Loss of innocence in Catcher in the Rye

Nothing Gold Can Stay by Robert Frost exemplifies the loss of innocence. The poem displays how you are pure and innocent when you are a child but as you mature, it is impossible to remain this way. In The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger, Holden will soon realize that nothing Holdens main goal in life is to protect children from losing their innocence. He designates this to the role of catcher in the rye, who catches children before they fall off the cliff.

Symbolically, the cliff represents the transition from childhood to adulthood. He idolizes his sister Phoebe and his deceased brother, Allie, because they embody the characteristics of innocence and virtue, attributes Holden finds ideal. Holden yearns for that childlike sincerity, instead of the adult world, which seems hypocritical and Obviously, Holdens job of catcher in the rye is only a dream, but he still tries to protect childrens naivet. While visiting Phoebes school, he notices that some had written Fuck you on the wall.

Seeing that drove him crazy because he knew that if his sister saw the writing, she would iscover what it meant, and therefore part of her innocence would be taken away. In order to preserve his catcher in the rye role, he wipes off all the Fuck you signs that he can. Here you can see he is a step closer to realizing that his dream role cannot come true when he says that not even in a million years could you rub off half the Fuck you signs. This shows that he is starting to realize that his dream may not be possible.

One good example of Holdens character comes when he is at the Museum of Natural History. He comments about how the greatest thing about the museum is how, although you may come many times over the years, it never changes. Every exhibit would be exactly the same. The only thing that changes is you. It makes Holden despondent to think about Phoebe going to the museum and changing every time she goes. Certain things should stay the way they are. You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone.

These two lines represent Holdens character entirely. The climax of the novel comes when Holden is watching Phoebe on the carousel in the rain and his dream is symbolically crushed. Phoebe and all of the children are reaching for a gold ring on the carousel and Holden is worried she will fall off. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but its bad if you say anything to them. When Holden makes this comment, you can see his views have changed.

He now sees that hildren cannot be restricted in this way. In his quest for an Eden filled with innocence and purity, Holden came to the conclusion that life must move forward and this means that Holden cannot hold onto adolescence forever. Although he does have a nervous breakdown, he now seems able to deal with his problems. He also seems to understand the word phony now, and no longer uses it. D. Bs English girlfriend sounds affected but not phony. Holden seems to have grown and realizes now that not every adult in the world is bad.

Catcher In The Rye

Throughout life, an individual may endure several emotionally or physically straining moments. In The Catcher In The Rye, Holden Caulfield suffers much verbal abuse, as well as physical. Both forms of the abuse, combined with other factors, eventually leads Holden to suffer a mental breakdown. Holden’s actions prove that ** “A blow from a whip raises a welt, but a blow from the tongue smashes bones. ” Holden experiences several fights throughout the story. Near the beginning, he begins a struggle with Stradlater, his roommate, over his friend’s date, Jane Gallagher.

Holden was upset to learn that the couple were alone in a car, knowing Stradlater’s sexual history. Holden’s mind chooses to push out the incident, so it is foggy in his head. But all he knew was, he tried to hit Stradlater but missed. After the miss, Stradlater proceeded to climb on top of Holden and take hold of his wrists, not letting him up. Stradlater dug his knees deep into Holden’s chest to keep him from moving. This seemed to go on for “around ten hours”. When Stradlater finally gave in and let Holden get up, the struggle started again, ending with a bloody nose for Holden.

Afterwards, although Holden was somewhat offended by the actions, he did not seem to care about his dripping nose. He went directly over to Ackley’s room, not even stopping to wipe up his nose. He also did not seem to care about the overall fight, because he talked of it like it meant nothing to him. “I had a little goddam tiff with Stradlater,” he explains to Ackley. “Do you feel like playing a little Canasta? ” This quick forgetting shows that the fight had little affect on Holden, and that his injury meant little to him. While Holden is in the Edmont Hotel, the elevator man mentions he prospect of a prostitute.

Holden reluctantly agrees to a throw, which would cost him five dollars. Holden was very nervous during his wait, but when the girl showed up he told her he only wanted to talk. Even though they didn’t do anything, Holden paid his money, only to find that the girl was promised ten. Holden refused to pay the extra amount, assuring the girl that he was told a throw was only five and he was not going to pay more. She left, only to return minutes later with the elevator man, Maurice. Maurice threatened and punched Holden, demanding the extra five dollars that he “owed”.

After a bit of “roughing up”, Sunny, the prostitute, searches Holden’s wallet and pulls out another five. Sunny starts out the door, but Maurice was still holding Holden, snapping on him and shoving him. Right before stepping out, he gives Holden a punch in the stomach. Although Holden was hurt badly, he didn’t care much about how he felt. All he knew was that he could hardly breathe. Halfway to the bathroom, he started pretending that he was dying. Although Holden was slightly affected emotionally by this incident, he didn’t care much at all about it, and let his injuries take care of themselves.

When Holden was first expelled from Pencey, he paid a final visit to his favorite teacher, Mr. Spencer. Mr. Spencer’s attitude was caring at first, but he began to scold Holden about his grades. “You knew absolutely nothing. Absolutely nothing,” he repeated several times. He even had the indecency to read Holden his own paper, the one in which Holden knew absolutely no idea about the subject. He makes a mockery of Holden and his work, and completely destroys any self-pride that Holden may have. Mr. Spencer was very insensitive with his words, implying that Holden needed to grow up nd move on in his life.

These words may have been part of what eventually caused Holden’s emotional breakdown, the feeling that he was lacking in life. The reader is able to interpret through Holden’s thoughts and actions that the physical blows meant little to Holden, while the emotional blows meant much more. He was able to basically ignore his injuries, but could not possibly take the emotional pain out of his head. Even when he didn’t think about it, it was always there subconsciously, proving that a blow from the tongue smashes bones, while a blow from a whip only raises a welt.

Catcher in the Rye – The Contemporary Enlightened One

J. D. Salinger is considered one of the most critically reviewed author in modern literature. In particular his only novel Catcher in the Rye has received the most criticism. The book has been constantly debate and sometimes banned in some states because of its vulgar language and sexual content. On the other hand it is used in freshmen English and praised as the greatest book in the twentieth century. Catcher in the Rye has been reviewed in many aspects.

People had drawn many conclusions in trying to decipher the meaning of Catcher in the Rye and the mind behind the mysterious Salinger. Buddhism is one apparent aspect in this book and it is also apparent in Salingers life. Does Salinger exhibit Buddhism on different levels in Catcher in the Rye? The main character in the book is Holden Caulfield. He attends a rich prep school called Prency prep. It is a school that typifies the idealistic American school, where the dirt and grind does not have a space, at least not on the surface.

Holden is then expelled from the school, and starts to venture out the world on his own. He goes back down to New York, the dirt and grind capital of the world. He gets more and more sickened by the fakeness, and cruelty of the world. An example of this would be in the Catcher in the Rye, when he goes in to the museum he notices an obscenity written with a childs red crayon on the wall(121 bloom). Holden says in the novel Thats the whole trouble, he realizes. You cant ever find a place thats nice and peaceful, because there isnt any.

You may think there is, but once you get there, when youre not looking, somebodyll sneak up and write Fuck you right under your nose(264 Salinger). He throws up because of the whole idea and from that point he then begins to understands the real meaning of life and learns to accept life as life. Holdens life is a mirror image of the life of Siddharta Gotama the price of Nepal in 563 B. C. The story of the Prince is the prince lived in his kingdom where he was shielded from suffering.

He never saw the dead, the dying, the suffering, the hungry. He knew none such existed. Until one day he had ventured out of the kingdom and saw the things he had been shielded from. From that day on he searched for the answer of why these things existed. When he realized the answer he became Buddha (the enlightened one). Holden and Gotama lived very similar lives. Although Holden did not have the startling revelation Gotama had Holden was indeed enlightened. Holden is not a tragedy that some people say but instead he was enlightened.

Catcher in the Rye Essay

“I keep picturing all these kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s big but me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff -What do I have to do, I have to catch them. I mean their running, and they don’t look where their going, so I must come out of somewhere and catch them. “(Salinger,173) J. D. Salinger, in his timeless classic, The Catcher in the Rye, a novel depicting the complications of life as an adolescent, uses reality verses allusion, phoniness in society, and the loss of innocence as themes in his novel, to present the true inner character of Holden Caufield.

Beginning to learn the truths of society and growing up, sixteen year old, Holden has a hard time adjusting to maturity. After the death of his younger brother Allie, his inability to remain in one school, and his ongoing dislike of many people and their morals, Holden has been driven to depression in which he dispenses to a psycoanaylgist throughout the novel. Through his novel, Salinger incorporated the theme reality verses allusion, to demonstrate how the mind of some adolescents are so unwilling to face the truths of society.

As stated above, Holden wishes to accomplish an futile task, save children from growing up, and protect them from the corruption of adulthood. The following presents an example of Holden’s inability to grasp the differences between reality and allusion. “Somebody written ‘Fuck You’ on the wall. It drove me damn dear crazy. I thought how Phoebe and all the other kids would see it, and then how they’d wonder what the hell it mean, and finally some dirty kid would tell them- all cockeyed, so I rubbed it out.

Presented here, an another example on how Holden once again attempts to accomplish the impossible, save children from the words and instances that they are going to transpire no matter how hard someone desires to hide it. Holden allows himself to live in a state of unrealistic thoughts, with the idea that change will forever be deleterious. Yet Holden seems frightened to admit to himself that change and development are a necessary part of reality. The only way one would be able to avoid change would be to die young, avoiding maturity, and maintaining innocence.

Holden’s dislike towards change attracts his interest to the museum, because a museum continues to be never changing, the displays are forever set in stone, and preserved. Lastly, Holden presents his fear of facing reality though avoiding the truth. After failing out of Pencey, he decided to hide out in New York City, until his parents reached notice of his being kicked out of yet another school, because of his fear to face problems. Yet in reality the only way Holden could fix the problems he had would be to face them, not avoid them.

He simply ran away from any instance to improve his problems, or to speak the truth, therefore; accomplishing nothing but more fear. His inability to grasp the differences between reality and allusion, lead Holden into his state of mental depression, because he makes it possible for himself to expect only the best, everything perfect, and unchanged, which is truly preposterous. “Since 1888 we have been molding boys into splendid, clear-thinking young men. “(Salinger,2) Throughout the novel, Catcher in the Rye, Holden expresses his distaste for the majority of society.

Specifically, he claims most people act in a superficial manner, and observes the masses to be phony and unthoughtful in nature. Yet he himself acts phony, attempting to portray himself as someone else, someone better, and older, at points. Such an example would be when he speaks with Ernie Morrow’s mother. In this instance, he characterizes himself as someone he hates. Another depiction of phoniness would be Stradlater, Holden’s roommate at Pencey. Stradlater presents the perfect phony attitude that Holden has such distaste towards.

His main worry seems to be that he must illustrate himself as the perfect jock; built, clean-cut, and gorgeous, and that bothered Holden to no end, because Stradlater never presented his true character, he constituted the word fake. Movie actors are yet another example of the phony attitude Holden so dearly dislikes. In his mind, actors always exemplify someone they aren’t. In his supposition, they just play some part they are requested for money, not a part that resembles their thoughts or personality.

In public, movies stars also carry out that fake attitude, where they act as though they are better than everyone else. Lastly Holden dislikes actors and movies because their phoniness demoralizes children, and allows them to explore with the mature corrupted world. Society’s phoniness causes the main reason for Holden’s insecurity and isolation for the outer world. He becomes so fearful that he too will become part of the fraudulent society similar to everyone surrounding him.

Holden has one concern throughout the novel, to protect the innocent, to keep children away from maturity, and the corrupted society. He wanted to be what he called “a catcher in the rye. “and stand on a cliff assuring that children wouldn’t jump off to adulthood. His brother Allie presents a great depiction of his admiration of youth and innocence. Holden idealizes Allie, mainly because he was never able to see him reach maturity. He died before he could lose his innocence, therefore leading Holden to believe that he exemplified perfection.

Allie’s baseball glove, and the “Little Shirley Beans” record for Phoebe, illustrate Holden’s challenge to preserve the innocence in his family. Another example of his fear of loss of innocence is when Holden had the opportunity to once again see Jane Gallagher. He had been great friends with her when he they were younger, but now remained afraid to face her realizing that she would have changed. She no longer could be the innocent girl he had loved, and considering her courtship with someone such as Stradlater, she had grown tremendously.

No matter how much he yearned to see her or talk to her, he had too much fear to face the fact that she too no longer appeared to be a child, that she was now mature, and experienced. Lastly, the young boy on the street whistling that Holden referred to as “swell ” exemplifies Holden’s love of youth. The young boy symbolized independence, and nonchalance; untouched by the outer world, and unaware of the problems of society, therefore; attracting the attention of Holden. Holden had envied the pureness of the young boy, proud to see that he had not yet lost his most admirable quality, his simplicity.

Children were the only people Holden seemed to be able to successfully communicate with, mainly because he did not worry that they would be phony, because they were too young to realize how to act fraudulent. Also, he did not have to be jealous of them, because he had no competition with them. Yet his idea of wishing to preserve innocence noted his life in the fantasy world. Maturity symbolizes a major part of life, one in which everyone must endure. As some may say “growing up is hard to do” yet it remains physically impossible to avoid it.

Maturity is a natural part of life, and Holden has to learn to come to terms with that idea.. In his novel, The Catcher in the Rye, J. D. Salinger, presents the themes of phoniness in society, reality versus allusion, and loss of innocence, to depict the thoughts and problems of adolescent life, in such a sixteen year old as Holden Caufield. Life as a teen, presents both challenging and questionable events, and in the mid stage of his adolescent life, Holden begins to comes to terms with the truths of society.

After undergoing the harsh realities of maturity, he begins to believe that he must save the rest of the young children in society from facing such problems, therefore wishing to restore their innocence. His absurd thoughts of society and the corruptness, in the end led him to his necessary evaluation with a psycoanaylgist. The adolescent days are suppose to be the best of your life, and Holden must come to terms that not everything in world will be fit perfectly the way he wants. He must just learn to go with the flow, and enjoy life while he can. He cannot always be “Blue as Hell. “

Holden Caulfield’s In The Catcher in the Rye

Holden Caulfield’s Perception and Gradual Acceptance of the “Real” World. In The Catcher in the Rye, Holden views the world as an evil place where there is no peace. This perception of the world does not change significantly throughout novel. However, as the novel progresses, Holden gradually comes to the realization that he is powerless to change this corruption. During the short span of Holden’s life covered in this book, Holden does succeed in making us perceive that the world is crazy. Shortly after Holden leaves Pencey Prep, he checks in to the Edmont Hotel.

This is where Holden’s turmoil begins. Holden spends the following evening in this hotel, which was “full of perverts and morons. There were screwballs all over the place. ” His situation only deteriorates from this point forward as the more he looks around this world, the more depressing life seems. Around every corner Holden sees evil. He looks out on a world which appears completely immoral and unprincipled. The three days we learn of from the novel place a distressed Holden in the vicinity of Manhattan.

The city is decked with decorations and holiday splendor, yet, much to Holden’s despair, “seldom yields any occasions of peace, charity or even enuine merriment. ” Holden is surrounded by what he views as drunks, perverts, morons and screwballs. These convictions which Holden holds waver momentarily during only one particular scene in the book. The scene is that with Mr. Antolini. After Mr. Antolini patted Holden on the head while he was sleeping, Holden jumped up and ran out thinking that Mr. Antolini was a pervert as well.

This is the only time during the novel when Holden thinks twice about considering someone as a pervert. After reviewing Mr. Antolini, Holden finally concludes that maybe he wasn’t making a “flitty” pass at him. Maybe he just iked patting guys’ heads as they sleep. This is really the only time in the novel where Holden actually considers a positive side. This event does not constitute a significant change. As Holden himself says, “It’s not too bad when the sun’s out, but the sun only comes out when it feels like coming out.

The sun is a reference to decency through the common association of light and goodness. His perception of the world remains the same. The one conviction that does change during the novel is Holden’s belief that he can change the world. On his date with Sally, Holden reveals his feelings. “Did you ever get fed up?… I mean did you ever get scared that everything was going to go lousy unless you did something…? ” Holden goes through several plans. He at one point contemplates heading out west where he will pretend to be a deaf-mute and live a quiet life.

At another point, Holden proposes to Sally to escape this world with him. It is finally to his younger sister Phoebe that Holden reveals his ultimate plan. Although Holden describes the situation in a very colorful and symbolic manner, he essentially tells Phoebe that he wants to prevent children from growing up. He blames the world’s corruption on adults and believes that hen he stops the children from growing up, he will preserve their innocence and save the world. It takes most of the book before Holden begins to realize that he is helpless to stop this corruption.

Finally, he realizes that not only is there nothing that he can do, but there is nowhere he can go to hide from it. Holden takes a while to comprehend these concepts. One good example is when Holden is delivering the note to his sister. He encounters a “*censored*-you” written on the wall. Holden careful rubs this off with his hand so as to protect the innocent children from reading it. Later on, he finds *censored*-you” scratched into the surface with a knife. He discovers that he can’t efface this one.

Even in the timeless peace of the Egyptian tomb room at the museum, there is an un-erasable “*censored*-you. ” This incident is the beginning of Holden’s realization that his dreams are unattainable. Ironically enough, it is one of the “innocent” children whom he is trying to protect who finally helps him come to terms with this realization. It is Phoebe who challenges his plan to escape out west. As he is telling Phoebe that she can not run away, he discovers that he too can not run away. “You can’t ever find a lace that is nice and peaceful because there isn’t any.

The final break-down comes near the end of the book when he is watching Phoebe on the carousel. “All the kids kept trying to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she’d fall off the goddam horse, but I didn’t say anything or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but it’s bad if you say anything to them. ” Becoming “the catcher” becomes obviously unrealistic. The gold rings are ironically not gold but really brass-plated iron.

The gold rings are symbols of the corrupted world which always “wears” a shiny surface to hide its evil. It is at this point that Holden sees that he can not stop children from growing up and therefore losing their innocence. They will fall if they fall; there is nothing that can be done. Shortly after this point, Holden has his nervous breakdown. His breakdown is due to this depressing realization that the world is corrupt and filled with evil. He knows now with a sickening certainty that he is powerless to stop both evil and maturation. As a matter of fact, it is “bad” to do so.

The Catcher in the Rye and The Stranger

Holden Caulfield and Mersault have both been alienated in their worlds as the authors have so clearly portrayed in both books. But as much as both have been alienated, one is an essentialist while the other remains an existentialist. Holden Caulfield being the essentialist that he is, has psychological motivation for every action he takes. He is a teenager that is struggling with the fact that everyone has to grow up, which to him means that you have to become phony or corrupt.

While on the other hand Mersault, he existentialist, does things for no reason whatsoever. He is a completely aloof, unattached , unemotional person. He doesnt think much about events or their consequences, nor does he express much feeling in relationships or during emotional times. The similarities between Holden and Mersault are the way they are both in a sense alienated from the worlds in which they live in. Holden Caulfield believes that all adults are phony so he doesnt want to become one and so he distances himself from the adult world.

He feels that when youre a child you view the world without any bias, you see everything for what it is. So to stay a child he constantly flunks out of schools back and forth. When you graduate from highschool you are going to the next level whether it be college or whatever else you want to do, everyone around you will view you as an adult and you yourself will become one. After highschool, most people tend to grow up but Caulfield is keeping himself in highschool so that he doesnt. In the beginning of the book, Holden sees everyone he knows as phony.

He feels that he is surrounded by hypocrites in a school filled with fakery. Principal Thurmur, the principal of Holdens high school of which he got kicked out of, Pencey, was the leader of the whole charade. During a teacher/parent day, Principal Thurmur would only say hello to the wealthy parents of students. He would not associate himself with those that were not financially stable, because he was fake. So taking into account the way his principal is, it just adds on to his hatred of adults and fear of becoming one.

Mersault on the other hand, gets alienated from the society in which he lives in which is still the one we live in today. Mersault shows no feelings towards the things that happen to him or the things he does. His own mother died and when he asked his boss for two days off he was wondering if his boss was mad at the fact he took a four day weekend. He even went as far as to tell his boss that it wasnt his fault. Mersault rarely shows any feeling in situations which would, for most people, elicit strong emotions like n his relationship with Marie Cardona.

She asked him to marry her and he responded that it doesnt matter to him, and if she wants to get married he would agree. She also asked him if he loved her and he responded that marriage isnt such a serious thing and doesnt require love. In our society, a person like Mersault who shows no feeling is likely to be rejected. Towards the end of the book, Mersault kills an Arab for no reason whatsoever. During the trial, he is unwilling to lie about the killing of the Arab.

Boys Will Be Boys

Holden Caulfield, portrayed in the J. D. Salinger novel Catcher in the Rye as an adolescent struggling to find his own identity, possesses many characteristics that easily link him to the typical teenager living today. The fact that they book was written more than forty years ago clearly exemplifies the saying “boys will be boys” no matter what period of time is taking place. Holden’s actions are those that any teenage can clearly relate with.

The desire for independence, the sexually related encounters, the questioning of one’s religion, the individual view of the world as a whole, the language, and dealing with teenage pressures such as drinking and smoking are issues that almost all teens have had or will have to deal with in their adolescent years. Thusly, this novel and its main character’s experiences can easily be related to and will forever link Holden with every member of society, because everyone was or will be a teen. The first and most obvious characteristic found in most teens, including Holden, would be the desire for independence.

Throughout the novel, Holden is not once wishing to have his parents help in any way. He has practically lived his entire life in dorms at prestigious schools, and has learned quite well how to be on his own. “This tendency of teenagers took place even in ancient history, where the freshly developed teen opts to leave the cave and hunt for his own food” (Kegel 54). Every teenager tries, in his or her own way, to be independent. Instead of admitting to one’s parents of a wrongful deed, the teen tries covering up the mistake or avoiding it in hopes that they won’t get in any rouble.

They feel that they have enough intelligence to think through a problem without going to their parents for assistance. When Holden hears the news that he has been expelled from Pency, he concludes that his parents would not know of this for a few days. Therefore, he would wait from Saturday until Wednesday, to let his parents “get it and thoroughly digest it” (25) and then face the consequences, which will more than likely be less severe after his parents calmed down. He states, “I didn’t want to be around when they first got it. My mother gets very hysterical.

She’s not too bad after she gets something thoroughly digested, though” (51). In taking the independent route, Holden does not look for sympathy or help from either of his parents. He feels that he can deal with his situation by waiting until the next school year in order to apply himself a little better. Another characteristic of a teenager, usually of the male gender, would be the widespread subject of sex. As everyone knows, during and after puberty, males have a stronger fascination with the issue and related experiences. Holden is no different. “In my mind, I’m the biggest sex manic you ever saw.

Sometimes I can think of very crumby stuff I wouldn’t mind doing if the opportunity came up” (62). Although Holden honestly states to the reader that he is a virgin; he still has encounters associated with sexual activity. First and foremost, Holden actually obtains a prostitute during a brief stay at a hotel room. Holden never has sexual intercourse with this woman, but it does show that he is a teenager looking for affection and pleasure. Also, he proclaimed that he had plenty of opportunities to “give the time” (32) to other women, but he never quite knew to do it while on a date.

Holden is very much like the average teen in this regard. The media and other primary sources in teen lives have taken an interest in sex, and have made it seem like it is the greatest thing known to mankind. Most teenagers find it slightly embarrassing to admit to being chaste, mainly due to the fact that they think everyone is doing it; which is clearly false. Teenagers want to experience and experiment with sex, and even if they choose to not have sex until marriage, they will fantasize about it. This is yet another example of the similarities in which Holden and the typical teen share.

Sex and religion almost go hand in hand today amongst the teenage population. Do teens wait for marriage like the Bible insists or should teens defy the rules outlined by the Bible and have pre-marital sex? Although the novel does not quite refer to sex in a religious sense, it is a good example of choices teens are forced to make. Teens, along with many other members of society, do not agree with every guideline that the Bible sets out for them. They have to decide how large a role religion is going to play in their lives. Holden says that he, in some ways, is “an atheist” (Breit 82).

He sometimes prays to Jesus, and yet other times he feels like he just cannot pray because of his likes, dislikes, and indifferent views of the church. This can be related to many teenagers, for religion is not always an easy subject. Teens sometimes feel that not all information on a particular religion is completely true. Some teens toy with the fact that their faith, if they have one, is actually factual. Holden feels that the information on Jesus is probably true, but he is a little suspicious of the Disciples and other characters from the Bible.

Take the Disciples, for instance. They annoy the hell out of me, if you want to know the truth. They were all right after Jesus was dead and all, but while he was alive, they were about as much use to him as a hole in the head” (99). He has many questions, as does all of society, of some contradicting issues concerning religion. As every teenager perceives the world in one way or another, Holden too has his own individual views on the world, in which he sees as an evil and corrupt place where there is no peace.

This perception of the world does not change significantly through the novel. However as the novel progresses, Holden gradually comes to the realization that he is powerless to change this. “During the short time period of Holden’s life covered in this book, he does succeed in making us perceive that the world is crazy” (Stevenson 216). Shortly after Holden leaves Pency Prep he checks into the Edmont Hotel. This is where Holden’s turmoil begins. Holden spends the following evening in this hotel that was “full of perverts and morons. (There were) screwballs all over the place” (188).

His situation only deteriorates from this point on as the more he looks around this world, the more depressing life seems. Around every corner, Holden sees evil. He looks out on a world that appears completely immoral and unscrupulous. The three days we learn of from the novel places a distressed Holden in the vicinity of Manhattan. The city is decked with decorations and holiday splendor; yet, much to Holden’s despair, he seldom yields any occasions of peace, charity or even genuine merriment. Holden is surrounded by what he views as drunks, perverts, morons and screwballs.

These convictions, which Holden holds, waver very momentarily during only one particular scene in the book. The scene is that with Mr. Antolini. After Mr. Antolini patted Holden on the head while he was sleeping, Holden jumped up and ran out thinking that Mr. Antolini was a pervert as well. This is the only time during the novel where Holden thinks twice about considering someone as a pervert. After reviewing Mr. Antolini, Holden finally concludes that maybe he wasn’t making a “flitty” (190) pass at him. “Maybe he just likes patting guys’ heads as they sleep” (191).

This is really the only time Holden actually considers a positive side. This event does not constitute a significant change. As Holden himself says, “It’s not too bad when the sun’s out, but the sun only comes out when it feels like coming out” (200). The sun of course is a reference to decency through the common association of light and goodness. His perception of the world would remain the same. Many teenagers today see the world in a way that everyone is out to get them. They believe if they do not get what they want that life is not fair.

Holden apparently feels the same way. The one conviction that does not change during the novel is Holden’s belief that he can change the world. On his date with Sally, Holden reveals his feelings. “Did you ever get fed upI mean did you ever get scared that everything was going to go lousy unless you did something” (131). Holden goes through several plans. It takes most of the book before Holden begins to realize that he is helpless to stop this corruption. Finally, he realizes that not only is there nothing that he can do, but there is nowhere he can go to hide from it.

This relates Holden back to the typical teenager in the sense that everyone wants to change the world in some drastic way. But in the end, they realize that there’s nothing for them do to that is so significant and that there is no escape from the harsh reality of the world surrounding them. “Adolescents use their own unique language of slang and swearing, which is partly to rebel and partly to find their own identity” (Carlton 337). This typical teenage trait is also exhibited in Holden. When someone listens to a teenager they usually hear a variety of swear words and slang terms.

Holden uses quite a bit of slang and profanity in his speech. For example, when he is talking about the football game near the beginning of the novel, he says: I was standing way the hell on top of Thomsen Hill, right next to this crazy cannonYou could see the two teams bashing each other all over the place. You couldn’t see the grandstand too hot, but you could hear them all yelling, deep and terrific on the Pencey sidescrawny and faggy on the Saxon Hall side (2) When Holden says, “crazy,” “bashing each other all over the place,” “hot,” and “faggy,” he is using slang terms.

Each generation has its own variety of slang terms each with separate and almost ironic terms. Some slang used by today’s teens means exactly the opposite of what would be thought. Each child is taught that there are some “bad” words or swear words that should not be used, but as like most teenagers, Holden swears quite often. Holden’s sister, Phoebe, makes a comment on his swearing. She merely requests Holden to, “Don’t swear so much” (168). Vulgar language is a pitfall of adolescence. Another major aspect of teenage life, are such pressures of drinking and smoking.

As most teenagers in today’s world have come across alcohol at one point or another, Holden has given into the pressures of underage drinking to drown his sorrows. Throughout the novel, Holden drinks even though he is underage. “Many drink to escape the problems that they face day to day, and in the novel it is apparent that Holden is drinking so that he can stop thinking about the fact that he has gotten expelled from yet another school” (Barr 93). Drinking is a major issue in the world today with such dangers of binge drinking and drinking and driving. Holden, like the typical teenager is also curious about drinking.

The media clearly exploits drinking and makes it appear “cool. ” His curiosity gets the best of him and he continually drinks. Another problem with teenage drinking, at all times throughout history, is the great ease at which it can be acquired. In the novel, Holden can simply walk into a bar of some sort, order a drink and in most cases, get served. Although society is more stringent with underage drinking today, there are ways for teens to easily acquire alcohol, as Holden does in this novel. Holden is also an avid chain smoker. It seems that every chance he gets, he is lighting up yet another cigarette.

