Key Facts about To Kill a Mockingbird

When the novel To Kill a Mockingbird was out, it became an immediate success, which greatly surprised its author. However, the reviews varied. Some reviewers liked the author’s style, called her a skilled writer and found the book nationally significant; other found the book childish, melodramatic, or even immoral. Some noted than a six-year-old protagonist cannot think … Read more

To Kill a Mockingbird Summary

The story is set in the times of the Great Depression, during 1933-1935, in the fictional little town of Maycomb, Alabama. The protagonist of the story is a girl aged six, Jean Louise Finch (also called Scout), living with her family, who are Scout’s elder brother Jeremy (Jem) and their father, Atticus, a widowed lawyer. … Read more

To Kill a Mockingbird

A now famous novel by Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, was first published in 1960. The book won the 1961 Pulitzer Prize immediately, becoming a classical book of modern American literature and a bestseller, and was soon adapted into a film in 1962. Being one of only two books by Harper Lee, it brought her instant … Read more

To Kill a Mockingbird Quotes – Explanation and Analysis

The image of Boo Radley can at first seem strange and even disturbing, according to the overall tone of the story. The mysterious man – or even creature – who never leaves the Radleys” house is an embodiment of all the childish horrors about the haunted houses and their inhabitants. Atticus Finch is one of the main … Read more

To Kill a Mockingbird Characters Analysis

The main characters of the book are: Atticus Finch – Atticus works as a local lawyer in Maycomb and is the single father of Scout and Jem. He strives to raise the children with pride, honor, and integrity to believe in their ability to see and make decision on things appropriately. He makes a good model … Read more

The Key Influences in Scout’s and Jem’s Lives

The course of growing up is always influenced by the people around you, since the people in your environment are vital in shaping the person you will become. Harper Lee demonstrates this reality in the classic tale To Kill a Mockingbird, through the eyes of a six year-old Scout and a ten year-old Jem in … Read more

Mayella Ewell: Powerful Or Powerless?

For centuries, countries have fought with one another over power. Whether squabbling over who has control of their nation or who really owns a territory, struggles over domination have been commonplace throughout history, featuring not only countries as a whole, but their individual settlers. Power can be defined as the amount of control one has … Read more

To Kill a Mockingbird Questions

Chapters 1,2, and 3 Scout’s comments and reactions towards Jem play a huge roll in Jem accepting Dill’s dare. Jem states that he isn’t scared of the Radley Place because he passes their house everyday on the way to school. However, Scout responds saying you’re “Always runnin’”(Lee 14). Because Scout likes to taunt her older … Read more

“To kill a Mockingbird” Summer Reading

The setting of this novel is a huge factor that controls the story and overall outcome, the novel takes place in a gloomy town, with the name Maycomb (Fictional town), located in Alabama. Also, this had taken place during the time of the “Great Depression”, during the 1930’s. The setting is odd, it seems it … Read more

Justice in To Kill a Mockingbird

Justice and its relationship with prejudice is the central theme of the timeless 1960 novel, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. Its focal point is the trial of Tom Robinson, an African-American erroneously charged with the rape of a white girl, Mayella Ewell. Racial prejudice is, of course, thoroughly explored in the novel. However, what … Read more

To Kill a Mockingbird: How Prejudice Can Ruin Somebody’s Life

Prejudice is a pre-judgement formed about something or someone – but it is more than this as well? This complex idea is highlighted in the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee and the picture book Goin’ Someplace Special by Patricia McKissack (illustrated by Jerry Pinkney). The picture book is set in 1950s Nashville … Read more

Scout’s Perception of Truth and Reality

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it” (Lee 33). Atticus Finch tells this quote to the main character, Scout Finch, in the book To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Jean-Louise Finch (Scout) is a … Read more

Dill in To Kill a Mockingbird: Farewell to Childhood

Often, there is no greater power that influences an individual’s development than his or her surroundings. It is one’s society that establishes what is generally accepted and how one comes to act within that society. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, the author Harper Lee develops the idea that an individual’s perspective of their … Read more

