Main Themes In A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Poem

A Valediction: forbidding Mourning “A Valediction: forbidding Mourning” is recognised as one of Donne’s most famous yet simplest poems. It is his most direct statement of his ideal of spiritual love. Unlike, “The Flea,” in “A Valediction: forbidding Mourning” Donne professes a devotion to spiritual love that transcends merely the physical. In this poem, the … Read more

The Specific Style of Writing in On the Road

Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road is a hallmark story of the Beat Generation, a movement defined by its rejection of conformity in favor of a search for deeper meaning. It is this search that serves as a catalyst for the majority of the action of the narrative, as the protagonist Sal Paradise travels across … Read more

Contrasting Unrequited Love Two Poems: Christina Rossetti’s ‘No, Thank You, John’ And W.H. Auden ‘The More Loving One’

Poetic verse has been used as an outlet of strong emotions and feelings for centuries. The elegance of poetry has long been thought of as more refined than that of prose writing, and thus as a better vessel for conveying strong feelings. Subjects such as death, love, hate, beauty, and betrayal are common themes, but … Read more

Depicting the Time Gone by in the Seafarer and the Wanderer

The poems The Seafarer and The Wanderer are both elegiac in nature: each speaker delivers a reflective monologue about their journey from the past they have lost to the solitary present they face, although there are limitations to the past’s disappearance, as it clearly lingers in their memories of ‘days of toil’. The ‘ubi sunt’ … Read more

Analysis of Roland's Death

In the Song of Roland, the protagonist, Roland, faces his death as the end consequence of his self-conceited and prideful actions. In the beginning of the poem Oliver indicated the consistent prideful behavior of Roland in the past. Roland then proves Oliver’s point by fighting with only his own intentions in mind. In the end, … Read more

The Use of Imagery and Alliteration to Present the Idea of Irony in Ozymandias, a Poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Analysis of “Ozymandias” The poem “Ozymandias” is a wonderful example of irony. Percy Bysshe Shelley use the elements of imagery and alliteration to first give the reader the sense of a “vast” ruin in the desert. Shelley then uses alliteration to describe the character of the person the ruin represents. Finally, Shelley introduces a wonderfully … Read more

The Different Types of Blindness of the Characters in Oedipus Rex by Sophocles and The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

Types of Blindness Life is full of things that humans wish to forget. Using blindness as a buffer from reality is a natural response to dangerous stimuli. The types of blindness are easily classified into many categories. These classifications make understanding stories and characters much better. The characters in Oedipus Rex by Sophocles and The … Read more

Loss and Grief

The loss of a loved one will always be a painful personal journey, and coping experience that no one is ready for or can prepare for till it happens. The after effect or grief is always personal for everyone that loses a loved one. “The Courage That My Mother Had” by Edna St. Vincent Millay, … Read more

The Analysis of the Sinful Character of the Pardoner

Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Pardoner’s Tale,” a relatively straightforward satirical and anti-capitalist view of the church, contrasts motifs of sin with the salvational properties of religion to draw out the complex self-loathing of the emasculated Pardoner. In particular, Chaucer concentrates on the Pardoner’s references to the evils of alcohol, gambling, blasphemy, and money, which aim not … Read more

Significance of Shield and Pentangle Metaphor

“Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” can be followed for entertainment value, but one passage in particular calls for deeper analysis. Before Sir Gawain begins to undertake his quest for the Green Chapel and dons his armor, the plot has been moving at a steady pace. At this point, the poet diverges from the plot … Read more

“Home “by Warsan Shire

Home The poem “Home “by Warsan Shire focuses on the importance of home and demonstrates how the connotation of home is experienced by refugees. The poem urges the west host countries to show modest receiving attitude to welcome the refugees and understand their suffering and pain. The speaker uses powerful imagery and metaphor to evoke … Read more

The Purpose of Lyric Poetry as Illustrated in William Meredith’s poem “The Illiterate”

Rhetoric in The Illiterate Gregerson’s article “Rhetorical Contract in the Lyric Poem” expounds upon the purpose of lyric poetry. She posits that there is a relationship between the reader and the speaker that extends beyond utilitarian or surface purposes, claiming that a contract forms between these two parties. Throughout the article, Gregerson applies the notions … Read more

