as it was not a black person who was doing well. However, to truly be a moral and successful person, one must sometimes ascend above the rules of society and refuse to follow the crowd. The way that white racists put down blacks, of any stature, is demeaning to not only the blacks, but also to the whites.

They prove to everyone that they are inferior in their struggle to become superior. Twains character ,Pap, is a drunk, poor, uneducated person. At one time, he saw a black professor from the North who was very successful and was able to vote. Pap complained about the black professor for a long, saying how terrible it was to have someone like that exist. He also complained about the government for letting him vote and also for letting the black professor stay free in the South until he stayed in that state for six months, after which he could be caught and sold in an auction.

Pap then refused to vote anymore because the government let a black person vote. And that aint the wust. They said he could vote when he was at home. Well that let me out It was lection, and I was just about to go and vote myself if I warnt too drunk to get there, but when they told me there was a state in this country that let a nigger vote, I drawed out. (p27) Pap made a big idiot of himself by doing this. He would not have even been able to vote even if he was able to go there since he probably could not read the ballots anyway.

Not only does he not know that he is making things worse in this situation, he believes that he is helping by not voting, which actually enhances the black professors voting power. Another character ,Tom Sawyer, also proved that he was racist, but he was quite different from Pap. He follows societys views about blacks, like Pap does, but he also lives in his own imaginary world which will get him nowhere in life. Tom has no mind of his own. Whenever he is faced with any type of situation, Tom applies something that he read in a book.

However, he is also very racist against blacks. When he found his friend Jim, a runaway slave, at his aunt and uncles house he tells one of the slaves there that they should hang Jim. I wonder if Uncle Silas is going to hang this nigger. If I was to catch a nigger that was ungrateful enough to run away, I wouldnt give him up, Id hang him. (p237) Tom feels that Jim should be hanged for running away even though he is Toms friend. Because Tom does not think on his own and just follows everything that he hears and reads he will not get anywhere in life nor will he be successful.

Huckleberry Finn, unlike the two characters mentioned before, was on the verge of understanding the morality of having slaves. He freed himself from the thinking of society in two different occasions and helped his friend, Jim, run away. However, since he was brought up by the ideas set by that society, he felt terrible about doing it. When Huck actually sat down to think about it, he found that he could not turn Jim over to the authorities. Although he felt that it was wrong for him to help Jim, he decided that he would do it regardless of what everyone else thought.

The first incident in which Huck did this was when he and Jim thought that they had found Cairo. Huck was excited to go ashore so he could turn Jim in but once Jim started telling Huck that he was the best and only friend that he had, Huck could not bring himself to tell some people that came by. Instead, he lied to those men and when they left, Huck felt that he had done something terrible and felt very bad. They went off and I got aboard the raft, feeling bad and low, because I knowed very well I had done wrong (p91). Huckleberry found that the more he thought about turning Jim in, the more he found himself unable to do it.

Once I said to myself it would be a thousand times better for Jim to be a slave at home where his family was (p212). Huck thought about writing a letter to Miss Watson, Jims former owner, about where Jim was but after he finished it, he thought about all that happened between him and Jim. He felt terrible about it, but he tore up the letter and decided to help Jim. Alright, then, Ill go to hell, and tore it up. It was awful thoughts and awful words, but they was said. And I let them stay said; and never thought no more about reforming And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again (p214.

Huck was doing the right thing in both cases and was being a good person morally but he felt incredibly bad about doing it since he was brought up to think in the opposite way. However, by following what his heart told him to do instead of following what society had taught him, Huck had surpassed the racism of the society and had become a moral person. All the characters shown from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn showed that they were all very racist and unmoral people because they didnt think for themselves.

They were racist because the society said so, and they never bothered to question or to explore the reason themselves. The only person that came close to a moral person was Huck but he did not know that he was right in doing what he did. Malcom Xs joke showed how the black professor in Paps case could be successful. What does a white racists call a black professor? Nigger (Malcom Xs quote) In both the quote and in Paps case, the black professor was a successful person. Obviously any black person would have been criticized and made fun of for even trying to become a professor.

However, by ignoring what was being said to them, as well as what the crowd and society thought, both these blacks had overcome the obstacles and became successful people. Just because everybody thinks that something is right does not always mean that it is right. Sometimes, people must question what society has put before them. By doing this, one may see that the majority is wrong. People may see that they might have to think for themselves instead of following the crowd because others told them to. In doing so, one can change the error in his or her ways and turn back toward the light, rather than walking further into the darkness.

Narrative Voices in Huck Finn

Huckleberry Finn provides the narrative voice of Mark Twain’s novel, and his honest voice combined with his personal vulnerabilities reveal the different levels of the Grangerfords’ world. Huck is without a family: neither the drunken attention of Pap nor the pious ministrations of Widow Douglas were desirable allegiance. He stumbles upon the Grangerfords in darkness, lost from Jim and the raft. The family, after some initial cross-examination, welcomes, feeds and rooms Huck with an amiable boy his age. With the light of the next morning, Huck estimates “it was a mighty nice family, and a mighty ice house, too”(110).

This is the first of many compliments Huck bestows on the Grangerfords and their possessions. Huck is impressed by all of the Grangerfords’ belongings and liberally offers compliments. The books are piled on the table “perfectly exact”(111), the table had a cover made from “beautiful oilcloth”(111), and a book was filled with “beautiful stuff and poetry”(111). He even appraises the chairs, noting they are “nice split-bottom chairs, and perfectly sound, too–not bagged down in the middle and busted, like an old basket”(111).

It is apparent Huck is more familar with busted chairs han sound ones, and he appreciates the distinction. Huck is also more familar with flawed families than loving, virtuous ones, and he is happy to sing the praises of the people who took him in. Col. Grangerford “was a gentleman all over; and so was his family”(116). The Colonel was kind, well-mannered, quiet and far from frivolish. Everyone wanted to be around him, and he gave Huck confidence. Unlike the drunken Pap, the Colonel dressed well, was clean-shaven and his face had “not a sign of red in it anywheres” (116).

Huck admired how the Colonel gently ruled his family with hints of a submerged temper. The same temper exists in one of his daughters: “she had a look that would make you wilt in your tracks, like her father. She was beautiful”(117). Huck does not think negatively of the hints of iron in the people he is happy to care for and let care for him. He does not ask how three of the Colonels’s sons died, or why the family brings guns to family picnics. He sees these as small facets of a family with “a handsome lot of quality” (118).

He thinks no more about Jim or the raft, but knows he has found a new home, one where he doesn’t have to go to school, is surrounded by interior and exterior beauty, and most importantly, here he feels safe. Huck “liked that family, dead ones and all, and warn’t going to let anything come between us”(118). Huck is a very personable narrator. He tells his story in plain language, whether describing the Grangerford’s clock or his hunting expedition with Buck. It is through his precise, trusting eyes that the reader sees the world of the novel.

Because Huck is so literal, and does not exaggerate experiences like Jim or see a grand, false version of reality like Tom Sawyer, the reader gains an understanding of the world Mark Twain created, the reader is able to catch Twain’s jokes and hear his skepticism. The Grangerford’s furniture, much admired by Huck, is actually comicly tacky. You can almost hear Mark Twain laughing over the parrot-flanked clock and the curtains with cows and castles painted on them even as Huck oohs and ahhs. And Twain pokes fun at the young dead daughter Huck is so drawn to.

Twain mocks Emmeline as an amateur writer: “She warn’t particular, she could write about anything you choose to give her to write about, just so it was sadful”(114). Yet Twain allows the images of Emmeline and the silly clock to deepen in meaning as the chapter progresses. Emmeline is realized as an early portent of the estruction of Huck’s adopted family. The mantel clock was admired by Huck not only for its beauty, but because the Grangerfords properly valued beauty and “wouldn’t took any money for her”(111).

Huck admired the Grangerfords’ principles, and the stake they placed in good manners, delicious food, and attractive possessions. But Huck realizes in Chapter 18 that whereas the Grangerfords may value a hand-painted clock more than money, they put little value on human life. The third view of the Grangerford’s world is provided by Buck Grangerford. He is the same age as Huck; he has grown up in a world f feuding, family picnics, and Sunday sermon that are appreciated but rarely followed. Buck, from when he meets Huck until he is brutally murdered, never questions the ways of his family.

For the rest of the chapter, Buck provides a foil for Huck, showing the more mature Huck questioning and judging the world around him. In fact it seems Buck does not have the imagination to conceive of a different world. He is amazed Huck has never heard of a feud, and surprised by Huck’s desire to hear the history and the rationale behind it. In Buck Grangerford’s rambling answers we hear Mark Twain’s view of a southern euding family, and after Buck finishes his answer, we watch Huck’s reaction to the true nature of the Grangerfords. Buck details Twain’s opinion that a feud is not started or continued by thought.

The reasons for the feud have been forgotten, and the Grangerfords do not hate, but in fact respect, their sworn enemies. They live their lives by tradition, and the fact that the feud is a tradition justifies its needless, pointless violence. From the dignified Colonel with “a few buck-shot in him”(121) to Buck, who is eager for the glory to be gained from shooting a Shepherdson in the back, the Grangerfords nquestioningly believe in de-valuing human life because it is a civilized tradition. It is interesting that the only compliment Huck gives to a Grangerford after Buck shot at Harney Shepherdson was to Miss Sophia.

He admitts that the young women who denied part in any family feud is “powerful pretty”(122). But the rosy sheen that had spurred Huck to use the word ‘beautiful’ six times previously in description of the Grangerfords has evaporated. He attends church with the family and notices all the Grangerfords keep their guns close by. Huck thinks it “was pretty ornery preaching”(121), but the feuding patriarchy praises he good values listed by the Preacher. The hypocritical mixture of guns and sermons, holy talk and bloodthirstiness make it “one of the roughest Sundays [Huck] had run across yet”(121).

He now questions the motives of everyone in the household, including Miss Sophia as she send him to the church on an errand. By this point the cynical, sarcastic Twain and the disillusioned Huck are of one mind. Huck walks among a group of hogs who have sought the coolness of the church and notes “most folks don’t go to church only when they’ve got to; but a hog is different”(122). The narration of Huck’s final day with the Grangerfords is refaced by: “I don’t want to talk much about the next day”(124).

For Huck’s easy-going fluid dialogue to become stilted and censored, the reader knows the young boy has been hurt. A senseless fatal feud is not the only tragedy depicted through the events of that day, also shown is the heartbreak of a young boy who loses every vestige of the hopeful trust he put in a father, brothers and sisters. Huck is shocked to hear the fatherless, brotherless Buck complain he hadn’t managed to kill his sister’s lover on an earlier occaison. And then from his perch in the tree, Huck hears Buck’s murderers “singing out, Kill them, kill them! It made [Huck] so sick [he] most fell out of the tree”(127).

He wishes he “hadn’t come ashore that night, to see such things”(127). The end of chapter nineteen, when Huck returns to the raft and Jim, almost exactly mirrors the end of chapter eighteen. Both chapter conclude with Huck enjoying a good meal with good company in a cool, comfortable place. First it is with the Grangerfords in the cool, high-ceilinged area in the middle of their double house. “Nothing could be better”(115), Huck thought. But only a few pages later the raft and Jim provide the same comforts.

Nothing had ever sounded so good to him as Jim’s voice, and Huck felt “mighty free and easy and comfortable on [the] raft”(128). . Huck happily slides away from the bloody scene with the unorthodox father figure of a runaway slave. Huck has realized he does not need a traditional family to make him feel safe and happy. He must develop and live by his own integrity, not the past decisions of a father or grandfather. This is clearly Mark Twain’s opinion also, and the reader, full of relief at Huck’s escape, is aware that the author sent us all into the Grangerfords’ world to prove just that point.

Huck Finn: Twain’s Cynic Point of View

Throughout the Mark Twain (a. k. a. Samuel Clemens) novel, The Adventures of HuckleBerry Finn, a plain and striking point of view is expressed by the author. His point of view is that of a cynic; he looks upon civilized man as a merciless, cowardly, hypocritical savage, without want of change, nor ability to effect such change. Thus, one of Mark Twain’s main purposes in producing this work seems clear: he wishes to bring to attention some of man’s often concealed shortcomings.

While the examples of Mark Twain’s cynic commentaries on human nature can be found in great frequency all through the novel, everal examples seem to lend themselves well to a discussion of this sarcastic view. In the beginning of the novel, it would seem that both Huck Finn and Jim are trapped in some way and wishing to escape. For Huck, it is the violence and tyranny of his drunken father. Kept in a veritable prison, Huck wishes desperately to escape.

Jim feels the need to escape after hearing that his owner, Miss Watson, wishes to sell him down the river-a change in owners that could only be for the worse. As they escape separately and rejoin by chance at an island along the river, they find themselves rawn to get as far as possible from their home. Their journey down the river sets the stage for most of Mark Twain’s comments about man and society. It is when they stop off at various towns along the river that various human character flaws always seem to come out.

Examples of this would include the happenings after the bringing on of the Duke and King. These two con artists would execute the most preposterous of schemes to relieve unsuspecting townspeople of their cash. The game of the King pretending to be a reformed marauder-turned-missionary at the tent meeting showed that people re gullible and often easily led, particularly when in groups and subjected to peer pressure. The execution of the Royal Nonesuch showed another instance of people in society being subject to manipulation.

The fact that, after being taken by a poor show they sent rave reviews of it to their friends to avoid admitting they had been conned showed that people in groups are ever afraid of losing status, and will do nearly anything to protect such. Both the King and the Duke, also, showed such a ridiculous degree of corruptness that it is difficult to believe that all humans aren’t t least somewhat evil. Another point made by the author is that of most men being basically cowards. A good example of this was when Col.

Sherburn shot the drunk Boggs and the townsfolk came after Sherburn to lynch him. After Sherburn, one man with only a shotgun, held off the immense mob and made them disperse, it was obvious that no individual really had the courage to go through with the lynching. The idea that people are basically savages, confined for the moment by society, is shown in more than one instance, such as when the group was preparing to hang Huck and the King over their plot o defraud the daughters, or, more obvious, in the war between the Shephardsons and the Grangerfords.

The aspect of people being basically hypocrites is seen at the beginning when Miss Watson displays a degree of hypocriticality on insisting that Huck follow the Widow and become civilized, while at the same time deciding to sell Jim into a hard life down the river. A final point seems to be that Man is continually fleeing from something. At the end, Jim and Huck found themselves at the end of their journey, neither having anything left to run from as Huck’s ather was dead and Jim was a free man.

It would seem, then that Huck and Jim had run a thousand miles down the river and ended up where they had started from. From the above examples, one can see some of the author’s point in producing ‘Huck Finn. ‘ It is apparent that Mark Twain wishes society to realize its shortcomings and the limitations imposed by human nature. He realizes that people will not change, but feels that they should be aware of who they are, of what comes with this thing we call humanity. That is Mark twain’s main purpose in writing this novel.

Huck Finn Themes

The primary theme of the novel is the conflict between civilization and natural life. Huck represents natural life through his freedom of spirit, his uncivilized ways, and his desire to escape from civilization. He was brought up without any rules and has a strong resistance to anything that might sivilize him. This conflict is introduced in the first chapter through the efforts of the Widow Douglas: she tries to force Huck to wear new clothes, give up smoking, and to learn the Bible.

Throughout the novel, Twain seems to suggest that the uncivilized way of life is better; he draws on the ideas of Jean-Jacques Rousseau in his belief that civilization corrupts rather than improves human beings. The theme of honor is one that permeates the novel. It is first introduced in the second chapter with respect to Tom Sawyer’s band: Tom believes that there is a great deal of honor associated with being robbers. This theme can be traced throughout the rest of the book.

Huck and Jim encounter robbers on the shipwrecked boat and later they are forced to put up with the King and the Dauphin, both of whom rob everyone they meet. Tom’s robber band is also paralleled by the fact that Tom and Huck both become literal robbers at the end of the novel. They both resolve to steal Jim out of slavery, and in the process they act honorably. Thus honor, and acting in a way to earn honor, becomes a central theme that Huck will have to deal with. The theme of food is one that occurs in many parts of the novel.

It is based on the fact that Huck grew up fighting for food with pigs, eating out of a barrel of odds and ends. Thus, whenever there is mention of food, it is a sign that Huck has someone to take care of him. For example, in the first chapter it is the Widow Douglas who feeds Huck. Later she is replaced by Jim, who takes care of Huck on Jackson’s Island. Food is again mentioned when Huck lives with the Grangerfords and the Wilks. Another theme, and probably one of Twain’s favorites, is the mockery of religion.

Twain tended to attack organized religion at every opportunity, and the sarcastic character of Huck Finn is perfectly situated to allow him to do so. The attack on religion can already be seen in the first chapter, when Huck indicates that hell sounds like a lot more fun than heaven. This will continue throughout the novel, with one prominent scene occurring when the King convinces a religious community to give him money so he can convert his pirate friends. Superstition is a theme that both Huck and Jim bring up several times.

Although both of these characters tend to be quite rational, they quickly become irrational when anything remotely superstitious happens to them. The role of superstition is two-fold: it shows that Huck and Jim are child-like in spite of their otherwise extremely mature characters. Second, it serves to foreshadow the plot at several key junctions. For example, spilling salt leads to Pa returning for Huck, and later Jim gets bitten by a rattlesnake after Huck touches a snakeskin with his hands. Slavery forms one of the main themes that has been frequently debated since Huck Finn was first published.

Twain himself was vehemently anti-slavery; Huckleberry Finn can in many ways be seen as an allegory for why slavery is wrong. Twain uses Jim, a slave who is one of the main characters, as a way of showing the human side of a slave. Everything about Jim is presented through emotions: Jim runs away because Miss Watson was going to sell him South and separate him from his family; Jim is trying to become free so he can buy his family’s freedom; Jim takes care of Huck and protects him on their journey downriver in a very maternalistic manner.

Thus, Twain’s purpose is to make the reader feel sympathy for Jim and outrage against the society that would harm him. However, at the same time that Twain is attacking slavery, he also pushes the issue into the background for most of the novel. Thus, slavery itself is never debated by Huck and Jim. Even the other slaves in the novel are noticeably minor characters. Only at the very end does Twain create the central conflict concerning slavery: should Huck free Jim from slavery and therefore be condemned to go to hell?

This moment is life-altering for Huck because it forces him to reject everything that civilization has taught him; he makes the decision to free Jim based solely on his own experiences and not based on the what he has been taught from books. The theme of money is threaded through the novel and is used to highlight the disparity between the rich and the poor. Twain purposely begins the novel by pointing out that Huck has over six thousand dollars to his name; this sum of money dwarfs all the other sums and makes them seem inconsequential by contrast.

It is also within this context that Huck is able to show such a relaxed attitude towards wealth. Having so much money, he does not view money as a necessity. In addition, Huck’s upbringing on the land has made him independent enough that he views money as a luxury. Huck’s views on money are meant to contrast with Jim’s views. Jim sees money as equivalent to freedom; with money he can buy his freedom and that of his family. Money also would allow him to live like a white person, thus raising his status in the society. Thus, throughout the novel Jim constantly tries to get money whereas Huck takes an apathetic attitude towards the subject.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Samuel Clemens

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Samuel Clemens, also known as Mark Twain, is probably one of the greatest works of American literature ever written. Ernest Hemingway even said in his book The Green Hills of Africa, “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn” (Zwick). However, since Twain published Huck Finn 112 years ago, it has been the subject of much criticism, mostly all unfair. The Concord, Ma, banned the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Public Library immediately after its publication in 1885. They said the book was “rough, course, and inelegant…

The whole book suited more to the slums than to intelligent respectable people” (as quoted in Clemens 285). Since the original banning of Huck Finn, it has been challenged and banned many times all over the country. Much question has been brought against Huck Finn as to its appropriateness for the reading public, and some of it rightfully so. Huck is not as strong in his morals as our parents and educators would probably like him to be. He is involved in several acts of theft. For example, shortly after the beginning of his journey along the river, he would go ashore and he “lifted a chicken that warn’t roosting comfortable… Clemens 56). Huck smokes and cuts school. (Clemens 9 and 18)

He engages in lying, when he impersonates a girl to visit St. Petersburg and when he tells the bounty hunters that Jim is white and implies that he has smallpox (Clemens 51 and 75). He lies many other times throughout the novel; Huck is a bad example to children who may read this book. Huck’s plan to escape from Pap’s cabin in the woods, which involves smearing pig’s blood all over the cabin and making it seem like a murder had occurred, is an easy scheme for any smart youth to scare his parents with (Clemens 31).

