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Repeat

Repetition, also repetitio, is a stylistic device found in all literary genres. Repetition is the repeated naming of the same word or a sequence of words in the same verse or in a stanza as well as in a short text section. There are different ways in which the respective element can be repeated. However, all have an amplifying effect on the receiver (reader, listener).

Term
Repeats of all kinds are summarized under the term repetitio. This noun is derived from the Latin verb repetere, which can be translated retry. Consequently, the translation of the subject-term already points to its meaning: namely, the repetition. However, this is considered a sort of collective name for the individual stylistic figures of the repetition. Let’s look at an example:

My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?
The above example shows how the evangelist formulates the last words of Jesus. The example, which is considered a form of Exclamation (Exclamation), contains at the beginning a repetition of the sequence of words My God. Since the called God is not physically present here, the salutation can also be regarded as an apostrophe. This doubling is called Geminatio, but can also be regarded as epanalysis. Another example:

Sir Mortimer, you do not surprise me, do not frighten me.
I had long since been prepared for such a message. I know my judges.
This example, which comes from Friedrich Schiller’s drama Maria Stuart, is also a kind of repetition. In contradistinction to the first example, the word sequence does not use me immediately, but at the end of two partial sentences. Equivalent words, which are at the end of verses or sentences and in the immediate vicinity, are called epiphyses.

The examples given have a similar effect on the receiver (reader, receiver): they have a clear reinforcing effect. In the first example, the duplication produces an intentity, ie, efficacy, of the statement. In the second example, the word sequence is not underlined. It became apparent that for the individual forms of repetition quite different names exist.

Style figures of repetition
There are several ways to repeat individual words, phrases, or sentences within a text. For most forms there is a concrete name. The following overview summarizes the various stylistic means of the repetition, which call what has been said at various points, but often have a similar effect, namely the amplification of what has been said.

stylistic device
the repetition example features
Styling the word repetition (repetitio)
Anadiplosis Ha! How then will I mock you? Scoff? God keep me! Is the repetition of the last sentence or word at the beginning of a subsequent sentence or verse.
Anapher The Mohr has done his duty, the Mohr can go. The repetition – one or more times – of a word or sentence at the beginning of successive verses, verses or sentences or sentence parts.
Diaphora When fly flies fly, fly flies fly after. Repetition of a word or a word sequence in different meaning. The word is, therefore, meant in the repetition in a different way, or is perceived differently from the first mention.
Epanadiplose (1) No, that can not be, no !, (2) With the ships wind and waves, // Wind and waves do not play with his heart. (1) Kyklos, that is, the fact that the same word is at the beginning of the verse or beginning of the sentence, and also marks the end of the sentence or verse, or (2) the anadiplosis, that is, the fact that the same word is at the end of a sentence or verses and marks the beginning of the next sentence or verse.
Epanalepse And breathed deeply and breathed deep word repetition, in which a word or a group of words is repeated immediately at the beginning of the sentence or at a distance.
Epanastrophe (1) Ha! How then will I mock you? Scoff? God keep me! (2) see main article on the epanastrophe. Means either (1) an anadipless or (2) repeating the last verse of a stanza at the beginning of the following.
Epanodos If you can not get enough of the one you love, The sentences of two sentences, also partial sentences, are arranged crosswise (see Chiasmus). The peculiarity is that the same words are used.
Epipher Sir Mortimer, you do not surprise me, do not frighten me. I had long since been prepared for such a message. I know my judges. The repeated or repeated repetition of a word or phrase at the end of successive sentences or verses.
Epiploke Oh, the woman was beautiful, she was beautiful and clever, wise

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