Character Analysis in To Kill A Mockingbird

While most people in society strive to have moral attributes, not everyone understands what traits are important in achieving this goal. Often, people attempt to model themselves after another’s example. In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, Atticus Finch is a single father who lives with his two children, Jem and Scout, … Read more

A Loss Of Innocence

“The world’s ending Atticus! Please do something!” (Lee 64) This was the innocent voice of Jean Louise Finch, the protagonist in “To Kill a Mockingbird”, by Harper Lee. Jean doesn’t understand what racism is, what violent acts are, and other issues that are applicable to the real world. Through the characterization of Scout, Lee reveals … Read more

King Lear’s Perspective on the Imperfect Relationship Between Wealth and Justice in To Kill a Mockingbird and Lindsay Lohan

Justice systems exist to implement suitable punishments and to combat inequities. However, society’s perspective of justice overwhelmingly favors the affluent, as evidenced in one of King Lear’s memorable speeches. “Small vices” and petty crimes have plagued the impoverished population, while the wealthy have obtained the luxury of evading consequences for their immoral deeds by “plating … Read more

English 10 Reading Journal: To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Chapter 11- the loss of Jem and Scout’s innocence When autumn turns into winter in Maycomb County, Scout and Jem plan to create a snowman. This is an example of how their innocence is retained towards the beginning. Jem and Scout shape the snowman: “Jem glanced at me, his eyes twinkling: ‘Mr. Avery’s sort of … Read more

The Prejudice of Race, Gender and Social Class During the Great Depression in To Kill a Mockingbird, a Novel by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird As a story based on The Great Depression, the time period shapes many aspects of life that contrast widely to that of today’s society. The 1930’s in the south was an era of inequality in many ways. Although many years after the abolition of slavery and rights for colored people were … Read more

Scout’s Perception of Truth and Reality

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it” (Lee 33). Atticus Finch tells this quote to the main character, Scout Finch, in the book To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. Jean-Louise Finch (Scout) is a … Read more

"To Kill A Mockingbird" Review

In the novel, “To Kill A Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee, she conveys the idea that characters are a product of their environment. Throughout the book, it is continuously portrayed that the African Americans are part of the lowest class in society. This is mainly shown through Robert Ewell’s trial against Tom Robinson, as he wants … Read more

Bob Ewell: A Journey into the World of an Alcoholic

To Kill a Mockingbird is many things: just to name a few, it is a comment on racism, class, and the mob mentality. In this brilliant novel, there are a lot of well defined characters whose goings on in the fictional Maycomb County help to propel the story along. One of the most interesting characters, … Read more

Mayella Ewell: Powerful Or Powerless?

For centuries, countries have fought with one another over power. Whether squabbling over who has control of their nation or who really owns a territory, struggles over domination have been commonplace throughout history, featuring not only countries as a whole, but their individual settlers. Power can be defined as the amount of control one has … Read more

The Differences in the Motivations for Learning of Scout from Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird and Skeeter from Kathryn Stockett’s The Help

Scout from To Kill a Mockingbird and Skeeter from The Help both learn about the lives of people not in their own racial group, but they both have different motivations for learning. In the film The Help, Skeeter learns about the black community by interviewing black maids in Jackson for a book she is writing. … Read more

Through Scout’s Eyes: The Concept of Perspective

“To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee is one of the greatest works of American literature of all time. It has been reprinted again and again, and is a staple in almost any writing or history class. There are a number of reasons why it can be argued that this novel is one of the … Read more

Mayella Ewell

In the coming of age novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee portrays many characters in various ways, but none more insidious than Mayella Violet Ewell. Mayella is the story’s boldest antagonist. She is a static character who undergoes no inner change throughout the story, although is one of the most influential characters. This character … Read more

To Kill A Mockingbird And Parents

Parenting is an act of being a parent, which means you show love and care towards your offspring. Harper lees book To Kill A Mockingbird, shows the difference in parenting of the characters Bob Ewell and Atticus Finch. Some ways these two characters are different is depicted in this essay by: showing the difference in … Read more