Smoking is an adult activity, and Holden smokes to be more of an adult. Even though the cigarettes taste bad, he still smokes them. He smokes to ease his nerves and simply because he has become addicted to the substance. Smoking is a big problem faced by teens in all generations. Many smoke to rebel against their parents or because, like alcohol, it is viewed sometimes as the “cool” thing to do. A large portion of today’s teens smoke although they are aware of the dangers like the fact that tobacco is the only product which kills a third of its users.

Smoking is a bad thing, but teenagers of every day and age are faced with this. As seen in these previous examples, and also found in more instances, Holden Caulfied truly resembles the typical teen. He has gone through the same situations, encountered many of the same problems, and he also has acted in similar ways as the average teen. Teenage adolescence is a period of transition between childhood and adulthood. In this period, we all experience development both physically and emotionally, including the epitome of all teens, Holden Caulfield.

Catcher in the Rye Essay

Holden wanted to be the catcher in the rye. Holden wanted to catch children before they fell off the cliff and realized how the world really is, the world is disappointing. He wanted to keep children innocent and pure. There are several quotes and examples to support this in Catcher in the Rye like when the kid was singing in the park of Radio City, the school scene, Allie’s death and Holden’s rage over Allie’s death. Allie’s death helps make Holden’s decision about wanting to be a catcher in the rye.

Holden wished he could have caught Allie before he fell off the cliff and died. Holden wanted to save Allie to catch him before it was too late. The night of Allie’s funeral Holden smashed every window in his garage with his fists. Holden tried smashing the windows on the car but his fists were too badly injured to do it. Holden went to the hospital bleeding during Allie’s funeral. Holden did not attend his brother’s funeral, so that he would not have to completely let go of Allie. Holden was changed so much by his brother’s death, Allie’s death.

Holden often talks to himself, like Allie was still right next to him, thinking he is having a conversation with Allie. This shows Holden has unresolved issues of Allie’s death, that he has not gotten over it yet. Holden never goes to Allie’s grave, to see his tombstone. Thinking that if he never goes to see him, Allie death would never have really taken place in Holden’s mind, kind of like hear no evil, see no evil. Holden watches Phoebe ride on the carousel, turning and turning on it, and thinks “so damn happy all of a sudden”.

This recreates the pattern of the catcher in the rye story” writes Malcolm Bradbury. Holden, the protective, watcher observes Phoebe’s happiness of childhood. Holden realizes that children are born innocent. Much like Adam and Eve in the Bible, both were innocent until coaxed into eating the fruit of knowledge from the tree by the snake of evil, in the Garden of Eden. God told them not to eat the fruit from the tree of knowledge but Adam and Eve wanted to be as smart as God. To punish Adam and Eve, God made the fruit get stuck in their throats and give them sin.

After that Adam and Eve started wearing clothes because they were no longer innocent. Children in Holden’s mind are innocent when they are young and he wants to save them so the children will stay innocent forever so they wouldn’t have to face reality. Holden tells Phoebe what he would like to do “If [he] had his own god dam choice”. Holden tells Phoebe about that song he misheard from the little kid in the park in Radio City, “If a body catch somebody coming through the rye”. Holden pictures all these little kids running around a field and him being the only adult around.

And if any kids were running around with out watching where they are going, he would catch them before they fell off the cliff and hit the harsh reality of how the world really is, sad, disappointing and lonely in Holden’s mind. While he was at Phoebe’s school “[Holden] saw something that drove him crazy. Someone had written ‘Fuck You’ on the wall. (Salinger 201) Those two little words, drove him “…damn near crazy”. All Holden could think about is how the little kids in the school would have seen it and wondered what it meant.

Then some dirty kid would tell the little kids and the little kids would have been changed forever by those two little words. Holden rubbed the message on the wall off, hoping nobody saw him doing it so they would not think that he wrote it on the wall. He tried protecting the children from vulgar language, to keep them innocent. I went down by a different staircase, and I saw another “Fuck you” on the wall. I tried to rub it off with my hand again. (Salinger 202) Holden tried rubbing the words off the wall, so the children would not see it but the words were etched in to the wall.

Holden realizes even if he had a million years he could not erase half the “fuck you”s in the entire world. That him only being one man could only do so much, by himself. At the end of the novel, “Holden crosses over a line of innocence to experience… he learns that ‘you can’t ever find a place that’s nice and peaceful, because there isn’t any’” Malcolm Bradbury criticizes. Holden wanted to find a place so good and innocent that there would not be a need for him to be the catcher in the rye. And that he must grow up and perceives the world in a different way.

The Catcher in The Rye: Unreachable Dreams

Many people find that their dreams are unreachable. Holden Caulfield realizes this in J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. As Holden tells his story, he recounts the events since leaving the Pencey School to his psychiatrist. At first, Holden sounds like a typical, misguided teenager, rebellious towards his parents, angry with his teachers, and flunking out of school. However, as his story progresses, it becomes clear that Holden is indeed motivated, just not academically. He has a purpose: to protect the young and innocent minds of young children from the “horrors” of adult society.

He hopes to freeze the children in time, as wax figures are frozen in a museum. After interacting with Phoebe, his younger sister, Holden realizes that this goal is quite unachievable. Holden wants to be the Catcher in the Rye, then realizes it is an unreachable ideal. Holden begins his story misguided and without direction. After flunking out of the Pencey School, Holden decides to leave early. Before he leaves, though, he visits his teacher, Mr. Spencer. Mr. Spencer and Holden talk about his direction in life: “Do you feel absolutely no concern for your future, boy?

Oh, I feel some concern for my future, all right. Sure. Sure, I do. ‘ I thought about it for a minute. But not too much, I guess,'” (14). After leaving Pencey, he checks into a hotel where he invites a prostitute up to his room. He gets cold feet and decides not to have intercourse with her, though. Later, Holden decides to take his old girlfriend, Sally Hayes, to the theater. After taking her to the theater, Holden formulates a crazy plan which entails running away with Sally, getting married, and growing old together. Sally thinks that he is crazy, and she decides to go home.

During his stay away from home, Holden drinks and smokes, showing even more misdirection. However, when Holden returns home and talks to his sister, Phoebe, his direction becomes clear. Holden wants to be the Catcher in the Rye to protect children from the world in which he is forced to live. While talking with Phoebe, she asks Holden what he would like to be. He responds saying: “Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around–nobody big, I mean–except me.

And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff–I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That’s all I’d do all day. I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all. ‘” (173) Holden wants to protect the innocence of his sister and every other innocent child in the world. Before Holden meets Sally for their date, he stops in front of the Museum of Natural History and begins to reminisce.

He thinks about he way he visited the museum when he was younger. He also tells that every time one visits the museum, he is changed in some way, but the figures in the exhibits always stay the same. He wants to be able to preserve some things in the glass: “Certain things they should stay the way they are. You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone,” (122). Holden wants the innocence of children to be frozen behind that glass. When he visits Phoebe’s school to give her a note, Holden notices two instances of graffiti on the walls.

He succeeds in rubbing one of them off cannot rub off the other. It depresses Holden to think that someday this kind of graffiti will spoil his sister Phoebe and all of her companions. Up to this point, keeping young children from his plight is Holden’s sole motive. He soon realizes that this is impossible. Holden sees that becoming the Catcher in the Rye is an unattainable ideal. When he meets Phoebe during her lunch break at school, he has made up his mind to leave and hitchhike out west. Phoebe knows this and asks if she can come along. This overwhelms Holden, and he decides not to leave.

Instead, he decides to take her to the zoo and to the carousel. Phoebe gets on the carousel and finds her favorite horse. When the carousel starts Holden notices Phoebe trying to grab for the golden ring. He knows this is dangerous but must let Phoebe do it: “All the kids kept trying to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she’d fall off the goddam horse, but I didn’t say anything or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything.

If hey fall off, they fall off, but it’s bad if you say anything to them,” (211). He understands that sometimes children must learn things the hard way. As he sees Phoebe riding the carousel he begins to cry. He sees perfection in that moment, and he knows that she will soon change as the world influences her. Holden finally realizes that he will not be able to protect his sister or anyone from falling into the adult world. Holden transforms from a dreamy idealist into a down-to-earth existentialist. When he understands that his dream is far from possible, he has o start over.

Throughout his story he talks about people being phonies, which suggests that he has some ideal to which he compares people. He tells his psychiatrist that he does not know what will happen in the future: “A lot of people, especially this one psychoanalyst guy they have here, keeps asking me if I’m going to apply myself when I go back to school next September. It’s such a stupid question, in my opinion. I mean how do you know what you’re going to do till you do it? ” (213). Holden now knows that he must live life by the moment and not with quixotic ideals.

The Language Of Catcher In The Rye

The passage of adolescence has served as the central theme for many novels, but J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, long a staple in academic lesson plans, has captured the spirit of this stage of life in hyper-sensitive form, dramatizing Holden Caulfield’s vulgar language and melodramatic reactions. Written as the autobiographical account of a fictional teenage prep school student Holden Caulfield, The Catcher in the Rye deals with material that is socially scandalous for the times (Gwynn, 1958).

As an emotional, intelligent, inquisitive, and painfully sensitive young man, Holden puts his nner world to the test through the sexual mores of his peers and elders, the teachings of his education, and his own emerging sense of self. Throughout the years, the language of the story has startled some readers. Salinger’s control of Holden’s easy, conversational manner makes the introduction of these larger themes appear natural and believable. (Bloom, 1990). At the time of the novel through today, Holden’s speech rings true to the colloquial speech of teenagers.

Holden, according to many reviews in the Chicago Tribune, the New Yorker, and the New York Times, accurately aptures the informal speech of an average intelligent, educated, northeastern American adolescent (Costello, 1990). Such speech includes both simple description and cursing. For example, Holden says, “They’re nice and all”, as well as “I’m not going to tell you my whole goddam autobiography or anything. ” In the first instance, he uses the term “nice” which oversimplifies his parents’ character, implying he does not wish to disrespect them, yet at the same time he does not praise them.

At best he deems them as “nice and all. Holden further cuts short his description, but in a more curt manner, hen he states he will not tell his “whole goddam autobiography or anything. ” From the start the reader picks up Holden’s hostility and unwillingness to share his views strictly by his use of language (Salzman, 1991). From the last two examples, another colloquialism can be seen. Holden has a habit of ending his descriptions with tag phrases such as “and all” or “or anything. ” (Salzman, 1991). Not only does Holden speak like this in the beginning of the novel, but throughout the book, making this pattern a part of his character.

One could imagine Holden frequently ending his sentences ith “and all,” realizing it is a character trait since not all teenagers used that phrase. So the “and all” tag to Holden’s speech served to make his speech authentic and individual. (Salzman, 1991). Salinger intentionally used such speech patterns to help individualize Holden, yet to also make him a believable teenager of the early 1950’s. Another example of how Holden’s speech helped define his character is how he constantly had to confirm any affirmation he made, as if even he did not quite believe himself.

Such reconfirmations include phrases such as “… if you want to know the truth,” or “… t really does. ” Holden says the first phrase several times. “I have no wind, if you want to know the truth,” “I’m pacifist, if you want to know the truth,” and a variation: “She had a lot of sex appeal, too, if you really want to know. ” In each of the above instances, Holden makes a statement then feels compelled to clarify that is he is not making it up but is, in fact, telling the truth. These mannerisms may point to several aspects of his character.

For example, Holden is on the verge of failing out of preparatory school and fears telling his parents. Because he did ot do well in school, Holden may have felt as though no one ever took him seriously and realized his actions left him with no solid academic standing. Since Holden is essentially a failure at school with no serious friendships, he attempts to solidify some communication in asking for approval by stating “if you want to know the truth. ” Holden wants people to believe him so he speeks to seek approval (Costello, 1990).

Again, Salinger creates this speech pattern as believable for a common teenager, yet it also seems to belong individually to Holden. The Catcher in the Rye gained much of its notoriety for the language sed in it, particularly the crude words (Gwynn, 1958). Like most colloquial uses of body parts, accidents of birth, or religious connotations, Holden does not strictly make use of words in reference to their original meaning. The word “hell” is a staple of Holden’s vocabulary, and he uses it often with both positive and negative connotations.

In one instance, he tells us he had a “helluva time,” when he and Phoebe sneaked away and had a good time shopping for shoes downtown. Other statements include “pretty as hell,” “playful as hell,” or “hot as hell. ” Holden’s perception that situations were anything but normal in some elation to the extremes of the usage of “hell” is applied to both positive and negative situations. In each use of the word, Holden uses “hell” as a way to expresses the confusion of adolescence and his own regular use of it illustrates his own extreme sensitivity as a character (Gwynn, 1958).

As Holden’s experiences change, so does his use of crude language. When he is caught up in his own antics and is enraged, “sonuvabitch” and “bastard” frequently find their way into his vocabulary. However, when he addresses the reader as a narrator, Holden rarely, if ever, slips into his abitual use of swearing (Costello, 1990). “Sonuvabitch” is reserved for his extreme anger, as when he kept calling Stradlater a “moron sonuvabitch” for the boy’s ostensibly offensive treatment of Jane Gallagher.

Again, Holden’s sporadic use of “sonuvabitch” in his angriest moments alerts the reader to the serious quality of his anger. Salinger carefully crafted such speech patterns to help us identify Holden’s character without lengthy descriptions of such. Here, the offending words lets the reader know when Holden is most angry and the types of situations that make him so, thereby offering further insight nto his character, often through the use of a single word.

Holden’s regular use of curse words to describe his view of any given situation leaves the impression his vocabulary is limited, as observed in one much younger than himself. However, Holden recognizes that he has a limited vocabulary and uncomprehendingly identifies it himself (Salzman, 1991). He makes use of cursing in an effort to add emphasis to his otherwise simplistic verbiage. For example, Holden says “That guy Morrow was about as sensitive as a goddam toilet seat” (Salinger, 1951). The best reference Holden could think of was “toilet seat,” a simple item readily grasped by even young children.

To give this simile more emphasis, Holden, as usual, tosses in a curse word. Holden makes another toilet-like reference when he says “He started handling my paper like it was a turd or something,” (Salinger, 1951) when referring to his teacher’s expressions and body language while picking up some written work Holden had done. “Turd” is a word a recently potty-trained child might use instead of a prep school teen. So Holden not only admits to having a limited vocabulary, but he has a vocabulary seemingly imited to one even younger than his age.

Holden’s regular use of cursing demonstates not only the depth of his emotion, but signals the reader to the fact that he is caught in the stage where childhood and approaching maturity collide. He relates poorly to instances other than those from his early youth, and tries in vain to bridge the gap between adolescent and adult worlds with his use of profanity. He fails to notice that his cursing loses much of his intended rebellious impact by his overuse of the words. Rather than successfully rebelling against school or his arents, Holden appears sometimes tortured and pathetic, and sometimes just plain silly.

This superficiality of youth leaves him with little ability to communicate because he relies so heavily on simple words and thoughts to express the majority of his feelings. While Holden’s teenage angst is apparent, Salinger carefully crafted Holden’s vocabulary to create a character who is believable. As Holden’s vocabulary and outlook on life demonstrate to us his character as a fictional persona, the realistic flavor of his vocabulary mixed with emotion unfailingly ties him with the harsh realities of adolescence and the youth of his time.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye was an interesting and controversial book. I chose to read the book because of the negative status it has with parents, teachers, and school. I wanted to discover what the roots of this controversy are. The main character who narrates throughout the book, Holden Caulfield, tells about his life before and after he is kicked from Pencey Prep. At Pencey, the only subject he got a decent grade in was English, all others he failed and didnt show up to regularly. The meat of the book consists mainly of what Holden does and thinks after he leaves Pencey.

His internal conflict after leaving is what his parents will think when they find out he had been kicked from another college. The title of the book portrays the best idea of what Holden wants to do with his life. He imagines a group of children playing in a rye field thats adjacent to a cliff. He described himself to his sister as the person that would catch the kids if they ever got near the edge. This book was truly enjoyable to read, to see Holdens strange and peculiar outlook on life. He had very distinct things that he hated and liked.

For example, the only kind of books he enjoyed were books written by his brother, who wrote short stories. In many parts of the book, he is remembering a girl he once went out with or liked at one time. In one instance he called a girl he had the number of in the middle of the night from a drab hotel room. I think he did this solely to hear a girls voice. The controversy that has arisen from this book also became clear after reading it. Holden has an overall negative attitude about everything and the way he lives his life.

Also, his being kicked from colleges numerous times doesnt set a good example either. This novel by J. D. Salinger about a troubled teen is one thats controversial and fun to read at the same time. The controversy involved with it makes it more enjoyable to read, knowing that many others have protested against the very same words. The main thing I myself enjoyed about the book was the way that Holden perceived every-day, normal situations. He looked at them in a way thats so different than normal that it is almost funny at some parts in the book. It was this that kept the pages turning for me.

Catcher In the Rye- Use of Lan

Not many great novels were produced during the post World War II era. Perhaps the greatest novel published was J. D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye. This book, just like all other great works, was met by scathing criticism and unyielding praise. Many literary critics marveled at Salingers genius use of language to make Holden Caulfield, the main character, unbelievably realistic. Through Holdens thoughts and dialogues, Salinger successfully created a teenage boy.

Because of that The Catcher in the Rye became one of the few great post World War II works. The language used in The Catcher in the Rye has been a topic of controversy in the literary critics realm. Holden Caulfields thoughts and comments serve to deepen his personality and provide entertainment. Salinger wanted to create a typical teenager but also wanted Holden to be an individual. Like most teenagers, Holden speaks in trite sentences however he also uses words in places that were then uncommon.

Holden often leaves his sentences dangling with words like “and all” and “or anything. ” Often he uses those phrase to extend some indescribable emotion or action like ” how my parents were occupied and all before they had me” or “theyre nice and all. ” But many times there is no significance at all to the expressions as in “was in the Revolutionary War and all,” “It was December and all” and “no gloves or anything. ” (Salinger 5-7) Holden has many expressions which appear consistently throughout the novel.

Some places, the expressions only serve to make Holden more realistic, other places Holden is trying to reinforce his values. Holden repeatedly comments on his hatred toward phonies. That is one thing that Holden hates more than almost anything. That could be the reason he frequently confirms a statement with “I really do,” “It really does,” or “if you want to know the truth. ” He also confirms comments by repeating them twice like “She likes me a lot. I mean shes quite fond of me. ” (Salinger 141) or “He was a very nervous guy- I mean a very nervous guy. Salinger 165)

He uses different phrases and styles to give a more factual backing to his comments, thus preventing himself from seeming like a phony. Holdens speech usually stays away vulgar and obscene. Whenever he says words like “ass,” it is merely teenage vernacular for a part of the human anatomy. He doesnt say it to be offensive. “Ass” is simply another word Holden uses to better convey ideas. He can mean cold by saying “freezing my ass off,” or incompetence “in a half-assed way,” or even disbelief “Game, my ass.

His vocabulary contains many words that are religious but are not used that way. Holden says “hell” to mean “to a great extent” when describing something: “We had a helluva good time,” “old as hell,” “playful as hell. ” He uses words that pertain to the divine such as “Gods sake,” “God” and “goddam,” however, he never means it in a blasphemous manner. They are just parts of his speech. He uses those words casually when referring to his “goddam hunting cap” or saying somebody is a “goddam moron. ” For more emotional circumstances, Holden reserves “Chrissake” or “Jesus Christ.

Even though Holden is not too religious, he never uses “Chrissake” unless he is depressed or enraged. For extreme anger Holden keeps “sonuvabitch” ready. After his fight with Stradlater, Holden continually refers to him as a “moron sonuvabitch. ” His anger is also reflected in the sudden increase in appearance of “goddam. ” While the words Holden uses may not be proper he is not trying to be sacrilegious. Salinger is merely using the language to make Holden seem like a normal teenager and also to reflect Holdens state of mind.

A popular word in Holdens youth was “crap. ” It was a word that could be inserted into any part of a sentence, just as Holden did. He used it to mean a dirty substance “I spilled some crap all over my gray flannel,” or miscellaneous items “I was putting in my galoshes and crap. ” He also used it to mean something undesirable “The show was on the crappy side. ” Holden also used a couple phrases like “shoot the crap,” and “chuck the crap” to mean chit-chat. Many characters in literature use the adjective old a lot.

Gatsby, from F. Scott Fitzgeralds novel The Great Gatsby, used it. Holden uses it in the same manner as Gatsby. Both of them use “old” towards the familiar or as a term of endearment. Gatsby would always refer to acquaintances as “old sport” and Holden refers to his sister as “old Phoebe. ” Holden probably acquired this expression from that novel because he says, “I liked Ring Lardner and The Great Gatsby and all. I did, too. I was crazy about The Great Gatsby. Old Gatsby. Old sport. ” (Salinger 183) Holden is a pretty nice guy.

He tries not to insult people but when he gets mad he lets his tongue loose, the result of which is often a powerfully invective statement. Holden just combines all of his speech idioms to form the nastiest comments he can. This was obvious after his fight with Stradlater when Holden said, “Get your dirty stinking moron knees off my chest,” (Salinger 43) and “Youre a dirty stupid sonuvabitch of a moron. ” (Salinger 43) This also provides a good comic effect. Holden is able to describe certain situations very well.

He makes similes that are so unexpected that they are hilarious. To describe someones personality he says, “That guy Morrow was about as sensitive as a goddam toilet seat. ” (Salinger 52) To describe Spencers facial expression he comments, “He put my goddam paper down then and looked at me like hed just beaten the hell out of me in Ping-Pong or something. ” (Salinger 14) Such similes catch the reader off guard and are extremely funny, yet they get the message across. Many times Holden refrains from blatantly stating something in an offensive way.

At times he will talk like a mature man and refer to a drunk as an “alcoholic” and instead of saying that he hadnt ever had sex he says “lose my virginity. ” Other times Holden will do almost the exact opposite; instead of using the mature and politically correct phrasing he will revert back to teenage slang. Instead of saying “lose my virginity,” he says “to give someone the time. ” Rather than saying somebody is an “alcoholic” he would say the person is a “booze hound. ” Inconsistencies like this make Holden more life-like.

Holden is on the verge of adulthood so his language is going to be a mix between adult manner and teenage slang. Holdens speech pattern is very revealing about his personality and age. After certain comical events or after a show of innocence, Holden would often say “that killed me. ” That further proves that Holden appreciates innocence and that he is able to see humor in society. Holdens lack of vocabulary shows how young and uneducated Holden really is. At one point he even admits it when he says, “Boy! I said.

I also say Boy! uite a lot. Partly because I have a lousy vocabulary and partly because I act quite young for my age sometimes. ” (Salinger 12) The language in The Catcher in the Rye sparked debate. The book dealt with subject matter that was considered inappropriate and it contained words that publishers would never print. Holdens battle for the preservation of innocence involved erasing the word “Fuck You. ” Many conservatives felt this was not reading material for children. The book was banned from many schools and libraries.

Pinsker 13) However Holden was not trying to promote the word. His quest was to eradicate it, but he knew that was impossible. No matter what, the graffiti would still be there and the children would be exposed to it. He could not catch all the children and prevent their loss of innocence. He even says, “If you had a million years to do it in, you couldnt rub out even half the Fuck You signs in the world. ” (Salinger 262) Even though the critics thought the language was not right, it served an important literary function.

Even though there were some critics who thought The Catcher in the Rye should be banned, it still became the greatest novel of post World War II. J. D. Salingers genius use of language throughout the novel made Holden Caulfield human. Because of the accurate portrayal of a teenage boy, the reader is able to become familiar with Holdens idiosyncrasies, therefore making him seem more realistic. By making Holden come to life, Salinger was able to create one of the most memorable characters in all of literature.

The Catcher in the Rye

In The Catcher in the Rye, Holden views the world as an evil and corrupt place where there is no peace. His view of the world does not change much through the novel. However as the novel continues, Holden gradually comes to the realization that he is powerless to change this. In the book Holden succeeds in making us think that the world is crazy. Shortly after Holden leaves Pencey Prep, he checks in to the Edmont Hotel in Manhattan which was “full of perverts and morons. There were screwballs all over the place. ” His situation only worsens from this point on as the more he looks around this world, the more depressing life seems.

Around every corner Holden sees evil. He looks out on a world which appears immoral and corrupt. Holdens beliefs on the possibility that not everyone has eveil intentions change only once in the book. The scene is that with Mr. Antolini. After Mr. Antolini patted Holden on the head while he was sleeping, Holden jumped up and ran out thinking that Mr. Antolini was a pervert as well. This is the only time during the novel where Holden thinks twice about considering someone as a pervert. After reviewing Mr. Antolini, Holden finally decides that maybe he wasn’t making a “flitty” pass at him.

Maybe he just like patting guys heads as they sleep. This is really the only time in the novel where Holden actually considers a positive side. As Holden himself says, “It’s not too bad when the sun’s out, but the sun only comes out when it feels like coming out. ” The one idea that does change during the novel is Holden’s belief that he can change the world. On his date with Sally, Holden reveals his feelings. “Did you ever get fed up?… I mean did you ever get scared that everything was going to go lousy unless you did something… ” Holden goes through several plans.

At one point he thinks about heading out west where he would pretend to be a deaf-mute and live a quiet life. At another point Holden proposes to Sally to escape this world with him. It is finally to his younger sister Phoebe that Holden reveals his whole plan. Although Holden describes the situation in a very attractive manner, he basically tells Phoebe that he wants to prevent children from growing up. He blames the world’s evil on adults and believes that when he stops the children from growing up he will save their innocence and the world.

It takes most of the book before Holden begins to realize that he is helpless to stop this corruption. Finally, he realizes that not only is there nothing that he can do, but there is nowhere he can go to hide from it. It takes Holden awhile to understand this. One good example is when Holden is delivering the note to his sister. He encounters an expletive written on the wall. Holden careful rubs this off with his hand so as to protect the innocent children from reading it. Later on he finds the same expletive scratched into the surface with a knife. He discovers that he can’t erase this one.

Even in the timeless peace of the Egyptian tomb room at the museum there is an un-erasable expletive. This situation is the beginning of Holden’s understanding that his dreams of protecting youngsters are hopeless. Ironically enough, it is one of the “innocent” children that he is trying to protect who helps him come to terms with this fact. It is Phoebe who challenges his plan to escape out west. As he is telling Phoebe that she can not run away, he discovers that he too can not run away. “You can’t ever find a place that is nice and peaceful, because there isn’t any.

His break-down comes near the end of the book when he is watching Phoebe on the carousel. “All the kids kept trying to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she’d fall off the******* horse, but I didn’t say anything or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but it’s bad if you say anything to them. ” In the above passage from the novel, Holden hits the final breakdown. Being “the catcher” becomes obviously foolish.

The gold rings are ironically not gold, but really brass-plated iron. The gold rings are symbols of the corrupted world which always “wears” a shiny surface to hide its evil. It is at this point that Holden sees that he can not stop children from growing up and losing their innocence. They will fall if they fall, there is nothing that can be done. Shortly after this point Holden has his nervous breakdown. His breakdown is due to this realization that the world is incorrupt and filled with evil. He knows now with a certainty that he is powerless to stop both evil and growth.

Goow Will Hunting vs Holden Caulfield

Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye will have a better chance throughout life than Will Hunting from Good Will Hunting because of several reasons. First, Holden has birth parents who still care about him and help comfort him when he needs help. Another reason is how Will has grown up already with an adult brain and is set in his ways. Holden, on the other hand, is still growing up and might change his attitude on life. Another reason is how both characters received mental help in one way or another and the products of the help resulted in different results.

For example, Holden lost his depression and self-conciousness from the help he received as no viable proof was given that stated otherwise. On the counterpoint, Will admired the psychologist because the psychologist had faith in who he was, or he simply didn’t learn anything about who he is and what talents he possesses. Just the environment both authors gives me says that Holden still has a chance to change, while Will has an opportunity to change, but refuses to.

The Catcher in the Rye and Good Will Hunting are two stories that have compelling story lines as well as main characters. The characters do have numerous similarities. One of these include intelligence and understanding in their own subjects (Holden excelled in English in his school and Will excelled in advanced mathematics naturally). Holden and Will both were depressed about life and try to keep personal problems away from the people they love. They both would appreciate deep relationships between himself and a girl.

Both try to give the impression to other characters that they are tough and can handle heavy loads of stress. They also live close or inside heavily populated towns loaded with people with bad attitudes (Boston and New York). The list goes on and on as far as these misleading similarities go. The similarities are misleading because they can disguise the fact that their are differences. Some of the differences include age, time period, personalities (in general), everyday worries and stress sources, self confidence and even their approaches to life.

Holden Caufield will have a better chance in life than Will Hunting to what I have found to be true, although I could be wrong. Some could say that Will was helped because he did what he truly wanted to do, which was pursue the girl of his dreams knowing that he can land a good job almost anywhere where his talents are needed. Or even how Will finally got all his angst about his foster parents out when he cried to his psychologist.

The Catcher in the Rye – Narration

In J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, the first person narration is critical in helping the reader to know and understand the main character, Holden Caulfield. Holden, in his narration, relates a flashback of a significant period of his life, three days and nights on his own in New York City. Through his narration, Holden discloses to the reader his innermost thoughts and feelings. He thus provides the reader not only with information of what occurred, but also how he felt about what happened. Holden’s thoughts and ideas reveal many of his character traits.

