Black Elk Speaks Book Report

In the book Black Elk Speaks, being the life story of a Holy Man of the Oglala Sioux as told through John G. Neihardt, an Indian boy then a warrior, and Holy Man describes the life his people had in the lands that belonged to them that were seized by invaders. As a little boy, … Read more

Black Elk Speaks by John G. Neihardt

The book Black Elk Speaks was written in the early 1930’s by author John G. Neihardt, after interviewing the medicine man named Black Elk. Neihardt was already a published writer, and prior to this particular narrative he was at work publishing a collection of poems titled Cycle of the West. Although he was initially seeking … Read more

Black Elk Speaks Review

The division in the world among the races always was and will be one of the biggest issues that the people have to deal with and solve. Many cultures, Indian culture is one of the examples, were affected by the persecution of the people who were though to be “superior” to others. Indian culture was … Read more

Racism in Wright’s Black Boy

The theme of Richard Wright’s autobiography Black Boy is racism. Wright grew up in the deep South; the Jim Crow South of the early twentieth century. From an early age Richard Wright was aware of two races, the black and the white. Yet he never understood the relations between the two races. The fact that … Read more

Black Boy by Richard Wright Review

Black Boy is a story written in first person through the black boy’s eyes. The story opens with the black boy cleaning eyeglasses at the sink during the morning hours before lunch. As the boy washed eyeglasses this day as all other days, Mr. Olin, a white man who ordered the black boy around hovered … Read more

Black Boy Summary

Black Boy, Richard Wright’s autobiography, covers his childhood and early adulthood. It opens with four-year-old Richard’s rebellion against authority, an important motif in Black Boy. At the time, Richard was restless and resentful of his mother’s injunction of silence. Richard accidentally burned down his grandparents’ house in his attempt to find something to occupy his … Read more

Violence and Oppression in Wright’s Black Boy

“You are dead to me dead to christ!” In the following paragraphs, violence and oppression in Ch. 5 will discussed and analyzed through examination of Richard Wright’s –author of Black Boy(1945)–use of diction, tone, and metaphors. Were people of his time to read this book it’s probable that they would understand, wheather they agree with … Read more

Black Boy: Racist Situation

One main point of the United States Constitution was missing from the Jim Crow South: equality. The Constitution clearly states that all men are created equal, but in the Jim Crow era, blacks were continuously persecuted for something that would be acceptable today. During slavery the South was a place of racial prejudice, discrimination, and … Read more

Native Son and Black Boy – Compare

1.The point of view of this novel would be third-person narrator, which is neither objective or omnicent; just all knowing. Throughout the novel the narrator sees through the eyes of bigger which in turn helps get a really good picture and description of the way the black community is. Due to this the white people … Read more

Black Boy By Richard Wright Summary

Chapter 1 At Richards’ grandmother’s house. He sets some curtains on fire, which leads to the house catching on fire. The family moves to Memphis. Richard hangs a cat after his father tells him to (sarcastically) Richard’s mother punishes him. At six while hanging out at a saloon he becomes a drunkard. At this age … Read more

Native Son by Wright and Their Eves Were Watching God by Hurston – Compare

This paper examines the drastic differences in literary themes and styles of Richard Wright and Zora Neale Hurston, two African–American writers from the early 1900’s. The portrayals of African-American women by each author are contrasted based on specific examples from their two most prominent novels, Native Son by Wright, and Their Eves Were Watching God … Read more

Black Beauty: Book Review

This book is for those who love animals. Everybody can enjoy reading this, but people who love animals will be especially moved by this book. This is the story about a horse named Black Beauty. He was a wise, brave, fine horse. He had a lot of hard experiences. He could understand men’s words and … Read more

Benito Cereno by Herman Melville

Herman Melville uses Benito Cereno as a voice for his observations and comments on the state of America and its people. He uses the two captains to represent two opposing attitudes toward slavery adopted by his pre-Civil War audience, and his own ideas about where the country is headed. In the end of the story, … Read more

