Symbolism in A Rose For Emily

William Faulkner (1897-1962) was a southern writer; he spent most of his time in Oxford, Mississippi. “A Rose For Emily” was a vehicle for him to write about the South and the old ways of the South. He was a well respected writer. In 1950 he received the Nobel Prize for Literature. faulkner uses symbolism to make his message stronger. Faulkner uses symbolism as a way to repersent the qualities of the character, places and events in his work.

Emily came from a well to do family that had alot of history in the town. The Grierson’s were so powerful, Emily did not have to pay taxes. The whole townspeople seemed to think taht they were snobby because in Emily’s father’s eyes, none of the men were quite good enough for Emily. Unfortunately, Emily turned out to be a lonely old woman because of her father’s influence. in “A Rose for Emily”, Faulkner uses the element of time to enhance details of the setting and vice versa.

By avoiding chronological order of events of Miss Emily’s life, Faulkner first gives the reader a completed puzzle, and then allows the reader to examine the puzzle piece by piece. By doing so he enhances the story and presents two different perspectives of time held by the characters such as, the world of the present and, the world of tradition and the past-“confusing time with it’s mathematical progression… divided from them by the narrow bottleneck of the most recent decade of years”(Faulkner 35-36).

Faulkner uses symbolic elements to compare the Grierson house with Emily’s life- “lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumps-an eyesore among eyesores”(Faulkner 29). This is expressed by the symbolism of the decaying house, which is like Miss Emily’s physical and mental deterioration. Emily’s life like the house, suffers from lack of love and care. The message that Faulkner presented in “A Rose For Emily” was strongly supported by symbolism. Faulkner compares the Grierson house with Emily and her life.

A Rose for Emily: Characterization

Characterization refers to the techniques a writer uses to develop characters. In the story A Rose for Emily William Faulkner uses characterization to reveal the character of Miss Emily. He expresses the content of her character through physical description, through her actions, words, and feelings, through a narrator’s direct comments about the character’s nature, and through the actions, words, and feelings, of other characters. Faulkner best uses characterization to examine the theme of the story, too much pride can end in homicidal madness.

Miss Emily, the main character of this story, lives for many years as a recluse, someone who has withdrawn from a community to live in seclusion. “No visitor had passed since she ceased giving china-painting lessons eight or ten years earlier” (394). Faulkner characterizes Miss Emily’s attempt to remove herself from society through her actions. “After her father’s death she went out very little; after her sweetheart went away, people hardly saw her at all” (395). The death of her father and the shattered relationship with her sweetheart contributed to her seclusion.

Though her father was responsible for her becoming a recluse, her pride also contributed to her seclusion. “None of the young men were quite good enough for Miss Emily and such” (395). Faulkner uses the feelings of other characters to show Miss Emily’s pride. Her pride has kept her from socializing with other members of the community thus reinforcing her solitary. But Miss Emily’s father is still responsible for her being a hermit. “We remembered all the young men her father had driven away…” (396). If he had not refuse the men who wanted to go out with Miss Emily, she may have not gone crazy.

Miss Emily may have wanted seclusion, but her heart lingered for companionship. Her desire for love and companionship drove her to murder Homer Baron. She knew her intentions when she bought the arsenic poison. “Then we noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head” (400). Her deepest feelings and hidden longings were lying in the bed. Miss Emily’s pride resulted in the shocking murder of Homer Baron.

Faulkner’s use of characterization to describe Miss Emily and her intentions was triumphant in bring the story to life. Miss Emily’s pride was expressed through her actions, words, and feelings, through a narrator’s direct comments about the character’s nature, and through the actions, words, and feelings, of other characters. Miss Emily’s story constitutes a warning against the sin of pride: heroic isolation pushed too far ends in homicidal madness.

Archetypes in A Rose for Emily

Archetypes are, by definition, previous images, characters, or patterns that recur throughout literature and though consistently enough to be considered a universal concept or situation. Archetypes also can be described as complexes of experiences that come upon us like fate, and their effects are felt in our most personal life. A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner contains many of this particular critical method. Although there are several archetypes found, the most important is Emily’s father.

Archetypes are like riverbeds which dry up when the water deserts them, but t can find it again at any time. This short story offers many interpretations. However, the structure of the story breaks down into two stages: past and present. By examining the archetypes within the story, it can be suggested that Emily’s over-protective father stands to represent Emily’s feminist struggle, the ongoing battle for women to have an equal place in society.

Emily should be able to do as she pleases, but her dependence her father does not allow her to have that freedom. Her father’s over-protection is evident in this passage, We remembered all he young men her father had driven away, and we knew that with nothing left, she would have to cling to that which had robbed her, as people will (279). Her father robs her from many of life’s necessities.

She misses out on having friends, being a normal woman, and her ability to be happy. Emily is not able to live a normal life which she indirectly blames on her father. Emily is so used to having her father be there for her, she figures that by keeping his body he can still be part of her life. The Jungian archetype of this feminist struggle can be noted as: Emily is ot able to live a normal life because her father keeps under his thumb.

In relation to keeping her father’s body, she keeps Homer Barron’s body so long because she feels that she has finally accomplished something in her life. Emily is not ready to give up that feeling. The feminist struggle is hard to detect but it is still there. In conclusion, there are two archetypes in A Rose for Emily: Emily’s father and Homer Barron. Emily’s father is the chief archetype because he is the reason for Emily’s breakdowns. She has been scarred for life which she obviously never over comes.

Shirley Jacksons The Lottery and William Faulkners A Rose For Emily

Evil and charm are considered by many people to be very different things. It is not often that it is thought that evil and charm coexist together. Evil is defined to be; morally bad, or wicked, while charms definition is; a trait that fascinates, allures or delights. According to British author Brian Masters evil is something you recognize immediately you see it: it works through charm. Masters argument can be backed up through two pieces of literature, Shirley Jacksons The Lottery and William Faulkners A Rose For Emily.

Both stories display evil and charm coexisting together in a society hrough setting, characters attitudes and symbolism. The Lottery is a somewhat sick, twisted story that sets the reader up with the right and then pops them one with the left. To begin, the setting makes the reader feel all warm and good inside, and gives the reader the feeling that the story is going to be a cheerful one. The morning of June 27 was clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full summer day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the grass was richly green.

Here, the author shows that summer is just beginning, and that with summer, life is just beginning. The flowers are lossoming, the grass is a rich shade of green, and the towns people are gathering in the square between the post office and the bank. The descriptions of the town are very misleading to the reader in terms of what is taking place. The charm of the town delights the reader at the start and gives the reader a comforting feeling about what is going to happen.

The evil of the town is hidden behind a mask of charm. The characters in The Lottery are very misleading to the reader in terms of character traits. The characters attitudes towards the lottery are very upbeat and display that the characters have no problem with the act that they are attending a lottery. The fact that a lottery is taking place leads many to believe that there is a chance to win money for free. Where in this case it is the chance to kill someone by stoning him or her to death.

Throughout the whole story the towns peoples attitudes are lackadaisical; they dont care about the lottery, and seem to only want it over with. The whole lottery took less than two hours, so it could begin at ten oclock in the morning and still be through in time to allow the villagers to get home for noon diner. (Jackson 229) Here it is seen that the lottery something nsignificant and meaningless to the towns people. Evil is definitely displayed here, as the event that is being organized and will take place is considered to be morally bad.

The charm of the people involved shines through brightly in character traits that are displayed. It is displayed that the persons involved in the event are excited to be there and delightful towards the fact that they are about to kill a person. Another example of The Lottery displaying evil and charm coexisting together is the symbolism that is used in the story. The black box is the central idea or theme in the story. It symbolizes at first some type of mystery, but reading further into the story it is realized that it is synonymous with doom.

The box is symbolic of the towns peoples fear of change, it is old and splintered showing that the people of the town would rather cling to what is familiar rather than change, symbolizing the traditions of the community. No one in the town questions the box, but accept it as a part of their lives. The box considered by the towns people to be charming, but has a direct link to the evil in the town as it determines who will be sacrificed in order for the people to be happy. Another story in which evil and charm coexist is A Rose For Emily written by William Faulkner.

A Rose for Emily is told by a nameless narrator describing the life of a pathetic woman, Emily. The setting of the story is seen through the view of the narrator, which seems to be the voice of the town. Emilys house is the main focus throughout the story, as the narrator constantly talks about what may be going on inside the house. The house seems to fascinate the town, the numerous remarks that arise throughout the story lead the reader to believe that the whole town knows about Emilys house. Only Miss Emilys house was left, lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumpsand eyesore among eyesores. Faulkner 27)

Emilys house is the evil part of the town as seen by the people in the town because it has become and eyesore in the community and but yet they are all drawn to the house, always wondering what is going on inside and what Emily is up to. The attitude of the narrator displays to the reader that the town is drawn to the life of Emily. The whole town has an idea on what type of life Emily led, but their image of Emily is created through ossip and assumptions that were made as a result of the lack of time Emily spent out in the public.