One late Saturday night, four days before the beginning of school vacation, Holden is alone, bored and restless, wondering what to do. He decides to leave Pencey, his school, at once and travels to New York by train. He decides that, once in New York, he will stay in a cheap motel until Wednesday, when he is to return home. His plan shows the reader how very impetuous he is and how he acts on a whim. He is unrealistic, thinking that he has a foolproof plan, even though the extent of his plans are to “take a room in a hotel, and just take it easy till Wednesday. ”

Holden’s excessive thoughts on death are not typical of most adolescents. His near obsession with death might come from having experienced two deaths in his early life. He constantly dwells on Allie, his brother’s, death. From Holden’s thoughts, it is obvious that he loves and misses Allie. In order to hold on to his brother and to minimize the pain of his loss, Holden brings Allie’s baseball mitt along with him where ever he goes. The mitt has additional meaning and significance for Holden because Allie had written poetry, which Holden reads, on the baseball mitt.

Holden’s preoccupation with death can be seen in his contemplation of a dead classmate, James Castle. It tells the reader something about Holden that he lends his turtleneck sweater to this classmate, with whom he is not at all close. Holden’s feelings about people reveal more of his positive traits. He constantly calls people phonies, even his brother, D. B. , who ” has sold out to Hollywood. ” Although insulting, his seemingly negative feelings show that Holden is a thinking and analyzing, outspoken individual who values honesty and sincerity. He is unimpressed with people who try to look good in other’s eyes.

Therefore, since it is obvious that Holden is bright, the reason for his flunking out of school would seem to be from a lack of interest. Holden has strong feelings of love towards children as evidenced through his caring for Phoebe, his little sister. He is protective of her, erasing bad words from the walls in her school and in a museum, in order that she not learn from the graffiti. His fondness for children can be inferred when he tells her that, at some time in the future, he wants to be the only grown-up with “all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all.

He’ll stand on the edge of a cliff and catch anybody who starts to fall off the edge of the cliff. He got this image from his misinterpretation of a line from the Robert Burns poem, ” if a body catch a body comin’ through the rye. ” When situations are described, in person or in a book, they are influenced by the one who describes them, and by his or her perceptions and experiences. Through Holden’s expressions of his thoughts and feelings, the reader sees a youth, sensitive to his surroundings, who chooses to deal with life in unique ways.

Holden is candid, spontaneous, analytical, thoughtful, and sensitive, as evidenced by his narration. Like most adolescents, feelings about people and relationships are often on his mind. Unfortunately, in Holden’s case, he seems to expect the worst, believing that the result of getting close to people is pain. Pain when others reject you or pain when they leave you, such as when a friend walks off or a beloved brother dies. It would not have been possible to feel Holden’s feelings or understand his thoughts nearly as well had the book been written in third person.

The Catcher in the Rye

In The Catcher in the Rye, Holden views the world as an evil and corrupt place where there is no peace. This perception of the world does not change significantly through the novel. However as the novel progresses, Holden gradually comes to the realization that he is powerless to change this. During the short period of Holden’s life covered in this book, “Holden does succeed in making us believe that the world is crazy”.

Shortly after Holden leaves Pencey Prep he checks in to the EdmontHotel. This is where Holden’s turmoil begins. Holden spends the following evening in this hotel which was full of perverts and morons. There were) screwballs all over the place. ” His situation only deteriorates from this point on as the more he looks around this world, the more depressing life seems.

Around every corner Holden sees evil. He looks out on a world, which appears completely immoral. The three days we learn of from the novel place a distressed Holden in the are of Manhattan. The city is decked with decorations and holiday splendor, yet, much to Holden’s despair “seldom yields any occasions of peace, charity or even genuine merriment. “Holden is surrounded by what he views as drunks, erverts, morons and screwballs.

These convictions which Holden holds waver very momentarily during only one particular scene in the book. The scene is that with Mr. Antolini. After Mr. Antolini patted Holden on the head while he was sleeping, Holden jumped up and ran out thinking that Mr. Antolini was a pervert as well. This is the only time during the novel where Holden thinks twice about considering someone as a pervert. After reviewing Mr. Antolini, Holden finally concludes that maybe he wasn’t making a “flirty” pass at him. Maybe he just like patting guys heads as they sleep. This is really the only time in the ovel where Holden actually considers a positive side.

This event does not constitute a significant change. As Holden himself says, “It’s not too bad when the sun’s out, but the sun only comes out when it feels like coming out. “The sun of course is a reference to decency through the common association of light and goodness. His perception of the world remains the same. The one conviction that does change during the novel is Holden’s belief that he can change the world. On his date with Sally, Holden reveals his feelings. “Did you ever get fed up?… I mean did you ever get scared that everything was going o go lousy unless you did something… Holden goes through several plans.

Holden at one point contemplates heading out west where he will pretend to be a deaf-mute and live a quiet life. At another point Holden proposes to Sally to escape this world with him. It is finally to his younger sister Phoebe that Holden reveals his ultimate plan. Although Holden describes the situation in a very picturesque and symbolic manner he essentially tells Phoebe that he wants to prevent children from growing up. He blames the world’s corruption on adults and believes that when he stops the children from growing up he will preserve heir innocence and save the world.

It takes most of the book before Holden begins to realize that he is helpless to stop this corruption. Finally, he realizes that not only is there nothing that he can do, but there is nowhere he can go to hide from it. Holden takes awhile to comprehend these concepts. One good example is when Holden is delivering the note to his sister. He encounters a “*censored*-you” written on the wall. Holden careful rubs this off with his hand so as to protect the innocent children from reading it. Later on he finds “*censored*-you” scratched into the surface with a knife.

He iscovers that he can’t efface this one. Even in the timeless peace of the Egyptian tomb room at the museum there is an un-erasable “*censored*-you. ” This incident is the beginning of Holden’s realization that his dreams are infeasible. Strangely enough, it is one of the “innocent” children that he is trying to protect who helps him come to terms with this realization. It is Phoebe who challenges his plan to escape out west. As he is telling Phoebe that she can not run away, he discovers that he too can not run away. “You can’t ever find a place that is nice and peaceful, because there isn’t any.

The final break – down comes near the nd of the book when he is watching Phoebe on the carousel. All the kids kept trying to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she’d fall off the goddam horse, but I didn’t say anything or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but it’s bad if you say anything to them. In the above passage from the novel, Holden hits the final breakdown. Being “the catcher” becomes obviously unrealistic. The gold rings are ironically not gold but really brass-plated ron.

The gold rings are symbols of the corrupted world which always “wears” a shiny surface to hide its evil. It is at this point that Holden sees that he can not stop children from growing up and therefore losing their innocence. They will fall if they fall, there is nothing that can be done. Shortly after this point Holden has his nervous breakdown. His breakdown is due to this depressing realization that the world is corrupt and filled with evil. He knows now with a sickening certainty that he is powerless to stop both evil and maturation. As a matter of fact, it is “bad” to do so.

The full-length novel, The Catcher in the Rye

J. D. Salingers only published full-length novel, The Catcher in the Rye, has become one of the most enduring classics of American literature. The novels story is told in retrospect by the main character, Holden Caulfield, while staying in a psychiatric hospital in California. This is a coming of age tale that is wrought with irony. Holden Caulfield, Mr. Antolini, and Phoebe are the main symbols of irony. The first and most obvious subject of irony is the novels protagonist, Holden Caulfield. His hatred for anything phony is ironic because he to is deceitful.

He is constantly performing by taking a new identity for each new situation he is in. For example, in the train scene he makes up stories about one of his classmates in order to delight his classmates mother. He not only initiates a new identity for himself, but he also spawns a whole new fictional account of life at Pencey Prep. He even admits that he is an impressive liar. Because of his hatred for anything artificial, he searches for something real. In his nave and desperate way he is searching for anything which is innocent and sincere (Parker 300).

He fantasizes about removing himself from society and becoming a reclusive deaf mute. Regardless of his independent personality, he clearly demonstrates how severely he needs companionship. His thoughts are always of his sister, Jane Gallagher, and additional people. Another fantasy of Holdens is to be the catcher of childrens innocence. Holdens fantasy elaborates his obsession with innocence and his perhaps surprisingly moral code (Walters 1009). However, it is clear that his real desire is to be salvaged from the emptiness of his negativism.

This is realized when he telephones Mr. Antolini and when he admits that he almost hopes that his parents will catch him as he sneaks out of the apartment. The Catcher, in fact, wants to be caught, the saviour saved (Engle 45). Mr. Antolini is the subject of irony because he is actually a catcher, even though he is a different kind of catcher from the one Holden imagines. Holden believes that he has already fallen over the cliff into the dissatisfaction that automatically goes together with adulthood. He felt the world has let him slip trough the cracks alone and unassisted.

Therefore, one of the reasons he wants to catch the children is because no one was there to catch him. However, it is evident that Holden has not yet fallen, but is only beginning his downward spiral, and Antolini is the one playing the role of the catcher. Holden seems to believe that he does not have any innocence left during his journey. In spite of this, he is still much like a child, and it is Antolini that sees this. Mr. Antolini knows that Holden is headed towards a great fall, and warns him about it. I have a feeling that youre riding for some kind of terrible, terrible fall.

But I dont honestly know what kind (Salinger 186). The fact that Mr. Antolini is trying to prevent Holden from a fall clearly corresponds with Holdens image of the catcher in the rye. However, the type of fall he describes is different from the one Holden pictures in his fantasy. It is perhaps Antolini, above the several other flawed people he meets, who embodies the moral emptiness and irrelevance of Holdens world (Rollins 301). The most significant irony in the novel is the role that Phoebe plays. Holden believes that children are the only ones that are not corrupted by the dishonest society in which they live.

The main reason Holden wants to be a protector is to keep children from growing up and becoming phony and fraudulent as he feels most adults have become. Holden’s sister, Phoebe, is his connection to children, and he does not want her to change. Holden believes that he could be the one to rescue Phoebe when it is her turn to fall. Ironically, she is the one that forces Holden to realize that he must grow up, and that the world is to be loved. His refusal to allow Phoebe to accompany him and his anger with her for even wanting to go shows that he is not as alienated from his world as he supposes.

He tells her that she cannot go with him, and that she has to go back to school. In this scene, it is evident that Phoebe is now behaving like him and taking on his role. This forces Holden to act like a combination of Mr. Antolini, and Phoebe as she had been on pervious nights. When tested, his love for his sister and his longing to protect her purity is far more superior to his abhorrence for the world and his determination to desert it. His love of good is stronger that his hatred of evil. Thus, paradoxically, he is saved through saving. The person he most wants to catch catches him. The theme of irony can be found throughout J.

D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye. Holden, Mr. Antolini, and Phoebe symbolize this theme. This coming of age story is easily becoming one of American literatures greatest classics. In a passage from the novel, Holden states: What really knocks me out is a book that, when youre all done reading it, you wish the author who wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it (Salinger 18). J. D. Salinger is not available for phone conversations, but generations of readers have felt that the book alone provides that kind of close connection with its author (Guinn).

Through Holdens Eyes

The Catcher in the Rye has truly earned it’s place among great classic works. J. D. Salinger created a literary piece that was completely unique. The entire novel was written in the first person view of the 17-year-old, Holden Caulfield. The majority of the story is compiled of Holden’s rudimentary monologue of ‘complexly simple’ thoughts, the rest utilizing his relay of previous dialogue. That and the use of unique punctuation, digressing explanations, and complex characterization, transformed the simple plot into the complex literary classic.

The novel’s dialogue and monologue alike, manage to relay the feel of natural speaking such as:”I mean you’d be different in some way – I can’t explain what I mean. “The contractions; you’d and can’t – since they are common in everyday language – establish a very common and simple tone. Stress on the first syllable of “different,” reinforces the tone by demonstrating how typically they speak, just as in reality. He uses dashes for pauses and signaling associative digressions.

Instead of signaling pauses, commas are used mostly where mechanically required, for instance:”So all of a sudden, I ran like a madman across the street – I damn near got myself killed doing it, if you want to know the truth – and went in this stationary store and bought a pad and pencil. ” Holden Caulfield creates a thought provoking point of view. On the surface many of his thought patterns seem unrelated and straying from the topic. His association of topic with digression is used almost constantly throughout the novel.

However, realizing that these digressions are very relevant and even crucial to the topic allow the reader to gain true insight to the character. His statements about his sister’s intelligence, followed by explanations of how well she listens, reveals Holden’s associations of intelligence with being quiet and observant. Another example would be his tension around the nuns. Even though he enjoyed the conversation, he worried about being asked if he was Catholic. He stated they “… would have liked it better if he were Catholic.

This gives insight to his discomfort with being judged morally, and to his association of people of morals looking down on those who don’t share them. In Holden’s descriptions and thoughts, Salinger accomplished the most unique aspect of the story’s point-of-view. Instead of using the popular – however overrated – style of well refined thoughts and flowery descriptions, Salinger describes things as they are perceived upon a first impression. Naturally the human mind does not instantly process first encounters or experiences into drawn out rhetorical metaphors.

We must think about them first, relate and compare them to past experiences, then form associations. This is based on Jean Piaget theory of assimilating new situations, accommodating them with previous knowledge, then forming generalizations for understanding, called schemas. [Houghton-Mifflin Psychology, pgs. 49-50] That is exactly how Salinger describes Holden’s thoughts. Holden, like us all, has difficulty explaining things until they have been thought through. For instance, Holden observes Stradlater’s grooming and his looks. Then he compares it to the way guys look in yearbooks, and what parents say about them.

Last he concludes, through comparison, that Stradlater is the kind of guy that your parents ask about. He states: “I’ve had that experience quite frequently. ” In the more descriptive writings of other authors, it is difficult to relate to the complex associations. The majority of thought inspired by these works can sometimes be just to figure out the point. However, Salinger expresses the thought patterns of Holden in the same inherent ways that all humans think, and through that, relays a strong tone of realism and active thought. Despite the lack of dazzling rhetoric, Salinger’s descriptions are no less intricate.

They inspire a more natural style of analyzation that most can relate to easily. A more logical and linear path, relating to typical primal human thought, is followed instead of abstract reasoning and artistic representation. Finally, the elements previously discussed, and a few independent ones, will be used to examine the characterization of Holden Caulfield. Such as how Caulfield’s tendency toward constant introspection and analyzing of his world, his digression of topics, and the nature in which he speaks, gives us clues to his character.

His level of intelligence is in no way reflected by his lack of knowledge on trivial issues. He is adept at reasoning the things around him. Almost all of the insight Caulfield spoke of were things that would not have been taught to him. Such as repeatedly displaying understanding of human nature, pretensions, and thought processes. However, despite his intuition, he applies his often cynical and pessimistic reasoning to almost everything. This fact illustrates ignorance and a level of immaturity.

This is obvious in his inquiry about the ducks, thoughts concerning women, obscene graffiti, and always getting a “pukey cab. “Since the fact that his mental health was brought up often with his thoughts of being crazy, with statements like “I’m crazy, swear to God, I am… ” and references of psychological hospitalization in the beginning and end, a psychological approach will be used to explain his manner. Holden demonstrates tendencies associated with both OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) and bipolar Disorder, consisting of swings between manic and depressive states.

OCD is characterized by obsessive thoughts and their motivation of compulsive acts to relieve the stress of the obsession. [Houghton Mifflin Psychology, pg. 539] It is quite obvious that Holden is very obsessed with detail. He also demonstrates a common symptom of OCD, counting. At Grand Central Station, he mentions repeatedly counting floor squares. Small details trouble him endlessly. Once he becomes so obsessed with type of luggage that his roomate has that he hides his own under the bed. Bipolar Disorder, the more severe of the two, is the most apparent in Caulfield.

He displays an amazing amount of symptoms of this Disorder. He suffers symptoms such as: little need to sleep, difficulty remaining on topic discussions (jumping from subject to subject), bursting with ideas and insight, irritation with people who rationalize with them, excessive spending of money, impaired decision making (instances of people going to live on the streets), cynicism, and paranoia. The mania will give way to severe depression, in some cases, in a matter of hours. The examples of the previous symptoms are demonstrated in Caulfield’s monologuos thoughts and dialogue.

The instances of his jumping from topic to topic, and his insight and ideas, have already been discussed. Holden comments on his “little need for sleep” often like after the clubs close he says, “I wasn’t sleepy or anything. ” A great amount of irritation is shown toward Sally when she points out flaws in his plans of running away. He becomes belligerent and tells her, “you give me a royal pain in the ass. ” In the beginning he comments on his abundant supply of money, but by the end he is forced to borrow from his sister. He frequently pays for peoples meals and drinks, donated money to nuns, and offered anyone a drink “on him”.

A textbook example of his impaired decision making was his plans to run away, pretend to be mute, and build a cabin in the woods. His cynicism is constant as he repeatedly generalizes everyone on the basis of dress, status, and looks. The thoughts of always getting a pukey cab and obscene words being everywhere are prime cases of paranoia. Then in his swing to depression, he comments on people making him depressed, his feelings of being “lousy,” and once expressed thoughts of suicide. When he spoke of people coming to New York to get up early, he voiced his wish to jump out of the hotel window.

Holden Caulfield, being afflicted with such handicaps, was doomed to fail in school, and his breakdown inevitable. Living in a time when clinical psychology would not come for a few years, Holden was forced to cope with this on his own. There was no one to go to for help, so his wish for it manifested itself into the one thing he would like. So in his subconscious wishes for control and help he said:”Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around – nobody big, I mean – except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff.

What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff – I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where their going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That’s all I’d do all day. I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it’s crazy, but that’s the only thing I’d really like to be. I know it’s crazy. ” The children represent all of his problems running rampid in his game of life that “old Spencer” told him of in the beginning. The absence of “big” people portray no one being in charge, and him the lone “big” person, express him as being souly in control.

The playing in the rye field next to a crazy cliff would depict his nearness to his fall, while being oblivious to the danger. His one wish is to able to prevent this, to be in control. Then after establishing his wishes he considers it impossible by expressing thoughts of it’s craziness. He is resolved that he cannot be in control, but it is all he wants. In a world before alternatives to his painful lifestyle, what can Holden do but blindly play the game in the rye field, right beside his cliff of sanity. “But life is a game boy.

The Catcher in the Rye Relative to the 1950’s

The Catcher in the Rye can be strongly considered as one of the greatest novels of all time and Holden Caufield distinguishes himself as one of the greatest and most diverse characters. His moral system and his sense of justice force him to detect horrifying flaws in the society in which he lives. However, this is not his principle difficulty. His principle difficulty is not that he is a rebel, or a coward, nor that he hates society, it is that he has had many experiences and he remembers everything. Salinger indicates this through Holden’s confusion of time throughout the novel.

Experiences at Whooten, Pency, and Elkton Hills combine and no evels of time separate them. This causes Holden to end the novel missing everyone and every experience. He remembers all the good and bad, until distinctions between the two disappear. Holden believes throughout the novel that certain things should stay the same. Holden becomes a character portrayed by Salinger that disagrees with things changing. He wants to retain everything, in short he wants everything to always remain the same, and when changes occur; Holden reacts.

However the most important aspect of Holden Caufield’s character can be attributed to his judgment of people. Holden Caufield, a character who always jumps to conclusions about people and their phoniness, can be labeled as a hypocrite because he exemplifies a phony himself. During the 1950’s America was recovering from the greatest war in the World. There was a cloud of forgetfulness after the war, people didn’t want to remind themselves of all the bad things. People wanted to celebrate everything, but some people like Holden Caufield didn’t feel all the phoniness is necessary to live life.

The 1950’s is so remanincant of the 1920’s, the world had just finished a war and it was suppost to be freedom and happiness for all. Everything eemed to be artificially okay. America’s economy was booming Southern California was once again known for its movies rather than a important piece of the War Effort, Paris was once again the center of world, and even Las Vegas started to grow with the help of the mofia. Everything was romanticised, they should have called the 1950’s the roaring 50’s.

Yet while all this was goin on America and the Soviet Union started pointing Nuclear bombs at each other, and independent countries formed out of the Colonial Empires of the British, French, Germany, and Spain. Its possible to see how Holden thought most people were phonies. It was a period of “not seeing the visible. ” Except for the fact that not everybody was blind, and that was where Holden lost touch. Holden Caufield the 16 year old protaginist and main character of The Catcher in the Rye narrates the story and explains all the events throughout three days of his life.

A prep school student who has just been kicked out of his second school, Holden struggles to find the right path into adulthood. He does not know what road to follow and he uses others as the scapegoat’s for his puzzlement in life. His problem is that he wants to retain a child’s innocence, at a time hen almost everybody tried to retain their innocence. Even though Holden tries to act like an adult at times, he is actually afraid of the adult life and as a way to escape life, he creates this character, the catcher in the rye, throughout his thoughts.

He feels that by saving the children from falling off the cliff, he saves them from falling into the adult world that he disgusts. He feels that this character can prevent the children from becoming adults by remaining in that childish world Holden pictured. “Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in his big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around-nobody big, I mean except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. “(Salinger 173) “What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff.

I mean if they’re running and they don’t look we’re they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. ” That’s all I have to do all day. I’d just be the Catcher in the Rye and all. I know it’s crazy, but that’s the only thing I’d really like to be. I know it’s crazy(Salinger 173). Holden exhibits the madness described before at often times hroughout the book and in the end it ends up sending him to a sanitarium. He knows he has become mad and he even tells himself this many times in the book; but he never really believes it.

One time in the book when he displays this madness is, “But I’m crazy I swear to God I am. About halfway to the bathroom, I started pretending I had a bullet in my guts. Old Maurice had plugged me. Now I was on the way to the bathroom to get a good shot of bourbon. I pictured myself with my automatic in my pocket, and staggering a little bit. I’d walk down a couple of floors-holding on to my guts, blood leaking all over the place. As soon as old Maurice opened the doors he’d start screaming at me. But I’d plug him anyway”(Salinger 103-4). This explains the psychotically disturbing actions Holden takes in this novel.

Holden becomes obsessed with death and dying, and several times in the book he wishes he was dead. “Again, Holden can’t stay away from the subject of the death of family members and the decay of the corpse. Even when he later goes to the Museum of Art, he winds up in the mummy room explaining about preserving the dead bodies of two boys and then getting sick and “sort of” passing out. “He knows that he has become crazy but has a roblem admitting it fully and this shows how he can be considered a phony. Throughout the book he makes remarks on Jesus and the Disciples many times.

He says that he believes in Jesus but not the disciples, he explains that his reason feeling this way is because he is an atheist. However the definition of an atheist is someone who does not believe in God. About the Disciples he says, “Take the Disciples for instance. They annoy the hell out of me, if you want to know the truth”(Salinger 99). At that time the Church was very important in peoples lives it was the basic cornerstone in the average American family, most Families attended hurch together, even those who didn’t attend church were faith based followers.

The role that church played was important because it kept hope alive for the people who weren’t doing as good as they should have been doing during the positive economic times. I belive that in Holden’s mind everyone was doing well, and the world was full of a bunch of phony upper-middle class people who thought they were all that and a bag of chips. Values during that time is what most American families prided themselves in having. What Holden was thinking, some would think was open-spirited but in all fairness it would have been a ac-religious comment to most people during that time.

To believe in God but nothing that accompanyed in him wasn’t a positive attitude during that time. Holden dislikes many people, places, and events all because of the phoniness surrounding them. It makes him literally ill. He is repulsed not only by the insincerity and self promotion of the “phonies,” “hot-shots,” “jerks,” “bastards,” and “morons,” but by the phoniness that is excellence corrupted”. Holden realizes all the flaws within others but he can’t see them within himself. At the end of the novel he complains heavily about the fowl language ritten on walls where children can see it.

This proves he is constantly seeking to appear older than he really is, for he is somewhat a child himself. His profanity is so innately intuned in his personality that he is wholly unaware of how rough his language is”. There were even a few times in the book that his sister reprimanded him for swearing too much. He also does not trust that anyone tells the truth. He prefaces his revelations with “If you really want to hear about it,” and “If you want to know the truth,” because he found few people do want to know the truth.

Holden encounters many different people, and experiences many dventures throughout the three days that this story occurs. He becomes involved with a variety of people, including taxi drivers, two nuns, an elevator man(pimp), three girls from Seattle, a prostitute, and a former teacher from whom Holden thinks he should flee from, in the middle of the night. He can never hold on to anyone he cares about; so he always finds a way to ruin the relationship by escaping, or destroying it. In Holden’s case, he seems to expect the worst, believing that the result of getting close to people is pain.

Pain when others reject you or pain when they leave you, such as when a friend walks off or a beloved brother ies . He also easily mocks certain people and the way they act. On teachers Holden feels that, “You don’t have to think to too hard when you talk to a teacher”(Salinger 13). I think that Holden was trying to be a realist, with the keyword being “trying”, he was trying to be too different. His instinct that children are the purest beings are false, he didn’t see things for what they really were worth.

He probably just saw them for their face value, for instance when he described not wanting to be a lawyer like his dad, he replies by saying, “Lawyers are all right, I guess-but it doesn’t appeal to me. All you do is ake a lot of dough and play golf and play bridge and buy cars and drink martinis and look like a hot-shot”(Salinger 172). The truth is that not all lawyers are rich and some can do very good things for some poeple while others are exactly what he was describing. While most people wanted change and allowed change in the way society processed Holden was trying to hold on, hold on to something not real.

Many would think that after all of Holden’s experiences and tragedies, he would go to his parents for help. However he does not, which shows that he must not have a good relationship with his parents if he can’t talk to them; Yet any many films and tv shows of the 50’s most parent-child relationships seemed to be closer than they had ever been in the American household. I didn’t live in the 50’s, but most of my friends parents who did seem to have had tight nit relationships with their parents.

If Holden had possibly had this he would have been able to reach out to them but for some reason he couldn’t According to Webster’s dictionary, “Phoniness is described as artificial, counterfeit, or hypocritical”. Phony is one of the words heavily used by Holden. He uses the word phony several times throughout the course of this book and he uses it to escribe the actions of others and not himself. Before Holden judges others, he should take a look at himself and check his flaws. Throughout all the encounters with different people in the book, he is easily the phoniest of all the characters.

Holden had a flawed look on life, he dreams of retaining his childhood which had no revelance in the evolving society in 1950’s America. This idealism explains why he is close to his sister Phoebe and why he was so close to his brother Allie. He does not want anyone to fall off the cliff into adulthood, he wants them to remain in the rye and if they go to fall off he will catch them. He feels as if he is the true protector of innocense, except for the fact that he isn’t trying to be so innocent himself.

Holden does not have any friends and cannot keep relationships. This is because he finds and exaggerates any negative aspect of all the people he knows or meet. The Catcher in the Rye is a novel, which gives us some idea of how an adolescent boy, facing the common experiences and troubles of daily life in the 1950’s may have felt. Salinger might also be trying to show the reader the confusion anger and frustration of loosing a loved one and of possibly the time period, and how it can effect a persons life.

The Catcher In The Rye: Connection to the Title

The title of the novel The Catcher In The Rye, by JD Salinger, has a substantial connection to the story. This title greatly explains the main character, Holden Caulfield, and his feelings towards life and human nature. In society he has found enormous corruption, vulgarity, harm and havoc. He knows that the children of the world are ruined by the corruption of adults around them and, he states later in the novel, his new purpose in life will be to help save the children from this vulgarity. Holden wants to be a “Catcher in the Rye.

We first hear the title of the novel being used in chapter 16, and in hapter 22 we have the full explanation of this title. Human dignity is vital to Holden’s existence and the only way to guarantee this on a long term basis is to assist children in maintaining their innocence from the dangers of adulthood. In chapter 16 we have the first reference to the meaning of the novel’s title, The Catcher in the Rye. Holden hears a little boy singing to himself a verse which makes Holden very happy: “If a body catch a body coming through the rye,” (Page 115).

It is difficult to understand why Holden is made happy by the little boy’s singing unless one has an idea of what the song means to Holden. The little boy is described by Holden in gentle caring terms: “The kid was swell. He was walking in the street, instead of on the sidewalk, but right next to the curb. He was making out like he was walking a very straight line, the way kids do, and the whole time he kept singing and humming. ” (Page 115). Holden notes that the child’s parents pay no attention to him.

To Holden this child represents innocence and youth unspoiled by adult immorality. Holden wishes to serve humanity by safeguarding the innocence and purity of children, by protecting them from the evils of life. His little sister, Phoebe, asks him what he would like to be and he answers: ” I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around – nobody big, I mean – except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff.

What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff – I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That’s all I’d do all day. I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it’s crazy, but that’s the only thing I’d really like to be. I know it’s crazy. (Page 173) From this quotation one can see that his role is completely selfless and humane : the beneficiary of his good deeds would be society at large, not Holden Caulfield.

He sees himself as the savior of children, of innocence and basic human dignity. What ultimately drives Holden mad is the realization that he cannot single-handedly eliminate the corruption and vulgarity of the world. When he understands that he must redefine his purpose in life and shift the focus of his good intentions to those areas where he can accomplish good, he is able to pull himself out of the despair and set forth a new path in life. Holden is torn between the desire on the one hand to grow up and to “adjust” and on the other hand to stay a child, living in a world of security and innocence.