Herman Melville’s Bartleby the Scrivener

Herman Melville’s “Bartleby the Scrivener” has characters that are very interesting to the intuitive reader. One character in particular is the narrator who seems to change though the story. The narrator is an interesting man who is difficult to completely understand. The narrator’s thoughts seem unclear even to himself. The narrator seems to have a … Read more

Bartleby, the Scrivener and The Tenant: Compare

Most everyone remembers a favorite story that he or she has read. A book that just captivated the reader from beginning to end. But how do authors successfully grab the attention of their readers? Authors utilize specific techniques to convey the characters, setting, and plot effectively. The two short stories Bartleby, the Scrivener by Herman … Read more

Bartleby the Scrivener – Book Report

“Bartleby the Scrivener” is a complex story, so I am going to zero in on one particularly interesting and intelligent aspect of it. Due to the power of the message even this one particular aspect will be complex, of course. The first thing to note is that the story has a first-person narrator. The narrator, … Read more

Bartleby, the Scrivener by Herman Melville: Review

In democratic ages men rarely sacrifice themselves for another, but they show a general compassion for all the human race. One never sees them inflict pointless suffering, and they are glad to relieve the sorrows of others when they can do so without much trouble to themselves. They are not disinterested, but they are gentle. … Read more

Bartleby the Scrivener: A Strange Relationship

The Webster’s New World Dictionary defines “folie a deux” as “A condition in which symptoms of a mental disorder, such as delusive beliefs or ideas, occur simultaneously in two individuals who share a close relationship or association.” (231) In Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener” this concept of coinciding peculiarity, or obsession is demonstrated quite vividly throughout … Read more

“Babylon Revisited” by F. Scott Fitzgerald

In “Babylon Revisited,” F. Scott Fitzgerald authors the story of a man trying to regain what he lost as a consequence of his former wanton lifestyle. Some things are irretrievable once they are lost, but others are not. Charlie Wales had previously, in a weak moment, agreed to transfer custody of his only child to … Read more

Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis

Arrowsmith is a classic American novel written by Sinclair Lewis. Lewis wrote this book in the early 1900s as a current outlook on the world of science in that time. The main theme it focuses on is commercialism and its effect on science. During this time period there were many advances in the field of … Read more

Arrow of God by Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe’s Arrow of God is set in the 1920’s, before secularism became dominant. It begins with the image of a mask, when he tells his son not to carve the mask of a god for the white man. The mask is a symbol of change. The whole world is changing, and the people who … Read more

Around the World In Eighty Days: Summary

The title of the novel, Around the World in Eighty Days, is pretty much self explanatory. An Englishman, Phileas Fogg, places a wager that he can circumnavigate the world in 80 days. The events that occur throughout the novel describe his journey around the world. Phileas Fogg, the protagonist, was a lonesome person who lived … Read more

Anthem Paper

“We do not think of them as Liberty 5-3000 any longer. We have given them a name in our thoughts. We call them the Golden One. But it is a sin to give men names which distinguish them from other men. Yet we call them the Golden One, for they are not like the others. … Read more

Rand’s “Anthem”

Anthem, a science fiction novel, deals with a future primitive society in which the forbidden word “I”, which is punishable, has been replaced by “We”. Anthem’s theme seems to be about the meaning and glory of man’s ego.  In this novel, Rand shows that the individualism needed for building a complex technological civilization has been … Read more

Anthem by Ayn Rand: Book Report

A standard rule of writing states that one should refrain from using the word “I” in one’s writing. Somehow this rule seems singularly inappropriate when writing about the book Anthem. I wish to talk about my thoughts on this work. I will not abstract my ideas so that I can refer to them without referring … Read more

Anthem – Story Of Struggle

Anthem is a story of man’s struggle to be free and to fight the masses of conformity. It tells of human nature and the want to gain all the knowledge that one could possibly attain. Man loses his safe haven and his security when he lets this lust for knowledge overpower him and lets it … Read more

Anthem Review

As the novel opens Equality 7-2521 states that what he’s doing is a sin. In his society it is a sin to do things that do not involve others, and the words he thinks and writes are for no one eyes to see or hear, but his own. In his society everyone thinks the same, … Read more