The town assumes that Emily has a problem with maintaining a clean house and assume that the stench coming from here house can just be covered up, so that is what they do. They broke open the cellar door and sprinkled lime there, and in all the out buildingsthey crept quietly across the lawn and into the shadow of the locust that lined the street. After a week or two the smell went away. (Faulkner 28) The attitude of the town displayed her demonstrates that the people of the town feel that Emily has a vil aura to here as they are to afraid to knock on her front door and ask her what the smell is coming from her house.

Instead the town decides to cover up the smell most likely because they are to fascinated with Emily to actually talk to her. This characteristic of the town results in the town being somewhat evil in terms that the people of the town cannot even speak to someone that delights them. As a result the town would rather make up stories about Emily than find out the truth. Symbolism is another method that shows how evil and charm coexist in A Rose for Emily. The people of the town believed that Emily was a flower lover and that she loved to have them around.

Especially roses. But the roses that Emily adored were just a symbol to confuse the town of her desire. The symbol of the rose is used to represent the preservation of roses. When preserving them they must be dried out. Emily has done exactly this, but not with roses, with her love, Homer. For a long while we just stood there, looking down at the profound and fleshless grin. The body had apparently once lain in the attitude of and embrace, but now the long sleep that outlasts love, hat conquers even the grimace of love, had cuckold him. Faulkner 33)

Emily had preserved Homer much like one does a dried out rose. The towns people are shocked at this as they realize that Emilys charm was a disguise for the evil that she possessed. In both Shirley Jacksons The Lottery and William Faulkners A Rose for Emily evil occurs but is masked by charm. Setting, characters, and symbols help to display this and reinforce that Brian Masters was correct in arguing that evil is something you recognize immediately you see it; it works through charm.

Emily’s Father Essay

Throughout this story, the overbearing presence of Emily Grierson’s father is perhaps the greatest influence on her behavior. The story describes how Miss Emily’s father rejected her suitors by standing in front of her and aggressively clutching a horsewhip whenever the young men came to call. Without her fathers influence and overprotective behavior it is likely that Emily would have made one of her suitors her husband when she was still of suitable marrying age for that time period.

When Emily’s father died the women of the town called on her to offer their condolences and aid as was their custom when someone suffered a tragic loss. Emily met the ladies at the door and with no trace of emotion or grief on her face she sent them away explaining that her father was indeed alive and well. Emily kept this up for three days and finally gave in just as the townspeople were going to forcibly take the body from her. All of her life up until his death Emily’s father controlled her and made all of her decisions for her.

When he died Emily was left alone finally able live her own life, but since her father had been controlling her for so long she wasn’t able to function without him. Since she wasn’t able to function without his presence Emily chose to live her life as if her father was still with her. She spent the majority of her time inside of her house because that was where she could best feel her father’s comforting dominance. Emily was extremely resistant to modern changes in the outside world affecting her own world because she was determined to live in the past with the ghost of her father.

When the new age of city authorities in the town visited her to collect taxes they felt she owed, she sent them away explaining that she didn’t have any taxes because the mayor of an earlier generation had remitted them. When the town got free postal delivery Emily alone refused to let the numbers be fastened above her door. Emily’s relationship with Homer Barron, the construction foreman, was a desperate attempt to save herself from living the rest of her life alone with only the shadow of her father to control her.

Emily wanted a real physical presence in her life to dominate her just as her father had done and she felt Homer was her only chance to have this. When Emily realized Homer wasn’t interested in marriage or a commitment of any kind she knew that he was bound to leave her eventually. To prevent him from deserting her she poisoned him and kept his body locked away in the upstairs of her old house. The body of Homer came to serve Emily as the physical representation of the controlling presence in her life, her father, and she found comfort in sleeping next to him.

The fact that the body was Homer’s and not her father’s was of little consequence to Emily, if the townspeople hadn’t forced her to give up her father’s corpse, then he would have lain in place of Homer on the bed. Emily’s unhealthy attachment to her father suggests that she may have had an incestuous relationship with him while he was still alive and she used the body of Homer Barron to continue this relationship.

William Faulkner A Rose for Emily

What story does the image of a strand of iron-gray hair resting on a pillow invoke? Many people could imagine a horrible ghost story or a beautiful tale of old age. Yet, through the eyes of William Faulkner, he imagined a tortured necrophiliac. The story’s amazing twists and turns take the reader on a terrific joy ride through the life of Emily Grierson. A Rose for Emily, I think, helps to portray a more grim, vile aspect of life. Most people do not realize that life includes these gruesome parts. This story included many different structures and details of literature.

I will discuss these differences and the interesting pieces throughout this literary work. The plot structure of A Rose for Emily is different from most of the stories that one reads. Most stories start from the beginning of the tale and go through a certain period of time. They normally end in a resolution. A Rose for Emily begins at the end of the story and tells the plot through various flashbacks. Instead of following the normal plot structure (the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and the resolution), it includes these throughout the tale in a precariously different order.

Faulkner also uses a different technique in choosing a narrator for A Rose for Emily. Instead of having one person or the main character tell the story, he uses a collective “we”. It represents all the townspeople and their version of the story. I think this brings an air of mystery throughout the story because no one knows who’s actually telling the story. The ending of A Rose for Emily was very surprising. Faulkner led you through Emily’s life shadowed from what she really was. In the end he throws you two shocking aspects that Emily murdered Homer Barron and that she has been sleeping beside him since she killed him.

Faulkner slowly brings us to this conclusion by keeping an air of mystery and suspense within the literature. The reader begins to like and sympathize with Emily until the horrible realization of her true character. If he had not have done this, the story would not have been as grand and effective. A Rose for Emily seemed to be a strange title for the story. We are not sure what Faulkner tried to convey with this name, but I think the “rose” he means symbolizes the life of Emily. The story was a living testament to her. She could live on through the retelling of her story.

He gave her life and a sort of “rose”. A Rose for Emily was a terrific literary work. The upsetting ending gave it depth and air of reality. The variation of plot structure gave it mystery. The collective narrator gives the story more life because you are less concerned with what or who the narrator is. The story was a tribute to an abnormal person who’s life could live on because of Faulkner’s imagination. I think it helped to open the eyes of the reader to the harmful effects of child abuse and the lengths one will go to get revenge. Truly, this was A Rose for Emily.

To Kill A Mockingbird and A Rose For Emily

Reading To Kill A Mockingbird and A Rose For Emily I noticed several differences and likenesses. I would like to convey my thoughts to you. Females in “A Rose For Emily” are depicted as reclusive, crazy, and nosy. Females in “To Kill A Mockingbird” are depicted as smart, outgoing, and full of pride. For example, Emily and Aunt Alexandra are both full of pride. Emily is so full of pride that when she finds out that Homer Barron is not going to marry her and that he is gay that she kills him.

She lets the town think that they are married. When in fact she kills him. Emily is afraid of what the town will say about her. Aunt Alexandra is full of a different kind of pride. She is full of family pride. She always tell Jem and Scout about their family tree and history. She also cares about what the town says about them. Aunt Alexandra doesn’t want the town to think badly about the Finch family. Emily is a sad figure. She doesn’t let anybody befriend her. She barely even talks to her servant.

Even when people come to talk to her she either meets them at the door to tell them to go away or she gets her servant to tell them to go away. She is also a recluse. She hardly if ever goes out. Her servant is occasionally seen at the market buying food, but other than that nobody ever goes out from the household. Calpurnia from “To Kill A Mockingbird” is also a sad figure. She has to compromise with the white society that discriminates against blacks. She has to compromise with Aunt Alexandra.

She has to do what Aunt Alexandra says even though she does not agree with her. Calpurnia is though, admirable because she has made the best of her opportunities. She is like a member of the Finch family. She has been with them since Mrs. Finch died. In conclusion, Emily has not done the best with her opportunities. She has given up on the world and so she withdrew into her own little world. Emilyis a sad and lonely lady and will die sad and alone. She could have so much more if she only tries, though.

“A Rose for Emily” – one of the most authentic short stories

As any reader can see, “A Rose for Emily” is one of the most authentic short stories by Faulkner. His use of characterization, narration, foreshadowing, and symbolism are four key factors to why Faulkners work is idealistic to all readers. Introduction Short biographical description. William Faulkner “A Rose for Emily” Characterization Emily as the protagonist. The townspeople. Comparison to Mrs. Havisham. Narration Narrator as an observer. Effects on story. Effects on reader. Point of View. Importance of narrator. Foreshadowing Homer Barron. Mood. Effects of foreshadowing in story. Symbolism Emily.

