StudyBoss » J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye

J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye

In J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, the first person narration is critical in helping the reader to know and understand the main character, Holden Caulfield. Holden, in his narration, relates a flashback of a significant period of his life, three days and nights on his own in New York City. Through his narration, Holden discloses to the reader his innermost thoughts and feelings. He thus provides the reader not only with information of what occurred, but also how he felt about what happened. Holden’s thoughts and ideas reveal many of his character traits.

One late Saturday night, four days before the beginning of school vacation, Holden is alone, bored and restless, wondering what to do. He decides to leave Pencey, his school, at once and travels to New York by train. He decides that, once in New York, he will stay in a cheap motel until Wednesday, when he is to return home. His plan shows the reader how very impetuous he is and how he acts on a whim. He is unrealistic, thinking that he has a foolproof plan, even though the extent of his plans are to “take a room in a hotel.. , and just take it easy till Wednesday. ”

Holden’s excessive thoughts on death are not typical of most adolescents. His near obsession with death might come from having experienced two deaths in his early life. He constantly dwells on Allie, his brother’s, death. From Holden’s thoughts, it is obvious that he loves and misses Allie. In order to hold on to his brother and to minimize the pain of his loss, Holden brings Allie’s baseball mitt along with him where ever he goes. The mitt has additional meaning and significance for Holden because Allie had written poetry, which Holden reads, on the baseball mitt.

Holden’s reoccupation with death can be seen in his contemplation of a dead classmate, James Castle. It tells the reader something about Holden that he lends his turtleneck sweater to this classmate, with whom he is not at all close. Holden’s feelings about people reveal more of his positive traits. He constantly calls people phonies, even his brother, D. B. , who ” has sold out to Hollywood. ” Although insulting, his seemingly negative feelings show that Holden is a thinking and analyzing, outspoken individual who values honesty and sincerity. He is unimpressed with people who try to look good in other’s eyes.

Therefore, since it is obvious that Holden is bright, the reason for his flunking out of school would seem to be from a lack of interest. Holden has strong feelings of love towards children as evidenced through his caring for Phoebe, his little sister. He is protective of her, erasing bad words from the walls in her school and in a museum, in order that she not learn from the graffiti. His fondness for children can be inferred when he tells her that, at some time in the future, he wants to be the only grown-up with “all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye nd all.

He’ll stand on the edge of a cliff and catch anybody who starts to fall off the edge of the cliff. He got this image from his misinterpretation of a line from the Robert Burns poem, ” if a body catch a body comin’ through the rye. ” When situations are described, in person or in a book, they are influenced by the one who describes them, and by his or her perceptions and experiences. Through Holden’s expressions of his thoughts and feelings, the reader sees a youth, sensitive to his surroundings, who chooses to deal with life in unique ways.

Holden s candid, spontaneous, analytical, thoughtful, and sensitive, as evidenced by his narration. Like most adolescents, feelings about people and relationships are often on his mind. Unfortunately, in Holden’s case, he seems to expect the worst, believing that the result of getting close to people is pain. Pain when others reject you or pain when they leave you, such as when a friend walks off or a beloved brother dies. It would not have been possible to feel Holden’s feelings or understand his thoughts nearly as well had the book been written in third person.

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StudyBoss » J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye

J. D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye

“Theres far more to the censorship issue than a ban on sex and four-letter words. I sometimes think that those of us who need to be the most clearheaded about these matters are planting the very trees that obscure our view of the forest,” says Dorothy Briley. According to Briley, a vast amount more is needed than simply vulgar language and suggestive material to censor a novel. But this is the very reason why J. D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye is frequently being banned from high schools.

To the teenage readers, who are at the transition from childhood to adulthood, the protagonist of The Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield, who has not quite reached the brink of manhood, becomes the readers hero. The adolescent mind that Salinger portrays so accurately in his novel is one with which most teenagers and readers, at one time or another, could identify. The Catcher in the Rye also contains universal themes that, for teenagers about to shift into adulthood, help young adults better understand the world and other people.

Although it does contain abusive language and sexual connotations, The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger should not be censored in high schools because it provides insightful information and relevance to the life of young adults through its realistic situations and themes of acceptance and materialism. The reader can relate to the realistic situations, such as the scene at the Lunts play, present in the novel. Salinger portrays “real life while he “She saw some jerk she knew on the other side of the lobby.

Some guy in one of those very dark gray flannel suits and one of those checkered vests. Strictly Ivy League. Big DealThe worst part was, the jerk had one of those very phony, Ivy League voices, one of those very tired, snobby voices” (127, 128). The theme of materialism also gives insight to the average teenage reader. Salinger uses clever mockery to illustrate to the reader how inane teenagers act over materialistic objects.

This is particularly evident when Holden elaborates about suitcases: The thing is, its really hard to be roommates with people if your suitcases are much better than theirs if yours are really good ones and theirs arent. You think if theyre intelligent and all, the other person, and have a good sense of humor, that they dont give a damn whose suitcases are better, but they do. They really do. Its one of the reasons why I roomed with a stupid bastard like Stradlater. At least his suitcases were as good as mine” (109). Apparent in this quote, Salinger purposefully makes Holden appear foolish, ridiculing teenagers materialistic nature.

Salinger makes a connection to teenagers through the protagonists materialism. Deliberately forcing the teenager to examine his or her own shallowness, Salinger illustrates how Holden and his roommate eventually separate, not because they did not like each other, but because one had inferior suitcases. Not only does the adolescent reader think Holden is asinine and absurd, but the reader also observes the callow and silly need for materialistic items within himself or herself.

The theme of materialism in The Catcher in the Rye allows teenagers to witness how senseless their need for materialism is, which is necessary concept for adolescents who are making the transition to adulthood. Another necessary idea that Salinger presents in the novel is the theme of acceptance. Holden frequently examines his role in society, finding that he is often isolated from adolescents his own age and even, at times, made to feel inadequate. Holden distances himself from his friends and family because of such feelings.

In the end, Holden realizes that he does need people to whom he can relate. At the close of the novel, Holden says, “About all I know is, I sort of miss everybody I told about. Even old Stradlater and Ackley, for instance. I think I even miss that goddam Maurice. Its funny. Dont ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everything” (217), letting his emotions of inadequacy and need for acceptance escape. Many teenagers can identify with Holdens feelings, and it is these very sentiments that may lead some teens to a life of solitude and agonizing unhappiness.

On the other hand, many young adults fear isolation and loneliness so much that it forces them to conform to societys ideas and perceptions. It is in this way that Holden truly becomes the readers hero. Through his actions and reactions to society and others, Holden demonstrates to the reader the theme of acceptance, illustrated throughout the novel. Holden speaks his mind, which the average teenage reader values highly, but it often forces him to be cut off from society. When Holden conforms to society, he feels an outer air of acceptance from his peers.

When Holden speaks his mind, he feels isolated and awkward. It is through the eyes of the protagonist that the reader can see the downfalls and benefits to going against and conforming to societys will. The universal theme of acceptance in J. D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye encourages teenagers to really consider societys creeds and to think as an individual, yet it still explains to the reader the need for friendship and family in life. Both of these concepts are essential to the readers development into adulthood.

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