In October of 1997, a ninth grader in Hollister, California “borrowed” money from his parents and used it to fly to Hawaii. His mother believed that the boy got the idea from his hero, Tom Sawyer (Zwick). Critics claim that the book is full of ideas that cause impressionable children to do things like that (Ockerbloom). Opponents still have more negative arguments about the content of the book. Leslie Fielder, a literary scholar, believes that Huck and Jim engage in some type of homosexual relationship on the raft (Fielder as quoted in Clemens 416).

The fact that Huck and Jim seldom wore any clothes on the raft only further substantiates this idea. Additionally, Twain intended Huck Finn to be a humorous novel. However, most of the humor, especially towards the end of the book in the Wilks brothers con, is in poor taste and “inelegant” Boston Transcript. Twain’s poking fun at the Hare-lip, and the “long legged under taker” episode were not looked favorably upon at time of publication, but are not as much criticized now (Clemens 139 and 144).

Today, the main objection to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the fact that the book contains the word “nigger” more than two hundred times throughout the novel. As recently as last February, the Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP led a charge against Huck Finn to have it removed from required and optional school reading lists. But, when considering the issues involved, one must keep in mind that this book was written in a different time from that which we live in today. There was no such thing as politically correct.

The word “nigger” was a word used commonly and unabashedly back then. So, how can we hold a book written over a hundred years ago to the literary standards of today? Huck Finn is not a racist book, in spite of Huck’s initial racist standpoint. Through the course of the novel, Huck gains increasingly more respect for Jim, but still shows some racist attitudes occasionally. After the disagreement with Jim over the biblical story of “ole’ King Sollermum”, Huck remarks that “you can’t learn a nigger to argue,” thus implying Jim’s stupidity (Clemens 65 and 66).

Throughout the book, Huck plays tricks on Jim, which are also meant to make Jim feel stupid. Towards the beginning of the book, shortly after we are first introduced to Jim, Huck and Tom put Jim’s hat on a nail over his head. He is convinced he has been ridden by witches (Clemens 11). The only motivation for Tom and Huck doing this is to make Jim look stupid. Later, on the river, after Huck gets lost on the canoe, he tells Jim that he was there the whole time and never gone (Clemens 71). Huck’s practical jokes caused Jim emotional pain and even physical pain.

On Jackson’s Island, Huck kills a rattlesnake and places it in front of Jim’s blanket to scare him. The rattlesnake’s mate comes and bites Jim on the foot. Jim is sick for four days and four nights subsequently (Clemens 46). By the end of the novel, Huck vows not to play tricks on Jim and he acquiesces to “humble himself to a nigger” (Clemens 72). He gains respect for Jim to the point where Huck will sacrifice his soul and go to Hell for Jim. Huck contemplates telling Miss. Watson about Jim, but Huck decides he would rather go to hell than betray his friendship with Jim (Clemens 169).

Huck’s willingness to lie to protect Jim definitely shows that Huck sees Jim on a higher level than his status was in nineteenth century America. In addition to being a book that has been called racist, Huck Finn is a book that also was criticized around the time of publication for being antiracist. Twain’s depiction of Jim as heroic sends an abolitionist notion through the book. Jim is said by many critics to be ignorant, superstitious, and typical for an uneducated slave. However, many of Jim’s superstitions turn out to be based on practical knowledge of nature.

For example, on Jackson’s Island, Jim could tell by the birds that the thunderstorm was coming (Clemens 43). In addition, Jim is shown as a caring and kind person in many instances, including after Tom is wounded and he insists on finding a doctor. (Clemens 216) This is made very clear when Jim recounts to Huck a story about him hitting his daughter and feeling guilty about it. (Clemens 125) Jim is not a character that Twain uses to make blacks look bad but a character that “should make every black American proud. ” (Brunner)

With all this controversy surrounding the book, it is not a big surprise that Huck Finn has been banned all over the country. However, as many people as the banning of this novel has appeased, still more have been angered by its banning. One man, one who you would think would be the most distressed at the banning of the book, was not upset. Mark Twain seemed to be almost grateful for the arguments surrounding his novel. Twain said that the Concord Public Library, ” condemned and excommunicated my last book–and doubled its sale” ( as quoted in Clemens 285).

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was not Twain’s only banned book. Another of his novels, The Diaries of Adam and Eve was banned. It was banned because of an obscene drawing contained with the original publication called Eve in “Summer Costume” (Zwick). The morals of the characters were also under scrutiny, a not unfamiliar state for many of Twain’s creations. Twain was not the only victim of America’s disdain for controversial literature. William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night was banned for encouraging homosexuality. In addition to Shakespeare’s play, books from other prestigious authors such as John Steinbeck and J.

D Salinger were also banned. Most notably books without recognized authors were banned too. Miriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary and The American Heritage Dictionary were both challenged because of their inclusion of obscene words. Possibly, the most surprising of all was The Bible, which was called obscene, and pornographic (Ockerbloom). When Twain learned of his books being in similar company along with The Bible, he asked, “If there is an expurgated [Bible] in the children’s department, won’t you please remove Tom and Huck from that questionable companionship?

Twain was actually a fan of condemned novels. He showed this, along with his contempt for the censors, when he said, “I am always reading immoral books on the sly, and then selfishly trying to prevent others from having the same wicked good time” (Zwick) Twain did not care so much what library officials and other censors thought of his book. In the words of Booker T. Washington, “All that he wrote had an interest for the commonest man and woman” (Washington as quoted in Zwick). He wrote for the regular, average person.

Twain refused to sell his book in bookstores, but door to door through subscriptions making it more accessible for average people. Twain once said, “My books are water; those of great geniuses is wine, everybody drinks water” (as quoted in Zwick). His book was not aimed at those who would take offense to abolitionist notions or humor at the expense of Hare-lips, but the common man. According to Brander Matthews, “Old maids of either sex will wholly fail to understand him or to like him or to see his significance and value. ” (as quoted in Sloane 10)

Critics say about Mark Twain, that his book, “enters as a classic only to explode like a hand grenade with all of these combustible issues” (Shelley Fisher Fishkin as quoted in Zwick). Huck Finn has managed to remain a piece of classic American literature even in spite of a mountain of unfair criticism. “We must be glad that we have a public commentator like Mark Twain always at hand” (Paine) We should all be glad that we have a “public commentator like Mark Twain” always at hand, and instead of banning his work, we should pay attention to what Twain has to say .

Huck’s Moral Dilemma

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is said to be ” the source from which all great American literature has stemmed” (Smith 127). This is in part attributed to Mark Twain’s ability to use humor and satire, as well as incorporating serious subject matter into his work. Throughout the novel Twain takes on the serious issue of Huck’s moral dilemma. One such issue which is particularly important in the novel is pointed out by Smith: He swears and smokes, but he has a set of ethics all his own.

He believes hat slaves belong to their rightful owners, yet in his honest gratitude toward his friend Jim, he helps him to escape the bonds of slavery. (181) This is something that tears at Huck throughout the novel and helps Twain show how complex Huck’s character really is. “The recognition of complexity in Huck’s character enabled Twain to do full justice to the conflict of vernacular values and the dominant culture” (Smith 125). Throughout Huck and Jim’s adventures Huck is constantly playing practical jokes on Jim who seems to take them all in stride.

But unknown to the reader Twain uses this aspect as another notch in Huck’s moral growth. Critic Frank McGill points this out: Huck’s humble apology for the prank he plays on Jim in the fog is striking evidence of growth in Huck’s moral insight. It leads naturally to the next chapter in which Twain causes Huck to face up for the first time to the fact he is helping a slave escape. (119) Another serious issue addressed by Twain is the abuse that was given to Huck by his father.

Huck was kidnaped from the Widow Douglas by his father who had heard of his inheritance. Huck’s father then took him to a cabin far away in the woods where he kept the boy a prisoner, beating him and half starving him. Twain tells us how Huck felt about life with his father: Before long Huck began to wonder why he had even liked living with the widow. With his father he could smoke and swear all he wanted, and his life would have been quiet pleasant if it had not been for all of the constant beatings. (156)

Huck would soon after grow tired of the beatings and fakes his death to escape the cabin. The humorous side of Twain is probably what he is most well known for. Humor is considered an art form by many writers. Jane Bernadette states the difference between humor and comical stories: The humorous story is strictly a work of art high and delicate and only an artist can tell it; but no art is necessary in telling the comic and the witty story; anybody can do it. The art of telling a humorous story-understand, I mean by word of mouth, not print-was created in America and has remained

Twain satirizes the south for its seriousness on certain matters. “I think one of the most notably southern traits of Mark Twain’s humor is its power of seeing the fun of southern seriousness”(Bernadette 175). Twain also satirizes the society of the day’ by describing the colonel Grangerford as “the symbol of southern aristocracy”(245). Twain also goes on to satirize the south’s racism. One such instance is pointed out in the novel when Aunt Polly hears of a steamboat explosion. ” Good gracious is anyone hurt? ” “No”, “it just killed a negro” (209).

Religious satire is another aspect that Twain uses. An easy illustration of this is the Widow’s attempt to teach Huck religious principles while she persists on keeping slaves. “Huck’s principles of morality make him more Christian’ than the Widow even though he takes no interest in her lifeless principles”(Bernadette 288). Twain’s humor has been mistaken by some to be racist or politically incorrect. “The humor of Mark Twain contains a sense of the incongruous which frontiersmen felt in a region where civilization and uncultivated nature come face to face” (McGill 95).

Adventures Of Huck Finn

When the book begins, the main character, Huck Finn possesses a large sum of money. This causes his delinquent lifestyle to change drastically. Huck gets an education, and a home to live in with a caring elderly woman (the widow). One would think that Huck would be satisfied. Well, he wasnt. He wanted his own lifestyle back. Hucks drunkard father (pap), who had previously left him, was also not pleased with Hucks lifestyle. He didnt feel that his son should have it better than he. Pap tries to get a hold of the money for his own uses, but he fails.

He proceeds to lock Huck up in his cabin on the outskirts of town. Huck then stages his kidnapping and subsequent killing, and takes a canoe across to Jacksons Island in the Mississippi River. There he comes across a runaway slave, Jim, and the two decide to leave the area. Huck leaves to avoid his father, and Jim leaves to escape a false charge of murder. The rest of the story follows all of their exciting and action packed adventures down the Mississippi River. Themes Slavery is a big theme in this story. Mark Twain was obviously against slavery because it is hypocritical.

Throughout the book we see Huck interacting with Jim as human to human, while everyone else treats him like a piece of property. He was especially against the Christians who promoted slavery, since it is obviously wrong and against Christian ideals. Twain also shows the hypocrisy in another theme, religion. In one scene, the Shepardsons and the Gangerfords are listening to a sermon about brotherly love, and in the next scene they are shooting and killing each other. This is exactly the kind of behavior that twain didnt like. However, the main theme in this book is breaking free.

He urges his readers to do the right thing, not necessarily what everyone else is doing. He illustrates this ideal with Huck. Most everyone else thought of Jim, along with blacks in general, as something less than human. Huck knew this was wrong, and his actions followed this when he rescued Jim. Main characters Huckleberry Finn Huck is the narrator of the story and for the most part is honest to us, the readers. He dreads the rules and conformities of society such as religion, school, and everything else that will eventually make him civilized.

A big debate surrounds Huck on whether he changes or not hroughout the story. Huck, in the beginning, seems very set in the souths anti-black ways, however, Huck states that he will go to hell to keep Jim out of slavery. At this point it seems like he does change, but at the end of the book, Huck plays yet another joke on Jim and seems as though any change was temporary. Huck has little sense of humor, which is ironical, considering the book is satirical. Twain has also been criticized about Hucks character, in that it seems as though Huck knows too much for his age.

In one of the movies Huck was about seventeen, in another he was about eight. I figure from the book that Huck is probably around the age of twelve or thirteen. Other traits of Huck show that he is sensible, trustworthy, tricky, deceiving, realist, yet imaginative. Jim Jim starts off the book as the Widow Watsons slave, however, because she is going to sell Jim off he decides to run away. In an ironic twist, Jim meets Huck Finn, who Jim is charged with murdering. Twain has been criticized for making Jim too stereotypical in the sense that he is easily tricked by Tom and Huck.

Jim is extremely superstitious, dependable, very trusting of Huck, strong and opeful. My Analysis In my opinion this is probably one of the best books ever written. The way that Mark Twain uses almost all of the literary elements in this novel make it one of the most fun to read. His use of satire makes this a very comical look of the south. His use of surprise contributes to the action of the story. Used along with suspense, it makes the book read very fast. The way Twain writes most of his novels is very fun and lighthearted, however some of them are very serious.

This novel is written with certain flair and attitude hat, I think, make it stick out as an incredible book. Some other people feel that the book is not well written at all and needs to be rewritten by someone else. They also think that Twain doesnt use very many literary techniques when he writes. These people need to realize that when they read a novel, that overwhelming sensation to keep reading to see what happens next is suspense. When something happens that you thought wouldnt, that is surprise. All in all, this novel has been one of the best I have ever read, and I know I will end up reading it again because it is so good.

Is Twain Mocking You – Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain uses his novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, to explore and satirize many problems facing American society; as religion, civilization, and mob mentality: to prove a point and to try to change the readers opinion about the subject. Twain attacks religion when Huck decides prays and decides that it is just a waste of time. He mocks the gullibility of civilized people when the Dauphin easily deceives the religious crowd. Lastly, he derides the hypocrisy of mobs when the mob attacks the Duke and Dauphin.

During the time period in which The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is written, religion is an integral part of civilization. Hucks guardian, Widow Douglas, preaches to him about Moses. Huck didnt think much of her lecture. He says, Here she was a bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone you see (Twain3). Twain speaks, through Huck, declaring religion, at least as it was taught, to be irrelevant to the average person’s life. Not much later Huck finds that prayer has never done him any good, and he can’t see that it has helped many others either.

Through Huck’s eyes we see that Twain opposes the blind faith put in the church teachings. He also finds that religion’s supposed altruistic spirit clashes with the reality of our self-motivated human nature, as Huck clearly illustrates this through his constant remarks that he doesn’t see what’s in it (religion) for him. Twain uses Huck to exhibit his objection to the blind faith that civilized society places towards religion. During Huck and Jims journey, they encounter two men who refer to themselves as the Duke and Dauphin.

These two men make their living by stealing and cheating people out of their money. When they are eventually caught they pay for their sins by being tarred and feathered. Huck expresses his thoughts on the subject by saying, It was a dreadful thing to see. Human beings can be awful cruel to one another (Twain294). Through this event, Twain shows that crooks and criminals are not the only ones that can be cruel. The crowd that considers themselves to be civilized and opposing any such impudent and cruel acts, actually commits one themselves.

They tar and feather the Duke and Dauphin, hurting and humiliating them in front of a large group of people. Twain illustrates how a society that views themselves as civilized can display such irresponsible conduct. This leads into mob mentality, which Twain also profoundly satirizes throughout the novel. Failure to use ones instinct, and following someone elses direction is one prospect that Twain pokes fun at. Take up a collection for him, take up a collection (Twain28), somebody sang out.

Everyone fatuously accepted the statement as stated, not taking time to perceive the actual meaning. The Dauphin took advantage of the situation and their gullibility, making the people believe that he is a pirate. Nobody stopped to observe the ludicrousness in the speech given by the Dauphin. He took advantage of the passiveness of people and got away with a significant amount of their money. Overall satire is a key defining feature of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Twain makes good use of it to poke fun at American society.

Twain uses the characters in the novel to pass valuable messages, one of which is, being dont judge a book by its cover. Mark Twain chose to satirize religion, civilization, and mob mentality to make his message clear. Through Twains use of satire, we cannot only poke fun at American society, but we can also learn from its mistakes. Twain turned an ordinary adventure down a river into an exploration of the problems society faces. Twain brilliantly intertwines satire in his novel. The lessons in The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn will be remembered forever.

The idea Miss Watson has of Huck Finn

The idea Miss Watson has of Huck Finn being a dirty, nasty, vulgar little boy who smokes, swears, and stays away from Sunday school is not a justifiable description of him. Hucks character goes much deeper. Huck is a literal-minded, imaginative, trustworthy boy who is greatly impacted by the inhuman ways of society. His society driven conscience is in constant conflict with his free, loyal heart. A mind of the greatest literalness is represented by Huck and what he calls his conscience. Hucks conscience is the belief in the inhuman rights of slave owners not to be deprived of their property.

Hucks conscience is a portrayal of the moral values of society. The idea of slavery is drilled by society into every one of its members, including the otherwise free tramp like Huck- and the natural, human rights of Jim. Hucks heart follows the opposite views of his conscience. Huck has been listening to Jims excited talk about what he will do when he is free and it has disturbed what Huck calls his conscience. Conscience says to me, What had poor Miss Watson dont to you that you could see her nigger go off right under your eyes and never say one single word?

What did that poor women do to you that you could treat her so mean? (92) Jim, as a man, has the right to be free. Huck does not realize this because of the views society has instilled in him. Jim has the right to love his wife and yearn for his children. Jim has the determination to work and save up his money and never spend a scent in order to buy his children out of slavery. The final plan he considers, getting an Ablitionist to go and steal (93) his children if their owner refuses to sell them.

The consideration of this plan is a shock to Hucks conscience that awakens him to the wickedness of consorting with Jim and helping him run away from the society-conforming Miss Watson. Miss Watson holds Jim in chattel slavery and Huck in the more subtle slavery of civilized conduct. Hucks conscience is thus badly shaken by Jims wicked talk of stealing his children from an innocent owner. He decides that it is his moral duty to betray Jim. This decision is a great relief to him, and the minute they sight a town he sets off in the canoe to find somebody to capture Jim.

Unluckily, as he is leaving Jim says to him, Ise a free man, en I couldnt ever been free ef it hadnt been for Huckyous de bes fren Jims ever had; en yous de only fren ole Jims got now (93). This innocent expression of human affection and gratitude is very ill-timed for Huck; as he says, I was paddling off, all in a sweat to tell on him; but when he says this it seemed to kind of take the tuck all out of me (93). As a result, when on some men in a canoe who are actually looking for runaway slaves Huck finds he is not man enough to betray Jim.

This explains Hucks loyalty and dedication to keeping his promise to Jim- his promise not to turn Jim in for escaping slavery. Instead he finds himself inventing and performing with great skill a complicated lie that persuades the men in the canoe not to go near the raft where Jim is hiding: he makes them believe- he never says so himself- that there are three people with small pox on the raft. Not only does this illustrate that Huck has a great level of imagination it shows the he has a profound knowledge of human nature.

This knowledge allows him to create stories, which play upon the selfishness and pettiness of society. He is deeply discouraged to find himself acting this way, as if he hadnt the spunk of a rabbit (94). I knowed very well, he says, that I had done wrong, and I see it warnt no use for me to try to learn to do right; a body that dont get started right when hes little aint got no show- when the pinch comes there aint nothing to back him up and keep him to his work, and so he gets beatSo I reckoned I wouldnt bother no more about it, but after this always do whichever cam handiest at the time (95).

Hucks heart conquers his moral views of society. Hucks heart wins as he battles the moral conflict of society. He conquers this society with his realistic-mindedness, creativeness, and loyalty. His heart defies societys inhuman acts while his conscience pushes him towards the routine ways of society. The victory of Hucks heart is attributable to his character traits and ultimately makes him a good person.