Rose” in title. Other characters in story. Conclusion The works of William Faulkner have had positive effects on readers throughout his career. Local legends and gossip trigger the main focus of his stories. Considering that Faulkner grew up in Mississippi, he was very familiar with the ways of the South. This award winning author has been praised by many critics for his ability and unique style of writing. One of Faulkners most popular works, which also was his first short story nationally published in 1930, “A Rose for Emily” is one of the most authentic short stories by Faulkner (Pierce 849).

By riting about the political and social ways of the South, Faulkner was able to create an illusion of the New south as being what we know today as mainstream America. His use of characterization, narration, foreshadowing, and symbolism are four key factors to why Faulkners work is idealistic to all readers. The use of characterization in “A Rose for Emily” is clearly important to the story. It is obvious to all readers that Miss Emily Grierson is the protagonist, or the principal character. According to a prominent critic, Elizabeth Sabiston, Emily is a gothic character (142).

Sabiston is referring to Emily that way ecause of the fact that she slept with the skeleton of her lover for forty years. Miss Emily added a mystical tone the mood of the story due to her incapability of being able to live in reality (Watson 180). She was awfully stubborn to the townspeople. This stubbornness also ties in with Emilys ability to live in reality. After she refuses to Nichols 2 pay her taxes, directly to the mayor, she tells them to go and see Colonel Satoris, who has been dead for ten years.

This portrays that Emilys illusion of reality was greatly distorted (Brooks and Warren 158). Arthur Voss, a notable critic ompares Miss Emily Grierson to the outstanding Mrs. Havisham of the famous story by Dickens, “Great Expectations. ” Both are motivated by their lovers, isolate themselves in old decaying houses, and refuse to recognize that time has passed. Both characters are proud, disdainful, and independent (Voss 249). This comparison shows the importance of characterization. Without these characters, the story would be radically changed.

By understanding Emily, the reader may get a clearer view of the actions that go on during the story (West 149). Several other characters in “A Rose for Emily” are set in opposition to Emily. Faulkners use of characterization proves to be positive way to exemplify the readers feelings about certain characters and the tribulations they experience. Another prime example of Faulkners effective writing is his use of narration. Of course, in most stories the narrator is a key asset. In ” A Rose for Emily” Faulkner uses the narrator not only as a story teller, but as an observer from the crowd as well.

The narrators point of view, which is third person, had a positive effect on the way a reader views the story (Lee 47). Through out the story the narrator uses “we” instead of “I”, evealing to us the way the townspeople judge Emily. The narrator thinks back in time throughout the story remembering particular events that occurred in past time. Nichols 3 This is important to the reader in that it helps aid the understanding of how the townspeople viewed Emily. The narrator also reveals to the reader that there was once a very distorted view of ideas in the Old South.

After revealing these views, he confronts the fact that most of these views were terribly wrong (Watson 180). If the story had been narrated by anyone else, it may not have been as easy for the reader to completely understand. With this spectator as the narrator, describing the events of the story through his eyes, one can detect a general impression of Emily (Madden 1987). The view of the narrator is beneficial in understanding the things that Emily goes through. Also, towards the end of the story the narrator gives the reader a feeling of sorrow and pity for Emily (Lee 48).

It is apparent that Faulkners use of narration enhances and clarifies the stories effectiveness. Another example of Faulkners unprecedented style is his use of foreshadowing. By using this technique, Faulkner forces the reader to notice or feel the intensity of the eeling s and sights given off by the story. An artistic nature is vividly exhibited by the use of foreshadowing (Madden 1989). A prime example of this is Homer Barron, who is Miss Emilys lover. Homer is casually mentioned at first, and he seems to have little or no significance to the storys direct meaning (Phillips 452).

However after looking back over the story, the reader can see that homer did display an important role in the theme of the story. The theme of Emily Nichols 4 being unhappy and basically leading a sheltered life foreshadows that Faulkner was bringing across that it was wrong for the townspeople to ossip and assume things about Emily (Pierce 852). By using Homer as the antagonist , one can see that because he had disagreed with Emily and was going to quit her as her father did, the unhappiness drove her to committing murder. Faulkner also used the mood as a foreshadowing tool.

Instead of the mood developing as a result of the story, the story actually develops as a result of the mood. This throws the reader off a bit considering that this occurrence is rare (Seyppel 73). The type of foreshadowing that Faulkner uses represents the past and present generations and how they have progressed. As the generations progressed in the story, Miss Emily still represented and stood for the beliefs of the Old South while the New south generation stood back and allowed her to bask in this illusion (Madden 1986).

One final example of Faulkners intellectual writing is his ability to incorporate symbolism into his writing. In “A Rose for Emily” Miss Emily actually symbolized a remembrance of values and sins of the townspeoples fathers in past generations. Some considered Miss Emily a decadent and perverse relic of the Souths ante-bellum past (Pierce 849). Miss Emily was definitely a complex character in that her haracter stood for the beliefs that she believed from the Old South. In the title ” A Rose for Emily” many have ask ” What does the rose stand for? According to the distinguished critic David Madden, “the rose is a symbol of the age of romance in Nichols 5 which the aristocracy were obsessed with delusions of grandeur, pure women being a symbol of the ideal in every phase of life. ” In other words, the story is ,in a way, a “rose” to Miss Emily for standing up for the things that she believed and died believing them (Pierce 849). Other characters also symbolized other things in the story. Colonel Satoris, the old Negro servant, and the older generation of the Board of Alderman symbolized the Old South.

The unnamed narrator, the new generation of the Board of Alderman, and the attitude of Homer Barron toward the Griersons and the Old South symbolized the feelings of the New South (West 148). Most people will agree that William Faulkners “A Rose for Emily” has an effect on those who read it. An entire novel could be written from this single short story due to the fact that it had so many components intertwined within (Madden 1989). Through the use of characterization, narration, foreshadowing, and ymbolism, the reader will gather a clearer understanding of the point that Faulkner is trying to get across.

The point that Faulkner is trying to get across is that gossip is not always true, and that no one should attempt to base facts on what they hear from word of mouth. Finally, the effect of ” A Rose for Emily” is one that is positive and enjoyable. ” A Rose for Emily” is and will continue to be a definite success in the works of William Faulkner. The story has been enjoyed by many readers and sure to be enjoyed by many others who will read it in further generations yet to come.

William Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily

Only when the present has become the past can we reflect on what we could have or should have done. Yet our society is so obsessed with keeping track of time that we spend millions of dollars a year to keep a set of atomic clocks ticking the time. These clocks are so accurate that they must be reset once a year to correct for the earth’s imperfect orbit. Our base-60 measure of time is an abstract idea dating from the Babylonians. All this, and what most human minds intrinsically understand about time is the past, present and future. I say most inds, because not every mind does comprehend these abstract ideas.

Many people are able to survive in the present, but give little or no thought to the future, and these people usually live in the past. Such a mind is the mind of Miss Emily Grierson in William Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily. Emily Grierson survives in the present, but lives in the past. The morbid ending is foreshadowed by the story’s opening with Miss Emily Grierson’s death and funeral. The bizarre outcome is further emphasized throughout by the symbolism of the decaying house, which arallels Miss Emily’s physical deterioration and demonstrates her ultimate mental disintegration.

Her life, like the house which decays around her is a direct result of living in the past. Part of living is death, and the future conjures life, the past, and death. Emily’s imbalance of past and present causes her to confuse the living with the dead. Perhaps the most prominent example of Emily’s confusion is the carcass of Homer Barron lying in the honeymoon room of Emily’s house. This division is exemplified by the symbolic imagery of Faulkner. The rose colored room, a color of life, is covered thickly with dust, a symbol of death. Of course, this is not the first time we learn of Emily’s confusion.

Previous to Barron’s discovery, her father dies, and she denies that he is dead. Faulkner gives the reader a taste of this confusion early on when Miss Emily instructs the town tax-collectors to consult with Colonel Sartoris about her taxes, though he had been dead for ten years. At this foreboding point in the story, Emily seems to be a senile old maid; this could not be further from the truth. The external characteristics of Miss Emily’s house parallel her physical appearance to show the transformation brought about by years of neglect.

For example, the house is located in what was once a prominent neighborhood that has deteriorated. Originally white and decorated in “the heavily lightsome style” of an earlier time, the house has become “an eyesore among eyesores”. Through lack of attention, the house has evolved from a beautiful representative of quality to an ugly holdover from another era. Similarly, Miss Emily has become an eyesore; for example, she is first described s a “fallen monument”, to suggest her former grandeur and her later grotesqueness. Like the house, she has lost her beauty.