He has perceived adulthood as a fallen condition characterized by evil, falsity and betrayal and so has tried to evade it by dreaming of retreating to the woods, living in isolation – even dreaming of dying. However in chapter 25, when Holden rejects his desire to prevent Phoebe from reaching for the gold ring, it signals his coming to terms with his inner conflict. Through the example of Phoebe, he begins to be restored to a belief in life – o accept that living connects both pain and joy, beauty and ugliness.

Holden realizes that risks must be taken if one is to grow : “The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but it’s bad if you say anything to them. ” (Page 211). Throughout the novel, The Catcher In The Rye, and with the information stated above, one can clearly see that the title is relevant to the story. Holden Caulfield wants to be a “Catcher in the Rye. ” He feels a need to save all children from the corruption and immorality that is found within society.

He wishes to aid mankind by protecting the innocence and purity of children. Holden tries to do this by protecting children from the evils of life, as symbolized by the cliff. He believes that if he could save the children and their purity of heart then he would be helping society enormously. He realizes though that he cannot solely do this, and redefines his purpose to something more approachable. He now understands that maybe “falling” isn’t that bad after all, and that one must take risks if one is to grow. When he makes this decision he rejects the role of catcher and in addition affirms his own acceptance of his evolving maturity.

Black Boy Vs. Catcher in the Rye: Book Reports

Black Boy is an autobiography of Richard Wrights early life in the south before he reached Chicago. The Catcher in the Rye is a fictional book whos main character, Holden Caulfield, finds maturity on a trip home. The main characters in Black Boy, by Richard Wright, and The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger, share similar and different qualities. Richard Wright and Holden Caulfield have many similarities.

They both have a passion for reading. Richard reads anything he can get his hands on, including racist newspapers. Holden enjoys reading books by his brother, D.B., and Ring Lardner. Neither gets along with teachers very well. Aunt Addie and Richard Wright had several incidents in Sunday school. Holden Caulfield had problems with all his teachers, resulting in his expulsion. Both boys have had harmful, addictive habits.

Richard was a drunkard at the age of six. Holden was a heavy smoker. Mr.Wright and Mr.Caulfield had many similar characteristics. While Richard and Holden had many similarities, the differences are many. Richard Wright is a black man. Holden Caulfield is white. Richard has an intense urge to learn. Holden has a different opinion on learning; he finds it dreadfully boring. Richard couldnt stay in school due to his constant travel and shift of residence.

Holden, on the other hand, was constantly expelled from school because he failed most his classes. Richard had only one parent growing up. Holden had both, whether they were there for him or not. Richard and Holden had many different qualities. Richard Wright had a rough childhood. Abandoned by his father at a young age, Richard was left to fend with his mother and younger brother. Richard had an abusive youth; he was almost beaten to death at age five. His family moved frequently, to and from his Grandmas house. Grandmas strict Christian way of life took its toll on Richard, as he rebelled against authority. Growing up Richard was tormented with the fact that hes black. As Richard was quoted, This was the culture from which I sprang. This was the terror from which I fled. (Wright 257)

On the other hand, Holden doesnt like to talk about his family, but we get the hint that it was strict. As Holden said, … my parents would have two hemorrhages apiece if I told anything pretty personal about them. Theyre nice and all, but touchy as hell. (Salinger 1) Richard had been moved from school to school over many years and didnt get a full year of schooling until he was older. When he was younger, Richard learned a number of obscenities from the older boys at school. He learned to prove himself when he moved to Greenwood by fighting the school bully. In middle and high school, Richard did very well in his studies. He was elected valedictorian of his class. At the beginning of the school term I read my civics and English and geography volumes through and only referred to them when in class, remarked Richard. (Wright 133)

Whereas, Holden Caulfield wasnt a big fan of school, teachers, or homework. He was expelled from his private school because he was failing four out of five classes. If Im not mistaken, I believe you had some difficulty at the Whooton School and at Elkton Hills, too, said Holdens teacher, Mr. Spencer. (Salinger 13) Richard was partially brought up by his Grandma, who was an avid Christian. He didnt really believe all the church stuff, though. You see, Granny, if I ever saw an angel like Jacob did, then Id believe.(Wright 117).

Richard was bored with Sunday school and played hooky from church with his friends. He was baptized, but only because he didnt want to risk embarrassing his mother in front of the whole neighborhood. Similarly, Holdens religious beliefs were to the extent of his foul vocabulary. He went to chapel at school, but didnt care too much. Holden thought it was all very phony, and Holden didnt like phony things or people. He told us we ought to think of Jesus as our buddy and all. That killed me.(Salinger 17)

Richard Wright and Holden Caulfield led very different lives, yet they both suffered from the same discrimination. Richard was discriminated because of the color of his skin; Holden because of his age. The two characters were very complex. In conclusion, Richard and Holden were very alike and very different.

JD Salingers’ Catcher in the Rye

In JD Salingers’ Catcher in the Rye, a troubled teenager named Holden Caufield struggles with the fact that everyone has to grow up. The book gets its title from Holden’s constant concern with the loss of innocence. He did not want children to grow up because he felt that adults are corrupt. This is seen when Holden tries to erase naughty words from the walls of an elementary school where his younger sister Phoebe attended. “While I was sitting down, I saw something that drove me crazy. Somebody’d written ‘Fuck you’ on the wall.

It drove me damn near crazy. I thought how Phoebe and all the other little kids would see it, and how they’d wonder what the hell it meant, and then finally some dirty kid would tell them- all cockeyed, naturally- what it meant, and how they’d all think about it and maybe even worry about it for a couple of days. I kept wanting to kill whoever’d written it. I figured it was some perverty bum that’d sneaked in the school late at night to take a leak or something and then wrote it on the wall.

I kept picturing myself catching him at it, and how I’d smash his head on the stone steps till hew as good and goddam dead and bloody. ” (201) His deep concern with impeccability caused him to create stereotypes of a hooligan that would try to corrupt the children of an elementary school. Holden believed that children were innocent because they viewed the world and society without any bias. When Phoebe asked him to name something that he would like to be when he grew up, the only thing he would have liked to be was a “catcher in the rye.

He invented an illusion for himself of a strange fantasy. He stated that he would like to follow a poem by Robert Burns: “If a body catch a body comin’ through the rye. ” He kept “picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around- nobody big, I mean- except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff- I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them.

Thats all I’d do all day. I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it’s crazy, but that’s the only thing I’d really like to be. ” (173) Holden wants to stop children from “falling” into losing their innocence and becoming an adult, and he takes pleasure in the attempted thwarting of maturation. In the beginning of Catcher in the Rye, his initial character is one of a child. Throughout the book, he takes steps and the forces of change take a toll on his childish ways. In the end, he seems to be changed into a man.

Holden is definitely extremely immature in the beginning of the book. He characterizes almost every person he meets as a “phony”. He feels that he is surrounded by hypocrites in a school filled with fakery. Principal Thurmer, the principal of Holden’s high school, Pencey, was the leader of the whole charade. During a teacher/parent day, Principal Thurmer would only say hello to the wealthy parents of students. He would not associate himself with those that were not financially stable, because he was a phony. Holden also maintains a lack of responsibility throughout the whole book.

He was the equipment manager of the fencing team at Pencey, but he lost the equipment on the subway. He also failed out of two schools for lack of effort and absences from classes. Holden also had a daydream about two children who never grew up, whore main in a perfect world forever. This daydream is a result of his younger brother Allie’s death. Allie represents the unchangeable youth of which Holden must let go if he ever expects to maintain sanity. Holden has a fixation on childhood, which shows itself in many forms.

His glorification of children, inordinate admiration of Phoebe, idealization of his dead younger brother, and the joy he gets from reminiscing about his own childhood all contribute to his obsession with innocence and youth. Throughout the middle of the book, forces of change unfold on Holden. While waiting for an old friend of his, he had the sudden urge to go into a museum that he had visited while still a child in school in order to bring back memories of his childhood. However, when he finally reached the museum, he decided not to.

Then a funny thing happened. When I got to the museum, all of a sudden I wouldn’t have gone inside for a million bucks. It just didn’t appeal to me… ” (122) This shows that Holden is becoming an adult. He did not want to enter the museum because he realized that he was too old to take part in such an activity. When he takes Phoebe to a carousel later in the book, he decided not to ride on it, or even stand on it during a rain storm, because he felt “too old” to get on. Holden also had another one of his childish fantasies for his future.

He wanted to go and be a deaf mute somewhere in the west, so he wouldn’t have to deal with all the phonies and hypocrites of every day life. Phoebe told him that she wanted to go along with him, but he denies her of this because of his growing responsibility and metamorphosis as an adult. He told her, “I’m not going away anywhere. I changed my mind. ” (207) At the end of the book, Holden seems to be much more mature. His key step was when he did not ride with Phoebe on the carrousel. Holden only watched his sister ride along. In the center of the carousel, there was a gold ring.

The children riding on the carousel would reach for the gold ring in order to win a prize. “All the kids kept trying to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she’d fall off the goddam horse, but I didn’t say anything or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but it’s bad if you say anything to them. “(211) This carousel symbolizes life, and the constant journey of childhood into adulthood.

Children would sometimes fall when striving to reach the gold ring in the center of life, or their complete success or adulthood. Holden would have yelled out to the children that it was dangerous to try to achieve this goal, but he realized in this anagnoresis that the children should go along the path of life by themselves. Throughout the book, Holden tried to save all children from growing up and losing their innocence. When he realized that he could not achieve this goal, he had a nervous breakdown and could not deal with it. However, it is an inevitable fact that everyone has to grow up.

The title of the book The Catcher in the Rye

The theme that the world has an outward appearance that seems fair and perfect but really they’re as Holden put it “phonies. ” This is shown countless amount of times in his journey through New York and even before he left. The setting is in the 1950’s; so I’m pretty sure that he didn’t encounter any transvestites, lesbians, or anything that extreme of phoniest. Or on the other hand he could have liked them for being as Elmemson said a “none conformist. ” But I doubt it, he seemed to like kids more than anything. And his job, as he felt, was to protect them in their innocents; of which I will talk about in my second theme.

The first example that stands out in my mind is the scene with Stradlater in the “can. ” If you remember Stradlater was getting ready for his other date while Holden watched him. “Stradlater was a secret slob” in public he always looked good and got all the girls but in fact he was a slob. His razor that made him look so good was “rusty as hell and full on lather and hair and crap. ” This proves that he is a slob to “never clean it or anything. ” If you think about it that’s even worst than Old Ackley. At least Ackley knew that he had a problem, that he need to do something about his face; but Stradlater thought that he was a great guy.

He actually thought that there was nothing wrong with never washing his razor. I think that what mad, Holden so made Stradlater was perpetrating in other word being “phony” every time he went out all GQ after using that filthy razor. Another instance is when he calls that girl in New York, Faith Cavendish, that Eddie Birdsell had brought to a dance at Princeton. Anyway he called her and she almost went off until Holden drooped Eddie’s name. Then all of a sudden “she was getting friendly as hell. ” The same person said “if you think I enjoy bein’ woke up in the middle-” was “getting an english accent all of a sudden.

I think Holden caught her with her faade down. When she first picked up the phone she was mad as anybody else would be in her shoes. But as soon as she processed “Eddie Birdsell from Princeton” she became so amicable. She most of thought that a friend of Eddie, from Princeton, most have been rich or at lest well off. Faith was all ready to hook up with him for a date until she asked “Where ya callin’ from? Where ya at now, anyways? ” And “in a phone booth” was the wrong answer. When he said that she new he had no money and from that point on she had no time to meet up any more.

This is a good example of the phoniest that Holden will talk about all through book. Oh and one I almost missed it is a little before the conversation with Faith it is a very important event. When J. D. Salinger had Holden look about of the window I think it was a big simile, of which I think about more in theme number 3, of the theme of the book. I’m sure Holden didn’t ride all the way to New York to pick a run down hotel. So I take it when he drove up it probably looked good on the outside. He even “took it off [referring to the red hunting hat] before I checked inI didn’t want to look like a screwball or something.

So we can assume it was nice, or at lest on the outside. Salinger even throw Holden foreshadowed a little in the line “I didn’t know then that the goddam hotel was full of perverts and morons. ” The first guy he saw out his room window “took out all these women’s clothes, and put them on. ” Then he started walking around like a women, smoking a cigarette, and looking in the mirror. And now I guest I have to take back my sentence about transvestites in the opening paragraph. Second he saw a couple squiring water and “they were in hysterics the whole time,” a little strange.

You see the outside of the hotel represents what society is or tries to be, all nice and neat. And the people acting silly in the rooms are what we a really like. Im not saying we are all perverts but we all have two different personalities; one outside and one inside closed doors. Since I’m will into the second page and it’s past my bed time or at lest it feels like it is this is the last one for this theme. The one I had in mind is the one the date he had with Sally. From the jump she was phony. Holden had already talked to her dad and told him how it was, but she still asked how it was.

Holden when call her “quite a little phony,” she even sounded phony through the book with lines like “I’d love to grand. ” And when they got through with the play on the Lunts it didn’t get any better. They ran into this guy that Sally knew and both of their phoniest began to shine. “You’ve though that they hadn’t seen each other for twenty years” they probably even hugged and kissed checks and all. And the funny thing is that “they probably met each other only once. ” And from that point on they went on a quest to outname the other. “They both kept thinking of places as fast as they could” trying to get the upper-hand in a game of illusion.

They both were trying to, I guest, show they are more popular than the other by making it seem like they known all these places and people, when in actuality they were two big phonies. The next Theme of this story that I want to talk about is the significance of the novel’s title. First of all I have to say why the book was entitle as it was “The Catcher in the Rye. ” The title of the book is a mystery all the way until chapter 21 when he sneaked back home to see Phoebe. When Phoebe fronted him about getting kicked out of school again saying “you don’t like anything” Holden was forced to come up with something he would enjoy to be or do.

After minutes of pondering Holden said “I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all. ” He just wanted to save the little innocent kids from falling. The kids I think represent the innocents of the young just playing and when they fall off the cliff they discover the world. He wants to protect them and keep them pure will. All through the story Salinger used Holden as the catcher on the rye to protect or try to protect the innocents of kids. The biggest and most memorial of this protection is when he went to Phoebe elementary school to talk to her before he had to leave.

Anyway he saw the word fuck you on the hall walls and “it drove him dam near crazy. ” He couldn’t stand the idea that Phoebe or her friend had seen that on the wall. If they saw it they would wonder and eventually “some dirty kid would tell them” and they would know the cruel the world thus falling in the rye. As his duty as the catcher in the rye Holden tried to erase the first one that was on the walls, but later said “it’s hopeless anyway. If you had a million years to do it in, you couldn’t rub out even half the fuck you signs in the world. Its impossible.

Now I think the word tragedy goes right there. If the job that Holden is set out to do is inevitable then it’s a tragedy. Salinger illustrates a full blown tragedy with a 15 year old boy; it sounds a lot like the classic we read last year Romeo and Juliet. A young boy, even the same age, is placed in a no win situation. The next one I just thought about is the time Holden got a snow ball off the window cell. This has nothing to go with protecting but it is about purity. Holden got some show from off the window pan and he “started to throw it” but after looking out at the scene he decides not to.

He said he stared it throw it at a car and fire hydrogen but they looked “too nice and white. ” Holden is consumed with finding and protecting purity, and when he found something pure he didn”t want to disturb it. But it’s strange how he used the words “nice and white,” I know that the snow was white but is there something more there. White is often associated with pure and even holiness. He may be comparing it to a holy site; because he does ask Ackley about joining later in the book. You never know. Theme number three is going to be a discussing about Salinger and his symbolism.

Salinger is a master of the subtle symbolism. He lays his symbols so subtle that most of the time they’re not even found or addressed even by a commentary over the book. I really enjoyed reading and rereading this book to find embedding symbols. I think that’s what made it so good. A very important character that is referred to all throgh the story by Holden is Allie. Allie is Holder’s younger brother who died of leukemia when he was just thirteen. Holden loved his brother more than anything and when he died he punched out all the windows in the garage. He said that “my hand still hurts me once in a while.

This is symbolic of the love he had and still has for his little brother; he even quotes latter that “you don’t stop loving someone because they die” proving that he still cares for him. He may even think he had something to do with his death or he caused it. Sometimes little kids think stuff like that. Holden also says that ” I can’t make a real fist any more-not a tight one. ” If his fist represents his love for his brother or his heart than maybe he can’t love again. When he meet up with Sally he said he felt like marring her than he discards it by saying “I don’t even like her much.

Holden is afraid to love again because of the way his heart and fist was broken by Allie. Another symbol is his own sister Phoebe. First you must understand that Phoebe came from the Greek word meaning Sun. Holden is lost in the world and feels that everything is “phony. ” Phoebe is his symbol of hope in the world. All Holden needs is hope. Just as the sun comes out and shines it’s beautiful color and truth to the world to nurrshish and feed the plant; so did Phoebe come with her innocent hands saving Holden from the world. “The first thing I did when I got off at Penn station, I went into this phone booth.

Holden first started to call his brother but then he thought of his sitter Phoebe, then he whet on about her and how she wouldn’t mind being woke up. All through the book he will think about call and eventually sneak home just to see her. This shows he sees her as his only light in this world of phonies hint the name Phoebe Greek for sun. I read a very interesting point in a book review about The Catcher in the Rye that explains the Holden behavior all through the book. In short it said his activities “describes a developing nervous breakdown. ” And if you think of the symptoms you would a agree.

Unexplained depression, show countless time in the story as “I felt depressed as hell. ” And the why that Salinger keep using the world depressed, not bad or mellow but depressed he may have been hinting at it. Impulsive spending, that is obvious through the fact he only had “3 dollars and some change” after just 2 days in New York. Erratic behavior, example is Holden just jumping up and put Stradlater in a “half Nelson. ” All of this is prior to his eventual nervous collapse. This book has been a joy to read. Holden was very funny at times especially when he called Sally to ask her about “trim a tree” for Christmas.

Salinger is ether a great writer or he just lucked up this good of a story. Sometimes I wonder if the author of books always think as deep as the reader. I mean do authors read a commentary over a book they wrote and say, hmm I didn’t think of that. Writers like Edgar Allen are obvious that they have a deeper meaning. But with Salinger it’s hard to tell if this is a simple story of a boy rebelling or is it a great big metaphor for the world and how we are. Now if you ask him I,m sure he would say “oh that’s what meant exactly,” and he might as well have meant that; but who is to say.

Catcher in The Rye: Holden Caulfield’s Perception and Gradual Acceptance of the “Real” World

In The Catcher in the Rye, Holden views the world as an evil and corrupt place where there is no peace. This perception of the world does not change significantly through the novel. However as the novel progresses, Holden gradually comes to the realization that he is powerless to change this. During the short period of Holden’s life covered in this book, “Holden does succeed in making us perceive that the world is crazy”. 1 Shortly after Holden leaves Pencey Prep he checks in to the Edmont Hotel. This is where Holden’s turmoil begins. Holden spends the following evening in this hotel which was “full of perverts and morons.

There were) screwballs all over the place. “2 His situation only deteriorates from this point on as the more he looks around this world, the more depressing life seems. Around every corner Holden sees evil. He looks out on a world which appears completely immoral and unscrupulous. The three days we learn of from the novel place a distressed Holden in the vicinity of Manhattan. The city is decked with decorations and holiday splendor, yet, much to Holden’s despair “seldom yields any occasions of peace, charity or even genuine merriment. “3 Holden is surrounded by what he views as drunks, perverts, morons and screwballs.

These convictions which Holden holds waver very momentarily during only one particular scene in the book. The scene is that with Mr. Antolini. After Mr. Antolini patted Holden on the head while he was sleeping, Holden jumped up and ran out thinking that Mr. Antolini was a pervert as well. This is the only time during the novel where Holden thinks twice about considering someone as a pervert. After reviewing Mr. Antolini, Holden finally concludes that maybe he wasn’t making a “flitty” pass at him. Maybe he just like patting guys heads as they sleep. This is really the only time in the novel where Holden actually considers positive side.

This event does not constitute a significant change. As Holden himself says, “It’s not too bad when the sun’s out, but the sun only comes out when it feels like coming out. “4 The sun of course is a reference to decency through the common association of light and goodness. His perception of the world remains the same. The one conviction that does change during the novel is Holden’s belief that he can change the world. On his date with Sally, Holden reveals his feelings. “Did you ever get fed up?… I mean did you ever get scared that everything was going to go lousy unless you did something… Holden goes through several plans.

Holden at one point contemplates heading out west where he will pretend to be a deaf-mute and live a quiet life. At another point Holden proposes to Sally to escape this world with him. It is finally to his younger sister Phoebe that Holden reveals his ultimate plan. Although Holden describes the situation in a very picturesque and symbolic manner he essentially tells Phoebe that he wants to prevent children from growing up. He blames the world’s corruption on adults and believes that when he stops the children from growing up he will preserve heir innocence and save the world.

It takes most of the book before Holden begins to realize that he is helpless to stop this corruption. Finally, he realizes that not only is there nothing that he can do, but there is nowhere he can go to hide from it. Holden takes awhile to comprehend these concepts. One good example is when Holden is delivering the note to his sister. He encounters a “fuck-you” written on the wall. Holden careful rubs this off with his hand so as to protect the innocent children from reading it. Later on he finds “fuck-you” scratched into the surface with a knife. He discovers that he can’t efface this one.

Even in the timeless peace of the Egyptian tomb room at the museum there is an un-erasable “fuck-you. ” This incident is the beginning of Holden’s realization that his dreams are infeasible. 6 Ironically enough, it is one of the “innocent” children that he is trying to protect who helps him come to terms with this realization. It is Phoebe who challenges his plan to escape out west. As he is telling Phoebe that she can not run away, he discovers that he too can not run away. “You can’t ever find a place that is nice and peaceful, because there isn’t any. “7

The final break-down comes near the end of the book when he is watching Phoebe on the carousel. All the kids kept trying to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she’d fall off the goddam horse, but I didn’t say anything or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but it’s bad if you say anything to them. 8 In the above passage from the novel, Holden hits the final breakdown. Being “the catcher” becomes obviously unrealistic. The gold rings are ironically not gold ut really brass-plated iron.

The gold rings are symbols of the corrupted world which always “wears” a shiny surface to hide its evil. It is at this point that Holden sees that he can not stop children from growing up and therefore losing their innocence. They will fall if they fall, there is nothing that can be done. Shortly after this point Holden has his nervous breakdown. His breakdown is due to this depressing realization that the world is corrupt and filled with evil. He knows now with a sickening certainty that he is powerless to stop both evil and maturation. As a matter of fact, it is “bad” to do so.

J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye

In J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, the first person narration is critical in helping the reader to know and understand the main character, Holden Caulfield. Holden, in his narration, relates a flashback of a significant period of his life, three days and nights on his own in New York City. Through his narration, Holden discloses to the reader his innermost thoughts and feelings. He thus provides the reader not only with information of what occurred, but also how he felt about what happened. Holden’s thoughts and ideas reveal many of his character traits.

One late Saturday night, four days before the beginning of school vacation, Holden is alone, bored and restless, wondering what to do. He decides to leave Pencey, his school, at once and travels to New York by train. He decides that, once in New York, he will stay in a cheap motel until Wednesday, when he is to return home. His plan shows the reader how very impetuous he is and how he acts on a whim. He is unrealistic, thinking that he has a foolproof plan, even though the extent of his plans are to “take a room in a hotel.. , and just take it easy till Wednesday. ”

Holden’s excessive thoughts on death are not typical of most adolescents. His near obsession with death might come from having experienced two deaths in his early life. He constantly dwells on Allie, his brother’s, death. From Holden’s thoughts, it is obvious that he loves and misses Allie. In order to hold on to his brother and to minimize the pain of his loss, Holden brings Allie’s baseball mitt along with him where ever he goes. The mitt has additional meaning and significance for Holden because Allie had written poetry, which Holden reads, on the baseball mitt.

Holden’s reoccupation with death can be seen in his contemplation of a dead classmate, James Castle. It tells the reader something about Holden that he lends his turtleneck sweater to this classmate, with whom he is not at all close. Holden’s feelings about people reveal more of his positive traits. He constantly calls people phonies, even his brother, D. B. , who ” has sold out to Hollywood. ” Although insulting, his seemingly negative feelings show that Holden is a thinking and analyzing, outspoken individual who values honesty and sincerity. He is unimpressed with people who try to look good in other’s eyes.

Therefore, since it is obvious that Holden is bright, the reason for his flunking out of school would seem to be from a lack of interest. Holden has strong feelings of love towards children as evidenced through his caring for Phoebe, his little sister. He is protective of her, erasing bad words from the walls in her school and in a museum, in order that she not learn from the graffiti. His fondness for children can be inferred when he tells her that, at some time in the future, he wants to be the only grown-up with “all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye nd all.

He’ll stand on the edge of a cliff and catch anybody who starts to fall off the edge of the cliff. He got this image from his misinterpretation of a line from the Robert Burns poem, ” if a body catch a body comin’ through the rye. ” When situations are described, in person or in a book, they are influenced by the one who describes them, and by his or her perceptions and experiences. Through Holden’s expressions of his thoughts and feelings, the reader sees a youth, sensitive to his surroundings, who chooses to deal with life in unique ways.

Holden s candid, spontaneous, analytical, thoughtful, and sensitive, as evidenced by his narration. Like most adolescents, feelings about people and relationships are often on his mind. Unfortunately, in Holden’s case, he seems to expect the worst, believing that the result of getting close to people is pain. Pain when others reject you or pain when they leave you, such as when a friend walks off or a beloved brother dies. It would not have been possible to feel Holden’s feelings or understand his thoughts nearly as well had the book been written in third person.

The greatness in Holden Caulfield

Holden Caulfield is teen angst bull-crap with a pickax. He’s sarcastic, nasty, and completely unlikeable. He also doesn’t give a crap. He is every teenager caught between the crapy little games of high school (“you’re supposed to kill yourself if the football team loses or something”) and the fear of adulthood (“going to get an office job and make a lot of money The greatness in Holden Caulfield is that what he has to say is better than a million Celestine Prophecies or anything said by Jonathan Livingston Seagull (save for the squawks after you shoot him) or Jesus save for the apocryphal “hey Peter I can see your house from here”).

Holden Caulfield says that life sucks, everyone is a phony, and you’ll be inevitably disappointed by everyone that you hold in awe. If you think that this sounds awful, ask yourself one question. When was the last time you found any joy in watching Barney or the Care Bears? It isn’t just what he says but the way he says it. He goes through life making dead-on observations that completely shoot the kneecaps out from under the terminally self-righteous. When a successful mortician tells the chool to follow his example and pray when things go bad, it is Holden Caulfield who points out that the guy is praying for more people to die.

He’s depressed by nuns and annoyed by shallow girlfriends, while in love Even more interesting is the fact that Caulfield’s general pissed off attitude and his hormones are inextricably linked. He practically wants to kill his roommate, Stradlatter, because Stradlatter might have screwed a girl he desires. He guiltily admits to making out with phonies, and in a major confession he confesses to being a virgin. He gets the crap beat out f him by a disgruntled pimp after deciding that he doesn’t want a to have sex with a prostitute for the silliest of reasons. he just found it disconcerting to see her take her clothes off without fanfare.

The fact that his little brother has just died and that he’s being kicked out of yet another school takes second place to the whole sex question. In other words, Holden Caulfield is a guy; stereotype away. What is also interesting is how closely Caulfield captures the attitude and culture of adolescence. There is the caste system in which Caulfield hates and wishes to be his roommate Stradlatter. Meanwhile zit-encrusted Ackley, whom he maybe should feel sympathy for, is an annoying guy that Holden can’t wait to get out of his room.

He’s sympathetic to the principle’s daughter, saying that it’s not her fault what kind of a bastard her old man is, and without missing a beat remarks on the fact that she pads her bra. Cruelty and frustration are mixed, but the comedy level allows you to laugh at your own painful memories. Granted, like many of his fans, Holden Caulfield turns out to be nuts or at least residing in an insane asylum. (Sorry, if you think that those tupid surprise endings are the best reason to read Salinger. ) Yet, in Caulfield’s insanity, there is a transcendent theme.

By being the pissed off, nasty, cynical insane bastard; Holden Caulfield suggests that it is ok to be a crap. Your criticisms of the world are not invalid and nothing you say or think is so bad that you need to repress it. Ironically, this is not only something that is essential to survival (especially if you are a teenager and desperately trying to maintain your lily-white self image) but is also the key to ultimately becoming a decent caring human being. Keep your prophets, preachers and shamans.

Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield

Jerome David Salinger, born in New York City on January 1, 1919, may not have written many novels in which he is recognized for. Although, he did write one novel, which brought him fame. In many of Salinger’s short stories and especially his most well-known novel he writes about how the main character falls from his or her own innocence then rises to face their challenges. In J. D. Salinger’s , Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield goes through a fall from his innocence throughout his journey to his safe haven, home.

One example of when Holden fell from his own innocence is when he is in the room with Phoebe and he can’t name anything he likes. Holden reacts to this question by saying, “Boy, she was depressing me”(Salinger 169). The only three things he can name that he liked were Allie, James Castle, and sitting there chewing the fat with Phoebe. The reason this is a time when Holden falls is because he gets really depressed when he can barely think of anything he liked. The reason I think Holden gets so depressed is because two of the people he names are dead.