The conflict between society and the individual – Huckleberry Finn

The conflict between society and the individual is a theme portrayed throughout Twain’s Huckleberry Finn. Huck was not raised in accord with the accepted ways of civilization. He practically raises himself, relying on instinct to guide him through life. As portrayed several times in the novel, Huck chooses to follow his innate sense of right, yet he does not realize that his own instincts are more moral than those of society. From the very beginning of Huck’s story, Huck clearly states that he did not want to conform to society; “The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would civilize me.

I got into my old rags and my sugar hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. ” When Pap returns for Huck, and the matter of custody is brought before the court, the reader is forced to see the corruption of society. The judge rules that Huck belongs to Pap, and forces him to obey an obviously evil and unfit man. One who drinks profusely and beats his son. Later, when Huck makes it look as though he has been killed, we see how civilization is more concerned over finding Huck’s dead body than rescuing his live one from Pap.

This is a society that is more concerned about a dead body than it is in the welfare of living people. The theme becomes even more evident once Huck and Jim set out, down the Mississippi. Huck enjoys his adventures on the raft. He prefers the freedom of the wilderness to the restrictions of society. Also, Huck’s acceptance of Jim is a total defiance of society. Ironically, Huck believes he is committing a sin by going against society and protecting Jim. He does not realize that his own instincts are more morally correct than those of society’.

In chapter sixteen, we see, perhaps, the most inhumane action of society. Huck meets some men looking for runaway slaves, and so he fabricates a story about his father on the raft with smallpox. The men fear catching this disease and instead of rescuing him, they give him money and advise him not to let it be known of his father’s sickness when seeking help. These men are not hesitant to hunt slaves, yet they refuse to help a sick man. This is contrasted to Huck’s guilt felt for protecting Jim when he actually did a morally just action. Huck’s acceptance of his love for Jim is shown in chapter thirty-one.

Huck writes a letter to Miss Watson to return Jim, yet he ends up ripping the letter and wishes to free Jim. ” ‘All right, then, I’ll go to hell’- and he tore it up. ” Here, we see that Huck concludes that he is evil, and that society has been right all along. The ending is perhaps most disappointing because it seems as though through all the situations that it seemed he was growing up and accepting his innate ideas of right, he hasn’t grown at all. When he is reunited with Tom, he once again thinks of Jim as property. Huck functions as a much nobler person when he is not confined by the hypocrisies of civilization.

The True Sign of Maturity

“To live with fear and not be afraid is the greatest sign of maturity. ” If this is true, then Mark Twain’s Huck Finn is the greatest example of maturity. Huck is the narrator of Twain’s book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In the book Huck, a young boy from the American South, travels down the Mississippi River with a runaway slave. The two encounter many adventures and meet many different people. Along the way, not only does Huck mature, but he also becomes a kind and loyal person, sometimes going against the values of society.

This is shown through his many experiences with the Duke and the King, the Peter Wilk’s scam, and Jim. Huck displays his kindness when he picks up two strangers and lets them travel with him and Jim. “Here comes a couple of men tearing up the path… They begged me to save their lives and wanted to jump right in… I says:… Wade down to me and get in. ” (19). These two men are complete strangers, and Huck knows that they are being chased, so they are obviously troublemakers. Yet he takes them in, and welcomes them aboard, showing great compassion.

Later, the two men lie to Huck and Jim. Huck does not say a thing, though he realizes they are lying. “But I never said nothing, never let on; kept it to myself; it’s the best way; then you don’t have no quarrels, and don’t get into no trouble… I hadn’t no objections, ‘long as it would keep peace in the family. ” (19). It is now clear to Huck that these men are not going to be a blessing to him and Jim. Still, he never says a thing, and just wants to have a friendly atmosphere between all of them. He goes as far as to refer to them as family.

Huck even treats liars with kindness and concern. More of Huck’s kindness is shown during the Peter Wilk’s scam. He feels bad for the three daughters, because the Duke and the King are trying to take their late father, Peter’s, money. While talking to the eldest daughter, Mary Jane, Huck establishes himself as a kind and compassionate person in general. “Miss Mary Jane, you can’t a-bear to see people in trouble, and I can’t–most always. ” (28). This shows that, no matter who the person, Huck can not stand to see anyone go through pain.

Later, in the same situation, Huck becomes close to these girls and can not bear to see the two frauds take advantage of the girls any longer. Huck resolves to expose the two. He says to Mary Jane, “I got to tell you the truth, Miss Mary… These uncles of yourn ain’t no uncles at all; they’re a couple of frauds. “(28). Although Huck has not known the Wilks’ girls long, he still has a kind heart toward them. In terms of society, Huck should keet allegiance to the two frauds, because he has known them for a while and they are treating him well.

However, Huck is able to foresee the pain that this will cause the girls later. Such kindness is rare in a human. Finally, Huck displays not only kindness, but great loyalty, towards his best friend, a runaway slave named Jim. This man is not even seen as a person in Huck’s society. After staging his death and running away to Jackson’s Island, Huck runs into Miss Watson’s “nigger”, Jim. Soon after, Huck inquires about how Jim came to be on the island. Jim replies cautiously, and Huck promises not to tell anyone about it. So Jim tells him. “Well… I-I run off… Remember, you said you wouldn’t tell. 8). In this society, the greatest sin is to be an abolitionist. Huck is well aware of this.

Nonetheless, he remains loyal to Jim throughout the novel. At one point of the story, after Jim has been sold by the Duke and King, Huck needs to decide whether to go after Jim or not. During a great moral debate, Huck writes a letter to Miss Watson, telling Jim’s whereabouts. Soon after writing it, he feels bad about his decision. He thinks hard, then makes a decision. “I studied a minute, sort of holding my breath, and then I says to myself: ‘All right then, I’ll go to Hell’-and tore it up. 31).

This is extremely significant. After debating throughout the novel about Jim, Huck makes a decision of complete loyalty, even if it means Hell. In conclusion, Huck is a true, mature friend of kindness and loyalty. In dealing with his friends, he sometimes debates about which choice is the right choice, but always picks the noble one, even if it isn’t socially acceptable. He has faced fear-to the extent of Hell-and, in the end, has not been afraid to be a true friend. That is one of the greatest signs of maturity.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – The Main Character Enters A Transitional Period Of His Life

In the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, the main character enters a transitional period of his life. This character, Huckleberry Finn, faces many situations. Such as Humble myself to a nigger(95), forcing him to deal with decisions that carry with them the ability to bring about change. Since transition can be defined as the process of entering change, Huck begins searching for an identity which is truly his own. All I wanted was a change(2).

In determining his self image, Huck deals with conformity and freedom by riding of his own identity, trying on different identities that do not belong to him, nd shaping these new found tributes into an identity which best suits his conscience. Is I The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins with Huck under the care of Widow Douglas. “She took me for her son, and allowed that she would civilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time”(1). Huck has become so used to being free that he sees the Widow Douglas’ protection as confinement.

Huck finds this unacceptable because he loses his freedom amongst “The bars and shackles of civilization”(17). Huck wants to rid the shackles Widow Douglas place on Huck. He wants to be Comfortable all day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study(27). Huck feels that he belongs out under the stars and in nature, where the community cannot bound him. Huck then faces the return of his drunkard father. When Huck’s father comes back to the town, he only intends to steal money from his son. I aint heard nothing but about you being rich. That’s why I come.

You get me that money tomorrow-I want it”(23). Huck’s own father does not feel one bit inclined to treat his son with respect. Then his father takes him to a log cabin deep in the woods and Huck once gain faces confinement; He always locked the door and put the key under his head(26). Huck’s escape, flight, and the changing of his identity are his only release from being in the log cabin. Then after escaping from it all, Huck is left with his freedom. The raft on which Huck and Jim travel demonstrates one of symbols of freedom in the story.

To Huck, the raft seems to be the safest place that brings freedom on which he can grow and experience life. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft(128). However, when duke and king enter the scene, the raft is no longer free. King and duke rob Huck and Jim of their isolation from society and the real world. The only way Huck can escape from society is to He attempts to slip into the identities of others to experience things in a different way than they normally would be. Huck’s longing for freedom is his only self desire.

His freedom requires that he find a conscious, moral identity. He must discover his true self and know himself as a person and as an individual in order to be free. However, other characters in the story put on different identities for much different reasons than Huck. Huck learns rom these peoples’ downfalls. One example would be king and duke. They made a body ashamed of the human race(178). Huck learns from them that there comes a time when to draw the line and when lying becomes unnecessary.

King and duke both put up fake identities in order to scam people of their money. Huck discovers the truth about king and duke but he feels that “If they wanted us to call them kings and dukes, I hadn’t no objections, long as it would keep peace”(137). Huck feels this way because he learned from his father that “The best way to get along with his kind of people is to let them have their Throughout the experiences on Huck’s journey, his identity slowly adapts to his conscience. One aspect of his identity which appears earlier on in the book is his religion.

Huck has learned to adapt to the views of society and to make them into what he feels is right according to his conscience. An example of this is when Huck talks about turning Jim in and decides “All right then, I’ll go to hell”(89), when he ends up deciding that he does not want to turn him in. Huck actually improves his conscience by refusing to turn Jim in. However, Huck thinks that he is making it worse. Huck has no self-conscious sense of the change that has occurred in himself.

All of this reveals Huck’s deformed conscience because he thinks he is doing wrong when he is really doing the right thing. Also, the subject of Jim and black people as a whole causes some change in Huck. At the beginning of the story, Huck does not even think blacks are human, but throughout Huck and Jim’s journey along the river together, Huck learns otherwise. At one point, Huck even “Goes and humbles himself to a nigger”(95), and another time he promises to keep the reason why Jim ran way a secret even though “People would call me a low-down Abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum”(98).

These are some of the many examples throughout the story that show us that Huck really cares for Jim and that he truly changes his views of blacks. Even though Huck knows that black people are not supposed to be respected, Huck cannot go against what he feels is right and gives Jim the respect that he deserves. Throughout this journey, Huck encounters many different situations in which he learns to adapt and react to each in a way that he feels suitable. Huck learns his own morals nd finds his own truths. I knows what I knows(86).

Huck learns about life and the real world. He observes how cruel and heartless the human race is. He then gathers what he has learned and combines it into an identity which suits him. Huck knows that the way he was made him Ashamed of the human race(178). This enables him to create a conscience with which he finds himself comfortable. Huck finding himself really did cause a struggle considering all that he had to accomplish in order to do so. Huck overcomes obstacles to find his identity. In the end, He done it(272).

Huckleberry Finn – Influences on Huck

Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel about a young boy’s coming of age in the Missouri of the mid-1800’s. The main character, Huckleberry Finn, spends much time in the novel floating down the Mississippi River on a raft with a runaway slave named Jim. Before he does so, however, Huck spends some time in the fictional town of St. Petersburg where a number of people attempt to influence him. Before the novel begins, Huck Finn has led a life of absolute freedom.

His drunken and often missing father has never paid much attention to him; his mother is dead and so, when the novel begins, Huck is not used to following any rules. The book’s opening finds Huck living with the Widow Douglas and her sister, Miss Watson. Both women are fairly old and are really somewhat incapable of raising a rebellious boy like Huck Finn. Nevertheless, they attempt to make Huck into what they believe will be a better boy. Specifically, they attempt, as Huck says, to “sivilize” him.

This process includes making Huck go to school, teaching him various religious facts, and making him act in a way that the women find socially acceptable. Huck, who has never had to follow many rules in his life, finds the demands the women place upon him constraining and the life with them lonely. As a result, soon after he first moves in with them, he runs away. He soon comes back, but, even though he becomes somewhat comfortable with his new life as the months go by, Huck never really enjoys the life of manners, religion, and education that the Widow and her sister impose upon him.

Huck believes he will find some freedom with Tom Sawyer. Tom is a boy of Huck’s age who promises Huck and other boys of the town a life of adventure. Huck is eager to join Tom Sawyer’s Gang because he feels that doing so will allow him to escape the somewhat boring life he leads with the Widow Douglas. Unfortunately, such an escape does not occur. Tom Sawyer promises much-robbing stages, murdering and ransoming people, kidnaping beautiful women-but none of this comes to pass.

Huck finds out too late that Tom’s adventures are imaginary: that raiding a caravan of “A-rabs” really means terrorizing young children on a Sunday school picnic, that stolen “joolry” is nothing more than turnips or rocks. Huck is disappointed that the adventures Tom promises are not real and so, along with the other members, he resigns from the gang. Another person who tries to get Huckleberry Finn to change is Pap, Huck’s father.

Pap is one of the most astonishing figures in all of American literature as he is completely antisocial and wishes to undo all of the civilizing effects that the Widow and Miss Watson have attempted to instill in Huck. Pap is a mess: he is unshaven; his hair is uncut and hangs like vines in front of his face; his skin, Huck says, is white like a fish’s belly or like a tree toa….. d’s. Pap’s savage appearance reflects his feelings as he demands that Huck quit school, stop reading, and avoid church.

Huck is able to stay away from Pap for a while, but Pap kidnaps Huck three or four months after Huck starts to live with the Widow and takes him to a lonely cabin deep in the Missouri woods. Here, Huck enjoys, once again, the freedom that he had prior to the beginning of the book. He can smoke, “laze around,” swear, and, in general, do what he wants to do. However, as he did with the Widow and with Tom, Huck begins to become dissatisfied with this life. Pap is “too handy with the hickory” and Huck soon realizes that he will have to escape from the cabin if he wishes to remain alive.

As a result of his concern, Huck makes it appear as if he is killed in the cabin while Pap is away, and leaves to go to a remote island in the Mississippi River, Jackson’s Island. It is after he leaves his father’s cabin that Huck joins yet another important influence in his life: Miss Watson’s slave, Jim. Prior to Huck’s leaving, Jim has been a minor character in the novel-he has been shown being fooled by Tom Sawyer and telling Huck’s fortune. Huck finds Jim on Jackson’s Island because the slave has run away-he has overheard a conversation that he will soon be sold to New Orleans.

Soon after joining Jim on Jackson’s Island, Huck begins to realize that Jim has more talents and intelligence than Huck has been aware of. Jim knows “all kinds of signs” about the future, people’s personalities, and weather forecasting. Huck finds this kind of information necessary as he and Jim drift down the Mississippi on a raft. As important, Huck feels a comfort with Jim that he has not felt with the other major characters in the novel. With Jim, Huck can enjoy the best aspects of his earlier influences. As does the Widow, Jim allows Huck security, but Jim is not as confining as is the Widow.

Like Tom Sawyer, Jim is intelligent but his intelligence is not as intimidating or as imaginary as is Tom’s. As does Pap, Jim allows Huck freedom, but he does it in a loving, rather than an uncaring, fashion. Thus, early, in their relationship on Jackson’s Island, Huck says to Jim, “This is nice. I wouldn’t want to be nowhere else but here. ” This feeling is in marked contrast with Huck’s feelings concerning other people in the early part of the novel where he always is uncomfortable and wishes to leave them.

At the conclusion of chapter 11 in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck and Jim are forced to leave Jackson’s Island because Huck discovers that people are looking for the runaway slave. Prior to leaving, Huck tells Jim, “They’re after us. ” Clearly, the people are after Jim, but Huck has already identified with Jim and has begun to care for him. This stated empathy shows that the two outcasts will have a successful and rewarding friendship as they drift down the river as the novel continues.

Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer

The narrator (later identified as Huckleberry Finn) begins Chapter One by stating that the reader may know of him from another book, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by “Mr. Mark Twain,” but it “ain’t t no matter” if you have not. According to Huck, Twain mostly told the truth, with some “stretchers” thrown in, though everyone–except Tom’s Aunt Polly, the widow, and maybe Mary–lies once in a while. The other book ended with Tom and Huckleberry finding the gold some robbers had hidden in a cave.

They got six thousand dollars apiece, which Judge Thatcher put in trust, so that they each got a dollar a day from interest. The Widow Douglas adopted and tried to “civilise” Huck. But Huck couldn’t stand it so he threw on his old rags and ran away. But he went back when Tom Sawyer told him he could join his new band of robbers if he would return to the Widow “and be respectable. ” The Widow lamented over her failure with Huck, tried to stuff him into cramped clothing, and before every meal had to “grumble” over the food before they could eat it.

She tried to teach him about Moses, until Huck found out he was dead and lost interest. Meanwhile, she would not let him smoke; typically, she disapproved of it because she had never tried it, but approved of snuff since she used it herself. Her slim sister who wears glasses, Miss Watson, tried to give him spelling lessons. Meanwhile, Huck was going stir-crazy, made especially restless by the sisters’ constant reminders to improve his behavior. When Miss Watson told him about the “bad place,” Hell, he burst out that he would like to go there, as a change of scenery.

Secretly, Huck really does not see the point in going to “the good place” and resolved then not to bother trying to get there. When Huck asked, Miss Watson told him there was no chance Tom Sawyer would end up in Heaven. Huck was glad “because I wanted him and me to be together. ” One night, after Miss Watson’s prayer session with him and the slaves, Huck goes to bed feeling “so lonesome I wished I was dead. ” He gets shivers hearing the sounds of nature through his window. Huck accidentally flicks a spider into a candle, and is frightened by the bad omen.

Just after midnight, Huck hears movement below the window, and a “me-yow” sound, that he responds to with another “me-yow. ” Climbing out the window onto the shed, Huck finds Tom Sawyer waiting for him. Commentary In a few short dense pages, Twain manages to accomplish a great deal. Most importantly, the two introductory notes and the first chapter establish the author’s use of humor and irony, the character of Huckleberry Finn, the novel’s theme, narration, and the use of dialect.

One hateful word the characters use has brought occasional condemnation onto the book and its author. The characters of the Widow Douglas and Miss Watson are also established. As well, the author establishes that the reader needs no familiarity with his previous work, Tom Sawyer, to understand Huckleberry Finn, though he fills the reader in on the pertinent information from the previous work. The brief “Notice” that introduces the book has been reprinted above in its entirety.

In humorously highfalutin language, it states that the reader must not seek plot, “moral,” or “motive”– the last two of which likely correspond to the present-day concepts of theme and character development. Of course, what the author really means by this notice is that the book does in fact contain all these things–that it is more than just a children’s, adventure, or humor book. Twain is using irony, saying one thing but meaning the opposite of its literal definition. He is using this irony humorously, covering this declaration of the book’s seriousness in a joke.

The joke pokes fun at the seriousness of adult American society, with its rules and officials, especially with the citation to “G. G. , Chief of Ordinance. ” Twain will use humor and irony throughout the book, most often combining the two. Indeed, humor usually occurs as a result of irony, with the gap between the expected and the actual provoking a startled reaction in the recipient, that, if done right, is humor. But Twain’s humor has the purpose not just of entertainment, but of conveying a serious message, as in the Notice.

Twain also uses ironic humor in Chapter One, in recording Huckleberry’s reactions to the Widow Douglas’s attempts at “civilization,” especially religion. When the Widow says grace, Huckleberry views it as unnecessary “grumbling. ” He finds the nice clothes she gives him stifling. He thinks Heaven (“the good place”) dull and would prefer to go to Hell (“the bad place”- the word “Hell” would likely be thought impolite in a “civilized” house like the sisters’) if his friend Tom is there.

Huck’s views are all completely naturalistic, free of any of the pretensions toward refinement that mark the Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson. Huckleberry is rough, rustic–a truly “uncivilized” boy. He rebels against the restraints of “civilization”–artificial, middle-class society– and its delusions, represented by “cramped” clothing and religion, respectively. Huckleberry’s complete sincerity, which leads to his dislike for hypocritical “civilization,” is his defining quality. The Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson, meanwhile, are the representatives of the society Huck rejects.

