Northrop Frye’s theory of symbols reconciles that people like the primitive and the popular tend to follow towards the core of imaginative experiences. However, in the play Othello, Othello reacts differently and begins to think without logic when jealousy strikes his inner conscience. Thereafter, Othello captures horrifying and explicit images of his wife Desdemona having an affair with Michael Cassio. These disturbing emotions he encounters influence the darkness and shallowness character that he shadows to unfold.

As well, the impression that his wife is sleeping with another man magnifies his experiences with her and examines imagery as a way to imagine things with a distinct viewpoint. According to Frye’s theory, which acknowledges the idea of imagining through the magnitude of one’s experiences – resembles the character of Othello. Likewise, Othello expresses his imaginations thoroughly, which is shown through his perspective. His mind performs a selection of overwhelming creativity, which expands and structures his ideas to feel emotionally jealous.

He behaves simplemindedly and acquires the feel of naivete that fulfils his imaginations of the unthinkable. He explores the idea of jealousy and frustration within himself, which strictly anticipates his intellectual emotions. Nevertheless, Frye’s concept of imagining something towards the core of one’s experience corresponds directly to Othello. The extent of this concept in relation to Othello is that he arises to distinguish between love and hatred he feels for Desdemona. Iago creates with such unfaithful intelligence, an illusion that haunts Othello throughout the course of the play, which eventually leads him to his dramatic downfall.

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