Once she had been “a slender figure in white”; later she is obese and “bloated, like a body long submerged in motionless water with eyes lost in the fatty ridges of her face”. Both house and occupant have suffered the ravages of time and neglect. The interior of the house also parallels Miss Emily’s increasing degeneration and the growing sense of sadness that accompanies such decay. Initially, all that can be seen of the inside of the house is “a dim all from which a staircase mounted into still more shadow” with the house smelling of “dust and disuse”.

The darkness and the smell of the house connect with Miss Emily, “a small, fat woman in black” with a voice that is “dry and cold” as if it were dark and dusty from disuse like the house. The similarity between the inside of the house and Miss Emily extends to the “tarnished gilt easel” with the portrait of her father and Miss Emily “leaning on an ebony cane with a tarnished gold head”. Inside and out, both the building and the body in which Miss Emily live are in a state f deterioration like tarnished metal. Finally, the townspeople’s descriptions of both house and occupant reveal a common intractable arrogance.

At one point the house is described as “stubborn” as if it were ignoring the surrounding decay. Similarly, Miss Emily proudly overlooks the deterioration of her once grand residence. This motif recurs as she denies her father’s death, refuses to discuss or pay taxes, ignores town gossip about her being a “fallen woman,” and does not tell the druggist why she is purchasing arsenic. Both the house and Miss Emily become traps for that strongest epresentative of the twentieth century, Homer Barron, laborer, outsider, confirmed bachelor.

Just as the house seems to reject progress and updating, so does Miss Emily, until both of them become decaying anachronisms. Through descriptions of the house that resemble descriptions of Miss Emily Grierson, “A Rose for Emily” emphasizes the way that beauty and elegance can become grotesquely distorted through neglect and lack of love. In this story, the house deteriorates for forty years until it becomes ugly; Miss Emily’s physical and emotional condition dissipate in a similar manner.

The story “A Rose for Emily”

In the story “A Rose for Emily”, William Faulkner, the author talks about a life of a woman and the town she lived in. The story begins just when miss Emily died. The author doesn’t tell us much about that time except that many people were interested to see what was in her house. As the story progresses, the author decides to jump all the way to the beginning when miss Emily was still a young woman and her father was still alive. During that time, the town felt bad for poor miss Emily and thought that she was going to die with out a husband by her side, since her father didn’t like any men that liked his daughter.

Later on, the author gets to the time when her father just died. Miss Emily felt so alone that she decided to keep her dead father’s body in the house, and not let anyone take him away from her. After the neighbors kept coming to the city council and complaining about the fowl smell that was coming from miss Emily’s house, the judge sent a few men to put lime around the house to kill the smell. As the reader later finds out, the smell was coming from miss Emily’s father’s decaying body. Finely the authorities took the dead body out of the house and buried it.

As the story goes on, the reader is told that the town was being renovated, streets being paved and such. With the renovators, came a young man, by the description, he was a handsome young man. The town kept talking as they always did, gossiping about miss Emily and after Homer Barron and miss Emily were started being seen together, the town thought they were going to get married. Unfortunate for miss Emily, Homer Barron enjoyed the company of men. After find this out, miss Emily came to a drug store and ordered their strongest poison.

When the druggist asked her what she needed it for, she refused to say. After that, the town thought that poor miss Emily was going to kill herself. As the renovations were complete, the streets paved, miss Emily and Homer Barron were still seen riding together but one night Homer Barron left and didn’t return for some time. The town once again felt bad for Emily that the one man that she finely liked and spent her time with has left her. After a while Homer Barron returned and one night, as he came to miss Emily’s house he was never seen again.

Years passed, miss Emily became sick and her hair started turning gray. Then finely, the author comes back to where he left off in the beginning. Miss Emily died and the authorities went into her house. As the writer tells the reader, before her death and after Homer Barron’s disappearance, the second floor of the house was completely off limits to everyone. Later, when the officials came into her house, they went to the second floor and finely revealed the mystery. As they went up to the second floor, they forced open a door that was locked for some time. When they entered, they saw a beautiful room.

In that room they saw man’s clothing nicely folded on the chair and on the bed, they saw a dead body. By the looks of it, the body was there for quite some time. Next to the body, they saw there was enough room for a second person.

On the pillow there was a dent, as if someone had slept there recently and on that pillow they found a strand of gray hair. The author chose to tell the story his way and not in order, sort of jumbled up the events, telling the story jumping from one point in time to another. I believe that the story was written this way to keep the suspense alive so the reader will want to read more of the story.

William Faulkners A Rose for Emily and Barn Burning

If we compare William Faulkners two short stories, A Rose for Emily and Barn Burning, he structures the plots of these two stories differently. However, both of the stories note the effect of a fathers teaching, and in both the protagonists Miss Emily and Sarty make their own decisions about their lives. The stories present major idea through symbolism that includes strong metaphorical meaning. Both stories affect my thinking of life. Both A Rose for Emily and Barn Burning address the influence of a father, and the protagonists of both stories make their own decisions.

Miss Emily lives with her father who prevents her from dating with any young man until she is thirty. Her fathers deed enhances her thirst for love and security. After her father died, she finally has the freedom of love. When she meets Homer Barron and thinks that she has found her true love. But opposite of what she wants, Homer is a homosexual: Khe liked men, and it was known that he drank with the younger men in the Elks Club — that he was not a marrying man (A Rose for Emily, 126). To keep him with her forever, Miss Emily chooses to murder Homer. Then we noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head.

One of us lifted something from it, and learning forward, we saw a long strand of iron-gray hair (A Rose for Emily, 130), Faulkner implies that Miss Emily actually sleeps with the corpse. She must love Homer deeply, to endure the rotten smell and appearance of the dead body. She even enjoys being with it. The body had apparently once lain in the attitude of an embrace (A Rose for Emily, 130). Although she picks the most ridiculous way to express love, her courage to choose her own way of life compels admiration. In Barn Burning, Sartys father enjoys setting fires to burn down others properties.

Sarty faces the problem between loyalty and honesty. On one hand, he wants to be loyal to his father; on the other hand, he does not endorse his fathers behavior. His father teaches him: Youre getting to be a man. You got to learn. You got to learn to stick to your own blood or you aint going to have any blood to stick to you (Barn Burning, 8). His father wants him to pledge loyalty to his own family, but Sarty can not tolerate his fathers conduct. When his father sets fire to burn down another barn, Sarty thoroughly despairs of his father. He notifies the landlord of the fire, and runs away from his family.

He [Sarty] did not look back (Barn Burning, 25). He does not want to let his father controlling him anymore. He wants to start his own life. Both the stories present major ideas through symbolism. Faulkner uses particular objects to link the tales with his metaphorical meaning. A Rose for Emily does not explicitly involve a rose. Faulkner notes the rose only twice, in the title and the third paragraph from the last, Kthis room decked and furnished as for a bridal: upon the valance curtains of faded rose color, upon the rose-shaded lightsK (A Rose for Emily, 129).

But the significant symbolic meaning of the rose strongly affects the readers perception of Miss Emily. It stirs the readers to sympathize with Miss Emily. Rose stands for true love, expectation and the most resplendent period of life. Miss Emily adorns her room as a bridal chamber in rose color, representing a woman who yearns for true love and dreams of a fairyland where she and her beloved can stay together forever. For years, Miss Emilys father drove away all the young men who want to date with her. Her father thwarted her to experiencing love.

In her dreary existence, Homer Barron is the only bright spot, one rose. Like a wilted rose, she keeps his body, forever. It reminds her of the joy she once had in her otherwise empty life. Although Miss Emily is stubborn and eccentric, she is a pitiful woman who needs more attention and love. In Barn Burning, Faulkner uses Major de Spains house to symbolize Sartys ambition. Sarty vibrates to the house: Khe saw the house for the first time and at that instant he forgot his father and the terror and despair both, and even when he remembered his father again (who had not stopped) the terror and despair did not return.

Because, for all the twelve movings, they had sojourned until now in a poor country, a land of small farms and fields and houses, and he had never seen a house like this before (Barn Burning, 10). It is a place where Sarty wants to stay. He yearns to be free from worry and control. For years, he migrates from place to place because of his father habit of burning down others properties. He dreams to live with peace and hopes that one day his father will change his behavior: Hits big as a courthouse he thought quietly, with a surge of peace and joy whose reason he could not have thought into wordsK They are safe from him.

People whose lives are a part of this peace and dignity are beyond his touchK Maybe he will feel it too. Maybe it will even change him now from what maybe he couldnt help but be. Therefore, when his father sets fire to burn down the barn that belongs to the house, he thoroughly despairs of his father. He not only destroys the barn, but also shatters Sartys hope. Sarty decides to leave his family and find his own way of life. The metaphorical meanings of A Rose for Emily and Barn Burning teaches me to view life in a different way.