That’s why he is so lonely all the time. Holden finds things in common with Allie and James Castle and since they’re both dead he feels, in the back of his mind, that he should also be dead which makes him depressed. Another example of a fall for Holden is when he realizes he can’t erase even half the “fuck you’s” in the world. This doesn’t sound very important, but it is symbolic because he realizes that he can not be the catcher in the rye. His dream of shielding all the innocent children from society’s harsh elements has been ruined by this one statement.

Now because of this realization he comes to the conclusion that he can not shield everybody, not even half of everybody. An example of Holden trying to be the catcher in the rye is when Holden first sees the “fuck you” on the wall. Holden said, “It drove me damn near crazy. I thought how Phoebe and all the other kids would see it, and how they’d wonder what the hell it meant, and then finally some dirty kid would tell them- all cockeyed, naturally what it meant, and how they’d think about it even worry about it for a couple of days. I kept wanting to kill whoever’d written it”. (Salinger 201)

Holden’s final fall comes when he is in the Egyptian Tomb in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. When Holden is deep within the Egyptian Tomb he feels he is in a safe and sanitary place free from society’s cruel components until he sees the “fuck you” on the wall. When he sees this he starts to think about committing suicide because he feels like living is just a waste. During this time he spent in the tomb he decides on life or death. After going unconscious for a couple of minutes he decides to live because, “Death thus becomes not a gesture of defiance but of surrender”(Miller 17).

Once Holden wakes up he feels better and symbolically chooses life. This is when Holden begins to rise. When Phoebe is on the carousel Holden wants to protect her but restrains himself, “The thing is with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but its bad to say anything to them”(Miller 17-18)When Holden says this his dreams of being catcher in the rye vanish. He realizes that all children must fall, like he himself did. In conclusion, The Catcher in the Rye is a story of a boy falling from innocence to enter adulthood.

An example of J. D. Salinger using symbolism to show Holden’s Holding on to his childhood is in his name, Holden(Hold On). This is referring to Holden not wanting to enter society and all it’s phonies. Today, when somebody holds on to their innocence they are often considered outcasts; and in the persons mind everyone who considers him this, is a phony, like how Holden saw everyone. After Holden Caulfield returns to his native New York and rents a room in a sleazy hotel, he makes a date with Sally Hayes. Before this date, Holden finds himself wandering the streets of the naked city.

He is feeling depressed and finds himself on Broadway trying to purchase a record for his sister. After making this purchase, Holden notices a poor family walking in front of him. This unit is composed of a father, mother, and “little kid. ” Holden notices the child who is walking in a straight line in the street and humming a tune to himself. Holden approaches him to determine the tune he is singing. This tune is “If a Body Catch a Body Coming Through the Rye. “Holden finds it amusing that the child is strutting quite literally on Broadway and is so care-free.

He notices cars screeching and honking all over the place, and yet the child proceeds. The child’s happy disposition seems to encourage Holden’s on vitality. It gripped Holden that the child was singing with “a pretty little voice… just for the hell of it” and brightened him up. A deeper interpretation of this scene would dictate that the child represents Holden’s own personality and life. Holden is defiantly singing his own tune just for the hell of it and like the child, seems to have no regard for his own well-being. At this point, Holden may see a side in himself that is care-free and this lightens his depression.

It is all Fun and Games until Someone Looses a Rye

Once is a generation, a book is written that transcends reality and humanity . The Catcher in the Rye, by JD Salinger, combines a unique style, controversial theme, and thought provoking main character in this perceptive study of the human condition. This postwar novel protests against the loss of innocence and hypocrisy of the era and is the definitive coming of age novel. Salinger constructs a shocking reality, populated by phonies’ and bursting with falsities- a reality that is all too real. The Catcher in the Rye is the story of a young man’s understanding of the world he lives in, and the things he encounters (Lomazoff 3).

This work is similar to other famous and influential works of the same nature. For example, Maxwell Geismar sums up the novel as “an eminently readable and quotable [novel] in its tragicomic narrative of preadolescent revolt. Compact, taut, and colorful, the first half presents in brief compass all then petty horrors, the banalities, the final mediocrity of the American prep school” (Geismar 195). Holden can not understand the purgatory of Pency prep, and futilely escapes from one dark world into darker world of New York City.

The second half of the novel raises the intriguing questions and incorporates the deeper meaning of the work (Geismar). Holden sits on the cusp of adulthood, tethering dangerously close to his fate and reality and The Catcher in the Rye is the story of his journey into the adult world. In addition, this novel is similar to other famous works of the same nature. Salinger emulates elements of Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Twain’s Huckleberry Finn. Like Huck Finn, The Catcher in the Rye is the story of a young man’s journey into adulthood. Holden journeys into the human condition, Huck likewise seeks out human nature.

Huck, like Holden, hates hypocrisy, and fells the need to search for integrity. Similarly, both works start out the same way. Their simple exposition of location and scope draws in the mind, and fastens it securely to the page. Holden’s opening speech is merely a modernized and adapted version of Huck’s. Holden Caulfield strikes many readers as an urbanized version of Huck Finn (Lomazoff 3). In William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, things Price Hamlet cannot control dominate his thoughts and life. Like Holden, Hamlet suffers from a mild form of psychological disturbance. Both men cannot come to terms with morality and mortality.

Holden is unsure of what happens after death, and confronts his own mortality, much like his Elizabethan counterpart, after an encounter with a vicious pimp: But I’m crazy. I swear to God I am. About halfway to the bathroom, I sort of started pretending I had a bullet in my guts. Old Maurice had plugged me. Now I was on the to the bathroom to get a good shot of bourbon or something to steady my nerves and help me really go into action. I pictured myself coming out of the goddamn bathroom, dressed and all, with my automatic in my pocket, and staggering around a little bit.

Then I’d walk down stairs, instead of using the elevator. I’d hold on to the banister and all, with this blood trickling out of the side of my mouth a little at a time. What I’d do, I’d walk down a few floors- holding on to my guts, blood leaking all over the place- and then I’d ring the elevator bell. As soon as old Maurice opened the doors, he’d see me with this automatic in my hand and he’d start screaming at me, In this very high-pitched, yellow-belly voice, to leave him alone. But I’d plug him anyway. Six shoots right throw his fat hairy belly.

Then I’d throw my automatic down the elevator shaft- after I’d wipe off all the fingerprints and all. Then I’d crawl back to my room and call up Jane and have her come over and bandage up my guts. These books by dissimilar authors and form different centuries are very different, but their insights into the quirks are humanity and coming of age are universal. The central theme of The Catcher in the Rye emanates from the confrontation and ultimate loss of innocence that occurs hand in hand with the assimilation into society and the loneliness that arises thereafter.

For example, Eric Lomazoff would argue that “In essence, Holden Caulfield is a good person stuck in a bad world. He is trying to make the best of his life, though ultimately losing that battle. Whereas he aims at stability and truth, the adult world cannot survive without suspense and lies” (4). Although he shoots idealistically at truth and sincerity, the adult world could not survive without the darkest side of growing up. Moreover, Holden like many teens feels like an outsider, lonely even in his peer group, “they both laughed like hyenas at stuff that wasn’t even funny.

I didn’t even enjoy sitting next to them at movies” (Salinger 37). Holden is aware of the insincerity of his friend’s laughter, and cannot join in with them. He silently protests against the evils of the adult world, and like many teens, feels all alone. Holden feels a strong connection to the elusive Jane Gallagher, and after a date with his roommate, Holden contemplates his feelings ” I sat there for about an hour after he left, I mean just sitting in a chair, not doing anything. I just kept thinking about Jane, and about Stradlater having a date with her and all.

It made me so nervous I nearly went crazy. I already told you what a sexy bastard Stradlater was” (Salinger 34). The sexual coming of age of Holden’s former girlfriend represent the slaughter of the innocent, and serves to illustrate that with age comes the burden of society. Holden solitarily contemplates the past, the social brainwashing of true innocents disturbs him, feeling totally repulsed. With this in mind, Holden feels compelled to save those not yet old enough to save themselves, specifically children: “I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all.

Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around- nobody big I mean- except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff. I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them . . . I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all. . . (173). Lomazoff argues that “It is a testament to his innocence and decent spirit that Holden would place the safety and well being of children as the goal of his lifetime”(3).

Metaphorically speaking, Holden is catching children from falling of the cliff of childhood into the ominous gorge that is being an adult. Holden’s loneliness and inner turmoil relating to his maturing creates an admirably honesty and mature of character. Loneliness motivates the protagonist, Holden Caulfield, to break off communication of with society. For example, Charles Kegel argues that Holden Caulfield: “is in search of the word. His problem is one of communication: as a teenager, he simply cannot get through to the adult world which surrounds him; as a sensitive teenager, he cannot get through others of his own age” (54).

Adult communication intimidates and alienates the protagonist. Moreover, Holden expresses his problem with communication indirectly and in a striking and decisive moment, he relays his desire to become a deaf mute: I figured that I could get a job at a filling station somewhere, putting gas and oil in people’s cars. I did not care what kind of job it was, though. Just so people did not know me and I did not know anybody. I thought what I would do was, I would pretend I was one of those deaf-mutes. That way I wouldn’t have to have any goddam stupid useless conversation with anybody.

If anybody wanted to tell me something, they’d have to write it on a piece of paper and shove it over to me. They’d get bored as hell doing that after a while, and then I’d be through with having conversations for the rest of my life. Everybody’d think I was just a poor deaf-mute bastard and they’d leave me alone . . . I’d cook all my own food, and later on, if I wanted to get married or something, I’d meet this beautiful girl that was also a deaf-mute and we’d get married. She’d come and live in my cabin with me, and if she wanted to say anything to me, she’d have to write it on a piece of paper, like everybody else (Salinger 198).

The adult world repulses Holden and in response, he feels the need to withdraw to a life in solitude being a secret, deaf mute. Holden suffers psychologically. In addition, the desire for no communication is also apparent in his missed telephone calls. “On fifteen separate occasions, Holden gets the urge to communicate by phone, yet only four phone calls are ever completed, and even those are with unfortunate results” (Kegel 55). He consciously manifests people and events into larger than life vapors that he cannot let fade into his past.

Like many teens, his past compels him to grip onto his memories. All teens try to keep grips on the past, if only to keep firm holds on their sanity. When Holden continually wants to give old Jane Gallagher a buzz’, but is unable to turn his thoughts into actions. His desire to call her is expressed countless times; yet he never does call her. Finally, Holden’s loneliness and transition into adulthood climaxes as he watches his sister ride the carousel. As he sits alone, his illusion of protecting the innocence of children is symbolically shattered.

Critics regard this episode as Holden’s transition into adulthood, for although the future is uncertain, his severed ties with the dead past have enabled him to accept maturity (Lomazoff). His sisters battle with innocence began when his ended. Holden feels so strongly for his cause, so lonely in his heart, but cannot express his feelings to others. Salinger accurately captures the informal speech of an average intelligent, educated, northeastern American adolescent by combining diction, and sentence structure in his work (Costello, 14).

Such speech includes both simple descriptions and cursing. For example, Holden says, “They are nice and all”, as well as “I’m not going to tell you my whole goddam autobiography or anything”. In the first instance, he uses the term “nice” which oversimplifies his parents’ character, implying he does not wish to disrespect them, yet at the same time he does not praise them. At best he deems them as “nice and all. ” Holden further cuts short his description, but in a more curt manner, when he states he will not tell his “whole goddam autobiography or anything”.

From the start the reader picks up Holden’s hostility and unwillingness to share his views strictly by his use of language (Salzman, 6). With this in mind, consider the structure of Holden’s Speech and his use of phrases. “Like Madmen”, “Old”, “It killed me”, It really is, and “Like a bastard” are all placed in critical sentences to emphasize meaning (Salinger). Holden uses these phrases to such an overpowering degree that they create a clear picture of Salinger’s style, and become a part of Holden himself (Costello). Also, consider Holden’s use of the word “phony”.

The phoniness and corruption of society repulse Holden, and Salinger uses the word phony over 40 times to spotlight the worst of human nature. Phony Is informal and simple, but the deeper meaning are ominous and overwhelming. Salinger’s words serve as a record of the teenage vernacular during the postwar era, and his use of language adds immensely to the overall feel and themes. Many book reviews on The Catcher in the Rye deal with the controversial issues raised in the novel. For example, many readers find themselves shocked by Holden’s words and actions (Smith, 1).

Nask Burger argues that, ” Holden’s efforts to escape from himself by liquor, sex, night clubs, movies, sociability- anything and everything- are fruitless” (Burger, 1). The dark world Holden finds himself in scares the moral and conservative parents that read the novel. People have protested against the books rebellious nature, profanity, homosexuality, sexuality, and going as far to saying it was a communist plot to corrupt America’s youth. In every case, however, the universal meaning of the novel has won over even the most stubborn censors.

Critics love this novel, and praise the author. Burger admires the theme, style, diction, and the issues raised in his review for The New York Times (Burger). Smith praises the adolescent nature, magic of the novel, and psychoanalysis of teens in the Saturday Review of Literature (Smith). Both men understand the motivation of Salinger, and respectfully praise his coming-of age masterpiece. This unusually brilliant novel withstood the critics before angry censors. The Catcher in the Rye is universally appealing as a coming of age novel.

Holden Caulfield is the ultimate protagonist, and stands for everything that is good within the human spirit. The Catcher in the Rye raises questions that are of epic proportions, and masterfully allows the scholar to interpret an individual answer. Perhaps Holden is too raunchy, perverse, or mentally unstable to be a hero; yet his human side and flaws are what seem to be his most idiosyncratic and admirable traits. Holden Caulfield, this modern Huckleberry Finn, reminds everyone of how bad growing up feels but never makes us feel sorry for it.

Use of Literary Elements

There are many important elements to The Catcher in the Rye but there are two that stand out from the rest by a great margin. These elements of the novel are the message that the book gives to reader as well as the style of writing that J. D. Salinger uses while writing the book. The messages can be seen clearly and are very important to the book, but they are not an original theme for a book. What does set the ideas in this book apart from other books with the same theme is the writing style that Salinger uses in the book; this writing style is called stream of consciousness writing.

Stream of consciousness writing is a type of writing that is not typically used in books because of its well defined limits. These limits are that when using stream of consciousness narration, the story line is required to revolve around one and only one main character if the writing is to be effective. With S. of C. writing it is also required that the author develop the main character extremely well into a very believable person both emotionally and physically through thoughts and actions.

To write an effective book in this writing style an author must be exceptionally talented, and thankfully Mr. Salinger is just that. The S. of C. writing style is used effectively with the character of Holden Caulfield in The Catcher in the Rye because the story line Mr. Salinger developed follows Holden specifically as well as the fact that the subject matter of the book is one of an personal nature. The ideas in the book are presented as thoughts of Holden through out the story. These topics include the fakeness of the world, as well as the rebellion against the world that many teenagers have. Holden does not like the phonies in the world and constantly voices his opinion about it as well.

The rebellion against the world in not a conscious thing that Holden does but it is apparent in the story line of the book. An example of this rebellion is the constant use of profanity in the book. Salinger makes good use of the constant profanity to show this rebellion but because of Holdens character it is not out of context. Because Holden is upper-middle class and educated he used profanity to exemplify points that he is trying to make, not because he is swearing out of anger. Basically Salinger has Holden swear because he knows that it is socially unacceptable but he can do it because of his good education as a shock factor.

Another good use of of how the stream of consciousness writing style is used as literary tool is with in the thoughts of Holden. In The Catcher in the Rye the character of Holden Caulfield is a mentally unstable person, he is emotional and confused. The S. of C. writing style is effective to present this idea because of its harshness and quick pace, just as the mental state of a mentally unstable person would be. The rambling of the internal thoughts of Holden are entertaining yet uncommonly real to all of us which causes the reader to wonder what his mental state is.

The constant thought about the underlying ideas also are presented well with S. of C. writing style because when in real life you can not get a subject off your mind usually until you actually make a decision about it. The final literary tool that is important to the story that Salinger does well in The Catcher in the Rye is the development of characters. Throughout the story Mr. Salinger is constantly developing Holden just as you would get to know him if you were meeting him. The extreme development bordering on overdevelopment is good though because the story revolves around Holden and Holden only.

Many critics of Salinger say that he underdevelops the other characters in The Catcher in the Rye but I believe he does this purposely. If Salinger were to develop characters like Phoebe, and Sally as well as he does Holden the point of the story would have been lost. The story is being told by Holden from a mental institution so obviously he is going to be the center of the story because all people are selfish if they are given the opportunity. The different levels that people are developed, I believe, are also indicators of the different levels of respect that Holden has for people.

If you look at people he held in great respect, for good or bad reasons, they are usually developed reasonably well like Phoebe, Allie, and Sally. People that Holden did not respect though were developed in almost no detail which indicated that they made no real impact on him and therefore had no real relevance in the story. Throughout the story there are several specific examples of these literary tools that Salinger did or did not use to make his story effective. The book as a whole was the stage for the off beat writing style of stream of consciousness as well.

I believe that Salinger did a good job with the different levels of character development as well as developing the plot in a way that encouraged the readers to think about these issues on their own as well as while reading the book. His talent as a writer is obvious because of the fact that he has gained so much fame for this work, as well as the fact that readers of all ages can relate to the issues that Holden is confused about, not just teenagers around Holdens own age. Overall J. D. Salinger did a great job with the technical part of writing this book and he did a even better job getting the messages that he wanted across to the readers.

In The Rye Problems

I think Holden Caulfields difficulties started when his brother died from leukaemia because on the night of his brothers death he smashed every window in the garage with his bare fist and said that he didnt really know what he was doing. From what I have read in the book so far this doesnt appear to have affected him in what he does. He is very quick to judge people and seems to hate nearly everyone he encounters but I dont think that this is related to he death of his little brother.

One of his problems which I think may be related to the death of his little brother is that he is continuously getting expelled from schools which is how the book starts with him getting expelled from Pencey Prep. When he is leaving the school he yells out “So long, ya morons! ” which I think is a dumb thing to say because someone may have been woken up by this and gone out to get him.

Another thing, which I believe should e counted as a problem, is that he wrote a little message at the bottom of his exam to the teacher saying that he found his lectures interesting but didnt take much of it in. Something else that Holden did a lot of was lying which I believe is a problem. He lied to another students Mum on a train about many things including what her son was like, why he was on the train and even his name. In another part of the book he lied about his age to a prostitute. He also lied about a few other things in the book.

The Language Of Catcher In The Rye

The passage of adolescence has served as the central theme for many novels, but J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, long a staple in academic lesson plans, has captured the spirit of this stage of life in hyper-sensitive form, dramatizing Holden Caulfield’s vulgar language and melodramatic reactions. Written as the autobiographical account of a fictional teenage prep school student Holden Caulfield, The Catcher in the Rye deals with material that is socially scandalous for the times (Gwynn, 1958).

As an emotional, intelligent, inquisitive, and painfully sensitive young man, Holden puts his nner world to the test through the sexual mores of his peers and elders, the teachings of his education, and his own emerging sense of self. Throughout the years, the language of the story has startled some readers. Salinger’s control of Holden’s easy, conversational manner makes the introduction of these larger themes appear natural and believable. (Bloom, 1990). At the time of the novel through today, Holden’s speech rings true to the colloquial speech of teenagers.

Holden, according to many reviews in the Chicago Tribune, the New Yorker, and the New York Times, accurately aptures the informal speech of an average intelligent, educated, northeastern American adolescent (Costello, 1990). Such speech includes both simple description and cursing. For example, Holden says, “They’re nice and all”, as well as “I’m not going to tell you my whole goddam autobiography or anything. ” In the first instance, he uses the term “nice” which oversimplifies his parents’ character, implying he does not wish to disrespect them, yet at the same time he does not praise them.

At best he deems them as “nice and all. Holden further cuts short his description, but in a more curt manner, hen he states he will not tell his “whole goddam autobiography or anything. ” From the start the reader picks up Holden’s hostility and unwillingness to share his views strictly by his use of language (Salzman, 1991). From the last two examples, another colloquialism can be seen. Holden has a habit of ending his descriptions with tag phrases such as “and all” or “or anything. ” (Salzman, 1991). Not only does Holden speak like this in the beginning of the novel, but throughout the book, making this pattern a part of his character.

One could imagine Holden frequently ending his sentences ith “and all,” realizing it is a character trait since not all teenagers used that phrase. So the “and all” tag to Holden’s speech served to make his speech authentic and individual. (Salzman, 1991). Salinger intentionally used such speech patterns to help individualize Holden, yet to also make him a believable teenager of the early 1950’s. Another example of how Holden’s speech helped define his character is how he constantly had to confirm any affirmation he made, as if even he did not quite believe himself.

Such reconfirmations include phrases such as “… if you want to know the truth,” or “… t really does. ” Holden says the first phrase several times. “I have no wind, if you want to know the truth,” “I’m pacifist, if you want to know the truth,” and a variation: “She had a lot of sex appeal, too, if you really want to know. ” In each of the above instances, Holden makes a statement then feels compelled to clarify that is he is not making it up but is, in fact, telling the truth. These mannerisms may point to several aspects of his character.

For example, Holden is on the verge of failing out of preparatory school and fears telling his parents. Because he did ot do well in school, Holden may have felt as though no one ever took him seriously and realized his actions left him with no solid academic standing. Since Holden is essentially a failure at school with no serious friendships, he attempts to solidify some communication in asking for approval by stating “if you want to know the truth. ” Holden wants people to believe him so he speeks to seek approval (Costello, 1990).

Again, Salinger creates this speech pattern as believable for a common teenager, yet it also seems to belong individually to Holden. The Catcher in the Rye gained much of its notoriety for the language sed in it, particularly the crude words (Gwynn, 1958). Like most colloquial uses of body parts, accidents of birth, or religious connotations, Holden does not strictly make use of words in reference to their original meaning. The word “hell” is a staple of Holden’s vocabulary, and he uses it often with both positive and negative connotations.

In one instance, he tells us he had a “helluva time,” when he and Phoebe sneaked away and had a good time shopping for shoes downtown. Other statements include “pretty as hell,” “playful as hell,” or “hot as hell. ” Holden’s perception that situations were anything but normal in some elation to the extremes of the usage of “hell” is applied to both positive and negative situations. In each use of the word, Holden uses “hell” as a way to expresses the confusion of adolescence and his own regular use of it illustrates his own extreme sensitivity as a character (Gwynn, 1958).

As Holden’s experiences change, so does his use of crude language. When he is caught up in his own antics and is enraged, “sonuvabitch” and “bastard” frequently find their way into his vocabulary. However, when he addresses the reader as a narrator, Holden rarely, if ever, slips into his abitual use of swearing (Costello, 1990). “Sonuvabitch” is reserved for his extreme anger, as when he kept calling Stradlater a “moron sonuvabitch” for the boy’s ostensibly offensive treatment of Jane Gallagher.

Again, Holden’s sporadic use of “sonuvabitch” in his angriest moments alerts the reader to the serious quality of his anger. Salinger carefully crafted such speech patterns to help us identify Holden’s character without lengthy descriptions of such. Here, the offending words lets the reader know when Holden is most angry and the types of situations that make him so, thereby offering further insight nto his character, often through the use of a single word.

Holden’s regular use of curse words to describe his view of any given situation leaves the impression his vocabulary is limited, as observed in one much younger than himself. However, Holden recognizes that he has a limited vocabulary and uncomprehendingly identifies it himself (Salzman, 1991). He makes use of cursing in an effort to add emphasis to his otherwise simplistic verbiage. For example, Holden says “That guy Morrow was about as sensitive as a goddam toilet seat” (Salinger, 1951). The best reference Holden could think of was “toilet seat,” a simple item readily grasped by even young children.

To give this simile more emphasis, Holden, as usual, tosses in a curse word. Holden makes another toilet-like reference when he says “He started handling my paper like it was a turd or something,” (Salinger, 1951) when referring to his teacher’s expressions and body language while picking up some written work Holden had done. “Turd” is a word a recently potty-trained child might use instead of a prep school teen. So Holden not only admits to having a limited vocabulary, but he has a vocabulary seemingly imited to one even younger than his age.

Holden’s regular use of cursing demonstates not only the depth of his emotion, but signals the reader to the fact that he is caught in the stage where childhood and approaching maturity collide. He relates poorly to instances other than those from his early youth, and tries in vain to bridge the gap between adolescent and adult worlds with his use of profanity. He fails to notice that his cursing loses much of his intended rebellious impact by his overuse of the words. Rather than successfully rebelling against school or his arents, Holden appears sometimes tortured and pathetic, and sometimes just plain silly.

This superficiality of youth leaves him with little ability to communicate because he relies so heavily on simple words and thoughts to express the majority of his feelings. While Holden’s teenage angst is apparent, Salinger carefully crafted Holden’s vocabulary to create a character who is believable. As Holden’s vocabulary and outlook on life demonstrate to us his character as a fictional persona, the realistic flavor of his vocabulary mixed with emotion unfailingly ties him with the harsh realities of adolescence and the youth of his time.

Cather in the Rye – Language

The passage of adolescence has served as the central theme for many novels, but J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, long a staple in academic lesson plans, has captured the spirit of this stage of life in hyper-sensitive form, dramatizing Holden Caulfield’s vulgar language and melodramatic reactions. Written as the autobiographical account of a fictional teenage prep school student Holden Caulfield, The Catcher in the Rye deals with material that is socially scandalous for the times (Gwynn, 1958).

As an emotional, intelligent, inquisitive, and painfully sensitive young man, Holden puts his inner world to the test through the sexual mores of his peers and elders, the teachings of his education, and his own emerging sense of self. Throughout the years, the language of the story has startled some readers. Salinger’s control of Holden’s easy, conversational manner makes the introduction of these larger themes appear natural and believable. (Bloom, 1990). At the time of the novel through today, Holden’s speech rings true to the colloquial speech of teenagers.

Holden, according to many reviews in the Chicago Tribune, the New Yorker, and the New York Times, accurately captures the informal speech of an average intelligent, educated, northeastern American adolescent (Costello, 1990). Such speech includes both simple description and cursing. For example, Holden says, “They’re nice and all”, as well as “I’m not going to tell you my whole goddam autobiography or anything. ” In the first instance, he uses the term “nice” which oversimplifies his parents’ character, implying he does not wish to disrespect them, yet at the same time he does not praise them. At best he deems them as “nice and all.

Holden further cuts short his description, but in a more curt manner, when he states he will not tell his “whole goddam autobiography or anything. ” From the start the reader picks up Holden’s hostility and unwillingness to share his views strictly by his use of language (Salzman, 1991). From the last two examples, another colloquialism can be seen. Holden has a habit of ending his descriptions with tag phrases such as “and all” or “or anything. ” (Salzman, 1991). Not only does Holden speak like this in the beginning of the novel, but throughout the book, making this pattern a part of his character.

One could imagine Holden frequently ending his sentences with “and all,” realizing it is a character trait since not all teenagers used that phrase. So the “and all” tag to Holden’s speech served to make his speech authentic and individual. (Salzman, 1991). Salinger intentionally used such speech patterns to help individualize Holden, yet to also make him a believable teenager of the early 1950’s. Another example of how Holden’s speech helped define his character is how he constantly had to confirm any affirmation he made, as if even he did not quite believe himself.

Such reconfirmations include phrases such as “… if you want to know the truth,” or “… it really does. ” Holden says the first phrase several times. “I have no wind, if you want to know the truth,” “I’m pacifist, if you want to know the truth,” and a variation: “She had a lot of sex appeal, too, if you really want to know. ” In each of the above instances, Holden makes a statement then feels compelled to clarify that is he is not making it up but is, in fact, telling the truth. These mannerisms may point to several aspects of his character.

For example, Holden is on the verge of failing out of preparatory school and fears telling his parents. Because he did not do well in school, Holden may have felt as though no one ever took him seriously and realized his actions left him with no solid academic standing. Since Holden is essentially a failure at school with no serious friendships, he attempts to solidify some communication in asking for approval by stating “if you want to know the truth. ” Holden wants people to believe him so he speeks to seek approval (Costello, 1990).

Again, Salinger creates this speech pattern as believable for a common teenager, yet it also seems to belong individually to Holden. The Catcher in the Rye gained much of its notoriety for the language used in it, particularly the crude words (Gwynn, 1958). Like most colloquial uses of body parts, accidents of birth, or religious connotations, Holden does not strictly make use of words in reference to their original meaning. The word “hell” is a staple of Holden’s vocabulary, and he uses it often with both positive and negative connotations.

In one instance, he tells us he had a “helluva time,” when he and Phoebe sneaked away and had a good time shopping for shoes downtown. Other statements include “pretty as hell,” “playful as hell,” or “hot as hell. ” Holden’s perception that situations were anything but normal in some relation to the extremes of the usage of “hell” is applied to both positive and negative situations. In each use of the word, Holden uses “hell” as a way to expresses the confusion of adolescence and his own regular use of it illustrates his own extreme sensitivity as a character (Gwynn, 1958).