They both immerse themselves in the values of “civilization,” feeling righteous by punishing themselves with tight clothing and delaying their meals to say grace, which only appears as “grumbling” to the more sincere Huck. Above all, they adhere to hypocritical and absurd religious values. Miss Watson describes her Heaven as a place where the inhabitants spend their days playing harps and singing; again, Huck more sincerely realizes that this place is dull rather than desirable. But the utter moral emptiness of Miss Watson’s religion is best demonstrated by her prayer meeting with the slaves.

Miss Watson dutifully respects the religious custom of evening prayer, yet at the same time sees nothing wrong with “owning” other people. The two sisters’ one redeeming quality is their concern for Huck, which, though it possesses moralistic overtones, includes an element of sincerity, giving them some patience in dealing with the “uncivilized” Huck. Other than this, the sisters’ role is to represent the artificial, empty civilization to which Huck stands in contrast. Thus, they serve as foils to the character of Huckleberry.

Their artifice and hypocrisy contrast sharply with Huck’s natural sincerity, and so serve to highlight Huck’s qualities. Huck’s recognition of the hypocrisies and absurdities of the society represented by the Widow and Miss Watson, and his preference for nature and his own natural impulses, bring out the novel’s theme. Huckleberry Finn is about how society tends to corrupt true morality, freedom, and justice, which exist in nature, and how the individual must follow his or her own conscience. Chapter One establishes the corruption of the society in which Huck lives.

That society stifles freedom–in a small sense through its restrictive clothing and manners, and in a larger sense through the institution of slavery–and also morality and justice, with its absurd religion, hypocritical taboos, and, again, the institution of slavery. Quite a few critics have characterized Twain’s deep distrust in society as “pessimistic. ” Yet it is important to remember that Twain maintains full confidence in the existence of morality, freedom, justice, and other absolutes. In fact, they transcend society’s most flagrant transgressions of them, awaiting proper recognition by the attuned individual.

Huckleberry is not only the protagonist, but the narrator of the entire book. That is, the book uses first-person narration. The reader only finds out about anything once Huck does (though this does not preclude the possibility of the reader understanding something that Huck does not). This way, the reader also gets Huck’s impressions of the world, which, as explained above, are important to the theme. In the “Explanatory” note, Twain advises the reader that his characters will all speak in dialects– that is, regional, ethnic, and class variants of English. As Twain notes, there are several different dialects used in Huckleberry Finn.

This may make the book somewhat more of a challenge to read, but if the reader sticks with it, the added detail will make the book more involving and believable. The added detail is also part of the book’s realism–that is, its unromantic attempt at an accurate depiction of the world. In particular, there is one word all the characters use that contributes to the novel’s accurate depiction of the world in which it is set. Yet this word is so hateful that over the years it has brought charges of racism onto the book and its author, and even some attempts to keep the book away from young people.

The word is “nigger”. It is first used in Chapter One, as it will be throughout the book, to refer to all African Americans and especially those held as slaves. It is important to remember that the word is used as part of the language of a corrupt, racist society. That society used that word as surely as it held human beings in slavery. Both facts are described in the novel; it is important to remember that the author condemns both. Summary Huck and Tom tiptoe through the garden. Huck trips on a root as he passes the kitchen.

Jim, a “big” slave, hears him from inside. Tom and Huck crouch down, trying to stay still. But Huck is struck by an uncontrollable itch, as always happens when he is in a situation, like when he’s “with the quality,” where it is bad to scratch. Jim says aloud that he will stay put until he discovers the source of the sound, but after several minutes falls asleep. Tom plays a trick on Jim–putting his hat on a tree branch over his head–and takes candles from the kitchen, over Huck’s objections that they will risk getting caught.

Later, Jim will say that some witches flew him around the state and put the hat above his head as a calling card. He expands the tale further, becoming a local celebrity among the slaves, who enjoy witch stories. He wears around his neck the five-cent piece Tom left for the candles, calling it a charm from the devil with the power to cure sickness. Jim nearly becomes so stuck-up from his newfound celebrity that he is unfit to be a servant. Meanwhile, Tom and Huck meet up with a few other boys, and take a boat to a large cave. There, Tom declares his new band of robbers, “Tom Sawyer’s Gang.

All must sign in blood an oath vowing, among other things, to kill the family of any member who reveals the gang’s secrets. The boys think it “a real beautiful oath. ” Tom admits he got part of it from books. The boys nearly disqualify Huck, who has no family but a drunken father who can never be found, until Huck offers Miss Watson. Tom says the gang must capture and ransom people, though nobody knows what “ransom” means. Tom assumes it means to kill them. But anyway, it must be done since all the books say so. When one boy cries to go home and threatens to tell the group’s secrets, Tom bribes him with five cents.

They agree to meet again someday, just not Sunday, which would be blasphemous. Huckleberry makes it back into bed just before dawn. Miss Watson tries to explain prayer to Huckleberry in Chapter Three. Huckleberry gives up on it after not getting what he prays for. Miss Watson calls him a fool, and explains prayer bestows spiritual gifts like selflessness to help others. Huck cannot see any advantage in this, except for the others one helps. So he resolves to forget it. Widow Douglas describes a wonderful God, while Miss Watson’s is terrible. Huck concludes there are two Gods.

He would like to belong to Widow Douglas’s, if He would take him – unlikely because of Huck’s bad qualities. Meanwhile, a rumor circulates that Huck’s Pap, who has not been seen in a year, is dead. A corpse was found in the river, thought to be Pap because of its “ragged” appearance, though the face is unrecognizable. At first Huck is relieved. His father had been a drunk who beat him when he was sober, though Huck stayed hidden from him most of the time. Soon, however, Huck doubts his father’s death, and expects to see him again. After a month in Tom’s gang, Huck quit along with the rest of the boys.

There was no point to it, without any robbery or killing, their activities being all pretend. Once, Tom pretended a caravan of Arabs and Spaniards were going to encamp nearby with hundreds of camels and elephants. It turned out to be a Sunday school picnic. Tom explained it really was a caravan of Arabs and Spaniards – only they were enchanted, like in Don Quixote. Huckleberry judged Tom’s stories of genies to be lies, after rubbing old lamps and rings with no result. Commentary These two chapters develop the characters of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer.

The two are, in several respects, foils. But they still have some things in common. Through the character of Tom, Twain also pokes fun at romantic (non-realistic) literature. Tom insists that all his make-believe adventures be conducted “by the book. ” As Tom himself admits in regarding his gang’s oath, he gets many of his ideas from fiction. In particular, Tom tries to emulate the romantic (that is, not realistic) novels that were mostly imported from Europe and achieved enormous popularity in nineteenth-century North America.

Tom will be identified with this genre throughout the novel (though he will not appear in most of it). Twain detested this category of literature, an opinion that is developed more fully in the last chapters of Huckleberry Finn. Ironically, the book that Tom explicitly mentions as a model in these chapters is Cervantes’s Don Quixote. Cervantes actually satirized romantic adventure stories in his masterpiece, as Twain does here and elsewhere in Huckleberry Finn. Tom apparently didn’t get the satire.

But with this allusion, Twain may be giving a literary tip of the hat to an earlier satirist and observer of human nature. But beyond simply using Tom’s connection to the romance novels to satirize the genre, Twain also seems to be associating Tom with the “civilization” that the genre represents. Tom further interests himself in contracts, codes of conduct, fancy language, and other made-up ideas. He also seems to embody some of the negative qualities associated with civilization in the novel. Most importantly, Tom is insensitive to others, particularly the slaves.

In Chapter Two, Tom actually wants to tie Jim up for the fun of it. He settles for playing a trick on him. Tom’s insensitivity, especially toward slaves, will reach a peak in the book’s final chapters. Tom also seems to possess a tendency in favor of the hypocrisy of “civilized society” that Twain pokes at. For instance, Tom makes his “gang” sign an oath in blood not to divulge the group’s secrets, but when a boy threatens to do this, Tom simply bribes him. Tom’s above-mentioned character traits contrast sharply with Huckleberry’s corresponding traits.

While Tom puts great stock in the literature of civilization, Huck is as skeptical of it as he is of religion. For both literature and religion, Huck refuses to accept much on faith. In Chapter Three, he rejects both genies and prayers once they do not produce the promised results. (Twain is making an irreverent statement on popular religious beliefs by showing Huck’s similar rejection of both prayer and genies. ) Again, since both religion and romantic literature are products of civilization, Huck’s doubt towards them hints at his separation from civilization.

Also, where Tom is insensitive to others, Huckleberry is naturally considerate, advising his friend against tying Jim up or playing tricks on him. Tom’s tendency toward hypocrisy also contrasts sharply with Huck’s sincerity, discussed in the critical reading of the last chapter. Thus, the two characters of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn are foils to each other: certain traits of one character serve to highlight the contrasting traits of the other. Nonetheless, though the important contrasting traits of the two characters make them foils, they still share some traits in common.

These shared traits are enough to preserve the friendship between Tom and Huckleberry throughout the novel. Most importantly, the two characters share a kind of “boyishness”– that is, the characteristic embodied in the phrase, “boys will be boys,” and expounded upon in the first novel, Tom Sawyer. In the Preface to that book, the author wrote that he hoped the novel would rekindle its readers’ memories of their own childhood impishness, “of how they felt and thought and talked, and what queer enterprises they sometimes engaged in.

That theme is continued as something of a motif, a topic of interest, in Huckleberry Finn. Both Huck and Tom, in their own ways, delight in the dirty language and pranks that adults shun. On the whole, though, Huck’s separation from the world of adults and their “civilization” is more complete, and more serious. Still, throughout the novel, Huck maintains some admiration for Tom’s romantic adventures, and often wonders what he would do in certain situations. Thus, Huck’s character has some connection to Tom’s less desirable traits.

The book, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Would you just stand by, as Nazis soldiers kidnapped your neighbors just because they were different? If you would, you have no voice and you need to develop one. Many people had neighbors who were taken away and killed by the Nazis. They just stood there, let it happen and did not utter a word. In the book, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, written by, Mark Twain, it shows the development of a young boy, and he does develop a voice. The main character, Huckleberry Finn, is a white, southern boy expected to believe in what everyone else believes in. He does not want to be like everyone else and he changes.

If you develop, or have a voice, you can make a difference. During the story, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck plays a trick on Jim. Jim is Huck’s runaway slave friend. So, as the story goes, Huck plays a trick on Jim and Jim thinks that Huck is dead. When Jim finally realizes that Huck is not dead, he gets really angry at Huck. Jim says, ‘ Dat truck dah is trash; en trash is what people is dat puts dirt on de head er dey fren’s em makes ’em ashamed. ‘; That line, from the story, is basically saying that Huck is trash for doing that to Jim. Then fifteen minutes later Huck goes into Jim’s wigwam and apologizes.

This is showing that Huck does have a voice because any other white person from the south would not apologize to a slave. The slaves were thought of as being lower than any white person and Huck was showing that a slave as equal to him or even better than him because he went and apologized to Jim. By doing this Huck was different and developed a voice because if he had no voice he would have gotten angry with Jim for calling him trash and Huck would not have apologized. The article, that accompanied my writing assignment, is about a man named Elie Wiesel.

Wiesel is a Holocaust survivor, he is an author, has won the Noble Peace Prize, and most important of all, Wiesel has a voice. Egil Aarvik, chairman of the Norwegian Noble Committee, said, ‘Wiesel’s mission is not to gain the world’s sympathy for the victims or the survivors. His aim is to awaken our conscience. ‘; With Wiesel’s focus on getting us to realize what happened during the Holocaust, he has made a voice for himself. He is trying to teach other people about this terrible monstrosity, so that no one could make that mistake again.

Wiesel is making a difference, the difference he is making is getting people to realize the terrible things that are happening each and every day. In a letter, Wiesel wrote, ‘Have you seen pictures of emaciated children in Somalia? Look at them. If they don’t move you to rage or compassion, look at them again. ‘; He is trying to get the American people to wake up and see what is going on around the world and that with a little help we can make a difference. He is a man that has a true and strong voice.

Wiesel is not afraid to speak his mind and tell the truth, he is not one to sugarcoat the truth, so it goes down easier, he tells it like it is. To have a voice is a quality that one should be happy to have, and if you do not have a voice, you should try, and make yourself heard. If the world were filled with people that had no voices, the world would be a very dull and useless place. Nothing would ever get done and no one would have an opinion about anything. If you have a voice use it. Do not just sit back and let others make decisions for you, speak up and be heard. If you develop, or have a voice, you can make a difference.

Huck Finn Character

-As a coming of age character in the late nineteenth century, Huck views his surroundings with a practical and logical lens. -His observations are not filled with judgments; instead, Huck observes his environment and gives realistic descriptions of the Mississippi River and the culture that dominates the towns that dot its shoreline from Missouri south.

It is his literal, pragmatic approach to his surroundings and his inner struggle with his conscience that make him one of the most important and recognizable figures in American literature.

-Abstractly, he does not recognize the contradiction of “loving thy neighbor” and enforcing slavery at the same time. He observes the racist and anti-government rants of his ignorant father but does not condemn him because it is the “accepted” view in his world. Huck simply reports what he sees, and the deadpan narration allows Twain to depict a realistic view of common ignorance, slavery, and the inhumanity that follows.

Huck possesses the ability to adapt to almost any situation through deceit. He is playful but practical, inventive but logical, compassionate but realistic, and these traits allow him to survive the abuse of Pap, the violence of a feud, and the wiles of river con men. To persevere in these situations, Huck lies, cheats, steals, and defrauds his way down the river. These traits are part of the reason that Huck Finn was viewed as a book not acceptable for children, yet they are also traits that allow Huck to survive his surroundings and, in the conclusion, make the right decision.

-Because Huck believes that the laws of society are just, he condemns himself as a traitor and a villain for acting against them and aiding Jim. More important, Huck believes that he will lose his chance at Providence by helping a slave. When Huck declares, “All right, then, I’ll go to hell,” he refuses his place in society and heaven, and the magnitude of his decision is what solidifies his role as a heroic figure.

Quote 1) “All right, then, I’ll go to hell el.” [Huck, as he reaches a decision about his responsibility toward Jim. This passage symbolizes Huck’s gesture of sacrifice for Jim.]

Quote 2) “But I reckon I got to light out for the territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she’s going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can’t stand it. I been there before.”

Aunt Sally’s intentions for Huck center around the upbringing that society thinks every boy should have: religion, clean clothes, education, and an indoctrination in right and wrong. Huck, however, has come to realize that the first two are useless and that, in reference to the third, he can provide a much better version for himself than can society.

The “territories,” the relatively unsettled western United States, will offer Huck an opportunity to be himself, in a world not yet “sivilized” and thus brimming with promise. Weary of his old life, Huck contemplates ways to continue living with the same freedom he felt on the raft. Huck’s break from society is complete, and before the dust from his adventures is fully settled, he is already scheming to detach himself again.

Adventures Of Huck Finn Description

In the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, the main character enters a transitional period of his life. This character, Huckleberry Finn, faces many situations. Such as “Humble myself to a nigger”(95), forcing him to deal with decisions that carry with them the ability to bring about change. Since transition can be defined as the process of entering change, Huck begins searching for an identity which is truly his own. “All I wanted was a change”(2).

In determining his self image, Huck deals with conformity and freedom by riding of his own identity, trying on different identities that o not belong to him, and shaping these new found tributes into an identity which best suits his conscience. “Is I me, or who is I? “(93). The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins with Huck under the care of Widow Douglas. “She took me for her son, and allowed that she would civilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time”(1). Huck has become so used to being free that he sees the Widow Douglas’ protection as confinement.

Huck finds this unacceptable because he loses his freedom amongst “The bars and shackles of civilization”(17). Huck wants to rid the shackles Widow Douglas place on Huck. He wants to be “Comfortable all day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study”(27). Huck feels that he belongs out under the stars and in nature, where the community cannot bound him. Huck then faces the return of his drunkard father. When Huck’s father comes back to the town, he only intends to steal money from his son. “I aint heard nothing but about you being rich. That’s why I come.

You get me that money tomorrow-I want it”(23). Huck’s own father does not feel one bit inclined to treat his son with respect. Then his father takes him to a log cabin deep in the woods and Huck once again aces confinement; “He always locked the door and put the key under his head”(26). Huck’s escape, flight, and the changing of his identity are his only release from being in the log cabin. Then after escaping from it all, Huck is left with his freedom. The raft on which Huck and Jim travel demonstrates one of symbols of freedom in the story.

To Huck, the raft seems to be the safest place that brings freedom on which he can grow and experience life. “You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft”(128). However, when duke and king enter the scene, the raft is no longer free. King and duke rob Huck and Jim of their isolation from society and the real world. The only way Huck can escape from society is to rid himself of his own identity. He attempts to slip into the identities of others to experience things in a different way than they normally would be.

Huck’s longing for freedom is his only self desire. His freedom requires that he find a conscious, moral identity. He must discover his true self and know himself as a person and as an individual in order to be free. However, other characters in the story put on different identities for much ifferent reasons than Huck. Huck learns from these peoples’ downfalls. One example would be king and duke. “They made a body ashamed of the human race”(178). Huck learns from them that there comes a time when to draw the line and when lying becomes unnecessary.

King and duke both put up fake identities in order to scam people of their money. Huck discovers the truth about king and duke but he feels that “If they wanted us to call them kings and dukes, I hadn’t no objections, long as it would keep peace”(137). Huck feels this way because he learned from his father that “The best way to get long with his kind of people is to let them have their own way”(138). Throughout the experiences on Huck’s journey, his identity slowly adapts to his conscience.

One aspect of his identity which appears earlier on in the book is his religion. Huck has learned to adapt to the views of society and to make them into what he feels is right according to his conscience. An example of this is when Huck talks about turning Jim in and decides “All right then, I’ll go to hell”(89), when he ends up deciding that he does not want to turn him in. Huck actually improves his conscience by refusing to turn Jim in. However, Huck thinks that he is making it worse. Huck has no self-conscious sense of the change that has occurred in himself.

All of this reveals Huck’s deformed conscience because he thinks he is doing wrong when he is really doing the right thing. Also, the subject of Jim and black people as a whole causes some change in Huck. At the beginning of the story, Huck does not even think blacks are human, but throughout Huck and Jim’s journey along the river together, Huck learns otherwise. At one point, Huck even “Goes and humbles himself to a nigger”(95), and another time he promises to keep the reason why Jim ran way a secret even though “People would call me a low-down Abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum”(98).

These are some of the many examples throughout the story that show us that Huck really cares for Jim and that he truly changes his views of blacks. Even though Huck knows that black people are not supposed to be respected, Huck cannot go against what he feels is right and gives Jim the respect that he deserves. Throughout this journey, Huck encounters many different situations in which he learns to adapt and react to each in a way that he feels suitable. Huck learns his own morals and finds his own truths. “I knows what I knows”(86).

Huck learns about life and the real world. He observes how cruel and heartless the human race is. He then gathers what he has learned and combines it into an identity which suits him. Huck knows that the way he was made him “Ashamed of the human race”(178). This enables him to create a conscience with which he finds himself comfortable. Huck finding himself really did cause a struggle considering all that he had to accomplish in order to do so. Huck overcomes obstacles to find his identity. In the end, “He done it”(272).

Race Relations With Huck Finn

Famous writers come and go every year. How do these writers become famous? Humans are fascinated with real life situations, tagged in with fictional story line. Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, describes real life situations, in a fictional story line perfectly. Twain put the real life happenings of slavery, in a fun and fictional story. The novel is mainly about the racial relations between each human. Classes of society, loyalty/friendship, and rebellion shows how the novel evolves into a main theme of Race Relations.

Through out the history of the world, people have been placed into categories based on their wealth, and all of the worldly possessions that we have. These classes of society can really make people talk, and act differently towards some people. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the novel shows these classes really well. In the beginning of the novel, we see a little bit of the black class, and how they were treated. “Miss. Watson’s big nigger, named Jim, was setting in the kitchen door, we could see him pretty clear” (14). Jim, Miss.