I do not agree with Miss Emilys deed, but admire her inflexible love. She reminds me to be careful when choose a beloved. It is important to find someone who suits me. The other protagonist, Sarty shows strong self-awareness. He is young, but he is able to determine right and wrong. He knows that if he continuing stay with his father, he will not be able to live his own life, or do right things. It is pretty courageous that he decide to leave his family. When I make a decision, I should have the same courage. Both stories plots themselves are odd, but the meanings stimulate deep thought.

A comparative essay on the use of symbolism in William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”

Authors traditionally use symbolism as a way to represent the sometimes intangible qualities of the characters, places, and events in their works. In his short story “A Rose for Emily,” William Faulkner uses symbolism to compare the Grierson house with Emily Grierson’s physical deterioration, her shift in social standing, and her reluctancy to accept change. When compared chronologically, the Grierson house is used to symbolize Miss Emily’s physical attributes. In its prime, the Grierson house is described as “white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies” (Faulkner 69).

This description suggests that the house was built not only for function, but also to impress and engage the attention of the other townspeople. Similarly, the wealthy women of the era, Emily Grierson not withstanding, were dressed in a conspicuous manner. This, for the most part, is because their appearance was perceived as a direct reflection on their husbands and/or fathers. This display of extravagance was egotistically designed by men to give an impression of wealth to onlookers. Emily was regarded by her father as property. Her significance to him was strongly ornamental, just as their overly lavish home was.

As the plot progresses, the reader is clearly made aware of the physical decline of both the house and Miss Emily. Just as the house is described as “smelling of dust and disuse,” evidence of Emily’s own aging is given when her voice in similarly said to be “harsh, and rusty, as if from disuse” (70-74). Ultimately, at the time of Emily’s death, the house is seen by the townspeople as “an eyesore among eyesores,” and Miss Emily is regarded as a “fallen monument” (69). Both are empty, and lifeless. Neither are even remotely representative of their former splendor.

Just as their physical characteristics, Faulkner uses the Grierson house as a symbol for Miss Emily’s change in social status. In its prime, the house was “big,” and “squarish,” and located on Jefferson’s “most select street” (69). This description gives the reader the impression that the residence was not only extremely solid, but also larger than life, almost gothic in nature, and seemingly impervious to the petty problems of the common people. The members of the Grierson family, especially Emily, were also considered to be strong and powerful.

The townspeople regarded them as regal. And Emily, as the last living Grierson, came to symbolize her family’s, and possibly the entire south’s, rich past. The townspeople’s reveration of Emily soon decayed, however, once it was rumored that she was left no money, only the house, in her father’s will. Also, her scandalous appearances with Homer Barron further lessened her reputation in the public eye. And, perhaps inevitably, the prestige and desirability of the Grierson house fell right along side Miss Emily’s diminishing name. Perhaps the most significant comparison occurs when the Grierson house is used to symbolize Emily Grierson’s unwillingness to accept change.

Emily Grierson held tightly to her family’s affluent past. A good example of this occurred when representatives were sent to her home to collect her delinquent taxes. She completely rejected her responsibility to the town by referring the men to a time when the since departed mayor, Colonel Sartoris, “remitted her taxes” (70). Miss Emily and the house show further examples of their disregard for progress when Emily denies the Grierson house a number, and a mailbox, just as Emily herself refused to be labeled or to be associated with anything as modernistic and common as a mailbox.

Even when she was left “alone, a pauper,” and “humanized,” she absolutely refused to be viewed with pity (72). In fact she “demanded more than ever the recognition of her dignity as the last Grierson” (73). Likewise, just as Emily held herself “a little too high” for what she was, the house is presented as “Lifting its stubborn and Coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and gasoline pumps” (69). The cotton wagons and gasoline pumps in this description are undoubtedly used to symbolize what Emily must surely see as the mostly unimportant and purposeless townspeople.

This single comparison by itself provides indisputable evidence that Emily Grierson and her family’s house are strongly related with one another. So, it should now be obvious to the analytical reader that the relationship between the Grierson house’s and Miss Emily Grierson’s, physical deterioration, shift in social standing, and reluctancy to accept change, is too precise to be construed coincidental. It is precisely this open usage of symbolism, and expert utilization of foreshadowing that earned both William Faulkner and “A Rose for Emily” their places among the classics.

William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”

William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” has been interpreted in many different ways. Most of these rely solely on hints found within the story. I believe that his life can also help one analyze this story. By knowing that Faulkner’s strongest influence was his independent mother, one can guess that Miss Emily Grierson’s character was based partly on Maud Falkner. William Cuthbert Faulkner was born in New Albany, Mississippi on September 25, 1897. His family moved to Oxford, Mississippi when Faulkner was five years old (Larinde). His parents were Murry and Maud Falkner (Zane 2).

Faulkner added the “u” to his last name on his Royal Air Force application for unknown reasons (5). Faulkner’s great-grandfather, Colonel William C. Falkner had moved from Tennessee to the Mississippi Delta in 1841. The Colonel was a Civil War hero, plantation owner, railroad builder, and even a writer (Larinde). Faulkner’s grandfather and father were both respected, though not wealthy. They were also both alcoholics. Faulkner and his father never had a very good relationship. He and his mother, though, were very close. Maud gave him his love of art and literature.

She influenced Faulkner more than anyone else with her strong independence (Zane 3-4). She may have been the inspiration for the strong, independent character, Emily Grierson. “William Faulkner was a quiet but mischievous child, polite and rude, loving and withdrawn” (4). He did well in grade school, but began showing signs of truancy during adolescence. Faulkner dropped out of high school in eleventh grade. In 1918, Faulkner attempted to enlist in the U. S. Army but was turned down. He then applied to the Royal Air Force where he adds the “u” to his last name.

He was soon discharged and returned to Oxford, Mississippi. Here he attended the university for two year. “In the decade that followed, Faulkner donned a host of other identities, alternately and aristocrat, a bohemian, or a derelict” (Zane 5). Faulkner established himself as a major novelist in 1929 with the book The Sound and the Fury (Larinde). He wrote twenty novels and many short stories (Zane 1). His greatest achievements were the Nobel Prize for literature in 1950, the National Book Award, and Pulitzer Prizes. All of these awards came after he was fifty (7).

Although Faulkner lived in Canada, New Orleans, New York, Hollywood, and Virginia, most of his life was spent in his native Mississippi (Faulkner 177). “In his works William Faulkner used the American South as a microcosm for the universal theme of time” (Larinde). Almost all of his stories are set in the Deep South. Some critics describe Faulkner as “the quintessential Southern writer with his greatest works centered in this region” (Zane 1). Many of his stories’ central themes seem to be based on themes that the South has struggled with for decades. These are race, gender, repression, myth, and heroism (2).

William Faulkner struggled with financial problems and alcoholism like his father and grandfather (“William Faulkner”). He died of a heart attack on July 6, 1962 and is buried in St. Peter’s Cemetery. William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” is an intriguing story of a lady who gets away with murder in the South around the turn of the century. There are many different interpretations regarding the meaning of this story. These range from Ray West’s theory of Emily Grierson’s attempt to stop time to Jack Scherting’s suggestion that she suffers from an Oedipal complex (Blythe 192).

In my analysis of Faulkner’s story, I will give several different interpretations written by different writers. Then I will explain which one I agree with the most and why. Celia Rodriguez believes that in “A Rose for Emily” the past is contrasted with the present era. The past is seen in Miss Emily, Colonel Sartoris, the old Negro servant, and the Board of Alderman. Emily’s suitor, the Yankee Homer Barron, the new Board of Alderman, and “the next generation with its more modern ideas” (Faulkner 178) represent the present (1). Emily lived completely in the past.

She told the new Board of Alderman that Colonel Sartoris had explained to her that she had no taxes in Jefferson. Colonel Sartoris, however, had been dead for at least ten years. When Homer Barron tried to escape from her world into the new world, Emily murdered him to keep him in the past with her (2). Cleanth Brooks believes that Miss Emily’s actions are the result of her strong independence. She refuses to be criticized by the town when she gallivants around with Homer Barron. She refuses to be left by Barron, so she murders him.

She refuses to pay taxes because the long dead Colonel Sartoris told her she was not obligated to (191). Brook’s admires Emily because she refused to conform to public opinion in a time when women were demanded to. Explains that the moral of the story is a warning against pride: “heroic isolation pushed too far ends in homicidal madness” (191). Hal Blythe provides a surprising motive for why Miss Emily Grierson murdered Homer Barron. He believes that Emily discovered that Barron was a homosexual. There are several clues within the story that could possibly lead a reader to this conclusion.

The narrator tells us that Barron “liked men, and it was known that he drank with the younger men in the Elks’ Clubthat he was not a marrying man” (Faulkner 181). She murdered him to “save face” (192). Blythe believes that Emily is humiliated when she discovers that Barron has simply used her to keep the community from discovering his true homosexual nature. Miss Emily openly buys men’s clothes, combs, and even a nightshirt. Then after she kills him, she positions his body to appear to be embracing a lover. Emily does these things to conceal the real tendencies of her beau from the town.