As Holden’s experiences change, so does his use of crude language. When he is caught up in his own antics and is enraged, “sonuvabitch” and “bastard” frequently find their way into his vocabulary. However, when he addresses the reader as a narrator, Holden rarely, if ever, slips into his habitual use of swearing (Costello, 1990). “Sonuvabitch” is reserved for his extreme anger, as when he kept calling Stradlater a “moron sonuvabitch” for the boy’s ostensibly offensive treatment of Jane Gallagher.

Again, Holden’s sporadic use of “sonuvabitch” in his angriest moments alerts the reader to the serious quality of his anger. Salinger carefully crafted such speech patterns to help us identify Holden’s character without lengthy descriptions of such. Here, the offending words lets the reader know when Holden is most angry and the types of situations that make him so, thereby offering further insight into his character, often through the use of a single word.

Holden’s regular use of curse words to describe his view of any given situation leaves the impression his vocabulary is limited, as observed in one much younger than himself. However, Holden recognizes that he has a limited vocabulary and uncomprehendingly identifies it himself (Salzman, 1991). He makes use of cursing in an effort to add emphasis to his otherwise simplistic verbiage. For example, Holden says “That guy Morrow was about as sensitive as a goddam toilet seat” (Salinger, 1951). The best reference Holden could think of was “toilet seat,” a simple item readily grasped by even young children.

To give this simile more emphasis, Holden, as usual, tosses in a curse word. Holden makes another toilet-like reference when he says “He started handling my paper like it was a turd or something,” (Salinger, 1951) when referring to his teacher’s expressions and body language while picking up some written work Holden had done. “Turd” is a word a recently potty-trained child might use instead of a prep school teen. So Holden not only admits to having a limited vocabulary, but he has a vocabulary seemingly limited to one even younger than his age.

Holden’s regular use of cursing demonstates not only the depth of his emotion, but signals the reader to the fact that he is caught in the stage where childhood and approaching maturity collide. He relates poorly to instances other than those from his early youth, and tries in vain to bridge the gap between adolescent and adult worlds with his use of profanity. He fails to notice that his cursing loses much of his intended rebellious impact by his overuse of the words. Rather than successfully rebelling against school or his parents, Holden appears sometimes tortured and pathetic, and sometimes just plain silly.

This superficiality of youth leaves him with little ability to communicate because he relies so heavily on simple words and thoughts to express the majority of his feelings. While Holden’s teenage angst is apparent, Salinger carefully crafted Holden’s vocabulary to create a character who is believable. As Holden’s vocabulary and outlook on life demonstrate to us his character as a fictional persona, the realistic flavor of his vocabulary mixed with emotion unfailingly ties him with the harsh realities of adolescence and the youth of his time.

Catcher in the Rye – Chapter Summaries

Chapter one:

*Starts off in a mental hospital somewhere near hollywood. Holden Caufield is the narrator and begins to tell the story through a flashback. His flashback starts off with him standing alone on a hill looking down on a football game. He was watching the game because he got home early from the fencing match because he left all of the teams gear on the subway (he was the manager for the team). Holden was waiting for an ending to his private highschool days at pency (he was kicked out because of the academic policy, he just wasn’t up to par and failing out). So he leaves the football game and heads for Old Spencer’s house his history teacher. He arrives at Old spencer’s house and Mrs. Spencer answers the door and he asks her how Old Spencer is doing.

Chapter two:

*He goes into Old Spencer’s room. Old Spencer explains to him why he had to fail him (because he knew nothing). He asks if he had seen Dr. Thurmer (the head guy at pencey) and holden tells him yeah and that he told him about how life was a game. Spencer plainly tells holden that thurmer is right. Then Spencer reads holden’s paper he wrote about some egyption crap and aloudly reads the note that holden had written to him at the end of it. Spencer asks him if he’s thought about his future. Then holden tells spencer that he has to go to the gym and says goodbye not feeling one bit like he was getting the hell out of pencey.

Chapter three:

*Holden reveals how much of a lyar he is. He didn’t really have to go to the gym to check equipment he just wanted to get out of there. He then talks about where his room is at pencey and how its in a hall named after Ossinburger some fat guy who donated alot of money to the school. He remembers of the time when Edgar Marsalla fladulated loudly during some speach that ossiburger gave during church. He then made it to his room where he was happy to be (his room had two of everything) he sat down in a chair put on the hat he had bought earlier in new york and started to read Out Of Africa.

Then as he had finished about three pages Ackley(a disgustingly poor hygenic guy who liked to pick at his pimples)came into the room. Ackley asked about Stradlater (holden’s roomate) where he was and keeping tabs on him coz he hated him so much. Then stradlater asked to borrow holden’s new houndstooth jacket and he acted like he was in a hurry to get all gussied up (he left his date sitting in the annex so he could get all fixed up) Then ackley decided to leave(basically because he couldn’t stand stradlater) Then stradlater tells holden he’s goin to the can to shave.

Chapter four:

*Holden has nothing to do so he goes with stradlater to the can. He sits there and watches him (stradlater is a secret slob he has a rusty razor but he always has a clean shave and spends alot of time fixing himself up). So holden aks about his date and stradlater tells him she knows him and that its jean gallagher (she was a girl he spent alot of time with over the summer and knew her well) Then holden gets all excited and keeps sayin he should go say hello to her and how he wonders if she still keeps all her kings in the backrow still.

He never gets up enough nerve to go say hello to her so he tells stradlater to. Then stradlater asks him to do an english composition for him describing anything. Holden says he will do it if he has enough time. Then they go up to their room agian and stradlater spends more time infront of the mirror. Then ackley leaves and holden sits there thinking only of jean and can’t get his mind off of her then ackley comes in and bothers him again (holden is happy tho coz its keeping him from thinking about her)

Chapter five:

*Holden decides to go out for something to eat and see a movie with Mal Brossard and he invites Ackley to come along (Ackley takes about five hours to get ready) They leave and take a bus into Agerstown and he gets back to his room at about quarter to nine. He sits their and thinks of jean while Ackley lays on his bed and pillow and picks at his pimples then he leaves coz holden has to write that composition. Holden decides to write about his brother Allies baseball glove (Allie died of lukemia and the day he died holden punched out all of the windows of the garage and tried to with the car but they were too tough and he broke his hand now its week and he can’t make a full fist) his brother’s glove had poems written on each of the fingers to keep him buisy during the game because he played outfield.

Chapter six:

*Holden begins to worry about jean being alone with stradlater because stradlater was one of those guys who actually had sex with girls (instead of ackley who just made up silly lies about it) He started to get mad at stradlater and sat aroudn thinkin about it. Then stradlater came home and obnoxiously asks where the hell everybody was when he knew that they were either out or asleep. So then he read holden’s composition and complained that it was aobut a baseball glove and how it was suposed to be about a room or something.

So holden snaged it back out of his hands and ripped it up and threw it out. Then holden asked what he and jean did Holden told him that he borrowed ed banky’s car and they just sat in it. Then holden punched stradlater and stradlater pinned him on the ground and told him he would let him up if holden stopped callin him a moron. then he let him up and then holden called stradlater a moron again and he punched him in the nose causing him to bleed terribly. Then stradlater left to go wash his face and look at himself in the mirror some more.

Chapter seven:

*Holden heads into ackley’s room well aware that he had to be up. He asks ackley if he wants to play a game of canasta and ackley says no. So holden lays on ackley’s roomate ely’s bed for awhile and plans a scheme to go to new york for awhile. He gets really depressed while laying on the bed so he gets up and shakes his hand and leaves to go pack …..his stuff. When he was leaving he yelled “sleep tight ya morons” to all of the people in the dorm.

Chapter eight:

*holden can’t get a cab to the station so he walks there in the cold. He only had to wait ten minutes for the train and then he got on and when the train stopped at trenton the mother of his classmate earnest morrow got on the train and sat next to him. holden found her verry attractive and he gave her a fake name when she asked for one and lied to her and told her all this crap about her son being sensitive. he then lies to her agian about having a brain tumor and going to south america with his grandma before she gets off the train at her stop.

Chapter nine:

*holden arrives at penn station and goes to a payphone and thinks of someone to call but he doesn’t end up calling anyone. He gets a cab to a crummy hotel and gets a room and looks out the window at all the crazy buisness going on around. Then he gets the urge to call his little sister but he can’t because his parents will know its him. So he calls this girl who’s number he got from a friend at a party from columbia. He asks her to go get a drink, but things don’t work out.

Chapter ten:

*He changes his clothes and thinks of his sister phoebe and how bright, smart and pretty she was and how he had such a good time with her and allie. Then he goes downstairs into the lavender room the club at the hotel. While sitting int the club he tries to get served alcohol but it doesn’t work and he eyes up these three girls sitting in the club too. He goes over and asks any of them if they want to dance then finally the blonde agrees. He dances with her and the rest of the girls and tries to have a conversation with them but they don’t pay attention. So he decides to leave and go somewhere else.

Chapter eleven:

*Holden gets jean on his mind again while he’s in the lobly. He sits there thinking of jean and their summer together and of time when they were playing checkers and her stepdad came home and asked where her mom was and she didn’t answer him and holden looked at her and she had a tear coming down from her eye so he got up and sat next to her and held her while she cried and he kissed her on the cheek and everywhere but on the lips.

Chapter twelve:

*Holden then took a cab too Earnies and inside earnies he is spotted by an ex gf of his brother DB’s and he doesn’t want to have to sit with her and her friend so he tells her he’s suposed to meet someone somewhere and is mad he has to leave

Chapter thirteen:

*Holden walks all the way back to the hotel. When he’s in the elevator he agrees to have a hooker come to his room for five bucks with a guy named maurice. He then waits for her at his room and when she comes he decides he doesn’t want to do anything with her so he pays her five bucks and she leaves

Chapter fourteen:

*Holden is even more depressed by the hooker. He begins to talk to allie because that is something he does when he is really depressed. Then he goes and lies in bed and then he hears nocking at the door adn he knows its maurice. Maurice tells him he owes him five bucks but holden refuses to pay it coz he told him five and then maurice and the hooker break into his room beat him up and take the five bucks. Holden calls maurice a moron so he beats him some more then the leave.Holden gets up and goes into the bathroom from lying on the floor. He takes a bath and then lies in bed

Chapter’s fifteen- eighteen:

*Holden wakes up in the moring and goes to a subway restaurant for food. He meets two nuns and donates to their charity and ends up having a pleasant conversation with them. Then holden arranges a date with sally hayes later for two o’clock that afternoon. He then goes to the park in hopes to see his sister phoebe, he didn’t see her but he helped a kid put on their skates and it reminded him of a childhood memory. He then left from the park for his date wich he arrived early His date ends up going horrible and he asks sally to run away with him and she says no and leaves crying.

Chapter’s nineteen-twentytwo:

*After his date he goes to a bar with Luce this freind he had from columbia (who always treats him like he’s a little kid) Luce leaves and holden rides aroudn in a cab for awhile and decides to go visit phoebe even tho its the middle of the night. He then works his way into his parents appartment and goes into phoebe’s room and wakes her (she’s really happy to see him and questions his being there and he lies to her about why he’s there) he then talks to her about school and people.

Chapter’s twentythree- twentyfive:

*Holden’s parents come home from their party and he almost gets caught but makes it out safely. He ends up at Mr. Antolini’s house where he is given good advice by him even tho he is drunk. Mr. Antolini lets holden spend the night on his couch. Holden spends the next day trying to leave town and head west but because of phoebe he can’t. He writes her a letter telling her to meet him at the museum before he leaves. He waits there then she appears with a suitcase that was his and she tells him she wants to go with him and he tells her no and she cries.

So the go into the museum together and then they go to the zoo and after they cross the street to a carousel where he buys her a ticket with his money for her to ride. He sits there and watches her ride the carousel and she gets off and tells him to ride but he says no he’ll just watch her. Then she asks if he’s going to come home and he tells her he is for real this time and phoebe gets on the carousel and holden sits in the rain and cries out of joy and because he is such a confused boy.

Chapter twentysix:

*Holden says he isn’t gonna tell us anymore, but he could tell us about what school he’s suposed to go to after he gets out of the mental institution. He says the doctors are askin him a million questions and so is his brother DB.

The book Catcher in the Rye

The book Catcher in the Rye is a story of Holden Caulfield’s thoughts about life and the world around him. Holden tells many of his opinions about people and takes the reader on a 5-day trip into his mind. Holden, throughout the book, made other people feel inferior to his own. I can relate to this because although I do not view people inferior to me, I judge others unequally. Holden and I both have similar judgements of people from the way they act and behave. We also share feelings about motivation as well as lack of it. After reading this book, I came to the conclusion that Holden and I are much more similar than I initially elieved.

Holden portrayed others to be inferior to his own kind all throughout the book. He made several references as to how people aren’t as perfect as he was. “The reason Stradlater fixed himself up to look good was because he was madly in love with himself. ” Holden had a difficults with no being good. He was afraid of not having any special talents or abilities and and did other thi8ngs to make himself look tough. “Boy, I sat at that goddam bar till around one o’clock or so, getting drunk as a bastard. I could hardly see straight. ” Holden tried all he could to try to be cool he was faking it just to fit in.

He drank, cursed and criticized life l to make it seem he was like he knew of his habits. I myself have found me doing this at times, also. I, at times, feel the need to fit in to a group and do things similar to what others do in order to be accepted by others, but I do have my limitations. I smoked a cigarratte once by myself cause I saw everybody doing that so I was like let me see how it is, I tried it and it didnt grow on me but that was only once. Holden and I both put people on levels higher and lower other than our own for amount of knowledge and and characteristic

Holden used the term ‘phonies’ to describe more than a few people in this book. He used the term to be what a person is if they don’t act themselfs and follow other people’s ways. Holden didn’t like phonies, he thought of them as if they were trying to show off. He didn’t like it when they showed off because it seemed fake and unnatural every time they would act like it.. “At the end of the first act we went out with all the other jerks for a cigarette. What a deal that was. You never saw so many phonies in all your life, everybody smoking their ears off and talking about the play so that everybody could hear how sharp they were.

I know many people like this and I really dont pay them attention, I just let them make a fool of themselves and I try to act like my self as much as possible. I have many friends who talk using vocabulary that they wouldnt normally use just to try to impress you, and others who make note of everything they see to show you how observant they are. People do this when they have a fear of their own individuality and feel that they need to acy different to get people to like them. Me, personally I dont like seeing somebody acting differently from themselves, cause I belive everyboddy is cool, you just have to find it in them.

Throughout the book Holden displays a lack of motivation for many things in which he should do and like myself I acknowledge that, but Im tool lazy to take it in to consideration. Holden couldn’t even call up an old girlfriend whom he knew a long time ago. “But when I got inside this phone booth, I wasn’t much in the mood any more to give old Jane a buzz. ” Holden also had a problem getting his motivation together in order to finish schoolwork and succeed in his prep school. I have similar problems with my motivation and find at times I must be in the mood to do something n order for me to accomplish it.

This stems from our experience in the past being that we can get through life, or the part we’ve been through already, with minimal effort. Holden has had this opportunity to notice this as his parents have been shuffling him around to different schools every time he flunks. He feels his parents will be there to move him somewhere else and take care of him every time something goes wrong. I . I find my forgetting to do things and having my parents doing them for me spoiled me, so now I just do what I can and dont worry bout the rest which is bad.

I find I am basically did things I was suppose to take care off. This is a bad habit though and I am trying to get out of this lifestyle because I know I won’t always have someone to fall back on and sooner or later its gonna backfire. Holden Caulfield and I are very similar in many ways. We tend to judge different people similar ways. We both dislike people who act fake because of their need to be cool. We also both lack motivation because of childhood experiences which have made us who we are. In conclusion me Holden Caulfield in many ways alike yet different.

The Catcher in the Rye: A Bridge from Innocence to Adulthood

Adolescence is a time of existence in two worlds. One world having the desire to be in the adult world, which is filled with all the unknown wonders of the world. The other world is the world of childhood which is comfortable and protected from all the impurities in the world. This sort of tug of war between the two worlds is not only mentally imposed on a being, but physically, socially, and morally as well.

With all the mentioned above, often times an adult will discourage an action of an adolescent by saying they are too old to a act a certain way, and then will turn around and say they are oo young to do something, like go out late or go on dates. These contradictions can lead an adolescent to complete uncertainty of their actions. J. B. Salingers book, The Catcher in the Rye, aptly describes the immense confusion of the in between stages of being a boy and a man.

Throughout the whole story, the narrator, Holden tries to act both the boy and thw man but cannot. He tries in vain to get a grip on the adult world, but never is quite successful. Holdens first attempt at adulthood is exemplified when he leaves his school without permission from his parents or the school. This act in tself sets the stage for his trial and error attitude about adulthood in the sense he failed out of school, which was a childish act. He tries to rectify his failing out of school by leaving, which he views as an adult act.

Holdens leaving school represents his need for independence and he achieves this by leaving. Another of Holdens failed attempts at adulthood is when he goes down to he hotels club where he orders an alcoholic drink, but he is refused because the waiter will not serve him because he is underage. Holden tries to give the illusion that he is older because when he orders he drink, he Orders it fast as possible, because if you hem and haw they think you are under 21 and wont sell you intoxicating liquor.

This is the classic example of adolescence when one attempts to act older than his or her age when attempting to obtain alcohol. Up until the age of 21, all young adults want to give the illusion they are older than they are in hopes of obtaining special adult privileges, such as drinking alcohol, smoking, etc. However Holdens failed attempts forces him to realize that his act is fooling no one other than himself. Such an example can be seen when one goes to college bars and an see all the adults that are hanging out there.

The people who are there are not fooling anyone as well. Sex is often the most complicated adult subjects, even for adults to understand themselves. The act of sex itself can be talked about immensely, as done in locker rooms or with friends, almost to the point where one could believe in the tales. However the act itself cannot be faked and innocence of such things are quite apparent when the situations do arise. The saying one can talk the talk, but cannot walk the walk describes this sort of situation perfectly.

Holdens first experience with a woman who he has heard about from a friend, emphasizes his inexperience. He called this woman because he heard from his friend that she Was not a whore, but she did not mind doing it once in a while. He tries to cover up his innocence by faking a deep voice and pretending that he was from Princeton. However she sees through his facade, and lets him down. Another attempt into the adult world, or what Holden considers to be the adult world, has been thwarted.

His failure is due in part to the fact that Holden does not really know the rules, which he is uessing at, and also in part because his loneliness is not a substitute for experience. Although this act is not childlike alone, but rather it is a stepping stone into the adult world of sex, where an individual will try new techniques, such as pickup lines and such, to obtain and reach his or her goal. Thus Holden has learned his first valuable lesson of what not to do in the future. However Holden is over his head when he agrees to have a prostitute, who is propositioned to him by the bellhop.

He is apparently nervous and he confesses that he is a virgin. His reasoning for having the prostitute s that it is Good to get some practice just in case I get married. He also tells of how in the past he had almost gone all the way, but at the last moment he recoiled. This indicates how immature he is and how he is not ready for a sexual relationship, primarily because he is doing it for the sake of doing it and not for love, and also the fact he shys away from sex is a definite indication he is not ready for it.

Once the prostitute come over, he again shys away and tells her to leave. Once again, with these examples in mind, Holden emphasizes how he is not ready for the grown up world of sex, despite hat his body is telling him. The girls that Holden refers to quite a bit are Sally and Jane, who together represent what he desires in a relationship . Jane, although she was a girlfriend from when he was younger, represents the caring and understanding part in a relationship, the mature part, in the sense that Holden in genuinely concerned for her nature.

Sally, a girl friend who is considered an adult relationship, represents what he wants in an adult relationship, such as sex and marriage. Holden tries to seduce Sally and they make out in the cab. Again he puts he cart before the horse, and asks her to marry him, even though he Did not like her that much. He wants the adult relationship of being married, but has the childlike idea of not doing it for the sake of love, because he did not love her, although he told her he did. Fortunately Sally said she would rather wait, not getting swept up by the excitement of Holdens immaturity.

After Holden asks her to marry him, he realizes how stupid his actions were, and that he did not love her, which indicates that Holden is learning something from his mistakes, and in turn becoming mature. As seen through Holdens failing at becoming an instant adult, it is quite apparent that he is not done being a child. It is exemplified when he tries to act like an adult, but acting is all he is doing. Behind every one of his adult actions, there is a childish one to follow suit, and it is clear that his mature act is fooling no one, i. e. the bartender, the girl he called, the prostitute.

Yet like a glutton for punishment, he starts over again only to end up disappointed. However the only time it seems that Holden is comfortable and secure is when he refers to a childlike tate or when he talks about children, in particular his sister Phoebe. Phoebe, who is ten, is the only person who he thinks that truly understands him. Yet when he tells her that he failed out of school, she does not does not show any compassion, but rather show him anger and she puts the pillow over her head and refuses to listen to him.

This is important because it emphasizes how Holdens adolescent age can no longer rely on the advice and understanding of a child, yet he cannot rely on adults advice, although he pretends to be one. The importance of childhood in Holdens life is seen gain when he starts talking to a little girl at the park, who he also helps put on her ice skates. He shows no fear or false nature when he is with her, and he shows his ease with her when he states that he Loves it when kids are nice and polite when you tighten their skates for them or something. Most kids are. They really are.

Unlike when he is with women or in bars, Holden is uninhibited with children and does not put on false faces with them. The fact he finds them genuinely polite shows how he feels how he can put his full trust with them, and explains why he eturns to children or a childlike state, because they are real, whereas adults are about putting on aires. The idea that children are real beings is seen again when Phoebe asks Holden what he wants to do with his life, and he replies he would want to be a catcher in the rye, where he would catch all children who got too close to the cliffs edge.

He wants to be a catcher of children because they love more easily than adults do, and they do not play games when giving love, as adults do. Holdens most obvious example his regression to childhood is seen when he returns back to his home. When e left school and decided to stay at hotels, opposed to returning to home, and he did so with the intent of showing himself, as well as his parents, how he could rebel against the forces that tie him to childhood. Staying away from home was his big test of not only himself, but to the world.

Yet despite his brave brave facade, the real reason he does not return home is because he is overcome by guilt and shame over his expulsion from school. Proving he cannot handle the adult world, he returns home. Unbeknownst to Holden, his parents are not home when he arrives, but they arrive shortly later. As he leaves, he takes no precautions about running into his parents, and by doing this it seems that he almost wants to be caught. This is symbolic because he then comes to terms with his immaturity and the only thing that would pull him back into his comfortable and safe child world is his parents.

When he blatantly smokes in the house and is not careful when he leaves, he is almost crying out for help and attention. Before Holden returned to his home, he is at the pond near Central Park, and he is thinking about dying and is rather nonchalant about the fact he might die. When Holden visits Mr. Antonlelli, he is again reminded of his immaturity and is faced with it when Mr. Antonelli repeats a poem that seems to describes Holdens whole nature, that The immature man is one who wants to die nobly for a cause, and the mature man is one who wants to live for one.

With this in mind, Holdens immaturity is brought to his face, and despite his act, he realizes he is still a child. In the end, Holden returns home, and in a sense he is beaten by the system and beaten at his own game. Throughout the story Holden refers to himself as Stupid or Crazy after many failed attempts into the adult world. What he fails to realize is that he is niether stupid or crazy, but rather he is naive and innocent to the workings of the world, and through his failures he begins to realize this fact.

The only thing he is guilty of is trying too hard an getting disappointed to easily because of his failures due to his inexperience in life. What he also does not realize is that there is no imaginary line that says child on one side and adult on the other. Rather there is a stairway towards adulthood, and unlike the imaginary line which is crossed effortlessly, the stairway requires some effort and work o achieve towards the top, which in this case is adulthood.

Holden attempts to cross the line versus going up the stairs, and as a result he realized that there is no easy path into adulthood, that it is a trial and error period, where you have to learn from your mistakes and not get hung up on them. Holdens failures are actually part of the steps toward adulthood, steps that are critical and help him understand the adult world and how it really works. Salinger accurately represents the difficult bridge between a child and an adult, and emphasizes that an individual at this age cannot pretend to be an adult nor an they regress back into the security of childhood.

Salinger also emphasizes that one must take this ride, despite the twists and turns that come with it because it is critical for survival as an adult. It is emphasized that there is no given amount of steps toward adulthood and it is different for each individual, but that the experiences encountered, both good and bad, mold the individual and shape them for the differences to come. In closing it is apparent that there is no easy way into adulthood, but it is accurate to say that the experiences of the child are the mold for the adult.

Analysis of Phoebe Caulfield

Siblings are never meant to get along. They yell and bicker over everything and are never able to have a friendly relationship. Very rarely do I see a pleasant relationship between a brother and a sister, who actually are able to communicate without killing each other. When I see siblings that are nice to each other, I admire them because it takes a lot to be nice to their siblings, especially if there is a seven year difference between them, like Holden and Phoebe. In J. D. Salingers novel, The Catcher in the Rye, Phoebe Caulfield, one of the major characters in the novel, loves and thinks highly of her brother, Holden, the protagonist.

Phoebe is a ten year old neat, intelligent girl, who looks up to his brother and respects him. She knows Holden inside and out and wants the best for him. It is through Phoebe that we see Holden as a child who never wants to grow up. Phoebe has a great influence both on the reader and Holden, and is one of the few people in the novel who understands what is happening to Holden. Phoebe has a great affect on Holden. Throughout the book Holden feels depressed and lonely. It is only the thought of Phoebe that makes him happy and less lonesome. He thinks about all the fun they had together.

When he is around her he does not feel depressed, but joyful. I certainly felt like talking to her [Phoebe] on the phone. Somebody with some sense and all. (Salinger, 66) When he feels lonely and wants to call someone, one of the people he always thinks of calling is Phoebe. He feels very close to Phoebe, who actually listens to him. Phoebe is a very smart girl, whom Holden enjoys talking to. He thinks of Phoebe as his equal; someone that he can share things with and talk to, without feeling like he is talking to a phony. Another reason Phoebe is important to Holden is the fact that both love each other.

She [Phoebe] likes me a lot. I mean shes quite fond of me. She really is. (Salinger, 159) Throughout the novel Holden is having trouble finding someone that truly feels for him and loves him, but Phoebe is the only person that not only understands, but loves him as much as he loves her and cares about him. Holden pictures Phoebe different than who she really is. He thinks that Phoebe is a sweet, innocent little child that has not yet been ruined by the phoniness of the world. Phoebes childhood is everything Holden wishes to have; nothing to worry about and feeling happy all the time.

However, he realizes that Phoebes childhood is much different than he had pictured it. Phoebe is more mature and has a better understanding of the world. Oh, why did you do it? She meant why did I get the ax again. It made me sort of sad, the way she said it. (Salinger, 166) Instead of sympathizing with him and making him feel better, she made even more depressed. Phoebe understands that the fact that Holden has been expelled from school, not only once, but many time, is because Holden does not want to grow up. Phoebe wants Holden to realize that he needs to grow up.

To Holden, the adult world is a place he wishes to stay away from. In a way, Holden is lost between childhood and adulthood. He is afraid to enter the cruel world of adult hypocrisy. Phoebe, however, knows that growing up is an important process. Phoebe challenges Holdens view of the world. She asks him what he wants to be when he grows up. Im standing on the edge of some crazy cliff I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliffI mean if theyre running and they dont look where theyre going I have to come out from somewhere and catch themId just be the catcher in the rye and all.

His response to Phoebes question reveals his fantasy of idealistic childhood and of his role as the protector of innocence. This fantasy of becoming the catcher in the rye shows his childish side, that he is having trouble seeing the world any other way. Phoebe response to Holdens dream is Daddys going to kill you. (Salinger, 173) She sees it as a crazy, unrealistic idea. She, also, knows that he would never go anywhere with it because the innocent kids that he wants to protect have to grow up and become adults just like everyone else. Through Phoebe, the reader can understand Holden better.

In the first half of the novel, the reader hears Holdens side of the story, which is how the adult world is killing him. Holden blames the adults for his depression and loneliness. He believes that he is the only noble person in the world. Next to Phoebe, Holdens maturity and stubborn outlook seem less charming and more foolish. You dont like anything thats happeningyou dont like any schools. You dont like a million things. You dont (Salinger, 169) Holden couldnt think of one actual thing that he liked. This quote proves that Holden, not the adult world, is the cause of his depression, thus making him his own worse enemy.

He cannot find anything good in anybody or anything, and even if he does, he still has something bad to say about them. Phoebe is the first and the only important character that explains Holdens real character and the problems that he has brought upon himself. However, it can be argued that Mr. Antolini is the person who introduces the reader to the fact that Holden is his own worse enemy, but it is through Phoebe, who knows Holden the best, that one first realizes that Holden has been dumb and childish and has brought all this problems upon himself.

Phoebes relationship with Holden is one of the most important relationships in the novel. Holdens love for Phoebe gives him energy him when he feels lonely and unhappy. Phoebe makes Holdens picture of childhoodof children romping though a field of ryeseem oversimplified. Phoebe seems to realize that Holdens bitterness toward the rest of the world is really bitterness toward himself. She sees that he is a deeply sad insecure young man who needs love and support. At the end of the book, when she shows up at the museum and demands to come with him, she seems not so much to Holden as to understand that he needs her.

The Catcher in the Rye, A Unique Connotation Of The Preservation Of Innocence And The Pursuit Of Compassion

A novel, which has gained literary recognition worldwide, scrutiny to the point of censorship and has established a following among adolescents, The Catcher in the Rye is in its entirety a unique connotation of the preservation of innocence and the pursuit of compassion. With certain elegance the writer J. D. Salinger, substantiates the growth and perils, which lie between childhood and adulthood. Embellishing the differentiation between innocence and squalor in the grasps of society.