Watson’s run away slave in the story, is part of the black class. We see the sub ordinance that blacks were placed in America, because blacks were not allowed to be in the house, because they were uneducated, and had to be working in the fields. Another example of the classes we put each other into is when Huck, the main character, and Jim were heading south. Jim and Huck are sitting on the banks of the Mississippi River, and Jim says “I owns myself en I’s wuth eight hund’d dollars. ” (54). This shows the reader that blacks are so low, that the white people place prices on the blacks.

As uneducated as the blacks are, they believe they are worth so much money, because that is all they hear from their owners. By doing such a thing to another human being, that degrades our country, and the black citizens themselves. At the end, we see how these classes can effect one person, due to his social status. Like before, people say things to other people, to make themselves feel better, and they do not care what it does to the person they are talking about, because of their class in society. One example of this is when “They cussed Jim considerably, though, and give him a cuff or two upside the head” (271).

This shows how people can be when one group thinks that he is better than another group. These classes of society can show the relations between races. In this case, the whites thought they were better, and so, they would not allow blacks to be in the house, make them feel like objects, and not human beings and greatly persecuted and abused the blacks. Another point that is with the main theme of race relations is loyalty/friendship. Huck shows this by being with Jim in the beginning, and shows some trust in Jim.

The beginning of this friendship is seen when Huck goes to Jim with a problem with his Father coming back, and Jim says “ sometimes he spec he’ll go ‘way, en den ag’in he spec he’ll stay” (26). That response from Jim really shows the reader that he cares about Huck, and he understands what Huck is saying. Like any relationship, it has to have an open, honest and submit caring feelings for one another. Jim proves that he cares by helping Huck, and telling the truth, even when it hurts. Later on in the novel, Jim and Huck are going down the river, and Huck is continuously faced with the same problem.

Huck does not know whether to turn Jim in or not. When a problem comes up, people can see how loyal or how much your friendship means to somebody when a problem occurs frequently. Huck says to himself “s’pose you’d a’ done right and give Jim up? Would you felt better than what you do now? No, I’d feel bad-I’d feel just the same way I do now” (94). With that decision by Huck, that shows two people the same thing. This shows both Jim and the reader that Jim is too good of a friend to be back stabbed. With that decision, Huck proves his loyalty to Jim, no matter if he is black or white.

Finally, at the end of the novel, we find out how much Huck appreciated Jim’s good attitude through the whole adventure of going to New Orleans. When “Tom give Jim forty dollars for being prisoner for us so patient…. ” (278), shows that Tom and Huck were very thankful for putting up with them, and their crazy ideas. The act of giving Jim the money proves Huck and Tom were very grateful for Jim’s loyalty to do everything. The loyalty towards Huck was seen through the whole story. From being tied up, being painted or even being treated worse, Jim knew it was worth it.

He was loyal and friendly towards the two children, because if it were not for them, he would still be a slave. Loyalty and friendship deals with race relations because even if somebody was black, or white, Huck showed that blacks were every bit as fun, caring and normal as the white people. Even if it meant rebelling against the law, loyalty and friendship was more important. Speaking of rebelling, this is the final point for making this main theme race relations, the ultimate theme of the novel. Rebellion is another theme frequently seen through the whole novel. Huck rebels against his father, and the law.

Huck’s Father tells him to do one simple thing, but he rebels and does what he wants to any ways. The first thing is when his Father leaves him locked in the cabin. Huck obviously is supposed to stay inside, but he rebels and crawls out of the house. “He had wore the ground a good deal crawling out of the hole and dragging out so many things” (40). This shows him rebelling against his Father by not doing what he was supposed to do. He then runs away, and meets Jim, where he really rebels. This will be the start of a stronger friendship between Huck and Jim. Speaking of Jim, he also rebels, but he rebels against the law.

Jim made a big decision while there was a great deal of distraction with in the city. When Jim and Huck first met, Jim says “Well, I b’lieve you, Huck. I-I run off” (50). Jim tells Huck and Huck becomes very shocked and concerned for Jim. Huck tells Jim that he will help Jim escape, even if “People would call me a low-down Abolitionist” (50). When Huck says that, he promises Jim he will help to the end, no matter what happens. That only shows the reader that Jim can really trust Huck with anything, improving their relationship. Finally at the end of the novel, we really see the respect Jim deserves as a human being.

Through the many escapades and adventures the two of them went through, Jim is first treated like garbage once again. When Tom, Huck’s one and only friend, Huck and Jim arrive at Aunt Sally’s, Tom’s aunt, house, Aunt Sally becomes outraged that the two of them helped a slave run away. Once she finally realizes everything Jim had done for Tom and Huck, “Aunt Polly and Uncle Silas and Aunt Sally found out how good he helped the doctor nurse fix Tom, they made a fuss, and fixed him up prime, and gave him all he wanted to eat, and a good time and nothing to do” (278).

This is a big push for race relations and rebellion. Slaves are not supposed to eat and dress real nice and have nothing to do. Aunt Polly, Uncle Silas and Aunt Sally realized everything that Jim did, and, by being helpful, changed the minds of the three adults. They now viewed Jim as a person, and not a slave. By doing this, these few people strengthen the relationship between whites and blacks. They only did this because they looked inside, and found out what Jim really is about, and what he has to offer to the world.

Through history, blacks have been discriminated for being a different color, or because of what they do not have, or how they act. Classes of society, loyalty/friendship, and rebellion shows how people can strengthen the race relations between whites and blacks. If the world only breaks free of our hateful chains, and isolated cages, we can see that each of us are no different from one another. We have to open our eyes, take each other for our qualities, not over our skin color, or background.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain

All children have a special place, whether chosen by a conscious decision or not this is a place where one can go to sort their thoughts. Nature can often provide comfort by providing a nurturing surrounding where a child is forced to look within and choices can be made untainted by society. Mark Twain once said “Don’t let school get in the way of your education. ” Twain states that this education which is provided by society, can actually hinder human growth and maturity.

Although a formal education shouldn’t be completely shunned, perhaps true life experience, in society and nature, are a key part of development. In the novel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain throws the curious yet innocent mind of Huck Finn out into a very hypocritical, judgmental, and hostile world, yet Huck has one escape–the Mississippi River constantly flowing nearby. Here nature is presented as a thought provoking environment when experienced alone.

The river is quiet and peaceful place where Huck can revert to examine any predicament he might find himself in: “They went off, and I got aboard the raft, feeling bad and lowThen I thought a minute, and says to myself, hold on,- s’pose you’d a done right and give Jim up; would you felt better than you do now? No, says I, I’d feel bad” (p. 127). Only a few weeks with Jim and still feeling great ambivalence, Huck returns to the river to think. Twain tries here to tell the reader how strong the “mob” really is, and only when totally alone is Huck able to make the morally correct decision.

The natural flowing and calm of the river cause this deep-thought, show! ing how unnatural the collective thought of a society can be. The largest and most obvious test of Huck’s character is his relationship with Jim. The friendship and assistance which he gives to Jim go completely against all that “sivilization” has taught him; at first this concept troubles Huck and causes him a great deal of pain, but over time, through his life experiences and shared times with Jim, Huck crosses the line upheld by the racist South and comes to know Jim as a human being.

Huck is at a point in his life where opinions are formed, and by growing on the river, Huck can stand back from society and form his own. Eventually he goes as far as to risk his life for Jim:”And got to thinking of our trip down the river; and I see Jim before me, all the time, in the day, and in the night-time, sometimes moonlight, sometimes storms, and we a floating along, talking, and singing, and laughing. But somehow I couldn’t see no places to harden me against him, but only the other kindI studied a minute sort of holding my breath, and then I s! s to myself: ‘All right, then, I’ll go to hell'” (pp. 270-271).

After a long and thought-provoking adventure, Huck returns to the raft one final time to decide the fate of his friend. Symbolically, Huck makes the morally correct decision away from all others, thinking on the river. Although it might not be evident to himself, Huck causes the reader to see that “sivilization”, in their treatment of blacks especially, is not civilized at all. Every person Huck and Jim come across seems to just be following someone else blindly, as the whole country were some sort of mob.

In the last few chapters, Tom Sawyer is re-introduced and the reader is left to examine how different environments: “sivilization” and nature (the river), have affected the children’s growth. It is distinctly evident that Huck has turned out to be the one with a clear and intelligent mind, and Tom, although he can regurgitate worthless facts about Louis XVI and Henry VIII, shows no real sign of maturity. “The first time I catched up to Tom, private, I asked him what was his idea, time of the evasion? – what it was he planned to do if the evasion worked out all right and he managed to set a nigger free that was already free before?

And he said, what he had planned in his head, from the start, if we got Jim out, all safe, was for us to run him down the river, on the raft, and have adventures plumb to the mouth” (p. 360). Huck has always thought of Tom as more intelligent than himself, but he cannot understand how Tom could toy with Jim’s life in such a way. For much time, Huck is! without the river and it is though his mind clouds; he follows along with Tom playing a sick game until the end when he is once again threatened with being “sivilized”.

But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because aunt Sally she’s going to adopt me and sivilize me and I can’t stand it. I been there before” (p. 362). Huck’s adventure, if nothing else, has given him a wary eye towards “sivilized” society. When the prospect of settling down with Sally is presented he light’s out for the Territory to distance himself from a restrictive, formal education. Twain ends his novel by setting Huck up for a new experience and personal growth.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn taught an important lesson, one that showed the importance of the self in the maturing process. We saw Huck grow up by having the river as a place of solitude and thought, where he was able to participate in society at times, and also sit back and observe society. Through the child’s eye we see how ignorant and mob-like we can all be. Then nature, peace, and logic are presented in the form of the river where Huck goes to think. Though no concise answer is given, the literature forces the reader to examine their surroundings, and question their leaders.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Relevance of the novels ending

The ending of the novel “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”, by Mark Twain, is very relevant to the themes and ideas of the main body of the novel. Although it has been criticised for being too long winded and being the downfall of this great novel, it is very important in reinforcing the messages put forward in the rest of the novel; the greatest of which is the shortcomings of modern society and the hypocrisy and arrogance, and even stupidity of the people of Mark Twains time.

The argument that Twain seems to put forward time and again in this novel, that the simple people, like the Phelps, the kind niggers like Jim and the uneducated but morally right like Huck are really above the aristocrats and big plantation owners, who are “civilized” and “cultured”, but carry on with pointless feuds, and keep niggers as slaves. These upper-class sorts think that they are far superior and much more important than anybody else, and an example of these and the conformation that they are so arrogant and stupid is Tom Sawyer.

Tom is a friend of Hucks from his old town where he used to live. He comes from a relatively wealthy family and has had a good education and upbringing. He is around the same age as Huck, but we can see the difference between these two, one who is “cultured” and “civilised”, and the other considered to be an outcast, even “feral”. Tom meets Huck at his Aunts house pretending to be him. In turn Tom pretends to be his brother, Sid Sawyer. This way they fool Toms Aunt and are able to focus on one problem; freeing Jim who is being held the Phelps to be a slave.

To Hucks amazement Tom agrees to help him free Jim, which would be to break the law, and because Tom comes from such a good family and is educated and so on, Huck never imagined that he would be willing to help him. However, Huck doesnt realise that Tom isnt breaking the law at all. Jim has been freed without his knowledge, but Tom just plays along to have an adventure. They find that Jim is being held in a small shack, easily opened from the outside, and Jim is shackled by a leg chain to a bed, which can be lifted to release the chain.

Huck devises a simple plan to release Jim so that they can escape together and continue down the river. However, Huck is castigated by Tom for being so simple minded and not thinking up something more imaginative and with “style”. Tom, being well educated and so on, has read many romantic type novels to do with prisoners escaping from jails such as Baron Trenck, Casanova, Benvenuto Chelleeny and Henri IV. He sees an opportunity to make his own great adventure out of this simple problem by making it as difficult as possible for Huck, Jim and himself.

He believes that they should do it in the same manner as it has been done in these books. This type of romantic illusion Tom holds towards Jims escape from captivity exemplifies the way the southern upper class fantasize about the way life should be. Tom lives in a dream world, oblivious to the dangers and problems he is causing to others to satisfy this fantasy. He puts Jim through hell, but Jim plays along because Tom is a white boy and he has learned to do what he is told by white men, no-matter how stupid or pointless it seems.

Tom also puts Huck through a very hard time, who plays along because Tom is well educated and from a good family so he must know how to do it right. Some of the ridiculous thing Tom does are to put a whole lot of snakes and rats and other unpleasant animals in the same room as Jim, because in the books the jails were all vermin infested, so it had to be this way here too. Also Jim had to carve a diary of his “stay here in prison for 37 years” into a granite rock. Although Jim couldnt write, Tom wrote the words and Jim just copied them. Then Tom insisted that Jim needed to be dug out, even though the door was easily opened.

At first he demanded that they use case-knives to do it, but eventually gave up and instead used picks and shovels, but called them case knives to keep up the illusion for Tom. Then he said that they needed to saw the leg of the bed off to let Jim free of it, and then eat the sawdust, even though the leg of the bed could easily be lifted up and the chain slipped off. The list goes on. They continue on in this way for a considerable amount of time, although to anybody else it seems ludicrous; however, Jim and Huck are helpless to do anything about it because of their social status.

Jim is a nigger, and Huck is a poor, uneducated boy. This situation symbolizes what is happening everywhere else in the Southern states in Mark Twains time. Niggers and the poor had no social status, while the rich and “cultured” controlled everything, irrespectively if it they were doing it intelligently or just plain stupidly. Huck does not totally agree with the way Tom is doing things, but plays along for the sake of keeping peace. This happens earlier in the novel with the King and the Duke. Huck knows that they are frauds but keeps quiet to avoid any trouble.

He states, “When I start in to steal a nigger, I aint no ways particular how its done so its done. What I want is my niggerand I dont give a dead rat what the authorities think about it nuther”. He is indifferent as to how its done, as long as its done. Richard P. Adams makes this statement about the ending of the book; “It is an immense expression of contempt for adult society, so easily and so thoroughly hoodwinked by a pair of audacious children; and the more absurd Toms antics become, the more the satire is built up” #1.

In the end the consequences of Toms stupidity is that he gets shot in the leg which very nearly costs him his life, however, any of them could easily have been shot and killed in the process. Because of Toms injury, Huck and Jim need to take him to the doctor, and soon after are caught and taken back to the Phelpss farm, where the whole thing is explained to Aunt Sally who nearly has a nervous breakdown. Finally the truth emerges that Jim has been freed, and is no longer a slave, and Huck is exposed and Tom is exposed by Aunt Polly who comes down the river to see what is going on.

Then Aunt Sally proposes to adopt Huck, but he has already decided that he can never be civilized, so he makes up his mind to light out for the territories. This is an important technique that Twain uses to try and indirectly point blame at anybody, but it is obvious to the reader. Huck does not decide to leave because he thinks that society is rotten, he decides to leave because he thinks that he is the one that is rotten, and cannot be civilized, so he decides to go somewhere far away from civilization.

Why Huckleberry Finn Crossed the River

During the latter part of the 19th century, the American public was still engrossed with the seemingly innocent ideals of romantic novels. Particularly in the South, where chivalrous acts were still commonplace, children and adults alike enjoyed reading the exciting exploits of such stories as Ivanhoe by Walter Scott. Despite its popularity, romantic literature was deemed worthless by many authors like Mark Twain who decided that it was not only useless in modern society, but also harmful and dangerous.

Consequently, Twain wrote The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in a very realistic fashion with even the dialogue between characters matching the intended historical period. However, despite his realist biases, Twain allows the novel to develop romantic aspects by exposing the natural and uncivilized tendencies of the main character, Huckleberry Finn, in order to eventually show the folly in exclusively adhering to a romantic style of writing and living.

Immediately introducing the reader to the most natural and unaffected persona in the entire novel, Twain establishes his intent of trying to present a reality that is predominantly realistic but unavoidably romantic. After cleverly escaping from his abusive father and the choking etiquette of the Widow Douglas, Huckleberry Finn, the young protagonist in the novel, spends the morning relaxing in the grass and the cool shade thinking about things, and feeling rested and ruther comfortable and satisfied with his decision to run away (36).

Entirely intentional, Twain juxtaposes Hucks dissatisfaction with society with his intrinsic connection to a cool summer morning. Hucks romanticized return to nature is almost like a biblical migration to the Promised Land, with society representing Egypt and Jackson Island the land of milk and honey. Interestingly enough, it almost seems as though Huck, in declaring that he does not want to be nowhere else than the island, has reversed the detrimental aging process that threatens to sivilize him, erasing all the innocence and goodness that naturally comes with childhood (49,1).

His vehement desire to feel lazy and comfortable and very well satisfied combined with his longing for the past and preference for the uncivilized perfectly parallels that of the Romantic Movement (36,37). Furthering his use of society as a disservice to human nature while still adhering to the realist boundaries of a young boy, Twain supplements Hucks metaphorical rebirth with a more specific and physical manifestation of freedom.

While [l]iving in a house and sleeping in a bed, Huck is forced to wear them new clothes again, and [he can not] do nothing but sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up like a prisoner in jail (15,1). Confined in societys chains, Huck feels compelled to cast off his bondage and return to a more natural and uncivilized existence. Ultimately finding this romantic solace while he and Jim float down the river, he remarks that he feel[s] mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft (116).

Although the river itself is confined by its banks, it serves as a modern Eden for Huck, who is always naked, day and night (118) and finds the lonesomeness of the river [to be] kind of lazy (118) and unfettered by rigid societal institutions. Thus, Twain uses Hucks primitive shedding of clothing to symbolize the romantics revolt against the austerities of modern society. In doing so, he juxtaposes the realism of a young boys natural urges with the romanticism of the river to develop a permissible combination of the two most influential schools of literature during the 19th century without compromising his own realist values.

Contrary to the literary style that he himself is credited with establishing, Mark Twain allows the novel to develop particular romantic elements, which contrast with the characters ordinary and realist qualities. By successfully integrating two seemingly opposite styles of writing, he not only disproves the impossibility of achieving success with such an unlikely pairing, but also arouses the curiosity of the reader into why a novel with such a dualistic nature was written.

Perhaps to show that realism can not exist without a certain amount of romanticism or that romantic traits are inherent to the human spirit, Twain does at least illuminate his obvious disgust with romanticized adventure novels. He is clearly satirizing the more extreme forms of romanticism when he includes the image of the sinking ferryboat that is appropriately named the Walter Scott or when he mocks the institution of Southern chivalry by explicitly illustrating the harm and danger that may arise from asinine tradition like the feud between the Grangerfords and Shepardsons.

But his satire reaches its climax when he describes Tom Sawyers nave conformity to romantic novels that ultimately causes agony and pain for Jim. However, it seems as though Twain, by giving Huck a somewhat romantic personality, tries to convey that a happy medium may be reached where the necessary realism that a novel must contain can pleasantly blend with a moderate amount of romanticism.

In the Style of Twain

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is said to be  the source from which all great American literature has stemmed (Smith 127). This is in part attributed to Mark Twain’s ability to use humor and satire, as well as incorporating serious subject matter into his work. Throughout the novel Twain takes on the serious issue of Huck’s moral dilemma. One such issue which is particularly important in the novel is pointed out by Smith: He swears and smokes, but he has a set of ethics all his own.

He believes that slaves belong to their rightful owners, yet in his honest gratitude toward his friend Jim, he helps him to escape the bonds of slavery. 181) This is something that tears at Huck throughout the novel and helps Twain show how complex Huck’s character really is. The recognition of complexity in Huck’s character enabled Twain to do full justice to the conflict of vernacular values and the dominant culture (Smith 125). Throughout Huck and Jim’s adventures Huck is constantly playing practical jokes on Jim who seems to take them all in stride.