Blythe states, “Once again Faulkner has used sexual deviation to indicate the decay of an old South tradition” (193). Judith Fetterley’s theory is the last analysis that I will explain. Hers is also the one that I happen to agree with the most. Fetterley believes that within her patriarchal society, Emily suffers the most injury from being forced into the position of a “lady”. Emily, however, uses this stereotype to gain power over those who place her in this role (195). I believe that Faulkner used his mother’s strong and independent attitude as the basis for Emily Grierson.

Emily’s power over the town is proven by the fact that Emily is not only exempt from paying taxes in Jefferson, but she gets away with murder. The new Board of Alderman visit Emily’s house to demand that she begin paying her taxes. She informs them that Colonel Sartoris explained to her that she was not required to pay taxes. She tells them to go ask him if they do not believe her. The aldermen know that Sartoris has been dead for at least ten years, but they cannot say this to Miss Emily because they believe that because she is a lady, she is not capable of either reason or logic. She then demands that they leave.

The men do this rather than acting in a way that is considered unbecoming of a gentlemen. Emily gets away without having to pay taxes simply because she plays up her role as a “lady” (Fetterley 195). Emily buys arsenic without anyone ever thinking that her intentions might possibly be homicidal. The women instantly assume that Emily will use it to commit suicide because her suitor, Homer Barron, has abandoned her. When she continues to live, no one gives a second thought as to what the poison was really for. Even when a terrible stench begins emanating from within Emily’s house, no one gets suspicious.

Judge Stevens refuses to let anyone say anything to her because it just would not be right to accuse a “lady” of stinking. When madness is thought to have befallen Emily, no one is suspicious because that is a typical result of bereavement in ladies. All of these things allow Emily Grierson to murder Homer Barron with impunity (196). Judith Fetterley’s analysis seems the most viable to me. However, I enjoy thinking that Miss Emily Grierson was cunning enough to use the stereotype of a lady that the men and women in Jefferson forced her into against them.

The character of Miss Emily

Characterization refers to the techniques a writer uses to develop characters. In the story “A Rose for Emily”, William Faulkner uses characterization to reveal the character of Miss Emily. He expresses most of her character through physical description, her actions, words, and feelings, a narrator’s direct comments about the character’s nature, and through the actions, words, and feelings, of other characters. Faulkner best uses characterization to examine the theme of the story, too much pride can end in madness.

Miss Emily, the main character of this story, lives for many years as a recluse, she has withdrawn from her community to live in seclusion. “No visitor had passed since she ceased giving china-painting lessons eight or ten years earlier. ” Faulkner characterizes Miss Emily’s attempt to remove herself from society through her actions. “After her father’s death she went out very little; after her sweetheart went away, people hardly saw her at all. ” The death of her father and the shattered relationship with her boyfriend added to her attempt to live in seclusion.

Though her father was responsible for her becoming a hermit, her pride also contributed to her seclusion. “None of the young men were quite good enough for Miss Emily and such. ” The town and Emily thought that she was of higher status because of her family name. Faulkner uses the feelings of other characters to show Miss Emily’s pride. Her pride has kept her from socializing with other members of the community reinforcing her solitary. But Miss Emily’s father is still responsible for her being a hermit.

We remembered all the young men her father had driven away…” If he had not refused the men who wanted to go out with Miss Emily, she may have not gone crazy. Miss Emily may have wanted seclusion, but her heart longed for companionship. Her desire for love and companionship drove her to murder Homer Baron. She has evil intentions when she bought the arsenic poison. “Then we noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head. ” Her deepest feelings and hidden longings were lying in the bed.

Miss Emily’s pride resulted in the shocking murder of Homer Baron. Faulkner’s use of characterization to describe Miss Emily and her intentions was necessary in bringing the story to life. Miss Emily’s pride was expressed through her actions, words, and feelings, through a narrator’s direct comments about the character’s nature, and through the actions, words, and feelings, of other characters. Miss Emily’s story constitutes a warning against the sin of pride: superhuman status in the eyes of everyone and too much pride in oneself can cause insanity.

Miss Emily’s House

The story’s opening lines announce the funeral of Miss Emily, to be held in her homenot in a churchand the reasons for the entire town’s attending-the men out of respect for a Southern lady, the women to snoop inside her house. Her death symbolizes the passing of a genteel way of life, which is replaced by a new generation’s crass way of doing things. The narrator’s description of the Grierson house reinforces the disparity between the past and the present: Once a place of splendor, now modern encroachmentsgas pumps and cotton wagonsobliterate most of the neighborhood and leave untouched only Miss Emily’s house, with its “stubborn and coquettish decay.”

This clash between the past and the present is evidenced by the different approaches that each generation takes concerning Miss Emily’s taxes. In the past, Colonel Sartoris had remitted them for her, believing it uncivilized to remind a Southern woman to pay taxes, which Miss Emily does not do after her father dies. But the next generation, with its more modern ideas, holds her responsible for them. Miss Emily, however, returns the tax notice that the new aldermen send to her; when the young men call upon her, she vanquishes them, saying, “I have no taxes in Jefferson” and “See Colonel Sartoris,” who has been dead for at least ten years.

One of the most striking contrasts presented in this first section entails the narrator’s portrayal of Miss Emily’s physical appearance and her house. Descriptive phrases include terms that add to the gothic quality of the story: She is dressed in black and leans on a cane; her “skeleton” is small; and she looks “bloated,” with a “pallid hue.” But Faulkner doesn’t say outright that she looks much like a dead person, for it is only in retrospect that we realize that the dead-looking Miss Emily has been sleeping with the very dead Homer Barron.

Miss Emily’s decaying appearance matches not only the rotting exterior of the house, but the interior as well. For example, the crayon, pastel, picture mentioned prior to the narrator’s description of Miss Emily is supported by a “tarnished” stand, and Miss Emily supports herself by leaning on the “tarnished” handle of her cane. Also note that the picture is a colored chalk portrait of her father, no doubt drawn by her when she was a child.

Miss Emily has some artistic talent: She teaches china painting, which is highly detailed and usually done in soft colors. But if she painted her father’s portrait using the same techniques she uses to paint china, then the portrait would not be an accurate representation of the fiercely authoritarian man who was Mr. Grierson. It would be washed out, pale as death, a shadow of his real self.

A Rose for Emily, a story about a young women

In A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner tells a story about a young women who is overwhelmingly influenced by her father. Her father controls her live and makes all of her decisions for her. Without him she could not do anything except stay at home. When her father dies, Emily has to confront a new life without her sponsor. Since she is not able to function without the presence of her father, it is hard for her to adapt and accept the truth. When Emilys father dies, women of the town call on her to offer their help, which is their custom when someone suffers a tragic loss.

Emily denies that as she meets them in front of her house with no emotion in her face. She sends them away as she considers her father still alive instead of being death. Her father controls all over her life; therefore, she couldnt accept the death of her father. In her thought, her father still exists in her house and he is the only one source that she can support to. Its time for her to make her decision herself. She spends majority of her time in the house where she feels comfortable and where her father still exists and protects her.

She decides to live herself in the house regardless of changes outside in the world. She could not escape from her father ghost shadow. Everything changes; nevertheless, she still lives with the past. For example, when a new age of city authorities in town visit her house in order to collect taxes they feel she own; she explains that: I have no taxes in Jefferson. Colonel Sartoris explained it to me. Yes, it is true; however, colonel Sartoris has been dead almost for ten years. There are two characters in this story described opposite to each other. They are Miss Emily and Mr. Homer.

Miss Emily is described as a short, fat, aged and mysterious woman. She is very stubborn lady and very hard to change; Miss Emily refuses modern change into her desolate life; for example, she refuses to allow attaching numbers on her door and a mailbox for free mail service. All her attitude is a result of her fathers over-control her when she was very young. On the other hand, Homer is a Yankee- a big dark, ready man, with big voice and eyes lighter the his face. Miss Emily represents for someone who lives in the South and couldnt accept the real thing that the North takes over the South after Civil War.

When the Negro opened the blinds of one window, they could see that the leather was cracked; and when they sat down, a faint dust rose sluggishly about their things, spinning with slow motes in the single sun ray is example of old thing. Emilys house with all old things represents the Old south, which has to face to a new modern generation. The plot of this story is mainly about Miss Emilys attitude. Miss Emily lives in the modern society but her attitude is about the past. She is dominated by her father. Because she is so influenced by her father, when he passes away and leaves her alone, she is so scared and cannot confront the truth.