The bridge that lies between these contrasting themes are personified hrough the novels protagonist, Holden Caul-field and his visualization of a cliff, which depicts a dividing point between the evident beginning and end. The connection, which binds this gap in reality, was made clear through a new found compassion, consummating Holdens place in society through the realization of his surroundings from which he successfully crosses over. Focusing on the rebellious and confused actuality of adolescents stuck between the innocence of childhood and the corruptness of the adult world, this novel strikes a cord, which most adolescents can relate.

The essence of the story The Catcher in the Rye follows the forty-eight hour escapade of sixteen-year-old Holden Caulfield, told through first person narration. After his expulsion from Pency, a fashionable prep school, the lat-est in a long line of expulsions, Holden has a few confrontations with his fellow students and leaves shortly after to return to his hometown, New York City. In the heart of New York City, Holden spends the following two days hiding out to rest before confronting his parents with the news.

During his adventures in the city he tries to renew some old cquaintances, find his significance in the adult world, and come to grips with the head-aches he has been having lately. Eventually, Holden sneaks home to visit his sister Phoebe, because alone on the streets he feels as if he has no where else to turn. Children are the only people with whom Holden can communicate with throughout the novel, not because they can help him with his growing pains but because they remind him of a simpler time (his inno-cence), which he wishes he could return.

The trials of the adult world wear down Holdens vision of a place in society, portraying innocence as a form of etreat from a confusing world. On the subject of innocence and symbolism there of, which is repre-sented through Holdens thoughts and actions, S. N. Behrman writes: “Holdens difficulties affect his nervous system but never his vision. It is the vision of an innocent. To the lifeline of this vision he clings invinci-bly, as he does to a phonograph record he buys for Phoebe (till it breaks) and a red hunting cap that is dear to him and that he finally gives to Phoebe, and to Allies baseball glove.

Understanding Holdens notion of innocence and the role it plays throughout the novel helps to put in tune the nderlying message found in Holdens description of the catcher in the rye. “I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobodys around–nobody big, I mean- except me. And Im standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff–I mean if theyre running and they dont look where theyre going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. Thats all Id do all day.

Id just be the catcher in the rye and all. ” (Pg. 173) The princi-ple of the catcher in the ye is a means for Holden to devote his life to the protection of innocence. The significance of the catcher image lies in three areas of thought as implied by B. Ramachandra Rao: “First of all, it is a savior image, and shows us the extent of Holdens re-ligious idealism. Secondly, it crystallizes for us Holdens concept of good and evil; childhood is good, the only pure good, but it is surrounded by perils, the cliff of adolescence over which the children will plunge in the evil of adulthood unless stopped.

But finally, the image is based on a mis-understanding. The Burns poem goes If a body meet a body ot if a body catch a body, and the fact that Phoebe is aware of this and Holden is not, plus the manner in which these two words (catch and meet) are re-examined and re-interpreted by Holden at the end of the novel, shows us in a powerful and deeply suggestive way the center of Holdens diffi-culty. ” Holdens view of life as it is and the way life should be is based on a misunder-standing of mans place in society.

Having difficulty coming to grips with this misunder-standing, Holden crosses a threshold. Later he fatefully comes in contact with his sister once again, at the Central Park arrousel in the final scene of the novel. At the sight of his sister he is overcome by a love for all people when he sees how much his sister cares about him. Domenic Bruni, incorporates this theme in his statement: “Holden has accepted a new positionan undiscriminating love for all mankind. He even expresses that he misses all the people who did wrong to him…

He is not mature enough to know what to do with this love, but he is mature enough to accept it. In this world, realizing what is squalor and what is good, and loving it all is the first step in achieving identity and humility: compassion is what Holden learns. The foretelling of the story ends abruptly but we learn that Holden in the end goes out west and is seeking psychological treatment in California. Through his recovery and the experiences of those two lonely days, he gains compassion towards everyone, in-cluding himself.

While his vision of the catcher in the rye was a hope, a dream, and a job Holden realizes that such a dream is impractical in the world. Although innocence is not lost in Holdens case, it is apparent that it was only passed by but by facing the world and loving it indiscriminately, such compassion will fill his need for acceptance and place in he world. Substantially giving Holden an admission into society and the acceptance of the responsibilities of adulthood. J(erome) D(avid) Salinger, is an American author, who controversially dared to cross the line of literary standards.

In his first and only novel The Catcher in the Rye, proved to be Salingers most important and influential literary work, establishing him as a leading author and cultural icon. As the popularity of his novel grew, Salinger became increasingly reclusive and has incidentally avoided the public eye for over thirty years. Under an apparent cloak of secrecy, the real story of Salinger lies incomplete and myste-rious. Although much about his life is uncertain, it is clear that Salinger was born on January 1 1919 in New York, New York, the second child and only son of Sol and Miriam Salinger.

Since much of Salingers early days are clouded and unknown, the only link to his apparent adolescence is through the statement that his “boyhood was very much the same as that of the in the book [Holden]. ” Salinger attended public schools on Manhattans upper West Side and during his high school years he transferred to the pri-vate McBurney School, where he flunked out after one year. In 1934, his father enrolled him at Valley Forge Military Academy, a private prep school in Pennsylvania.

After graduation in 1936, Salinger enrolled in a short-story writing course at Columbia Univer-sity in New York and began publishing some of his short stories. Salinger was inducted into the service in 1942, at the age of twenty-three, the following year, he was transferred to the Counter-Intelligence Corps and later joined the American Forth Division, he landed on Utah Beach five hours after the initial assault on D-Day. After the war, Salin-ger began ublishing again and featured his stories in the Saturday Evening Post and Colliers.

By 1951, Salinger has established his reputation exclusively in The New Yorker and the popularity of his work was emerging among college students. And so, he re-leased The Catcher in the Rye, after working on and off on it for ten years. Although it was not an immediate hit it did give Salinger an increasing critical praise and respect. Eventually, as critical acclaim grew, the letters, autograph seekers, and interview-ers began hunting him down and so he became annoyed and moved to Cornish, New Hampshire, where he has lived ever ince.

While secluding himself from the rest of the world Salinger began work on Nine Stories, which includes a number of published short stories and introduces the Glass family, the central figures of his later works. Nine Sto-ries was published in 1953, after which Salinger published four lengthy short stories about the problems of the extremely bright and overly sensitive children of the Glass family. The books in this short story collection include Franny and Zooey (1961), and Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction (1963).

The novel, The Catcher in the Rye

From the novel, The Catcher in the Rye, the youthful protagonist Holden Caufield, employs the word phony to describe the behavior of a number of characters including Mr. Spencer and Ossenburger, however it is not them who arephony, it is the young main character. First, Mr. Spencer, Holdens ex- history teacher, is not described as phony, but according to the adolescent, his choice of words are. Secondly, according to our main character, Ossenburger is not the generous philanthropist he portrays himself to be, but rather a greedy undertaker.

Lastly, the protagonist could quite possibly be the authentic phony. All in all, the main characters use to describe many other characters in the book is with the single word phony, when in fact the word phony would be the most probable word to describe the lead character. Illustrating Mr. Spencer as phony because of his vocabulary, is when Holden leaves Pencey Prep permanently, and goes to say good-bye to the ex-history teacher. The depicted fake tells the ex-Pencey student I had the privilege of meeting your mother and dad when they had their little chat with Dr. Thurmer some weeks ago.

Theyre grand people. The ex-Pencey student immediately impugns Mr. Spencers use of the word grand, and tells the reader: Grand. Theres a word I hate. Its a phony. I could puke every time I heard it. To sum up, Holden disgusts Mr. Spencers utilization of the word grand and thinks it is fraudulent. Also, Caufield, describes Ossenbuger as phony because of what Holden perceived he did for a living. The wing where the central character lived at Pencey was called the Ossenbuger Memorial Wing named after a men who went to Pencey and later donated a substantial amount of money to the school.

Ossenburger makes this income by the business of undertaking. Next, according to our youthful character, Ossenburger is phony because he probably just shoves the dead bodies in a bag and throws them in the river. As a result, Caufield feels that Ossenburger is phony because of his profession in undertaking. While observing the discription of many other characters in the novel as phony, it is safe to say that the phony character is indeed the protagonist. For example, the false character when lying to Mr. Spencer about going to the gym to clear everything out before leaving, is Holden.

Once again we see this falsehood, when he tries to hit on some women in a bar, despite thinking the girls are not particularly extraordinary women. Exemplifying this phony behavior as well, is when our puerile character is telling Sunny, (the prostitute) that after all, he could not do it with her because of a broken spinal canal. In summary, it is in fact hypocritical in the sense that Holden is the phony one, but just not anyone else. In conclusion, our primary character implicates both Mr. Spencer and Ossenburger to be phony, when on the other hand, the protagonist can certainly fit this description to its optimum eligibility.

Our leading character explicates that Mr. Spencer is phony as soon as he says Holdens parents are grand. In Holdens opinion on Ossenburger, he is phony because of his employment. Obviously, these characters stated above are not the phonies, the veritable phony is the protagonist because he is deceptive, and one may never know when one is regarding the genuine Holden Caufield. Holden should stop being so hypocritical and accept others for who they are in addition to accepting himself so he could stop all of the prevarication.

Through Holden’s Eyes

The Catcher in the Rye has truly earned its place among great classic works. J. D. Salinger created a literary piece that was completely unique. The entire novel was written in the first person view of the 17-year-old, Holden Caulfield. The majority of the story is compiled of Holden’s rudimentary monologue of ‘complexly simple’ thoughts, the rest utilizing his relay of previous dialogue. That and the use of unique punctuation, digressing explanations, and complex characterization, transformed the simple plot into the complex literary classic.

The novel’s dialogue and monologue alike, manage to relay the feel of natural speaking such as: “I mean you’d be different in some way – I can’t explain what I mean. ” The contractions; you’d and can’t – since they are common in everyday language – establish a very common and simple tone. Stress on the first syllable of “different,” reinforces the tone by demonstrating how typically they speak, just as in reality. He uses dashes for pauses and signaling associative digressions.

Instead of signaling pauses, commas are used mostly where mechanically required, for instance: “So all of a sudden, I ran like a madman across the street – I damn near got myself killed doing it, if you want to know the truth – and went in this stationary store and bought a pad and pencil. ” Holden Caulfield creates a thought provoking point of view. On the surface many of his thought patterns seem unrelated and often straying from the topic. His association of topic with digression is used constantly throughout the novel.

However, realizing that these digressions are very relevant and even crucial to the topic allow the reader to gain true insight to the character. His statement’s about his sister’s intelligence, which is followed by explanations of how well she listens, reveals Holden’s associations of intelligence with being quiet and observant. Another example would be his tension around the nuns. Even though he enjoyed the conversation, he worried about being asked if he was Catholic. He stated they “… would have liked it better if he were Catholic.

This gives insight to his discomfort with being judged morally, and to his association of people of morals looking down on those who don’t share them. In Holden’s descriptions and thoughts, Salinger accomplished the most unique aspect of the story’s point-of-view. Instead of using the popular style of well-refined thoughts and flowery descriptions, Salinger describes things as they are perceived upon a first impression. Naturally the human mind does not instantly process first encounters or experiences into drawn out rhetorical metaphors.

We must think about them first, relate and compare them to past experiences, and then form associations. This is based on the Jean Piaget theory of assimilating new situations, accommodating them with previous knowledge, then forming generalizations for understanding. [Houghton-Mifflin Psychology, pgs. 49-50] That is exactly how Salinger describes Holden’s thoughts. Holden, like many of us, has difficulty explaining things until they have been thought through. For instance, Holden observes Stradlater’s grooming and his looks.

Then he compares it to the way guys look in yearbooks, and what parents say about them. Last he concludes, through comparison, that Stradlater is the kind of guy that your parents ask about. In the more descriptive writings of other authors, it is difficult to relate to the complex associations. The majority of thought inspired by these works can sometimes be just to figure out the point. However, Salinger expresses the thought patterns of Holden in the same inherent ways that all humans think, and through that, relays a strong tone of realism and active thought.

Despite the lack of dazzling rhetoric, Salinger’s descriptions are no less intricate. They inspire a more natural style of analyzation that most can relate to easily. A more logical and linear path, relating to typical primal human thought, is followed instead of abstract reasoning and artistic representation. Holden’s level of intelligence is in no way reflected by his lack of knowledge on trivial issues. He is adept at reasoning the things around him. Almost all of the insight Caulfield spoke of were things that had not been taught to him.

Such as repeatedly displaying understanding of human nature, pretensions, and thought processes. However, despite his intuition, he applies his often cynical and pessimistic reasoning to almost everything. This fact illustrates ignorance and a mediocre level of immaturity. This is made clear in his inquiry about the ducks, thoughts concerning women, obscene graffiti, and always getting a “pukey cab. ” Holden demonstrates tendencies associated with both OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) and bipolar Disorder, consisting of swings between manic and depressive states.

OCD is characterized by obsessive thoughts and their motivation of compulsive acts to relieve the stress of the obsession. [Houghton Mifflin Psychology, pg. 539] It is quite obvious that Holden is very obsessed with detail. He also demonstrates a common symptom of OCD, counting. At Grand Central Station, he mentions repeatedly counting floor squares. Small details trouble him endlessly. At one point in the novel he becomes so obsessed with type of luggage that his roommate has that he hides his own under the bed.

Bipolar Disorder, Which is the more severe of the two, is the most apparent in Caulfield. He displays an amazing amount of symptoms of this disorder. He suffers symptoms such as: little need to sleep, difficulty remaining on topic discussions (jumping from subject to subject), bursting with ideas and insight, irritation with people who rationalize with them, excessive spending of money, impaired decision making (instances of people going to live on the streets), cynicism, and paranoia. The mania will give way to severe depression, in some cases, in a matter of hours.

The examples of the previous symptoms are demonstrated in Caulfield’s monologues thoughts and dialogue. The instances of his jumping from topic to topic, and his insight and ideas, have already been discussed. Holden comments on his “little need for sleep” often like after the clubs close he says, “I wasn’t sleepy or anything. ” A great amount of irritation is shown toward Sally when she points out flaws in his plans of running away. He becomes belligerent and tells her, “you give me a royal pain in the ass.

In the beginning he comments on his abundant supply of money, but by the end he is forced to borrow from his sister. He frequently pays for other people’s meals and drinks, donates money to nuns, and offeres anyone a drink “on him”. A textbook example of his impaired decision-making was his plans to run away, pretend to be mute, and build a cabin in the woods. His cynicism is constant as he repeatedly generalizes everyone on the basis of dress, status, and looks. The thoughts of always getting a pukey cab and obscene words being everywhere are prime cases of paranoia.

Then in his swing to depression, he comments on people making him depressed, his feelings of being “lousy,” and once expressed thoughts of suicide. When he spoke of people coming to New York to get up early, he voiced his wish to jump out of the hotel window. Holdenn Caulfield, being afflicted with such handicaps, was doomed to fail in school, and his breakdown inevitable. Living in a time when clinical psychology would not come for a few years, Holden was forced to cope with these dilemmas on his own. There was no one to go to for help, and so his wish for it manifested itself into the one thing he would like.

In his subconscious wishes for control and help he said: “Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around – nobody big, I mean – except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff – I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where their going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That’s all I’d do all day. I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all.

I know it’s crazy, but that’s the only thing I’d really like to be. I know it’s crazy. ” The children represent all of his problems running rampid in his twisted game of life, which “old Spencer” warned him of in the beginning of the novel. The absence of “big” people portray no one being in charge, and the image of him being the lone “big” person, express him as being souly in control. The playing in the rye field next to a crazy cliff would depict his nearness to his fall, while he remained oblivious to the danger.

His one wish is to be able to prevent this, to have complete and total control over himself as well as his surroundings. Then after establishing his wishes he considers it impossible by expressing thoughts of its craziness. He is resolved that he cannot be in control, and yet it remains his one desire in life. He exists in a world where no alternatives to his chaotic lifestyle exist, and therefore he is forced to blindly play the game of life, while unknowingly he continues to step closer and closer to his edge of sanity.

Movie Proposal: The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye, a contemporary novel by J. D. Salinger, is a thought-provoking, fascinating look at society’s values and issues in the 1950’s. This book would make an excellent transition to film because it is full of both action and implication. It focuses on a four-day period of time in the life of a sixteen-year-old cynic with emotional problems. The book follows Holden Caulfield as he struggles with others and himself to find his way through the “phoniness” and disillusionment involved in his adolescent life.

These struggles essentially make up the novel, occurring during a long “flashback” of the four days as he relates them to a psychoanalyst. It would make a brilliant movie because it is written with so much detail, so many pictures that would be beautifully expressed through visual representation. Not only that, but the novel possesses substance, providing a subjective view of the superficiality of modern life, which is represented by the world Salinger creates around Holden. Summary: The movie would be named after the novel it is based on, and would attempt to follow the exact storyline.

Pencey Prep, the private school that Holden attended would not have to be in Pennsylvania, but somewhere resembling the area. Most of the city incidents would actually be filmed in New York City. Of course, certain streets would have to be singled out, and the costuming and cars, etc. , would have to resemble1950’s New York in order to fit the time period. The movie would be narrated by Holden, who would stop talking at times to allow focus on the flashbacks taking place in what would then seem like present tense.

Much of the narration does not need to be put into dialogue because Holden spends a great deal of time in his descriptions of what is going on around him. This aspect of the book would have to be carried out carefully and precisely by actors with the right kind of talent (see Characters/Acting) in order to make the movie successful in capturing Salinger’s exact tones and concepts. Note: the main objective of the movie is to present The Catcher in the Rye in visual format. This means to follow as closely as possible to the original plot, dialogue, settings, etc. written in the book unless truly impossible.

The movie should reflect the intentions of J. D. Salinger and also incorporate the themes expressed in the novel (i. e. , hypocrisies and phonies in everyday life, the search for a place to belong, isolation and wearing masks). If possible, the author should be contacted for opinions and criticism throughout the filming of the movie. The beginning of the movie could or could not be modified from the beginning of the book; either way would still appropriately capture the atmosphere of the psychoanalyst and Holden.

One way to begin is by actually showing Holden lying in a psychoanalyst’s office, where he begins his narration. The camera would then fade into Pencey Prep, with Holden standing atop Thomsen Hill. Another approach could just be to begin directly with the scene on the hill, with Holden voicing over the picture. Of course, not every scene could have narration. Otherwise the movie would be unrealistic. Some of the thoughts that run through Holden’s head would have to become dialogue, for example, Holden would mumble “Phony” under his breath while talking to certain characters. Locations:

All of the scenes occurring at Pencey would be filmed at another prep school resembling the descriptions given by Holden throughout the book. (“… Way the hell up on top of Thomsen Hill, right next to this crazy cannon that was in the Revolutionary War… You could see the whole [football] field from there… “-The Catcher in the Rye, p. 2) One of the more grotesque scenes would be the suicide of James Castle. This is a critical scene because Holden tells the reader about it after the incident in Mr. Antolini’s apartment, depicting Holden’s sudden unwillingness to judge him.

It can be filmed well using stuntmen and technology to recreate the jump from the window and the death. The moment Mr. Antolini approaches the body afterwards should be caught on camera to emphasize his character. The scenes in Mr. Antolini’s apartment, along with the scenes in the hotel room with the prostitute and the bars in the other hotels, should be shot in the appropriate hotels in New York City. A seedy, run-down hotel in a bad neighborhood named something like E-Z Rest Hotel would be appropriate as a substitute for the Edmont Hotel.

This is where Holden stayed and had the prostitute incident in, along with the experiences at the bar downstairs. A nice, upscale hotel like the Ritz would be appropriate for the Biltmore Hotel, and the meeting place for Holden and Sally Hayes. Other settings might need a fake set because finding actual places resembling the time period would be hard to do, but should be done if at all possible to make the movie as good as it can be. Some locations would be the theater Holden and Sally go to, the Caulfields’ apartment, etc.

Certain settings that are preexisting in New York city, such as Radio City Music Hall, the museums, Grand Central Station and Central Park should be used as they are, unless modifications would be necessary to make the areas look like they did in the 1950’s. The rest home, whether used in both the beginning and end or just in the end, would be in an unspecific location, but obviously somewhere in California. The room Holden is in with the psychoanalyst would be sunny, but not too bright, and the psychoanalyst would never actually be seen.

All that is visible is Holden, lying on a couch, talking. The majority of the book takes place in New York City, as before mentioned. The city must be filmed carefully, because it is not only a backdrop for the book, but has an essential purpose. The nameless people of the city that Holden observes throughout the book are actually symbolic for the city’s character itself. Holden sees and has contact with various unnamed characters throughout the city, like the unusual cab drivers, and the little boy humming Burns’ song that Holden misheard, “If a body catch a body coming through the rye”.

These people all represent the different aspects of the City, and of urbanization during the beginning of the Atomic Age. Characters/Acting: Because of the numerous characters Holden encounters, not every single character mentioned will be actually played by an actor, or even seen in the film, but the majority will be. Most of the small roles are vital however, such as the characters mentioned above. All of the shortly mentioned characters are placed into Holden’s world for a reason, so they must be portrayed. The small characters give insight to Holden’s personality, as well as the personality of the “character” played by the urban world.

Such interactions between them, like the one between Horowitz, the second cab driver, and Holden, about the ducks in Central Park are used as insight to Holden’s personality. Holden asks the cabby about something that would seem trivial to others, and the cabby responds in a dramatic, rude manner, almost comedic, and stereotypical of urban dwellers (“Who’s ignoring it? Nobody’s ignoring it! “-p. 82). The personality displayed by Horowitz is another indication that the novel is not only about Holden and his adventures, but also of the world he lives in.

Characters must be played by actors with a certain similarity to the character itself, whether it is by their physical appearance, the way they speak or otherwise. Holden is a 16 year-old boy, and so he should be played by a boy who looks no older than that. The boy should be rather thin, but with muscles, and have a face with character. Holden is to be played with intensity, anger, sadness, but also have a loving nature, all of which he displays throughout the novel, whether obviously or inconspicuously. The novel accurately describes most of the other characters, because of Holden’s observant nature.

All details given by Holden should be carried out accordingly. The movie would be best directed by Stephen Spielberg, because of his ability to keep movies true to nature, and still produce a compelling story. This would be an excellent project for him because the objective of the film is to do exactly what Spielberg did with movies such as Schindler’s List and Saving Private Ryan: to take a story, fiction or non-, and portray it as a emotionally moving picture, while keeping it true to the original vision.

The movie spin-off of The Catcher in the Rye should accurately represent the novel written by J. D. Salinger. The budget for the film should be whatever is deemed necessary by the director to make the movie as realistic and well done as possible. The budget should not be a consideration because it would hinder the quality of the film and therefore not allow it to live up to the wonderful the novel could have as a film. If carried out well, this film would be a huge success.

A Psychological Profile Of Holden Caufield

Holden Caufield is a hostile, negatively charged character that suffers from depression which stems from a desire not to grow up and a lack of closure in his brothers death. “If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like . . . “(pg. 1) These first words that Holden Caufield communicates during his tell of events that brought him to his breakdown, show the pent up hostility that still lingers.

This pattern of speech, the constant expression of negativity, is a character trait of Holden that shows his inner anguish. Holden also feels a continual need for affirmation of what he just said with phrases such as, “He really would. “(pg. 25) or “It really isn’t. ” (Pg. 89) This continual need for approval shows a lowered level of self-assurance. This lowered self-assurance probably stems from his self-awareness that he is an unreliable source. The reason he is unreliable is due to his deceitful narrative of occurrences.

This is seen repeatedly as Holden builds an individual up as good or righteous such as Stradlater, (pg. 25) then tears him down later. (pg 43) This inability to give truthful accounts of individuals could stem from his constant digression from the point at hand. Holden freely admits to this trait on page 183 when he says “The trouble with me is, I like it when somebody digresses. It’s more interesting and all. “”Certain things they should stay the way they are. You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone. pg. 122)

This phrase Holden made while discussing how things were different each time he went to the museum, stems from an inability to accept that he must grow up. The thought of growing up has driven Holden into bouts of depression as inhis discussion on page 133, ” It’d be entirely different. I said. I was getting depressed as hell again. ” This nonconformist desire has led Holden to have illusions of grandeur as a fictional savior, “The Catcher in the Rye. “(pg. 3)

The catcher in the rye is undoubtedly a metaphor, for keeping children from falling into the same norm as adults. The inability of Holden to accept growing up and the depression caused by it has made Holden suicidal, “what I really felt like, though, was committing suicide. “(pg. 104) This one phrase shows the true depth of Holden’s depression. “What I did, I started talking out loud to Allie. I do that sometimes when I get very depressed. “(pg. 104) This bought of psychosis demonstrates Holden’s lack of closure on his younger brother’s death.

Holden probably in some way blames himself for his brother’s death due too not always allowing him to play with him. Holden sees his late brother Allie as better then those around him today. (pg. 171) Until Holden comes to grasp with his brothers death he will be unable to deal with the depression and fear of growing up. After performing a psychoanalysis on Holden’s case, one is compelled to feel a since of despondency for his future. “I think I am, but how do you know what your going to do till you do it?

The answer is you don’t. I think I am, but how do I know? I swear it’s a stupid question. ” (pg. 213) This statement shows Holden’s unresponsive behavior to psychotherapy. It is due to this lack of positive progress that one becomes compelled to recommend a padded cell to ensure Holden is unable to hurt himself or anyone else with his senseless babble. Should this form of therapy fail Holden, one would strongly suggest for shock therapy until he is unable to communicate with another living sole.

Brief Description Of Edward Teller

The catcher in the rye is a work of fiction and a tragic-comedy. I came to choose it because I heard it is about a boy who is around my age. In this book, the main character, Holden Caulfield, tells us a story about what happened during his Christmas vacation. Holden is a sixteen-year-old boy who has flunked out of a private prep school. Because he is afraid that his parents would find out this fact, he goes to a hotel in New York City instead of going home after he leaves school for Christmas vacation.

In New York, many things happen to him within a few days. For example, he goes o the hotel bar and meets three women after he first arrives there. The women go away soon after he fails to talk with them, and Holden feels lonely and depressed. He goes to another bar to find someone to spend some time with, but he fails to find anyone to talk to and comes back to the hotel feeling more depressed. In the hotel, he meets a prostitute, but he sends her back without having sex because he feels depressed and sorry for her.

He was further disappointed when she tries to rob him of his money even though he tries to be nice to her. In the next morning, he has a ate with an old girl friend, and asks her to flee from this corrupt world and live in the woods with him. However, she tells him he is crazy and then leaves him. Holden meets some more people later, but they also cannot solve his problems, and he feels more and more depressed and lonely. He finally decides to run away and live as a deaf-mute who will not need to communicate with anyone.

Before leaving, he goes to say good-bye to his little sister, Pheobe, who he admires the most. While talking and playing with her, Holden changes his mind and decides to rejoin is family and because he realizes there are many things that he cannot solve by himself. The theme of this novel is how innocence is corrupted by society. Holden thinks everybody who is grown up is a phony because their behavior and advice are all false. The title of this book is based on an old game where someone catches children from falling off a cliff.

This symbolizes that Holden wants to be the catcher in the rye because he wants to protect the vulnerable, especially to prevent small children from losing their innocence and becoming corrupted by society as they grow up. Holden Caulfield is an amusing character because he talks about everyone without my respect, but with much irreverence. This is shown thorough the language he uses which includes slang and swear words. Even though Holden believes in honesty or innocence, he is a pessimistic character because he seems to find something depressing in almost everything and everyone.

He is also a depressed character because he feels alone in the most of the time, and he never finds any place where he feels comfortable. He doesnt fit into this society where many people live by false values and take advantage of others. This is shown very well when he says: I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, nobodys around- nobody big, I mean- except me. And Im standing on the edge of some crazy cliff.

What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff- I mean if theyre running and they dont look theyre going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. Thats all Id do all day. Id just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know its crazy, but thats the only thing Id really like to be. This shows Holdens compassion and sensitivity very well, but I feel sorry for him because nobody can understand his dream, and it is not realistic. Holden seems to be too good a person to be in this corrupt world.

The style of this book is unusual because it is told by a sixteen-year-old boy who appears to be sympathetic since he is so amusing. However, one of the problems with this style is that some of the things he observes might not be true, but somewhat exaggerated and biased. We are not very sure that he is even mentally stable since he tells us the story from a hospital bed. Despite these things, this style is highly effective because it makes us very involved with him and sympathetic to him.

I liked this book very much because it talks about the concerns of teenagers who feels the pressures of society. The some parts of the message of this book can be dangerous because they suggests rejecting school or society, but it also made me think about many things filled with the false standards, and I could find some of the real truths. I also appreciate the way Holden talks which is very comical even though hes dealing with a serious and sad subject.

The main character, Holden Caulfield

The catcher in the rye is a work of fiction and a tragic-comedy. I came to choose it because I heard it is about a boy who is around my age. In this book, the main character, Holden Caulfield, tells us a story about what happened during his Christmas vacation. Holden is a sixteen-year-old boy who has flunked out of a private prep school. Because he is afraid that his parents would find out this fact, he goes to a hotel in New York City instead of going home after he leaves school for Christmas vacation.