But unknown to the reader Twain uses this aspect as another notch in Huck’s moral growth. Critic Frank McGill points this out: Huck’s humble apology for the prank he plays on Jim in the fog is striking vidence of growth in Huck’s moral insight. It leads naturally to the next chapter in which Twain causes Huck to face up for the first time to the fact he is helping a slave escape. (119) Another serious issue addressed by Twain is the abuse that was given to Huck by his father. Huck was kidnaped from the Widow Douglas by his father who had heard of his inheritance.

Huck’s father then took him to a cabin far away in the woods where he kept the boy a prisoner, beating him and half starving him. Twain tells us how Huck felt about life with his father: Before long Huck began to wonder why he had even liked living with the widow. With his father he could smoke and swear all he wanted, and his life would have been quiet pleasant if it had not been for all of the constant beatings. (156) Huck would soon after grow tired of the beatings and fakes his death to escape the cabin.

The humorous side of Twain is probably what he is most well known for. Humor is considered an art form by many writers. Jane Bernadette states the difference between humor and comical stories: The humorous story is strictly a work of art high and delicate and only an artist can tell it; but no art is necessary in telling the comic and the witty story; anybody can do it. The art of telling a humorous story-understand, I mean by word of mouth, not print-was created in America and has remained at home. (159) Twain satirizes the south for its seriousness on certain matters.

I think one of the most notably southern traits of Mark Twain’s humor is its power of seeing the fun of southern seriousness(Bernadette 175). Twain also satirizes the society of the day’ by describing the colonel Grangerford as the symbol of southern aristocracy(245). Twain also goes on to satirize the south’s racism. One such instance is pointed out in the novel when Aunt Polly hears of a steamboat explosion. Good gracious is anyone hurt? No, it just killed a negro (209). Religious satire is another aspect that Twain uses.

An easy illustration of this is the Widow’s attempt to teach Huck religious principles while she persists on keeping slaves. Huck’s principles of morality make him more Christian’ than the Widow even though he takes no interest in her lifeless principles(Bernadette 288). Twain’s humor has been mistaken by some to be racist or politically incorrect. The humor of Mark Twain contains a sense of the incongruous which frontiersmen felt in a region where civilization and uncultivated nature come face to face (McGill 95).

Adventures Of Huck FinnBanning From School

My essay deals with banning the novel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from high school reading lists, and why this behavior is inappropriate. Specifically, it addresses the following question: Columnist James J. Kilpatrick wrote that Huck Finn is “a fun book for white boys to read… For black children, I have come to realize, it is a brutal slap in the face. ” He condemns the book because of its use of the word “nigger. ” Many school districts have banned this book for the same reason. What are your views on this subject? Since the Civil War, racism has been a very delicate issue with the American public.

Whereas some people have tried to transgress this issue, pretending that race no longer plays a significant role in our country, other people still believe that there are serious racial dilemmas in the United States. I am one these people. However, unlike some, I do not believe this problem can be solved by avoiding or sugarcoating the issue of race, as James L. Kilpatrick and several schools appear to be doing. In the novel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain presents an adventure story filled with deeper meanings and controversial topics, two in particular being slavery and racism.

Despite the usage of the word “nigger” and the stereotypical portrayal of African Americans, I do not think schools have any justification in banning this book from reading lists. Mark Twain wrote Huck Finn during the Reconstruction period in the south, at a time when most Americans wanted to forget all about the institution of slavery and its consequences. However, Twain set the time period of this novel prior to the Civil War when slavery was at its peak. Thus, the racist views he included in the book mirrored the attitudes of most southerners during this time.

Those that say that Huck Finn is inappropriate to be read in schools are in effect saying that a portion of United States history should not be taught in the classroom. Although slavery was one of the most horrific periods in our countries history, to make sure nothing of its caliber ever occurs again, we must make sure every high school student is aware of the ramifications of such practices. By banning an important work in U. S. history, these schools are ignoring the racial sentiments of this time period simply because the language in Huck Finn may not be appropriate.

In addition, reading this novel hopefully invokes in people a sense of shame for the mistakes of our ancestors. Though the novels language may offend some, it is Africans Americans and Caucasians alike who are offended. Nobody likes to look at the word “nigger” nor hear it used, however, we must accept that this word was at one time considered appropriate language. Reading the novel, I was repulsed by this word and my stomach churned as I read about the ignorance and hate stored within the hearts of characters.

However, I enjoyed reading this novel and gained a new erspective of life prior to the Civil War. I think that when schools ban the novel Huck Finn from their curriculum that they are in effect failing their students. Huck Finn is an excellent piece of literature, rich with history, description, and unique perspectives. By not allowing this book to be read in schools is like shutting students out from a valuable learning experience. Yes, they can still read the novel in their spare time, but they are not afforded the privilege to discuss this book openly in class or gain new perspectives into its meaning.

In addition, when African Americans refuse to read this novel they are depriving themselves of a experiencing a brilliant piece of literature. I think that until you try something, you cant attack it, or else you are showing your ignorance and stubborn nature. Twain did not write this novel to belittle the African American race or to promote the institution of slavery. Twain wrote this novel to depict life in the South prior to the Civil War. Along with this depiction are the bias and racist attitudes prevalent in South at this time. For all those school administrators who say that the language and ideology of

Twains writing is offensive, well, maybe Twain wanted to offend people with this novel. Maybe he wanted to offend them so much that they would come to the realization that individuals should not conform to societys standards, one of these standards being slavery. Until someone is offended, status quo doesnt change. Maybe its about time that we remove the blindfold from our nations youth and stop trying to be politically correct. Maybe its about time that kids are exposed to the true horror of racism and prejudice so to detour them from repeating fatal mistakes.

Samuel Clemens novel, The Adventures of HuckleBerry Finn

Throughout the Mark Twain (a. k. a. Samuel Clemens) novel, The Adventures of HuckleBerry Finn, a plain and striking point of view is expressed by the author. His point of view is that of a cynic; he looks upon civilized man as a merciless, cowardly, hypocritical savage, without want of change, nor ability to effect such change. Thus, one of Mark Twain’s main purposes in producing this work seems clear: he wishes to bring to attention some of man’s often concealed shortcomings.

While the examples of Mark Twain’s cynic commentaries on human nature an be found in great frequency all through the novel, several examples seem to lend themselves well to a discussion of this sarcastic view. In the beginning of the novel, it would seem that both Huck Finn and Jim are trapped in some way and wishing to escape. For Huck, it is the violence and tyranny of his drunken father. Kept in a veritable prison, Huck wishes desperately to escape.

Jim feels the need to escape after hearing that his owner, Miss Watson, wishes to sell him down the river-a change in owners that could only be for the worse. As they escape separately and rejoin by hance at an island along the river, they find themselves drawn to get as far as possible from their home. Their journey down the river sets the stage for most of Mark Twain’s comments about man and society. It is when they stop off at various towns along the river that various human character flaws always seem to come out.

Examples of this would include the happenings after the bringing on of the Duke and King. These two con artists would execute the most preposterous of schemes to relieve unsuspecting townspeople of their cash. The game of the King pretending to be a reformed marauder-turned-missionary t the tent meeting showed that people are gullible and often easily led, particularly when in groups and subjected to peer pressure. The execution of the Royal Nonesuch showed another instance of people in society being subject to manipulation.

The fact that, after being taken by a poor show they sent rave reviews of it to their friends to avoid admitting they had been conned showed that people in groups are ever afraid of losing status, and will do nearly anything to protect such. Both the King and the Duke, also, showed such a ridiculous degree of corruptness that it is difficult o believe that all humans aren’t at least somewhat evil. Another point made by the author is that of most men being basically cowards. A good example of this was when Col.

Sherburn shot the drunk Boggs and the townsfolk came after Sherburn to lynch him. After Sherburn, one man with only a shotgun, held off the immense mob and made them disperse, it was obvious that no individual really had the courage to go through with the lynching. The idea that people are basically savages, confined for the moment by society, is shown in more than one instance, such as when the group was reparing to hang Huck and the King over their plot to defraud the daughters, or, more obvious, in the war between the Shephardsons and the Grangerfords.

The aspect of people being basically hypocrites is seen at the beginning when Miss Watson displays a degree of hypocriticality on insisting that Huck follow the Widow and become civilized, while at the same time deciding to sell Jim into a hard life down the river. A final point seems to be that Man is continually fleeing from something. At the end, Jim and Huck found themselves at the end of their journey, either having anything left to run from as Huck’s father was dead and Jim was a free man.

It would seem, then that Huck and Jim had run a thousand miles down the river and ended up where they had started from. From the above examples, one can see some of the author’s point in producing ‘Huck Finn. ‘ It is apparent that Mark Twain wishes society to realize its shortcomings and the limitations imposed by human nature. He realizes that people will not change, but feels that they should be aware of who they are, of what comes with this thing we call humanity. That is Mark twain’s main purpose in writing this novel.

Rejection of Civilization in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

In the novel Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Huck decides to reject civilization. At the end of the story Aunt Sally wants to civilize him, but he refuses. He says “I reckon I got to light out for the territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally, she’s going to adopt me civilize me, and I can’t stand it. I’ve been there before. ” Huck decides to choose against society because of all the harsh realities that he has seen first hand. Huck’s early doubts of the civilized world all started with Pap.

During most of his childhood, Huck had been abused both physically and entally by his redneck guardian Pap. This man had walked into and out of Huck’s life on numerous occasions. He was the only father figure in Huck’s life and failed miserably at the job. Pap was the first representation of civilization to Huck and it was a sour one. It was also civilization that awarded custody of Huck to Pap. He had been screwed over too many times by the civilized world, and that was the main reason he decided to leave home. Huck ran from his troubles at home down the Mississippi River.

The river is where he found his sanctuary. Jim and Huck were always safe, independent, and free out on the raft. It seemed that every time they would go to shore, something negative involving civilization would arise. The dark side of human nature and suffering would meet up with the two of them. They always stumbled upon the under-belly of society. The symbol of human suffering was the Grangerfords family. When Huck found himself in front of their farm after the ship wreck, his first impression was a positive one. He thought that the Grangerfords were a pleasant, normal family.

However the dark secrets that existed within the family could make skin crawl. The paintings and writings made by Emmeline Grangerford, who died when she was fourteen, are of rather morbid subjects. She was a messed up child that came from a bizarre, disturbed family. They had a feudal war going with another family where constant deaths and suffering took place. Just before Huck leaves, his age equivalent and friend Buck, gets shot in cold blood. Just another exemplary performance of this so-called civilization that Huck is supposed to return to.

The king and duke however were the icing on the cake. They represented the greed and fraud that Huck especially hates about society. From the moment that Huck and Jim met up with the king and duke, the voyage took a turn for the worse. These two con-men were not only thieves and murderers, but they also ended up selling Jim as a runaway slave. After that, the two tried to swindle a couple of innocent girls out of their family fortune. This hanase act is what made Huck feel the worst about people in general.

The quote “It was enough to make a body ashamed of the human race,” (162) showed that Huck was embarrassed to be a human. He could never go back to a civilization which he had no respect for. According to Huck, the morals of society were up the creek. Huckleberry Finn was dealt a raw deal in life. It started with his abusive father Pap. Stability is the most important aspect of childhood and Huck didn’t have that. Pap kept leaving and coming back into his life and even went as low as to attempt to take Huck’s money.

He decides to run away and make his voyage down the river. Every time that they go to shore, some reject of civilization is who they would run into. Aunt Sally wants him to come back with her and civilize him, but based on his experiences, Huck just can’t let that happen. He needs to roam free. The only thing that Pap was never able to steal from his son was his imagination. He needs to be able to think freely and to explore. Huck wants his youth and innocence and he feels that civilization would take that away from him.

Matt’s Huck Finn Analysis

You didn’t want to come. The average man don’t like trouble and danger. You don’t like trouble and danger. But if only half a man-like you Buck Harkness, there shouts Lynch him! Lynch him! ‘ you’re afraid to back down – afraid you’ll be found out to be what you are – cowards! ” In the novel the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain expresses his own views of society (using speeches, thoughts, and sayings such as this one). Huck Finn is the narrator so it enables Twain to use Huck’s thoughts and feelings as his own. Twain expresses his thoughts on a variety of subjects and his dislikes about them.

Huck doesn’t seem to fit in Twain’s groups of society so he is the perfect character to use as the narrator. Twain expresses his negative views of different types of society like slavery, groups of people or mob mentality, and Huck himself, through the characters and their actions. Twain chows just how white people felt towards black people or slaves back then. He uses Jim as a main source for this. Through Huck’s feelings towards Jim he can get his point across to the reader. Huck has mixed emotions about Jim and slavery.

He knows Jim should be free and wants him to be, but because of the society he lives in he feels that it is wrong. Huck and Jim are good friends and companions throughout the book, but even Huck says, “He’s my nigger” in one point in the story. The constant use of the word “nigger” also shows societies feeling towards black back then. Back then it was a common word used by everyone, now the word “nigger” is used as a put-down or racial slur and is prohibited. Twain uses these techniques to show us how society felt about blacks even though it was wrong.

Twain also expresses his views towards people when they get into a group or mob. This was Twain’s most expressed comment about society. Twain expresses in many different occasions just how gullible, stupid, following, and cowardly people in groups are. Like the time the King and Duke put on the Shakespearean play for the townspeople. The first crowd came willingly and when they discovered that they had got ripped off instead of revealing the two as fakes they went and told the rest of the town to go. So the gullible second crowed went and got ripped off just as the first ones did.

Then both the crowds came the second night in order to tar and feather the men but the King and the Duke ran out the back before the show started (lets just chalk this one down under stupidity). This was the best example Twain uses to express how stupid and gullible people are. The next example is when Buck Harkness raises the mob to lynch Sherburn. This showed us how cowardly the people were and how they would follow anyone that was half a man. Twain’s depiction of Huckleberry Finn was very different from the rest of society.

Huck was his own man and had his own opinions on slavery and other ideas. Huck knew, even though no one else did, that slavery was wrong. He was brought up to believe in slavery but his conscience wouldn’t let him accept it, especially with Jim. Huck disobeyed all authority. The only exception was when Tom Sawyer was around. Huck did whatever Tom said and liked to do it. Tom was smarter than Huck but he still wasn’t all knowledgeable and lied to make everything his way. This just goes to show that even though Huck isn’t like the rest of society he still wasn’t perfect.

Twain’s use of Huck to express his negative feelings about slavery, groups of people, and Huck himself, proved to be very effective. He kept emphasizing the importance of these thoughts in numerous places throughout the book. He got all of his views on society across to me and I am not the smartest when it comes to literature. “But I reckon I got to light out for the territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she’s going to adopt me and civilize me, and I can’t stand it. I been there before. ”

Challenge to Slavery

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn In recent years, there has been increasing discussion of the seemingly racist ideas expressed by Mark Twain in Huckleberry Finn. In some extreme cases the novel has even been banned by public school systems and censored by public libraries. The basis for these censorship campaigns has been the depiction of one of the main characters in Huckleberry Finn, Jim, a black slave. Jim, is a “typical” black slave who runs away from his “owner,” Miss Watson. At several points in the novel, Jim’s character is described to the reader, and some people have looked upon the characterization as racist.

However, before one begins to censor a novel it is important to separate the ideas of the author from the ideas’ of his characters. It is also important not to take a novel at face value and to “read between the lines” in order to capture the underlying themes of a novel. If one were to do this in relation to Huckleberry Finn, one would, without doubt, realize that it is not racist and is even anti-slavery. Through society, Hucks father and Huck, Mark Twain reveals a challenge to slavery. On a superficial level Huckleberry Finn might appear to be racist.

The first time the reader meets Jim he is given a very negative description of Jim. The reader is told that Jim is illiterate, childlike, not very bright and extremely superstitious. However, it is important not to lose sight of who is giving this description and of whom it is being given. Although Huck is not a racist child, he has been raised by extremely racist individuals who have, even if only subconsciously, ingrained some feelings of bigotry into his mind. It is also important to remember that this description, although it is quite saddening, was probably accurate.

Jim and the millions of other slaves in the South were not permitted any formal education, were never allowed any independent thought and were constantly mistreated and abused. Twain is merely portraying by way of Jim, a very realistic slave raised in the South during that time period. To say that Twain is racist because of his desire for historical accuracy is absurd. Despite the few incidences in which Jim’s description might be misconstrued as racist, there are many points in the novel where Twain through Huck, voices his extreme opposition to the slave trade and racism.

In chapter six, Huck’s father fervently objects to the governments granting of suffrage to an educated black professor. Twain wants the reader to see the absurdity in this statement. Huck’s father believes that he is superior to this black professor simply because of the color of his skin. In Chapter 15 the reader is presented with a very caring and father-like Jim who becomes very worried when he loses his best friend, Huck in a deep fog, contradicting the original “childlike” description of Jim. Twain is pointing out the connection that has been made between Huck and Jim – a connection that does not exist between a man and his property.

When Huck first meets Jim on the Island he makes a monumental decision, not to turn Jim in. Two opposing forces, the force of society and the force of his personal conscience confront him. Many times, throughout the novel, Huck comes very close to rationalizing Jim’s slavery. However, he is never able to see a reason why this man, who has become one of his only friends, should be a slave. Through this internal struggle, Twain expresses his opinions of the absurdity of slavery and the importance of following one’s personal conscience before the laws of society.

By the end of the novel, Huck and the reader have come to understand that Jim is not someone’s property and an inferior man, but an equal. Throughout the novel society’s voice is heard through Huck. The racist and hateful contempt, which existed at the time, is at many times present. But, it is vital for the reader to recognize these ideas as society’s and to recognize that Twain throughout the novel disputes these ideas. Twain brings out into the open the ugliness of society and causes the reader to challenge the original description of Jim. In his subtle manner, he creates not an apology for slavery but a challenge to it.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a novel about a young boy

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, is a novel about a young boy’s coming of age in the Missouri of the mid-1800’s. The main character, Huckleberry Finn, spends much time in the novel floating down the Mississippi River on a raft with a runaway slave named Jim. Before he does so, however, Huck spends some time in the fictional town of St. Petersburg where a number of people attempt to influence him. Before the novel begins, Huck Finn has led a life of absolute freedom.

His drunken and often missing father has never paid much ttention to him; his mother is dead and so, when the novel begins, Huck is not used to following any rules. The book’s opening finds Huck living with the Widow Douglas and her sister, Miss Watson. Both women are fairly old and are really somewhat incapable of raising a rebellious boy like Huck Finn. Nevertheless, they attempt to make Huck into what they believe will be a better boy. Specifically, they attempt, as Huck says, to “civilize” him.

This process includes making Huck go to school, teaching him various religious facts, and making him act in a way that the women ind socially acceptable. Huck, who has never had to follow many rules in his life, finds the demands the women place upon him constraining and the life with them lonely. As a result, soon after he first moves in with them, he runs away. He soon comes back, but, even though he becomes somewhat comfortable with his new life as the months go by, Huck never really enjoys the life of manners, religion, and education that the Widow and her sister impose upon him.

Huck believes he will find some freedom with Tom Sawyer. Tom is a boy of Huck’s age who promises Huck and other boys of the town a life f adventure. Huck is eager to join Tom Sawyer’s Gang because he feels that doing so will allow him to escape the somewhat boring life he leads with the Widow Douglas. Unfortunately, such an escape does not occur. Tom Sawyer promises much-robbing stages, murdering and ransoming people, kidnapping beautiful women-but none of this comes to pass.

Huck finds out too late that Tom’s adventures are imaginary: that raiding a caravan of “A-rabs” really means terrorizing young children on a Sunday school picnic, that stolen “joolry” is nothing more than turnips or rocks. Huck is disappointed that the adventures Tom promises are not real and so, along with the other members, he resigns from the gang. Another person who tries to get Huckleberry Finn to change is Pap, Huck’s father.

Pap is one of the most astonishing figures in all of American literature as he is completely antisocial and wishes to undo all of the civilizing effects that the Widow and Miss Watson have attempted to instill in Huck. Pap is a mess: he is unshaven; his hair is uncut and hangs like vines in front of his face; his skin, Huck says, is white like a fish’s belly or like a tree toad’s. Pap’s savage appearance reflects his feelings as he demands that Huck quit school, stop reading, and avoid church.