She meets Homer, she feels balance in her life. He could be the one she can count on; however, she is still scared that he will leave her one day. Fears of Homers departure and of being left alone are reasons to make her poison hem and kill him. This is a way she can keep him with her forever. A neighbor saw the Negro man admit him at the kitchen door at dusk one evening. And thats the last we saw of Homer Barron Faulkner writes. Until her death, people find out the truth about Homers mysterious death. This is the climax of this story. The truth is discovered.

A Rose For Emily by William Faulkner and Shiloh by Bobbie Ann Mason

I would choose A Rose For Emily by William Faulkner and Shiloh by Bobbie Ann Mason to be put in a time capsule to be unearthed 100 years from now. Because A Rose For Emily was written in 1930, and Shiloh was written in 1982, I think that considering the two stories side by side would provide an interesting contrast between lifestyles of the early and late 20th century. By comparing setting and characterization in these two stories, people 100 years from now could get a feel for some of the things that have changed during the course of the 20th century and some of the things that have not.

A Rose for Emily and Shiloh are both set in the South, and both take place during times of change. In A Rose for Emily, the Grierson house was located on what had once been the most select street (80) but as the town changed the house had become crowded by garages and cotton gins (80). During the course of the story, the town of Jefferson gets its sidewalks paved, and free postal delivery is made available to all the residents.

Emily, who alone refused to let them fasten the metal numbers above her door, (85) for the purpose of postal delivery, also refused to acknowledge the passage of time in any other way. The character of Leroy in Shiloh is much the same as Emily in that he fears and dislikes the changes brought by the passage of time. In the story Shiloh, Leroy notices with uneasiness that subdivisions are spreading across western Kentucky like and oil slick (69) and that the farmers who used to gather around the courthouse square on Saturday afternoons to play checkers and spit tobacco juice have gone (69).

The grand and complicated (70) houses of the new subdivisions depress Leroy, and his wife Norma Jean thinks that the log house Leroy longs to build would be inappropriate here in the new subdivisions (70). It would be interesting for people 100 years from now to compare the characters of Emily Grierson, Homer Baron, Leroy Moffitt, and Norma Jean Moffitt, and also it would also be interesting for them to compare the relationships between the two couples.

Emily, who in some respects was a typical woman of her day, was dominated by the wishes of her father as a young woman, and later her treatment at the hands of Homer Baron became the main issue of her life. She had no career; the energy which a woman of the later part of the 20th century would have put into a career she put into maintaining her social standing in the community of Jefferson. Emily fears and rejects any change that she thinks might lessen her social standing in the eyes of others.

She wants to retain the past in which the Grierson family was at the top of the social ladder: her self worth is based entirely on her connection to her eminent ancestors. In contrast, Norma Jean Moffitt hopes to find fulfillment through her own actions. She takes classes in weight lifting and English composition, because her self worth is measured by her own accomplishments instead of her relationship to others. She is even willing to forfeit her relationship with her husband because she thinks Leroys goals are too different from her own.

The difference in their goals is demonstrated by Leroys desire to build a log house, which is a symbol of the past and fear of change, while Norma Jean sees change in a positive way. The relationships of the two couples are quite similar, even though they are so widely separated in time. Both of the relationships consist of one member who venerates the past and sees the relationship as the most important aspect of their lives (Emily and Leroy), and one member is more self-reliant and sees change as good (Homer and Norma Jean).

By comparing A Rose for Emily and Shiloh, Americans 100 years from now would be able to note the gradual change of womens role in our society during the past 100 years. It can be seen from these two stories that there has been a shift in womens roles from being mostly centered in the home and their relationships with their families, to a broader range of goals possibly including education and careers. Also, I think that readers from the 22nd century would appreciate these two works as especially vivid portraits of the respective time periods they depict.

William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”

William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” tells a story of a young woman who is violated by her father’s strict mentality. After being the only man in her life Emily’s father dies and she finds it hard to let go. Like her father Emily possesses a stubborn outlook towards life, and she refused to change. While having this attitude about life Emily practically secluded herself from society for the remainder of her life. She was alone for the very first time and her reaction to this situation was solitude.

This story takes place throughout the Reconstruction Era from the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s in Jefferson, Mississippi. Emily was raised in the period before the Civil War. Her father who was the only person in her life with the exception of a former lover who soon left her as well raised her. The plot of this story is mainly about Miss Emily’s attitude about change. While growing up Emily was raised in a comfortable environment because her father possessed a lot of money.

Considering that her father was a very wealthy person who occasionally loaned the town money Emily had everything a child could want. This caused Emily to be very spoiled and selfish and she never knew the value of a dollar until her father left her with othing but a run down home that started to decay after a period of time. She began to ignore the surrounding decay of the house and her appearance. These lies continued as she denied her father’s death, refused to pay taxes, ignores town gossip about her being a fallen woman, and does not tell the druggist why she purchased rat poison.

Her life, like the decaying house suffered from a lack of genuine love and care. Her physical appearance is brought about by years of neglect. As time went on pieces from Emily started to drift away and also the home that she confined herself to. The town grew a great deal of ympathy towards Emily, although she never hears it. She was slightly aware of the faint whispers that began when her presence was near. Gossip and whispers may have been the cause of her hideous behavior. The town couldn’t wait to pity Ms.

Emily because of the way she looked down on people because she was born with a silver spoon in her mouth and she never thought she would be alone the way her father left her. Miss Emily might have stayed out of the public eye after the two deaths because she was finally alone, something she in her petty life was not use to. Emily’s father never left her alone and when he ied Homer Barron was a treat that she was never allowed to have. He later died and left her and she was completely alone after that.

After her fathers death she went out very little; after her sweetheart went away, people hardly saw her at all. ( ) With this dilemma she isolates herself from civilization, using her butler, Tobe to run her errands. Miss Emily cannot except the fact that times are changing and society is growing. Maybe Miss Emily is shy about her old fashioned beliefs. If no one was to observe her then no one could force her to change. Emily had been through much and has seen many generations grow efore and around her. This brings reason to her strong Confederate beliefs.

Miss Emily refused to allow modern change into her depressed life. For example when she refused to let the newer generation fasten metal numbers above her door and attach a mailbox when Jefferson got free mail service. This reflects Emily’s stubborn persona caused by her father’s treatment when she was young. “A Rose for Emily is told through the eyes of the townspeople. William Faulkner expressed a lot of the resident’s opinions towards Emily and her family’s history. They mentioned old lady Wyatt, her great aunt who had gone completely mad.

Compare/contrast Faulkner’s ‘Dry September’ with ‘A rose for Emily’ in terms of writing style and character presentation

What is going to be analyzed in this paper are the two short stories by W. Faulkner ‘A Rose for Emily’ and ‘Dry September’. Basically, what is to be performed is a comparison/contrast analysis in terms of the writing style and character presentation. More specifically, I will provide first the information from the story ‘A Rose for Emily’, concerning writing style and character presentation, and following is going to be the same analysis for the other story ‘Dry September’.

After the necessary data are provided, there is going to be a comparison/contrast of these data, by also citing passages from the two stories, for making them more understandable. The similarities and differences that exist in the two stories are substantial. Before, the analysis on the stories takes place there are some general points that have to be mentioned that concern other elements of fiction that are as well important. To begin with, the town name that is used in both stories is the same and that is ‘Jefferson’. Also both stories are taking place in the old South.

And finally, in both of them the main character is a woman, Miss Emily Grierson and Miss Minnie Cooper respectively. The first story that is going to be analyzed is ‘A Rose for Emily’, and more specifically the analysis is divided in two parts, first I am concerned with the writing style and second with the character presentation. To begin with I have to say that this story is one that keeps the readers’ interest undiminished. It has a complex plot and many questions arise when reading through it. Basically what is creating this is the lack of chronological order in the evolution of the facts that are presented.

Things become more clear when one places them in the right order. Since the story is taking place in the old South, the choice and use of words indicts us to that region. Furthermore, what is also noticed here is that there are many descriptions(descriptive language) used in the story; “It was a big, squarish frame house that … an eyesore among eyesores”(431-2). These help to understand more about the surrounding environment and about the appearance, “They rose when she entered-a small fat woman in black … while the visitors stated their errand”(432) of the people that are involved in the story as well.

Also we have to say that there are many similes and metaphors in the text that make it more true to the reader, “She looked bloated, like a body long … stated their errand”(432). Inversely, another element of fiction that is going to be analyzed is the character presentation. There are many characters involved in the story, and Faulkner is presenting information about all of them, in most of the cases he also describes the appearance of them as well; “… a Yankee-a big, dark, ready man with… team of bays from the livery stable”(434).