In New York, many things happen to him within a few days. For example, he goes o the hotel bar and meets three women after he first arrives there. The women go away soon after he fails to talk with them, and Holden feels lonely and depressed. He goes to another bar to find someone to spend some time with, but he fails to find anyone to talk to and comes back to the hotel feeling more depressed. In the hotel, he meets a prostitute, but he sends her back without having sex because he feels depressed and sorry for her.

He was further disappointed when she tries to rob him of his money even though he tries to be nice to her. In the next morning, he has a ate with an old girl friend, and asks her to flee from this corrupt world and live in the woods with him. However, she tells him he is crazy and then leaves him. Holden meets some more people later, but they also cannot solve his problems, and he feels more and more depressed and lonely. He finally decides to run away and live as a deaf-mute who will not need to communicate with anyone.

Before leaving, he goes to say good-bye to his little sister, Pheobe, who he admires the most. While talking and playing with her, Holden changes his mind and decides to rejoin is family and because he realizes there are many things that he cannot solve by himself. The theme of this novel is how innocence is corrupted by society. Holden thinks everybody who is grown up is a phony because their behavior and advice are all false. The title of this book is based on an old game where someone catches children from falling off a cliff.

This symbolizes that Holden wants to be the catcher in the rye because he wants to protect the vulnerable, especially to prevent small children from losing their innocence and becoming corrupted by society as they grow up. Holden Caulfield is an amusing character because he talks about everyone without my respect, but with much irreverence. This is shown thorough the language he uses which includes slang and swear words. Even though Holden believes in honesty or innocence, he is a pessimistic character because he seems to find something depressing in almost everything and everyone.

He is also a depressed character because he feels alone in the most of the time, and he never finds any place where he feels comfortable. He doesnt fit into this society where many people live by false values and take advantage of others. This is shown very well when he says: I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, nobodys around- nobody big, I mean- except me. And Im standing on the edge of some crazy cliff.

What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff- I mean if theyre running and they dont look theyre going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. Thats all Id do all day. Id just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know its crazy, but thats the only thing Id really like to be. This shows Holdens compassion and sensitivity very well, but I feel sorry for him because nobody can understand his dream, and it is not realistic. Holden seems to be too good a person to be in this corrupt world.

The style of this book is unusual because it is told by a sixteen-year-old boy who appears to be sympathetic since he is so amusing. However, one of the problems with this style is that some of the things he observes might not be true, but somewhat exaggerated and biased. We are not very sure that he is even mentally stable since he tells us the story from a hospital bed. Despite these things, this style is highly effective because it makes us very involved with him and sympathetic to him.

I liked this book very much because it talks about the concerns of teenagers who feels the pressures of society. The some parts of the message of this book can be dangerous because they suggests rejecting school or society, but it also made me think about many things filled with the false standards, and I could find some of the real truths. I also appreciate the way Holden talks which is very comical even though hes dealing with a serious and sad subject.

Holden Caufield in J.D. Salinger’s novel “The Catcher in the Rye”

The use of forshadowing in a novel can help it’s reader get a sense of what is to come in the story without giving away the events themselves. It is a powerful tool which prevents events from being left unexplained, leaving the reader question the effectivness of an outcome. The eventual breakdown of the character Holden Caufield in J. D. Salinger’s controversial 1945 novel “The Catcher in the Rye” was foreshadowed in the early chapters of the book.

The first clue is his negative approach to life. He begins by talking about is “lousy childhood” (p. 1) and the first traces of profanity can be seen scattered about the page in the form of “crap”, “hell” and “goddam”. Holden’s first sign of distrust comes when he speaks to Ward Stradlater about his date with Jane Gallagher: “Listen. Give my regards, willya? ” “Okay,” Stradlater said, but I knew he probably wouldn’t… “Ask her if she still keeps all her kings in the back row. ” “Okay,” Stradlater said, but I knew he wouldn’t. (p. 33-34)

This is seen again when he doesn’t trust Stradlater to stop his advances of Jane in he case that she says no. Holden gives up his faith in people to trust him when he boards a bus holding a snowball. The driver refuses to believe that Holden won’t throw the snowball so he draws the conclusion that “People never believe you. ” (p. 37). He is also always placing labels upon people as being “phonies” which gives the reader the idea that Holden thinks that others are materialistic. Holdens attempts to protect the innocence in the world is another early sign of his deteriorating state.

When Holden goes to Pheobe’s school to deliver his note he sees some swearing of the wall which he says “drove me damn near crazy” (p. 201). He wipes the words from the wall in an attempt to prevent the inevitable from occuring, leading the reader to believe that he may experience some mental unstability in the future. Eventually he comes to the realization that he can’t rub all the profanity away himself. Another example of Holden’s attempt to shelter innocence is the fact that he never does call Jane, possibly for fear that he will scar his memories of her as an innocent child.

The title of this novel presents this theme to the reader in that Holden wants to be “the catcher in the rye” (p. ) so he can catch all of the children that sway to close to the edge of a cliff in thier play. Perhaps the most obvious example of foreshadowing in the novel occurs when his parents come close to having him “phsycoanalyzed and all” (p. 39) when he breaks all the windows in the garage. Throughout the novel he refers to himself as “a madman” (p. 9) which gives the reader the idea that he sees himself as having a sort of mental problem.

These two peices of evidence alone present a fairly firm idea of what will happen to Holden towards the end of the story. The use of foreshadowing is evident in the novel “The Catcher in the Rye”. It does it’s job well in that it foretells the outcome of Holdens many problems and gives reason for it. The eventual breakdown of Holden is not startling to the reader because of the authors use of foreshadowing and therefore it is effective.

Holdens Misapprehension of Death

Death is one of lifes most mysterious occurrences. It is sometimes difficult to comprehend why an innocent young child has to die, and a murderer is released from prison and gets a second chance at life. There is no simple explanation for this. Though, perhaps the best, would be the theological perspective that God has a prewritten destiny for every man and woman. In J.D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye Holden often finds himself questioning his faith and pondering why an innocent adolescent like his brother Allie has to die. By the close of the novel Holden learns to accept not only death but life as well.

There are several instances within J.D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye in which Holden expresses his misapprehension of death. In Chapter 5, on page 38 Holden provides a long excursus on Allie, specifying the particulars of his life and death. The consequential point comes at the close of the digression when Holden discloses his own reaction to Allies death. In this Chapter Holden first poses the question of why did Allie have to die at such a young age.

Another example of Holdens confusion about death can be found in Chapter 9, on page 60. In a cab on the way to the Edmont Hotel Holden asks the cab driver if he knows what happens to the ducks in the lake in Central Park during the winter. Although this question may seem trivial, it is in fact a way of Holden asking what happens to people when they die. What Holden really wants to know is if they just disappear or do they move on to a more suitable place. Unfortunately the cab driver doesnt truly comprehend Holdens question and is unable to provide an adequate explanation for him.

One final illustration of Holdens misconception of death is evident in Chapter 12, on pages 81-82. In this instance Holden once again poses the question of what happens to the ducks in the lake in Central Park during the winter. This driver, Horowitz, responds much more climactically than the anonymous driver in Chapter 9. , and he provides a ardent series of remarks.

Horowitz changes the subject of the conversation from ducks to fish, because he can cope with them. Horowitz is also a believer of the rightness of things. His departing comment: “Listen,if you was a fish, Mother Natured take care of you, wouldnt she? Right? You dont think them fish just die when it gets to be winter do ya?Youre goddam right they dont.” elucidates his thinking completely. This conversation clarifies many things for Holden and helps him begin to understand the true meaning of death.

Throughout the novel The Catcher in the Rye Holden is constantly struggling to accept and understand the true meaning of not only death but life as well, for if Holden doesnt accept death he can never truly understand life. By the end of this great work by Salinger, Holden is on the road to recovery with a much more detailed and complex understanding of life and death. He now accepts Allies death, and will be able to continue to live a much less stressful and much freer life.

Three Easy Steps On How To Avoid Being A Phony

Everybody at one point in life has someone that he looks up to. Whether they want to Be like Mike or want to be like their favorite actor, every child needs someone to be a role model. Unfortunately, many of todays idols are people who are admired simply because they can run faster, jump higher, or shoot straighter than normal people. Most people will never be able to be as physically adept as these professional athletes. However, an excellent role model is readily available for all people who are literate.

Holden Caufield from The Catcher in the Rye demonstrates many qualities that people should strive for. First, Holden is someone who lets people know what he is really thinking. He does not hide what he is thinking about people even if he knows that they would not want to know the truth. When this happens, people often feel irate for knowing what another really thinks of them. Holdens transparency can be seen when he talks with Stradlater and accuses him of sleeping with a girl that Holden has feelings for. Although in the book, Stradlater got angry at Holden, he should be happy.

It is always better to know where one stands, than to have a misconception on what that person really thinks. If more people indicated their true feelings, fewer people would have psychological disorders from pent up emotions. Second, Holden Caufield is someone who is brutally honest. It was once said the truth shall set you free. If this is true, then Holden is one of the freest people ever. Holden is a guy who will speak his mind no matter what, even if it is something the person he was talking to did not want to hear.

This can be seen by the way he talks about phonies. A phony is someone who is a complete fake and insincere. Holden has the lowest regard for these people, even though he has admitted to being one at different points. That takes a lot of courage to be that honest. When he knows that he has been wrong, he admits it. This is another reason why people should try to take on qualities of Holden Caufield. Finally, Holden Caufield has great qualities, such as people can learn from his actions.

When Holden makes a mistake, he accepts it and moves on. An example of this is when he hires the prostitute, and then does not feel like using her. Instead of trying to get out of his arrangement with her, he just talks to her, and then pays. This indicates that even though he screwed up, and knew it, he will pay what he owes. The book also shows the ramifications for each action that Holden does. One could infer that even when Holden knows he screws up, he still tries to do the right thing.

Therefore, Holden is the perfect role model because the reader can learn from Holdens mistakes and avoid making them himself. Holden Caufield truly should be one of Americas heroes. Forget the super athletes in professional sports. Their physical abilities are not achievable for most people. Instead, have a role model that most people can be like. To be a happy person, all that is needed is to indicate emotions, to be honest, and to learn from mistakes. If people could be more like that, then the world would be a happier and more successful place for everybody.

Jerome David Salinger Catcher in the Rye

Jerome David Salinger was a very famous American author who wrote several books. One of his most successful books was The Catcher in the Rye. Other works by Salinger include the short story collection Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, and Raise High The Beam, Carpenter and Seymour. In the book The Catcher in the Rye Holden Caulfield, became a model of the rebellious and confused adolescent who detected the phoniness of the adult world. (Microsoft Encyclopedia 98). This showed that he had a serious psychological problem. He never wanted to grow up and, he also never wanted his sister to face the world.

He thought that the world was too bad for her to go out to because of the problems he faced in life. Psychology of a person determines that persons personality. This research paper will attempt to tell why Holden suffered from psychological problems. Holden is a teenage character who has suffered a lot in his life. He has suffered a lot. He doesnt care about anybody other than his sister, Phoebe. He did not like the adulthood because he thought that every adult was a phony. Holden thinks that when people lie, they are being phony. Holden doesnt like people who are phony but he acts phony himself all the time.

I am the most terrific liar you saw in your life (Salinger 16). He started taking it very seriously when his favorite teacher, Mr. Antaloni, approached him one night, which he thought was a sexual approach. Parents are model for their childrens behavior(Ledouy 372). There was nobody to explain to him the fact about life. His parents were often busy with parties and work. They spend very little or no time with him or his sister. Parents should sit with their kids and talk and give them a hug or a kiss sometimes. This will give the child the feeling that there is someone to care for them.

Parents should pay attention to their children or else they would try to do something thats not right to get their attention. For example, the shooting which took place in Littleton, Colorado the two students did not get any attention from anybody. What they did was went around shooting people getting the attention of everybody in the world. Well, Holden, didnt do anything so insane, but thats what some teenagers do to get some attention. Holden had his own way of judging other people on their occupation. Holden had an older brother, D. B. He was not very fond of him because of his occupation.

Holden thinks that D. B. is phony and that he is a prostitute. The reason Holden calls D. B. a prostitute is because he is selling his stories and ideas to Hollywood for money. Holden thinks that D. B could have been a good writer instead he chose to go to Hollywood and became a prostitute. There was no one to tell Holden that his thinking was wrong because most of the people in this world had to work for somebody. Nobody can be successful by himself or herself. There is always someone behind ones success. Holden portrayed others to be inferior to him all throughout the book.

Holden thinks that everybody is phony. He made several comments as to how people aren’t as perfect as he is. “The reason he fixed himself up to look good was because he was madly in love with himself” (Salinger 27). Holden had an inferiority complex. He was afraid of not having any special talents or abilities and used other methods to make him out to be a rough tough boy. Boy, I sat at that goddam bar till around one o’clock or so, getting drunk as a bastard. I could hardly see straight” (Salinger 150). Holden tried all he could to fit in.

He drank, cursed and criticized life in general to make it seem he was very knowing of these habits. Now a days the teenagers have a lot of pressure by their peers and they try to do anything to get into some groups because nobody wants to be left out of the cool groups. Depression has been considered as reaction to some loss of or seperation from a valued person or object (Liebert 210). Holden is very sad after the death of his brother, Allie. Holden is very close to him and loves him very much. Holden looks up to him and is very proud of his smartness and his abilities.

Holden has a ot of respect for Allie. Holden still has Allies baseball mitt and he used to still think about him and he never got over his death. Death of a parent or sibling causes serious psychic wounds(Liebert 211). He lost a person whom he looked up to and so he got more and more depressed about it. After the death of Allie, Holden is afraid to get attached or get closer to anyone because he afraid that he is going to lose them. Holden also tries not to get very close to his sister Phoebe. He suffered depression with all kinds of trouble in his heart with nobody to talk about his feelings.

Everybody cannot be as strong on the outside like Holden who keeps all his emotions in his heart and with nobody to share it. He has realized at a very early age that he has nobody to talk to about his personal stuffs so he has learned to be very strong and tough in his heart. There are many sides to his personality. He is a very caring person too. His sister Phoebe, wanted to come with him while he was running away from his house and he denied her wish. He made the right decision because he knew that she wouldnt be well off with him and he also did not know where his future was going to lead him.

Holdens parents have to be blamed for his condition because he did not get the affection and love from his parents at the time he needed the most. It became clearer that the children werent taken care of when his sister, Phoebe, wanted to run away from the house, too. Parents are a model for a child’s personality and behavior. Holden was never held compassionately by his parents or by any one close to him. So he didnt know about compassion. He thought that the only meaning for being touched was sexual. When Mr. Antolini shows him love and affection he gets really uncomfortable because no one had showed him love and affection before.

So he takes the affection showed to him in a sexual manner and leaves Mr. Antolinis house in anger. In the end Holden is found in mental institution telling his life story to D. B. Holden ended up in the institution because of a nervous breakdown. He got the breakdown because of all the trouble he had to go through his teenage years when he was really suppose to understand the problems like other teenagers. His condition should be blamed on his parents because they were not there for him whenever he needed them.

His parents were always out parting and doing all kinds of social things instead of being with their children and taking care of them. Parents play a very important role in life of their children. The children learn from their parents. They learn how to talk and walk from their parents. When children dont get the attention that they need from home they turn to other people or ways, for attention which most of the time are wrong. This paper has attempted to demonstrate the reasons why Holden Caufield, from The Catcher in the Rye suffers from psychological depression.

Salinger, J.D. The Catcher in the Rye

Holden Caulfield, the main character in J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, is what I believe to be one of the most well-developed characters which I have read about. He has many characteristics that are all his own, such as the way he views the world, his friends and his family. One of the main things that characterizes Holden, is that way that he thinks the entire world is “phony. ” Holden’s view of the world as “phony” is a very strong one, and in most cases, is correct. Holden thinks that the majority of the people in the world are putting on some sort of an act to impress or efriend people.

In a way, Holden is probably correct in thinking that most of the people he came in contact with are “phony,” such as his roommate at Pencey, Ward Stradlater. In one instance, Holden refers to Stradlater as a “secret slob. ” He describes how Stradlater always tries to be neat and tidy on the outside so as to impress people, but how he is not when you get to know him. In the scene where Holden and Stradlater are in the “can,” and Stradlater is getting ready for a date, Holden describes Stradlater’s razor as “rusty as hell and full of lather nd hair and crap. Another of Holden’s run-ins with “phonies,” came to him while he was in New York City.

He was lonely and looking for someone to keep him company, so he calls a girl named Faith Cavendish. He was told about Faith by a friend of his who went to Princeton, Eddie Birdsell. When he calls Faith, she has no desire to talk to him whatsoever, and she makes that quite clear, until Holden drops the name of Eddie, and she instantly perks up at the thought that Holden might be an important person. She asks Holden where he’s calling from, and he replies “a phone ooth,” and he tells her that he has no money, and she then tells Holden that she has no time.

The wat that Faith changes her mind so quickly when she finds that Holden has no money is a prime example of the “phonies” Holden encounters. Another general example of what Holden thinks is “phony” is actors. He talks about how D. B. took Phoebe and him to see “Hamlet,” and he talks about Sir Laurence Olivier, and how the play would have been good, except that Olivier “knew he was good, and that spoils it. ” Holden says how he can’t go to a play and pay attention to what the actor is saying ecause he “has to keep worrying about whether he’s going to do something phony every minute.

Holden has another incident with phonies when he invites Sally Hayes on a date. Holden takes her to a play, which he considers phony as it is, but then at intermission, Sally meets a man who she hasn’t seen for years, and they began a big phony act. Holden says, “You’ve though that they hadn’t seen each other for twenty years they probably even hugged and kissed checks and all. ” This is the kind of behavior that Holden obviously never grew up with, isn’t used to, and doesn’t like.

A Psychological Profile of Holden Caufield

Holden Caufield is a hostile, negatively charged character that suffers from depression which stems from a desire not to grow up and a lack of closure in his brothers death. “If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like . . . “(pg. 1) These first words that Holden Caufield communicates during his tell of events that brought him to his breakdown, show the pent up hostility that still lingers.

This pattern of speech, the constant expression of negativity, is a character trait of Holden that shows his inner anguish. Holden also feels a continual need for affirmation of what he just said with phrases such as, “He really would. “(pg. 25) or “It really isn’t. ” (Pg. 89) This continual need for approval shows a lowered level of self-assurance. This lowered self-assurance probably stems from his self-awareness that he is an unreliable source. The reason he is unreliable is due to his deceitful narrative of occurrences.

This is seen repeatedly as Holden builds an individual up as good or righteous such as Stradlater, (pg. 25) then tears him down later. (pg 43) This inability to give truthful accounts of individuals could stem from his constant digression from the point at hand. Holden freely admits to this trait on page 183 when he says “The trouble with me is, I like it when somebody digresses. It’s more interesting and all. ” “Certain things they should stay the way they are. You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone.

This phrase Holden made while discussing how things were different each time he went to the museum, stems from an inability to accept that he must grow up. The thought of growing up has driven Holden into bouts of depression as inhis discussion on page 133, ” It’d be entirely different. I said. I was getting depressed as hell again. ” This nonconformist desire has led Holden to have illusions of grandeur as a fictional savior, “The Catcher in the Rye. “(pg. 3)

The catcher in the rye is undoubtedly a metaphor, for keeping children from falling into the same norm as adults. The inability of Holden to accept growing up and the depression caused by it has made Holden suicidal, “what I really felt like, though, was committing suicide. “(pg. 104) This one phrase shows the true depth of Holden’s depression. “What I did, I started talking out loud to Allie. I do that sometimes when I get very depressed. “(pg. 104) This bought of psychosis demonstrates Holden’s lack of closure on his younger brother’s death.

Holden probably in some way blames himself for his brother’s death due too not always allowing him to play with him. Holden sees his late brother Allie as better then those around him today. (pg. 171) Until Holden comes to grasp with his brothers death he will be unable to deal with the depression and fear of growing up. After performing a psychoanalysis on Holden’s case, one is compelled to feel a since of despondency for his future. “I think I am, but how do you know what your going to do till you do it?

The answer is you don’t. I think I am, but how do I know? I swear it’s a stupid question. ” (pg. 213) This statement shows Holden’s unresponsive behavior to psychotherapy. It is due to this lack of positive progress that one becomes compelled to recommend a padded cell to ensure Holden is unable to hurt himself or anyone else with his senseless babble. Should this form of therapy fail Holden, one would strongly suggest for shock therapy until he is unable to communicate with another living sole.

Love, Affection, and Adulthood

In J. D. Salingers controversial 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye, the main character is Holden Caulfield. When the story begins Holden at age sixteen, due to his poor grades is kicked out of Pencey Prep, a boys school in Pennsylvania. This being the third school he has been expelled from, he is in no hurry to face his parents. Holden travels to New York for several days to cope with his disappointments. As James Lundquist explains, Holden is so full of despair and loneliness that he is literally nauseated most of the time. In this novel, Holden, a lonely and confused teenager, attempts to find love and direction in his life.

Holdens story is realistic because many adolescents face similar challenges. J. D. Salinger presents Holden Caulfield as a confused and distressed adolescent. Holden is a normal teenager who needs to find a sense of belonging. All though Holdens obsession with phonies overpowers him. Dan Wakefield comments, The things that Holden finds so deeply repulsive are things he calls phony- and the phoniness in every instance is the absence of love, and , often the substitution of pretense for love. Holden was expelled from Pencey Prep School not because he is stupid, but because he just is not interested.

His attitude toward Pencey is everyone there is a phony. Pencey makes Holden feel lonely and isolated because he had very few friends. Holdens feeling of alienation is seen when he doesnt attend the biggest football game of the year. His comments on the game: It was the last game of the year and you were supposed to commit suicide or something if old Pencey didnt win (2, Ch. 1). This also hints to Holdens obsession with death. Holden cant find a since of belonging in the school because of all the so-called phonies. Holden speaks of Penceys headmaster as being a phony.

Holden says that on visitation day the headmaster will pay no attention to the corny-looking parents. Holden portrays his not being interested by saying, all you do is study so that you can learn enough to be smart enough to buy a goddam Cadillac someday, and you have to keep making believe you give a damn if the football team loses(131, Ch. 17). Holden does not care for school or money. He just wants everyone to be sincere and honest. Holden’s obsession with phonies causes him to have no positive adult role models to follow. This restrains him from becoming close to anyone but children.

He is lost among the feelings and actions of becoming an adult. It seems that Holdens parents were never affectionate to him. By sending Holden off to these boys schools, his parents seem to have abandoned him. In addition, his parents were briefly mentioned in the novel gives the idea that he isnt close to them. Holden misses being able to talk to his parents. Holdens father is a sophisticated lawyer who seems to have tried to buy Holdens love. This in Holdens eyes characterizes his father as a phony. When Holden and Phoebe discuss what Holden should be; Phoebe suggests him being a lawyer like his father.

Holden believes lawyers are good if theyre protecting innocent peoples lives. His materialistic side sees a lawyer in a different way. Holden comments on lawyers, All you do is make a lot of dough and play golf and bridge and buy cars and drink Martinis and look like a hot-shot(172, Ch. 22). Holdens father has provided him with materialistic love but has never showed him much affection. This causes Holden to restrain from having his father as an adult role model. Holdens mother is still grieving over Allies death. Holden pretends to be blind and shouts, Mother darling give me your hand. Why wont you give me your hand(21, Ch. 3)?

Holden loves to clown around, but this incident reflects the feelings of isolation Holden receives from his parents. The affection from ones parents is very important during a time of such transition from a child to an adult. The absence of parental love made Holden feel like all adults were phony. This obviously causing him to have no adult role models leaving him to feel lonely and unloved. Holden believes all adults are phony and fears he will become a phony. He feels that they have two different sides to them the phony or showy side and the true hidden side. Coming from a wealthy family, Holden is lonely from human touch.

Holden is sickened by the effect that material values have on love in todays society. Holden comments: Take most people. Theyre crazy about cars. They worry if they get a little scratch on them, and theyre always talking about how many miles they get to a gallon, and if they get a brand-new car already they start thinking about trading it in for one thats even newer. I dont even like old cars. I mean they dont interest me. Id rather have a goddam horse. A horse is at least human for Gods sake(130, Ch. 17). With this comment, Holden explains that material values have taken the place of people.

In todays society it seems that people worry more about material values than actually loving a person for who they are. Holdens thoughts of death are not typical of most adolescents. This may come from his experiences with death in his early years. One of these experiences was the death of his younger brother, Allie, who died from leukemia at the age of ten. The other experience is the death of James Castle, a boy from a former school, who committed suicide after being harassed by other students. Holden constantly dwells on the death of his brother, Allie. It is apparent that Holden loves and misses Allie.

Holden carries around a baseball mitt in remembrance of Allie. This mitt means a lot to Holden because his brother had written poetry on the glove. Holden has no one to teach him how to cope with death comments Gerald Rosen. Therefore, the death of Allie has made Holden feel lonely and afraid to feel loved by anyone again. Religion is a very confusing subject to Holden Caufield. Holden has not forgiven God for the death of his brother. He explains his concept as not having a religion by saying, my parents are different religions, and all the children in our family are atheists(100, Ch. 14).

Everyone has his or her own choice of what religion to believe. In Holdens case, he could use some religious guidance. On several attempts to search for love, Holden has needed someone who could give him advice. If he had a specific religion he would have someone to talk to at all times. I agree when David Galloway says, To act with morality and love in a universe in which God is dead is perhaps the most acute problem of our age. Holden could use some faith of God to help him through this rocky time. Ossenburger, the owner of several funeral parlors, gave a speech to the students of Pencey.

Ossenburger was more or less preaching to the students. Ossenburger said, he talked to Jesus all the time(17, Ch. 3). Holden points out that Ossenburger was asking Jesus to send him more stiffs. This perhaps is an illusion to the religious guidance that is absence in Holdens life. Holden travels to New York for a mini-vacation to cope with his disappointments. In New York Holden tries again and again to contact anyone to alleviate his loneliness, while trying to overcome his feelings of distress Holden experiments with liquor, sex, night-clubs, and movies. Holden stays in a hotel in New York.

This hotel is where he is approached by Maurice, a prostitutes pimp. Holden accepts Maurices plan for the prostitute to come to Holdens room. Holden is really nervous and excited at the same time because he is a virgin. Once Sunny, the prostitute, arrives Holden decides he just wants to have someone to talk to that will understand him. Holden says, Sexy was about the last thing I was feeling, I felt much more depressed than sexy(95, Ch 13). The reason for Holden being depressed was he had failed again at relating to someone. Sunny had dull personality and seemed to have no feeling of love.

This is not at all what Holden is looking for. Holdens search for love and understanding has failed. Holden runs to the only person that he can trust Phoebe, his ten years old sister. He believes children are the only people he can trust because they tell you exactly what they are thinking. The only person he seems to relate to is Phoebe. Holden meets with Phoebe by sneaking into his parents home late at night. Phoebe makes him feel better because she tells the complete truth. Holden tries to lie to her about being expelled from another school, but Phoebe sees right through him.

Then Holden just begins to share all the problems on his mind with Phoebe. This is where Holden portrays the title of the book. Holden is so obsessed with preserving the innocents of children, he tells Phoebe he wants to be the catcher in the rye. Holden says, What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff- I mean if theyre running and they dont look where theyre going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. Thats all Id do all day(173, Ch. 22). What Holden really wants to help those children make the transition of becoming an adult.

After informing Phoebe that he is going to escape his responsibilities by running away, Holden visits with Mr. Antolini, a former English teacher he admires. Mr. Antolini sees that Holden is in a state of confusion and tries to provide him with good advice. He also tells Holden that he needs to pay more attention to school. Mr. Antolini says, but I think that once you have a fair idea where you want to go, your first move will be to apply yourself to school (189, Ch. 24). It seems that Holden has finally found someone to give him advice and support.

Holden really trust and understands Mr. Antolini, but Mr. Antolini makes homosexual advances toward Holden. Here again Holden fails to establish a concept of understanding with another. Arriving at Phoebes school to leave her a note Holden sees Fuck you written on the wall of the school. Thinking about all the kids seeing it and wondering what it meant, Holden went over and rubbed it off. This again shows how Holden wants to preserve the innocents of children. When he meets Phoebe at the Museum, she insisted to go with him. Holden decides not run away because of his sisters love. Holden feels responsible for Phoebe.

Holden finally goes home, where he becomes ill, and is admitted to a psychiatric ward. Holden is afraid of becoming an adult. The fact that Holden knows he cant stay a child makes him depressed. He must fall off the cliff of childhood into the world of adulthood. The transition from a child to an adult is very tragic to Holden. All adolescents have to overcome this struggle to adulthood. Does love and affection make adulthood easier? Love and affection from another human being can go a long ways. Holden just could not find love or affection from anyone.

His parents fail to give affection so he turns to others. Holden greatly needed some adult role models but could not see past his obession with phonies. Hans Bungert comments, Holden possesses a refined moral instinct, an unusually critical but also creative intellect, a lively imagination, a passion for asking questions and, above all, a great desire for contact and love. This search keeps Holden preoccupied so that he does not see all the love around him. The suffering from the inability to feel love drives Holden to a state of mental illness.