Huck is able to stay away from Pap for a while, but Pap kidnaps Huck three or four months after Huck starts to live with the Widow and takes him to a lonely cabin deep in the Missouri woods. Here, Huck enjoys, once again, the freedom that he had prior to the beginning of the book. He can smoke, “laze around,” swear, and, in general, do what he wants to do. However, as he did with the Widow and with Tom, Huck begins to become dissatisfied with this life. Pap is “too handy with the hickory” and Huck soon realizes that he will have to escape from the cabin if he wishes to remain alive.

As a result of his concern, Huck makes it appear as if he is killed in the cabin while Pap is away, and leaves to go to a remote island in the Mississippi River, Jackson’s Island. It is after he leaves his father’s cabin that Huck joins yet another important influence in his life: Miss Watson’s slave, Jim. Prior to Huck’s leaving, Jim has been a minor character in the novel-he has been shown being fooled by Tom Sawyer and telling Huck’s fortune. Huck finds Jim on Jackson’s Island because the slave has run away-he has overheard a conversation that he will soon be sold to New Orleans.

Soon after joining Jim on Jackson’s Island, Huck begins to realize that Jim has more talents and intelligence than Huck has been aware of. Jim knows “all kinds of signs” about the future, people’s personalities, and weather forecasting. Huck finds this kind of information necessary as he and Jim drift down the Mississippi on a raft. As important, Huck feels a comfort with Jim that he has not felt with the other major characters in the novel. With Jim, Huck can enjoy the best aspects of his earlier influences.

As does the Widow, Jim allows Huck security, but Jim is not as confining as is the Widow. Like Tom Sawyer, Jim is intelligent but his intelligence is not as intimidating or as imaginary as is Tom’s. As does Pap, Jim allows Huck freedom, but he does it in a loving, rather than an uncaring, fashion. Thus, early, in their relationship on Jackson’s Island, Huck says to Jim, “This is nice. I wouldn’t want to be nowhere else but here. ” This feeling is in marked contrast with Huck’s feelings concerning other eople in the early part of the novel where he always is uncomfortable and wishes to leave them.

At the conclusion of chapter 11 in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck and Jim are forced to leave Jackson’s Island because Huck discovers that people are looking for the runaway slave. Prior to leaving, Huck tells Jim, “They’re after us. ” Clearly, the people are after Jim, but Huck has already identified with Jim and has begun to care for him. This stated empathy shows that the two outcasts will have a successful and rewarding friendship as they drift down the river as the novel continues.

Adventures Of Huck Finn And Civilization

In the book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck rejects “sivilized” life. He dreads the rules and conformities of society such as religion, school, and anything else that will eventually make him civilized. He feels cramped in his new surroundings at the Widow Douglass house. He would rather be in his old rags and sugar-hogshead because he was free and satisfied. He felt out of place when he tried being “sivilized” because he grew up fending for himself and to him it felt really lonely. Huck Finn grew up living in the woods and retty much raised himself because his pap was a drunk.

He never had a civilized lifestyle and he believed that his way of living was good enough for him. He was free to do what ever he liked and that is how he learned to live. He did not believe in school because all you need to know to live is not found in a book that you read at school. He believed that you learned by living out in the wild. Huck would rather be an individual than conform to society. Huck would rather follow his heart then his head and because of this Huck is ruled as a bad person ecause in society your suppose to use your head.

Huck is being penalized for his beliefs and he does not want to be apart of a lifestyle that does not support his ways. For instance his choice not to turn in Jim shows that Huck understands why Jim is escaping. Huck sees Jim as a friend not as a slave and so he truly is able to see that societys way of treaty Jim is wrong. Huck is portrayed as a boy who sees life at face value and not by the set”standards” of the “sivilized” society. The rejection of the”sivilized” lifestyles shows that Huck does not agree with it rules.

Because of this, he is able to see life from different perspectives. He can sympathize with all the class in society. He learns to figure out what is morally correct and wrong. Through out his journey down the river, Huck is able to learn more about himself and others. His adventures has taught him more than he will ever learn just by reading books. Huck is able to live a great life just by reacting o situations as they come along. Huck is better off not living a”sivilized” lifestyle because that is how he learns.

Hucks rejection of a”sivilized” life can be seen as being rebellious, but as you read more and more about Hucks adventures, you come to the realization that this has helped Huck to become a well rounded person. Huck is a practical and realistic person who grows more and more as he deals with every situation he is put in, but during his time, it was not right for a child to be on his own because they are oo young to know anything and they need guidance through school and religion.

Even though Huck is young, he has learned a lot by reading and by self-study. Huck believes in being free so he can able to adjust to situations rather than living a set life. Huck learns without the help of school and other forms that will eventually make him “sivilized”and he intends to keep it that way and therefore he runs away from the “sivilized” society. Huck learns from his actions and mistakes and not from others and that is how he grows mentally and physically.

Adventures Of Huck Finn By Twain

When children are born into the world they are completely free and uncontaminated from outside influences and ideas but as life continues they grow and are affected by society, their environment, and personal aspirations. All of these reasons cause people and society to react in certain ways when confronted with particular situations and people. Often the reactions to these confrontations are based mainly on morality, yet no always as proven in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by the fictional writer, Mark Twain.

Huckleberry Finn, a young man who has experienced and survived great obstacles in his young ears, shaped his beliefs and morals but was capable of undergoing a considerable change in both mind and heart with the help of his run away slave, Jim. Jim and Huck had a relationship, which was transformed through time and trust, but always had the reminder that one was white and the other was black.

This was a major influence on Hucks behavior towards Jim but through the progression of the book Hucks attitude and respect towards Jim increases considerably after Huck self-evaluates himself and society and begins to focus on what is truly important but not always right. Huck is a strong-willed, free-spirited youth who attempts to portray himself as a bad boy but often finds himself doing just the opposite; however, several times he causes negative situations which affects himself and people around him.

When Jim and Huck find each other after escaping their homes, they continue their journey down the river together. One night Jim and Huck separate on the river because of the fog but Huck finds Jim asleep after a few hours of searching for each other. When Jim wakes Huck attempts to tell him that it was all a dream because they had ever been separated and there was never any fog. After lying so sufficiently for all his life, Huck never considering how his lies affected a person and especially a friendship until Jim told him.

When I got all wore out wid work, en wid de callin for you, en went to sleep, my heart wuz mos broke bekase you wuz los, en I didnt kyer no mo what become er me en de raf. En when I wake up en fine you back agin, all safe en soun, de tears come, en I could a got down on my knees en kiss yo foot, Is so thankful. En all you wuz thinkin bout wuz how you could make a fool uv ole Jim wid a ie. Dat truck dah is trash; en trash is what people dat puts dirt on de head er day frens en makes em ashamed. Twain, 83)

This was a turning point for both Huck and Jims relationship because Huck realizes for the first time that someone actually loves and cares about him and his well being. As a result, Huck apologizes to Jim, which shows that Huck now posses respect for him even though he is black. Through a misfortunate lie and situation trust and love was rewarded to both runways. As Huck and Jim proceed down river they encounter umerous people and difficult circumstances but always remain together as their relationship and trust develop.

In chapter 31 Huck returns to the raft to discover that Jim is gone and that the two frauds, which they had been traveling with, had sold him for forty dollars. Huck contemplates what actions he should take, whether he should allow Jim to be returned to his owner or save him, but as Huck reminisces about Jim and all he had brought into his life he makes a decision rapidly; he was going to save his friend.

[He] do everything he could hink of for me, and how good he always was; and at last I struck the time I saved him by telling the men we had smallpox aboard, and he was so grateful, and said I was the best friend old Jim had in the world, and the only one hes got nowAll right, then Ill go to hell. (Twain, 206) This concludes that the division between Jim and Huck has become so minuet that it no longer influences Hucks decision. He was not going to stand-by and witness his only true friend and person who cared for him to be taken away without a fight, even if it meant his after life of peace in heaven.

It is quite obvious that Huck transformed tremendously through the novel. He began as a self-concerned child who took part in foolish make believe games, which he never enjoyed because he had seen and experienced the real world and was not capable of replacing it with a make-believe world. He decides, that all that stuff was only just one of Tom Sawyers lies. (Twain, 16) Jim was not as much able to introduce, but generate, trust, love, and morals into him, which he already possessed but needed the help from an outside force.

In the beginning of the novel Huck viewed Jim as a much lower, uneducated, and foolish black slave, but soon those stereotypes were almost deteriorated as a man with feelings and hopes replaced them. Unlike Mark Twain who still possessed the same perspectives of blacks, allowed the voice of the opposing society to voice their opinions through Huck and his actions. Hucks choices were not always correct because he caused others to be put in great danger put he learned from his mistakes, mostly through Jim, and was able to mature and separate what is important in life and what is not and make his decisions based on those aspects.

Samuel Clemens The Adventures of HuckleBerry Finn

Throughout the Mark Twain (a. k. a. Samuel Clemens) novel, The Adventures of HuckleBerry Finn, a plain and striking point of view is expressed by the author. His point of view is that of a cynic; he looks upon civilized man as a merciless, cowardly, hypocritical savage, without want of change, nor ability to effect such change. Thus, one of Mark Twain’s main purposes in producing this work seems clear: he wishes to bring to attention some of man’s often concealed shortcomings.

While the examples of Mark Twain’s cynic commentaries on human nature an be found in great frequency all through the novel, several examples seem to lend themselves well to a discussion of this sarcastic view. In the beginning of the novel, it would seem that both Huck Finn and Jim are trapped in some way and wishing to escape. For Huck, it is the violence and tyranny of his drunken father. Kept in a veritable prison, Huck wishes desperately to escape.

Jim feels the need to escape after hearing that his owner, Miss Watson, wishes to sell him down the river-a change in owners that could only be for the worse. As they escape separately and rejoin by hance at an island along the river, they find themselves drawn to get as far as possible from their home. Their journey down the river sets the stage for most of Mark Twain’s comments about man and society. It is when they stop off at various towns along the river that various human character flaws always seem to come out.

Examples of this would include the happenings after the bringing on of the Duke and King. These two con artists would execute the most preposterous of schemes to relieve unsuspecting townspeople of their cash. The game of the King pretending to be a reformed marauder-turned-missionary t the tent meeting showed that people are gullible and often easily led, particularly when in groups and subjected to peer pressure. The execution of the Royal Nonesuch showed another instance of people in society being subject to manipulation.

The fact that, after being taken by a poor show they sent rave reviews of it to their friends to avoid admitting they had been conned showed that people in groups are ever afraid of losing status, and will do nearly anything to protect such. Both the King and the Duke, also, showed such a ridiculous degree of corruptness that it is difficult o believe that all humans aren’t at least somewhat evil. Another point made by the author is that of most men being basically cowards. A good example of this was when Col.

Sherburn shot the drunk Boggs and the townsfolk came after Sherburn to lynch him. After Sherburn, one man with only a shotgun, held off the immense mob and made them disperse, it was obvious that no individual really had the courage to go through with the lynching. The idea that people are basically savages, confined for the moment by society, is shown in more than one instance, such as when the group was reparing to hang Huck and the King over their plot to defraud the daughters, or, more obvious, in the war between the Shephardsons and the Grangerfords.

The aspect of people being basically hypocrites is seen at the beginning when Miss Watson displays a degree of hypocriticality on insisting that Huck follow the Widow and become civilized, while at the same time deciding to sell Jim into a hard life down the river. A final point seems to be that Man is continually fleeing from something. At the end, Jim and Huck found themselves at the end of their journey, either having anything left to run from as Huck’s father was dead and Jim was a free man.

It would seem, then that Huck and Jim had run a thousand miles down the river and ended up where they had started from. From the above examples, one can see some of the author’s point in producing ‘Huck Finn. ‘ It is apparent that Mark Twain wishes society to realize its shortcomings and the limitations imposed by human nature. He realizes that people will not change, but feels that they should be aware of who they are, of what comes with this thing we call humanity. That is Mark twain’s main purpose in writing this novel.

The Reality Of Huckleberry Finn

Huckleberry Finn is a book that contains elements of romantic and realistic fiction; even though it contains both these elements, it is a book on realistic fiction, and that is how it was written to be. Mark Twain used historical facts and data to make this story realistic, it used situations that would normally happen in the time the novel takes place in. Huckleberry Finn’s father is a vagrant and a despicable person; his actions are written to how a man of that characteristic would act. Two more characters in this novel also act accordingly; the Duke and the Dauphin.

A couple of crooks and frauds who are ill at heart and produce no good at all. A kind man Jim, a black slave at the beginning of this novel, goes through much and many people go through much for him. Of these characters I have just mentioned, Jim is the only considerate one, and the Duke and the Dauphin and Huckleberry Finn’s father are evil. Huckleberry Finn has no strong feelings for his father except that of resentment. His father abandoned him when he was a child and come backs to town once in a while. His father would beat Huck many times usually because he was drunk.

This is not unusual for someone drunk to do if that person is a beater. “I used to be scared of him all the time, he tanned me so much. ” (Twain, p. 25) Besides him beating Huck, his father has put fear into Huck, which is sad, but is realistic. Besides beating Huck, he also scolded him for trying to get an education; he though Huck was trying to become smarter than his father, and he wouldn’t have that. “You’re educated, too, they say — can read and write. You think you’re better’n your father, now, don’t you, because he can’t? I’ll take it out of you. ” (Twain, pg. )

Not only is Huck’s father mean and petty, he is also greedy. “‘I’ve been in town two days, and I hain’t heard nothing but about you bein’ rich. I heard about it away down the river, too. That’s why I come. You git me that money to-morrow — I want it. ‘”(Twain, pg. 27) But Huck’s father isn’t the only greedy character in this play, there are two men that pose as the Duke and the Dauphin (who are obviously not really who they claim to be). These were two men that were frauds, they would scam people out of their money and move along to the next town as swiftly as possible.

Occasionally they were, caught, which is quite realistic. “‘Well, I’d been selling an article to take the tartar off the teeth — and it does take it off, too, and generly the enamel along with it — but I stayed about one night longer than I ought to, and was just in the act of sliding out when I ran across you on the trail this side of town, and you told me they were coming, and begged me to help you to get off. So I told you I was expecting trouble myself, and would scatter out with you. ‘” One example of how these men are nobody but a couple of petty thieves.

Well, I’d ben a-running’ a little temperance revival thar ’bout a week, and was the pet of the women folks, big and little, for I was makin’ it mighty warm for the rummies, I tell you, and takin’ as much as five or six dollars a night — ten cents a head, children and niggers free — and business a-growin’ all the time, when somehow or another a little report got around last night that I had a way of puttin’ in my time with a private jug on the sly. ‘” (Twain, pg. 161) A very noble person does not get the respect he deserved Jim that is. Jim was a very brave, strong, courageous man, and the only person that truly recognizes him is Huck.

There is one scene where Huck is questioned about a runaway slave. Most people would have given Jim away really quickly, but Huck’s friendship with Jim, and that he knows how good a person he is does not. “‘ Well, there’s five niggers run off to-night up yonder, above the head of the bend. Is your man white or black? ‘” Then Huck replies, “‘ He’s white. ‘” (Twain, 120) Though this may not seem to be a big quote, it is quite important. It shows how Huck feels about Jim, and that a friendship between two people is very strong, and most peoples in that situation with a friendship like that would do the same, making it a realistic situation.

Yes, Huckleberry Finn contains elements of romanticism and elements of realism. But throughout this book, the element of realism prevails, and thus making this book a realistic fiction novel. These examples I have given should be just enough to prove this point of realism over romanticism. These two elements do coexist, but romanticism isn’t a strong enough element to categorize the book in. But to say this book only has elements of realism is unjust.

Character Analysis: Huckleberry Finn

Huckleberry Finn is one of the many milestones in modern literature. It stands as a testament to the genius the world knows as Mark Twain. Through clever use of “local color” and other literary devices, he is able to weave not only the entertaining tale of Huck and Jim, but also a powerful anti-slavery message, which became the cause of both negative criticism and critical acclaim. This embodiment of Mark Twain’s ideals in the young Huck Finn is a perfect example of the many people and things Huck Finn poses as and represents in the novel.

Throughout the tale, Huckleberry Finn is portrayed as being a master of masquerading around as another person and is the means by which Mark Twain conveys his views to the world. If Mark Twain could have written an autobiography about himself, he more than likely would describe himself as possessing many qualities similar to those of Huck Finn. The many encounters Huck has with the Mississippi River are drawn from Mark Twain’s childhood home of Hannibal, Missouri, a town on the Mississippi. Even more important than childhood similarities; in the novel, Huck becomes more than just another character.

He becomes a vessel by which Mark Twain shares his views with the world. In the South where he lived, there was still much bitterness towards ex-slaves and this dictated what was proper and what was not. Instead of writing a manifesto of his views, these views were consolidated with Huck’s character. Through Huck’s eyes, we are not only able to see Twain’s views but we also see them justified. Twain’s satirical view of religion manifests itself when Miss Watson confronts Huck on the subject of Heaven.

She feels that Heaven is a place where all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever, and ever. ” Huck is disgusted by this and says that he “didn’t think much of it. ” and goes on to say that he wants to go to the “bad place” because the widow said that Tom Sawyer didn’t have much of a chance of going to the “good place”. Not only is this Twain’s way of saying that religion, taken at face value, is bunk, but is also his observation of how society shapes the minds of those who choose to harmonize with it.

At another point during the book, Huck assumes the guise of a girl named Sarah Williams. During this entire episode, Huck is eerily calm and plays his part perfectly; that is, until the woman sees Huck’s seasoned throwing skills and his threading of the needle. Although Huck plays his part almost perfectly, because of his lack of interaction with society, especially with women, he cannot anticipate the ‘traps’, which the woman unknowingly lays out for him. The fact that Huck forgot his name for a minute is but a minor detail that would have probably gone unnoticed had it not been for Huck’s two previous follies.

After he divulges his “true” identity as being George Peters, the woman tells Huck You do a girl tolerable poor, but you might fool men, maybe. Bless you, child, when you set out to thread the needle don’t hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that’s the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t’otherway. ” This is Mark Twain’s way of telling us that society makes fools of those who choose not to conform to its standards. Despite a failed first attempt, Huck proves himself to be comfortable in disguise when he encounters the Grangerfords.

At one point in this encounter, he forgets his name, despite being warned not to do so by the lady who saw through his guise. Here, Huck shows his superior ability of human understanding by fooling the young Buck Grangerford into telling him his own name. To accomplish this, he first asks Buck whether he can spell his name. Knowing that if a person sees a chance to raise himself over another person’s expectations, he probably will, Huck taunts Buck by saying “I bet you can’t spell my name”. Buck falls for Huck’s tricks and replies by saying “I bet you what you dare I can”.

After this, Buck reveals the alias Huck gave them when they first met, and saved Huck the trouble of working around using his fake name. In this scene, Twain illustrates his belief of the importance of understanding human nature, which Huck clearly excels at. Throughout the novel, Huck takes on many roles that, for the most part, are comical. However, The final disguise is one which the reader seldom notices; that of the author, who speaks through the words and actions of Huck Finn. The last laugh goes to none other than Mark Twain himself.

Huck’s Character Essay

All children have a special place, whether chosen by a conscious decision or not this is a place where one can go to sort their thoughts. Nature can often provide comfort by providing a nurturing surrounding where a child is forced to look within and choices can be made untainted by society. Mark Twain once said “Don’t let school get in the way of your education. ” Twain states that this education which is provided by society, can actually hinder human growth and maturity.

Although a formal education shouldn’t be completely shunned, perhaps true life experience, in society and nature, are a key part of development. In the novel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain throws the curious yet innocent mind of Huck Finn out into a very hypocritical, judgmental, and hostile world, yet Huck has one escape–the Mississippi River constantly flowing nearby. Here nature is presented as a thought provoking environment when experienced alone.