Comparative Analysis of the poems “The Horses” and “The Thought Fox”

In Hughes’s poetry, “racial memory, animal instinct and poetic imagination all flow into one another with an exact sensuousness” – Seamus Heaney “The Horses” and “The Thought-Fox” are two of Hughes’s most powerfully symbolic poems, introducing the author’s extensive examination of the rational actions of humans as compared to the instinctual actions of animals. It … Read more

The Pardoner As a Cheater

The Pardoner of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales is representative of the darker side of the corrupt church of the Middle Ages. A pardoner was a church official who had the authority to forgive those who had sinned by selling pardons and indulgences to them. Although the pardoner was a church official, they were almost always part … Read more

A juxtaposition of Emily Dickinson’s poem Hope Is a Thing with Features and Walt Whitman poem, O Captain! My Captain!

America experienced profound changes during the mid 1800s. New technologies and ideas helped the nation grow, while the Civil War ripped the nation apart. During this tumultuous period, two great American writers captured their ideas in poetry. Their poems give us insight into the time period, as well as universal insight about life. Although polar … Read more

Color Symbolism in The Miller’s Tale of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales

“The Miller’s Tale”, a ribald and bawdy fabliaux about the generation gap, youthful lust, aged foolishness, and the selfishness and cruelty of people towards each other, contains a wealth of color terms which add to and expand the meaning of this rustic tale. The teller, too, the Miller, is described in detail in Chaucer’s “Prologue” … Read more

The Clear Value of Romantic Love: “Soeur Louise de la Misericorde,” “Twice,” and Other Poems

The idea of romantic love being presented as invariably negative in 19th century literature is questionable to some extent. Romantic love is often characterised as being damaging and hurtful in Rossetti’s poetry through the contrast with divine love in poems such as ‘Soeur Louise de la Misericorde’ and ‘Twice’, supported by her religious devotion and … Read more

Literary Analysis of the Poem Strange Meeting

Wilfred Owen’s “Strange Meeting” explores an extraordinary meeting between two enemy combatants in the midst of battle. Owen forgoes the familiar poetics of glory and honor associated with war and, instead, constructs a balance of graphic reality with compassion for the entrenched soldier. In fact, the poetic appeal of the text comes from pity and … Read more

Funeral Blues: A Literary Review of the Poem

W.H. Auden wrote Funeral Blues the poem. Wystan Hugh Auden (1907-1973) was born in York, England, and later became and American citizen. Auden was the founder for a generation of English poets, such as C. Day Lewis, and Stephen Spender. Auden s earlier works were composed of a Marxist outlook with a knowledge of Freudian … Read more

“Home “by Warsan Shire

Home The poem “Home “by Warsan Shire focuses on the importance of home and demonstrates how the connotation of home is experienced by refugees. The poem urges the west host countries to show modest receiving attitude to welcome the refugees and understand their suffering and pain. The speaker uses powerful imagery and metaphor to evoke … Read more

Main Ideas in "The Song of Roland"

In Song of Rowland, the author tells the story of Charlemagne’s attempted takeover of Saragossa, a land controlled by the Muslim king, Marsilla. The poem covers the feud between Rowland and his stepfather Ganelon, as well as the disastrous consequences that come from that feud, including the betrayal of their lord and kinsman, Charlemagne. Through … Read more

An Analysis of Tone in The Road Not Taken, a Poem by Robert Frost

Robert Frost’s work The Road Not Taken conveys a very simplistic, yet introspective theme. The poem describes the dilemmas and choices one must make in life, and how those specific decisions affect that person. Frost establishes this theme with an allegorical illustration of two paths in the woods. Later in the poem, the author reveals … Read more

The Gratitude to Nature in the Poems Burial, Weeping, and Catalogue of Unabashed Gratitude in Ross Gay’s Book Catalogue of Unabashed Gratitude

The Ross Gay’s book Catalogue of unabashed gratitude consists of several poems with rich content. The report analysis herein will cover three poems from the book such as “Burial,” “Weeping,” and “Catalogue of Unabashed Gratitude.” The poems coverage insists on the real world we live, its goodness, things people take for granted, declaration of the … Read more