The Handmaid’s Tale and Anthem: Compare

The two novels, The Handmaid’s Tale and Anthem, are both haunting, first person tales of personal hardship in a closed and controlled society. In this essay I will point out many important similarities and differences between the two books, mainly the setting and the similarities between the two societies in which the stories take place, … Read more

Ayn Rand’s Anthem

When born into the world, you are sheltered and nourished. When the appropriate age is reached you begin your schooling. Once your education is complete you are employed and work with complete security in your trade. At forty years of age you retire and spend the rest of your days with your peers, with everything … Read more

Anthem By Ayn Rand: Book Review

Imagine a world where the individual has been repressed to the point that the word I no longer exists. Now, as hellish as that sounds, imagine that you are the only one who has the capability to break free from the iron fists that are choking you and your brothers. This is the life of … Read more

Anthem by Ayn Rand: A Review

The novel Anthem by Ayn Rand tells the story of Equality 7-2521, an individual living in a communal society devoid of human individuality. Equality 7-2521 began his life in the Home of Infants and was educated in the Home of Students. He had a keen mind and excelled at his school work; however, he was … Read more

Anthem Style Analysis

The book Anthem by Ayn Rand is about a person named Equality 7-2521. This book takes place in the future where everything is quite different. The word I does not exist and all the people, or brothers, of the world must refer to themselves as we or our instead of I and my. Everyone is … Read more

Archetypes in Ayn Rand’s Anthem

(p. 18) “The walls are cracked and water runs upon them in thin threads without sound, black and glistening as blood.” Water represents the mystery of creation, the cycle of death, and rebirth. The color black is a color of mystery and the unknown. The Home of the Street Sweepers is a mystery to Equality. He doesn’t understand … Read more

Less Could be More in Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina was well-written, with a good plot, and valuable themes. But it fell short in each of these categories, because Tolstoy simply tried to do too much. The language was beautiful but, at times, far too descriptive. The plot was also well written, but tedious and hard to follow in many parts of the … Read more

Anna Karenina – Part 2 Chapter 3

In part two chapter three, Kittys broken heart causes her health to decline. There is a moment in this part of the story that Tolstoy adds to show that money and social status should not be the reasons for marriage. Kitty realizes this when she finds out about Anna and Vronsky. Kitty has something that … Read more

Anna Karenina – The Complex Character of Constantine Dmitrich Levin

In the novel Anna Karenina, written by Leo Tolstoy, both major and minor characters played important roles through out the story. One protagonist, Constantine Dmitrich Levin, caught my interest as being a compassionate, moral character. Constantine Dmitrich Levin is a complex character whose direct and indirect characterization emphasizes a search for balance. Constantine Dmitrich Levin, … Read more

Madama Bovary & Anna Karenina: Compare

Reading provides an escape for people from the ordinariness  of everyday life. Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina, dissatisfied with  their lives pursued their dreams of ecstasy and love through reading.  At the beginning of both novels Anna Karenina and Emma Bovary made  active decisions about their future although these decisions were not  always rational. As … Read more

Anna Karenina- Characters in the Life Novel

By examining the character list, one immediately notices the value Tolstoy places on character. With one hundred and forty named characters and several other unnamed characters, Tolstoy places his central focus in Anna Karenina on the characters. He uses their actions and behavior to develop the plot and exemplify the major themes of the novel. … Read more

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

The world of Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina is a world ruled by chance. From the very opening chapters, where a watchman is accidentally run over by a train at Moscow’s Petersburg station, to the final, climactic scenes of arbitrary destruction when Levin searches for Kitty in a forest beset by lightning, characters are brought together and … Read more

Angela’s Ashes: Analysis

It is a common view that times for the Irish majority in the 1930’s and 40’s were very hard. Especially for the Irish Catholic families with the stereotypical drunken father, emotionally wrecked mother, kids running round her with her sore back from the next child ready too be born. In Angela’s Ashes, McCourt examines his … Read more