The river is quiet and peaceful place where Huck can revert to examine any predicament he might find himself in: “They went off, and I got aboard the raft, feeling bad and lowThen I thought a minute, and says to myself, hold on,- s’pose you’d a done right and give Jim up; would you felt better than you do now? No, says I, I’d feel bad” (p. 127). Only a few weeks with Jim and still feeling great ambivalence, Huck returns to the river to think. Twain tries here to tell the reader how strong the “mob” really is, and only when totally alone is Huck able to make the morally correct decision.

The natural flowing and calm of the river cause this deep-thought, show! ing how unnatural the collective thought of a society can be. The largest and most obvious test of Huck’s character is his relationship with Jim. The friendship and assistance which he gives to Jim go completely against all that “sivilization” has taught him; at first this concept troubles Huck and causes him a great deal of pain, but over time, through his life experiences and shared times with Jim, Huck crosses the line upheld by the racist South and comes to know Jim as a human being.

Huck is at a point in his life where opinions are formed, and by growing on the river, Huck can stand back from society and form his own. Eventually he goes as far as to risk his life for Jim:”And got to thinking of our trip down the river; and I see Jim before me, all the time, in the day, and in the night-time, sometimes moonlight, sometimes storms, and we a floating along, talking, and singing, and laughing. But somehow I couldn’t see no places to harden me against him, but only the other kindI studied a minute sort of holding my breath, and then I s! s to myself: ‘All right, then, I’ll go to hell'” (pp. 270-271).

After a long and thought-provoking adventure, Huck returns to the raft one final time to decide the fate of his friend. Symbolically, Huck makes the morally correct decision away from all others, thinking on the river. Although it might not be evident to himself, Huck causes the reader to see that “sivilization”, in their treatment of blacks especially, is not civilized at all. Every person Huck and Jim come across seems to just be following someone else blindly, as the whole country were some sort of mob.

In the last few chapters, Tom Sawyer is re-introduced and the reader is left to examine how different environments: “sivilization” and nature (the river), have affected the children’s growth. It is distinctly evident that Huck has turned out to be the one with a clear and intelligent mind, and Tom, although he can regurgitate worthless facts about Louis XVI and Henry VIII, shows no real sign of maturity. “The first time I catched up to Tom, private, I asked him what was his idea, time of the evasion? – what it was he planned to do if the evasion worked out all right and he managed to set a nigger free that was already free before?

And he said, what he had planned in his head, from the start, if we got Jim out, all safe, was for us to run him down the river, on the raft, and have adventures plumb to the mouth” (p. 360). Huck has always thought of Tom as more intelligent than himself, but he cannot understand how Tom could toy with Jim’s life in such a way. For much time, Huck is! without the river and it is though his mind clouds; he follows along with Tom playing a sick game until the end when he is once again threatened with being “sivilized”.

But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because aunt Sally she’s going to adopt me and sivilize me and I can’t stand it. I been there before” (p. 362). Huck’s adventure, if nothing else, has given him a wary eye towards “sivilized” society. When the prospect of settling down with Sally is presented he light’s out for the Territory to distance himself from a restrictive, formal education. Twain ends his novel by setting Huck up for a new experience and personal growth.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn taught an important lesson, one that showed the importance of the self in the maturing process. We saw Huck grow up by having the river as a place of solitude and thought, where he was able to participate in society at times, and also sit back and observe society. Through the child’s eye we see how ignorant and mob-like we can all be. Then nature, peace, and logic are presented in the form of the river where Huck goes to think. Though no concise answer is given, the literature forces the reader to examine their surroundings, and question their leaders.

Huckleberry Finn in High Schools

High Schools in the United States should not ban The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This book is one of the most important components of American literature in our libraries today, it throws the reader into a time when slavery was lawful and accepted, and gives the reader a new perspective on slavery in general. Until civil rights groups can come up with a better argument than the word “nigger” creating a “hostile work environment”(Zwick) it should not be taken off the required reading list of any High School in the country.

Every one hundred years dialects change and what is considered “politically correct”, or socially acceptable, changes. “David Bradley argues that ‘if we’d eradicated the problem of racism in our society, Huckleberry Finn would be the easiest book in the world to teach’” (Zwick, Jim. “Should Huckleberry Finn Be Banned? ”). If we, as a nation, make it a point to rule out all books that could possibly offend students, then every hundred years or so our library of American Literature will be completely different.

Even today, modern day authors use vulgar language, lurid sexual content, and racial slurs to get their point across. If The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is taken off of required reading lists across the country, then that could create a never-ending cycle of books being taken off of school shelves every time words and ideas become unacceptable. If this is the way that American society is turning then something must be done, and the Superintendents, Deans, and Principals of every High School around the country must take it upon themselves to do it because the students will not.

The people who are trying to ban The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn are only trying to block out a part of American history that they would just as soon be forgotten, but every part of American history needs to be dealt with and accepted by everyone at a young age. Trying to shield students from any important part of history is a crime within itself. Hannibal, Missouri is a prime example of this type of crime. Every year they have a citywide celebration of Mark Twain, but they do not celebrate The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn or The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson nor do they teach it in their schools.

Best stated by Shelly Fisher Fishkin, the theater company in Hannibal “was upholding a long American tradition of making slavery and its legacy and blacks themselves invisible”(Zwick, Jim. “Should Huckleberry Finn Be Banned? ”). This just shows how foolish many parts of America can be; they embrace him and call him a genius in one aspect, but they conveniently don’t seem to notice his genius in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn because they are too distracted by the language and actions of Huckleberry Finn himself.

Just because a book has some offensive content is not enough of a reason to ban a book, the general value of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn greatly overshadows any offensive language it may contain. It shows how the American public thought back then, their morals, and their way of life. It was simply they way they were brought up. In Chapter 32 of Huckleberry Finn Aunt Sally asks if anyone was hurt in a steamboat accident, Huck replies, “No’m. Killed a nigger”(Twain 167). The subject is then closed because no “people” were harmed, and in their minds, nobody was.

That is something that cannot be expressed in a textbook or a teacher with the same degree of authenticity. The book immerses the student in a time where slavery was accepted. Teachers taught it, pastors preached it, mayors practiced it, and children saw absolutely nothing wrong with it because that is how they had been brought up. Huckleberry, however, was not raised “proper” and so had an almost completely clean head about the subject “The Widow Douglas, she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time” (Twain 1).

He saw Jim as a person and was even willing to go to hell to protect him. Just his use of the word “nigger” did not make him a bad person; it was exactly the way people talked back in that period of time. The book tries to show that black people were just as human as white people and was probably the most blatant anti-slavery book of the time, “many scholars consider it a staunchly antiracist novel”(Zwick, Jim. “Should Huckleberry Finn Be Banned? ”).

If only that idea was appreciated today, the book would come across as a classic instead of a source of debate. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an avid anti-slavery novel, and despite flawed criticism from close-minded individuals, is one of the finest windows into a dark period of history that we all must deal with. One will not completely understand the way of life when slavery was accepted until they have read an entirely unbiased and uncensored book written during that time and dealing with the topic of slavery.

The Adventure’S Of Huck And Jim: A Boy’S Rebellion, A Slave’S Freedom

In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Twain develops the plot into Huck and Jim’s adventures allowing him to weave in his criticism of society. The two main characters, Huck and Jim, both run from social injustice and both are distrustful of the civilization around them. Huck is considered an uneducated backward boy, constantly under pressure to conform to the humanized surroundings of society. Jim a slave is not even considered as a real person, but as property. As they run from civilization and are on the river, they ponder the social injustices forced upon them when they are on land.

These social injustices are even more evident when Huck and Jim have to make landfall, and this provides the author with the chance to satirize the socially correct injustices that Huck and Jim encounter on land. The satire that Twain uses to expose the hypocrisy, racism, greed and injustice of society develops along with the adventures that Huck and Jim have. The ugly reflection of society we see should make us question the world we live in, and only the journey down the river provides us with that chance. Throughout the adventure, Huck sees the hypocrisy of society.

Huck’s recognition of these hypocrisies and absurdities of the society represented by the Widow and Miss Watson, and his preference for nature and his own natural impulses, bring out the novel’s notion of how society tends to corrupt true morality, freedom, and justice, which exist in nature, and how the individual must follow his or her own conscience. The first character we come across with that trait is Miss Watson and the Widow Douglas. Miss Watson constantly corrects Huck for his unacceptable behavior, but Huck doesn’t understand why, That is just the way with some people.

They get down on a thing when they don’t know nothing about it(15). The widow Douglas adopted and tried to civilize Huck. The two sisters’, one redeeming quality is their concern for Huck, which, though it possesses moralistic overtones, includes an element of sincerity, giving them some patience in dealing with the uncivilized Huck. Other than this, the sisters’ role is to represent the artificial, empty civilization to which Huck rejects. As much as the widow Douglass tries to adopt conventional religion upon Huck, he continues to reject it.

Before every meal the widow told Huck he had to say grace. Huck referred to this as having to grumble over the food before they could eat it (14). She tried to teach him about Moses, until Huck found out Moses was dead and lost interest. The comments made by Huck clearly show both women as hypocrites, scolding Huck for wanting to smoke and then using snuff herself and firmly believing that she would be in heaven: Here she was bothering me about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, yet finding fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it.

And she took snuff too; of course that was all right, she done it herself (15). Huck shows his anger and dislike for the values that were constantly placed on him by the Widow Douglas and her sister, Miss Watson. They both try to socialize Huck into a good boy. Huck was going stir-crazy, made especially restless by the sisters’ constant reminders to improve his behavior. When Miss Watson told him about the bad place, he burst out that he would like to go there, as a change of scenery.

Secretly, Huck really does not see the point in going to the good place and resolved then not to bother trying to get there. When Huck asked, Miss Watson told him there was no chance Tom Sawyer would end up in Heaven. Huck was glad because I wanted him and me to be together”(16). Huck ran away but he went back when Tom Sawyer told him he could join his new band of robbers if he would return to the Widow and be respectable. The Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson, are the representatives of the society Huck rejects.

They both immerse themselves in the values of civilization, This is not just a boy running away from home. It is someone who has decided to turn his back on everything home stands for, even one of its most cherished beliefs. Huck’s adventure began because he was rebelling; he pushed aside all those values that everyone else wanted him to have. Huck’s views are all completely naturalistic; free of any of the pretensions toward refinement that marks the Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson. Huckleberry is rough, rustic–a truly uncivilized boy.

He rebels against the restraints of civilization artificial, middle-class society and its delusions, represented by cramped clothing and religion, respectively. Huck’s complete sincerity, which leads to his dislike for hypocritical civilization, is his defining quality. He was running away from what everyone else believed. He in a way refused not to conform and be bound by the limitations of American Civilization. He was running to freedom of the river. The river never cares how saintly you are, how rich you are, or what society thinks you are. The river allows Huck the one thing that Huck wants to be, and that is Huck.

The river constitutes freedom from the land of oppression, and that oppression is no more evident than it is to Jim. It is somewhat surprising that Huck’s traveling companion is Jim. In this irony both Jim and Huck have that in common, feeling oppressed. However there is the difference of being oppressed physically as Jim and mentally oppressed as Huck is. As anti-society that Huck is, you would think that he would have no qualms about helping Jim. Huck and Jim’s journey begins as Huck fights within himself about turning Jim over to the authorities. Finally he decides not to turn Jim in.

This is a monumental decision for Huck to make, even though he makes it on the spot. . In this way this allows Huck to leave his thoughts of bigotry behind and start to see Jim for who he really is, a man. Even though Huck has made his decision about Jim, early in the voyage we see Huck’s attitude towards Jim as racist. Eventually Huck plays a mean trick on Jim and we see Huck begin to change his attitude, It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger; but I done it, and I warn’t ever sorry for it afterward, neither (86).

Later on in the story Huck becomes very caring and protective for Jim, where this reaches a climax at the point where Huck saves Jim from two slave catchers by tricking them to think Jim is was Huck’s small pox ridden father. The dialogue between Huck and Jim also illustrates that Jim is more than someone’s property. He is a human being with feelings, and hopes for a better future. He is not some ignorant, uncaring sub-human, but plainly the opposite. Huck and Jim’s adventures give us a chance to examine the society they live in.

It also gives us a chance to examine ourselves as well as the society today. The story is over a hundred years old, but many of the social vices then, sadly, pertain to our society now. There is cruelty, greed, murder, trickery, hypocrisy, racism, and a general lack of morality, all the ingredients of society. All through the adventure you have Huck and Jim trying to find the one thing they can only find on the river, freedom, but a person can only stay on the river for so long, and so you have to go on land to face the injustices of society.

Quite a contrast, the freedom of being without authority, being able to think for yourself, running right next to the constraints made upon you by society. Somewhere deep within the novel, the author is making a powerful statement, a wish for all humanity, that we can be brave enough to break with what others assume is correct and just, and make decisions for ourselves and the ability to stand on our own and do something about it. Somewhere along the line we must become I, someone has to have the courage to stand up for what is right, to be what most would call a real man.

Huck gives us that chance, that ability to see things for what they are. His adventures give us that realization that Jim was just about Huck’s only friend, yet Jim was black. Jim looks out for Huck like a father would. As they were escaping from the civilized world, they take refuge in the Jackson’s Island, on the Mississippi River. Huck is running away from a bad father and Jim has left Miss Watson. Huck and Jim’s sacrifices for each other, however different, also present many similarities. For example, Huck and Jim both think they are sacrificing themselves for a friend.

Huck sacrifices himself for a black friend he has come to love as an equal. Similarly, Jim sacrifices himself for a friend, when in reality, he is risking his freedom to save the life of a racial bigot, Tom. In addition, both sacrifices have as a consequence a life of everlasting hell. When Huck sacrifices himself for Jim, he accepts a literal hell (that is truly the path to heaven). Jim, on the other hand, accepts a life of figurative hell in slavery, when he is in fact free all along. Huck is unaware that his decision of accepting hell will actually lead to his salvation and ironically decides on doing what the thinks is wrong.

Likewise, Jim is unaware that he is free, and is not risking his freedom in saving Tom. In making these two brave sacrifices, Huck and Jim achieve a higher character than if they had chosen easier paths. Huck’s willingness to face hell to protect Jim and Jim’s willingness to face capture and slavery to save Tom, both contribute to the overall theme of racial equality/inequality present throughout the book. Huck and Jim’s journey down the Mississippi River has led them to look past color boundaries, and discover that all men are created equal.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer

Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer are the best of friends with remarkably different personalities. Each brings their unique characteristics into this comical friendship giving the novel numerous amusing passages. Throughout the tale, Tom is often the leader while Huck is the reluctant follower. It doesn’t matter that Tom’s ideas are ridiculous and extravagant, and Huck’s are simple and practical, together they always proceed with Tom’s imaginative plans. In contrast to Tom’s great imagination and creativity, Huck is humorless and literal minded. Tom’s imaginativeness comes only from knowledge he has gained through books.

Huck, on the other hand, actually lives out the fantasies Tom can only imagine. Tom Sawyer, already civilized, follows the values and beliefs of society. Due to these convictions, Tom always abides by the laws. For these reasons, Tom would never have helped free Jim unless he knew that Jim had already been freed. Conversely, Huck Finn rejects the philosophy of political beliefs for the fear of becoming civilized. He usually runs away at the first notion of him becoming “sivilized. ” Huck is able to function in any society with the help of his adaptability and survival skills.

He is able to go from the freedom of the raft, to the perceived harshness of civilization, and back again with ease. Although Tom has been able to slip past Death’s grip so far, his chances of escaping may not always work out to his liking. Of the two, Huck will always be the survivor in life. Together this pair achieves their goals because of their intelligence and witty personalities. They have the ability to put the knowledge they obtain into their every day lives. They are two adventurous souls in search of fresh and exhilarating escapades.

Their ages united with their exceptional education keeps them on their toes. Huck’s humorless personality and Tom’s extravagance has made The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, a popular adventure for all ages. The American people have forever enjoyed this novel and have made it the American literary classic that it is today. “So there ain’t nothing more to write about an’ we is rottin’ glad of it, because if we’d ‘a’ knowed what a trouble it was to make this essay, and, we wouldn’t ‘a’ tackled it, and ain’t a-going to no more. ” – Mark Twain

How Huck Uses His Creativity, Luck, and Wits to Get Rid of the Pits

What would you do if you were a young teenager traveling down the Mississippi River, not knowing where to sleep that night or find food for your next meal? That is the dilemma faced by Huckleberry Finn, and Huck always found a lot of trouble. When most people are in trouble they either take the easy way out and lie, or they use their creativity and wit. The protagonist of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, uses more wit than most fourteen year old kids use in their lifetime. Whenever life hits Huck with a problem, he always conquers it by using awareness, cleverness, and insight.

Before Huck starts his adventure down the river, he must fake his death to escape from pap. The first thing Huck did was to make sure that pap was far away before starting his getaway. At this point, many children of Hucks age would merely get in a canoe and head down stream, most likely getting caught the next day. Huckleberry Finn is smarter than that. Huck wanted to make sure that no one would come down the river looking for him, except to make his corpse rise. First, he collected all the supplies that he could find and loaded them into a canoe.

After that, he went into the woods and caught a wild hog. He brought the hog in the Cabin, and slaughtered it, making sure that it left behind a pool of blood on the hard packed dirt ground. He disposed of the dead hog by throwing it in the river to float downstream. Huck also opened a sack of corn and left a trail leading to a shallow lake nearby. Before leaving the cabin, he filled another sack with rocks, and made a path toward the river. This was done to simulate the trail of the robbers dragging their bounty to the river bank.

Huckleberry hoped that pap would think he was killed by a group of robbers that stole all his possessions. After using these tactics to avert any search parties, he floated down the river to Jackson Island. Huck made every attempt to make sure that he could sail down the river in peace. As Huck had hoped, his plan worked beautifully. While on Jackson Island, Huck mistakenly met up with a friend of his, Jim. After they settled on the island, Huck wanted to find out what was happening at the town across the river. Jim knew that Huck needed to a disguise, and they decided that Huck would dress up as a girl.

After putting on a gown and bonnet, Huck took the canoe across the river, and found the house of a stranger. Because he had to keep a low profile for a while, it was important that it was a stranger. As he knocked on the door, he reminded himself to act like a girl. The lady invited him in. They talked about Hucks home town, Tom Sawyers 20,000 dollars, and inevitably, Hucks murder. The lady soon became suspicious of Hucks femininity. She finally asked Huck, What is you real name? Is it Bill, or Tom, or Bob? -or what is it? (Twain 59). Huckleberry finally admitted that he was a male by the name of George Peters.

He continued on to weave a tall tale saying that when looking for the town of Goshen, and had received directions from a drunken farmer. Instead of telling the lady his name was Huckleberry Finn and risking the possibility of getting caught with Jim, he extended his lie. To keep his story realistic, he told the lady that both his parents had died, and he left because his new guardian treated him poorly. This was a very good choice because not many strangers will question a person their parents death. Huck Left the ladys house with a snack and the directions to Goshen.

This naturally encourages the boy to tell Huck more about Jims whereabouts and condition. Huck learned that an old fellow nailed him, and Jim is just waiting at the Phelps farm. Huck starts talking innocently about the reward. The young boy expressed that he would wait seven years to collect the 200 dollar bounty. This is another example of Hucks discreet inquirings. After leaving the boy, he most likely forgot about the situation because Huck didnt pressure information out of him. He only asks in a nonchalant manner, therefore acting innocent and polite

Huckleberry learns that he can only trust a few people. When he is in trouble, he can use his wits to either get out of, or go deeper into trouble. In Hucks case, he usually goes farther into trouble until he can escape. Huck also learns that he can get a lot of information out of people with well worded, yet innocent questions. This is a lesson that people should learn. When in trouble, we have two choices. We can either tell the truth, or have fun and try to use wit, cleverness, and a little bit of luck to save ourselves.