The information that I received can be interconnected and form a point of view for each one of the persons involved. The protagonist in the story is Miss Emily, for whom I have many information. She is aristocratic and once belonged to the distinguished and prestigious people of Jefferson. We have many backup information about her concerning her past, especially the role of her father towards Emily. Moreover there is a man involved in the story also, whose name is Homer Barron, and is the man that Emily falls in love with, and consequently he disappears.

Some of the town people are presented in the story also. Throughout the story we see that there are many descriptions about the people and especially for Miss Emily, as mentioned before. This helps us understand the various stages that she is going through and how her behavior is affected. We see that as the years pass Emily is becoming more and more enigmatic until she reaches the point where she is locking herself in the house and nobody sees her for 10 years, “She was sick for… -sort of tragic and serene”(434).

Finally all the questions that are created are answered when she finally dies and town people enter her house, “The violence of breaking down the door… lay in the bed”(437-8). Generally I can say about the characters, that Faulkner creates in this story, are puzzling, and are revealed throughout miscellaneous stages that are taking place, and through which the reader receives information that show this for them. On the other hand, the other story that is going to be discussed is ‘Dry September’, which as well is a story that keeps the readers’ interest in high levels, due to the interesting plot that it has, and the various changes in it.

Here also, I first analyze the writing style and then proceed with the character presentation. This story has to do as well with a woman(Miss Minnie Cooper), who is supposedly raped by a black man. This woman was once in the high social class of Jefferson and as the years pass by she began to ‘fall’. The choice and use of words is really careful, again, and especially here the use of ‘South’ words and way of speaking is obvious and extensive, “ ‘Maybe you know who… ,you damn niggerlover’”(517).

The story contains dialogues between characters, from which also the reader acquires necessary information, in order to understand better the story. Descriptions are spread all over the text, which have to deal basically with the setting, “… none of them, gathered in the barber shop… ,knew exactly what had happened”(517) and the characters as well, “The screen door crashed… had been decorated for valor”(518), to make the reader understand and know more about their special features.

There are many similes and metaphors, “…like a fire in my glass…”(517); used throughout the text that transform and make the text more interesting and intensive. Again here, Faulkner has lack of chronological order but not so complex. The story basically when reading through it, gives the impression of two stories in one since Faulkner is changing settings constantly, from the barber shop to Minnies house, or from the alley to the road and then to the factory.

Even though the story is moving around Miss Minnie and Will Mayes(black man), there are not many information about the black man as if it was not necessary or important, because his fate did not depend on him, but on the white people of the town. Besides this, I observed that throughout the text during the dialogues there are many interruptions, “ ‘I just know and you… a woman that never-’ ”(518), which do not let the reader receive some more information. These interruptions also help in rising the interest of the reader in what is going to happen next.

Furthermore, I am going to proceed with the character presentation. There are many characters presented throughout the text. The author provides with information about their past or even for now like their appearance. The information that we receive can help us understand and justify the actions of these people and at some point even foresee how the situations are going to turn out in the end. Through the character presentation Faulkner here also presents two conflicting arguments which are whether the black man is guilty or not.

Through the various people that are presented, we get to know as well the perceptions and how people used to face this kind of problem-rape. The woman that is the main character of the story, Minnie, is falling in love with a bank cashier who finally leaves to the city and abandons her. One problem that was understood when reading through the text is that Faulkner is using different names for the same characters and that the characters are so many that it requires careful reading, in order not to get confused, and think that other people are saying the words.

A point that has to be mentioned and it is of major importance is that in this story we see the transformation of a ‘popular’ girl, to a woman that nobody cares for and then again we see her feeling different in the picture show where men start again paying attention to her. Generally, he shows to us how the life of a woman changes, and how an incident affected her life. Now if we compare the two stories we will find similarities in terms of the two elements of fiction, we discussed before.

One of the major similarities that the two stories have is that both of them have to do with women, who had a strange life; also both of these stories are taking place in the old South, in the same town. Likewise, as much as the writing style is concerned we see that in both texts the use of descriptive language is obvious, which is something that helps the reader understand and interpret them so as to have a clearer point of view. In like manner, there are also similarities that have to do with the character presentation.

Basically, a common tactic that Faulkner uses in both stories is to describe their appearance, because in a way it is interrelated with their actions. The heroines in both stories have common features like their belonging in the high social class of town, and are both disappointed by men in their own way. The author also is providing us with the past of some of the characters involved. Both women at one point in their lives they were called by the town people ‘Poor, Emily’(Faulkner,436), and ‘Poor Minnie’ (Faulkner,521), respectively which shows that they created the same feelings to them, but for different reasons.

Furthermore, what we are going to provide here is the contrast between the two stories, concerning again the two elements of fiction. To begin with, we have to denote a major difference that is observed and this is the diction and the language that the author uses. In Emily’s story we see that, due to the fact that Emily belonged to a high social class the language used in the dialogues is not that much ‘South’, while in Minnie’s story we have the large dialogues between the men in the barber shop and in other settings where we can see clear the use of these kind of words.

This is natural because the people in the second story, and especially the people(men) in the barber shop did not seem to belong in high social class. In addition to that I have also to denote that ‘Dry September’ is a story that it is based on dialogue while ‘A Rose for Emily’ is more like a narration by an observer, with some small exceptions of dialogue and quotes of words. On the other side, I have also to comment that in the first story Faulkner uses more descriptions about people, due to the fact that large dialogues exist.

These descriptions include main and secondary characters like McLendon, Hawkshaw, stranger, barbers and others. Likewise, there are differences existing in the character presentation. Basically, I observed that the characters in “Dry September” were presented and described more extensively. This is happening almost for everybody. On the contrary in Emily’s story the descriptions about characters are referring to Emily a lot, and to other people that were close to her like the servant and H. Barron.

In “A Rose for Emily”, I saw that the reader is more like adduced to Emily’s actions and emotions, while on the other story the reader has to deal with other people’s actions and feelings. Added to this, I have also to say that two big differences concerning the main characters in that Emily’s complex personality-in relation with her father and loved one is projected more, while on the other story we have more on Minnie’s environment and relationships with other people.

Summing up, throughout the analysis of the two stories by W. Faulkner, I spotted many similarities and differences, concerning the two elements of fiction, the writing style and the characters’ presentation. Overall, the two stories are really interesting with a strange plot. Faulkner maintains in both stories, the strange feeling of an almost horror stories. He shows the profound wickedness that penetrates the various characters in both of the stories. Bizarre characters, outlandish settings, but more or less the same feelings to the reader, created by William Faulkner.

A Rose for Emily – William Faulkner

Emily was a woman that cannot be described without a the words not quite normal, and extra ordinary. The story, A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner is about one womans life, from her being a teen to her death in her house. The towns people did not like her, her family did not like her, but when she died, everybody showed up to Miss Emilys Funeral. The only person to see Emily was her old manservant, a black man that was the cook and the gardener. The only time that the town would see him was when her went to the grocery store to shop. He would never talk to anybody while he was there.

The end of her life never saw Emily out of her house. The town questioned this, but Emily soon just became another story with the town. Miss Emily was not always alone. When she was younger, her father lived at the house with her. He was a man without his sanity. When ever a male would come to the house to see Emily, he would great them at the door, and see them off before Emily could even say hello. The town used this excuse for Emily when her father died. He was dead for three days before she would let the coroner to take him out of the house.

This can be een as the beginning of Emilys decent to madness. Emily was not always without a man. The town was getting sidewalks put in, and a group of colored men from the north was called in to build them. Their Foreman went by the name of Homer Barron. We began to see him (Homer) and Miss Emily on Sunday afternoons driving in the yellowed-wheeled buggy It was at this time that Emily bought poison from the druggist. The town thought that she was to kill herself, but her talk of marriage to Homer changed that. Emily and Homer started to get to know each other quite well during his time there.

But it was a relationship that was to pass. Homer himself had remarked- he liked men, and it was known that he drank with the younger men in the Elks club-that he was was not a marrying man. Soon, after the work had been finished, the men were gone, and Homer Barron was but a story. This is about the time that Emily stopped going out. She used to teach town children china painting, but they grew old, and they did not carry their children on. Soon, the only element of Emilys household to be seen was her manservant that would go shopping, but ould never talk to anyone.

And then, she died. In her old age, inside her own house like her father. The towns people came. Some out of respect, most to feed their curiosity to see the inside of this mysterious house. They paid their respects to the family and the servant, and walked around and surveyed the household. But there was one room left that they did not see. Already we knew that there was one room in that region upstairs which no one had seen in forty years They broke down the door, and the room was open for the group to see.

Covering the entire room was a thick coat of dust. On the side table lay a mans toilet things. The entire room was made in a pale red. The silver so tarnished that the monogram was blurred. On the bed lay a man. The group stood there for a while just looking at the body. It lay there as if it was in an embrace. Then the group noticed the pillow that was next to him. Then we noticed that in the second Pillow was the indentation of a head. One of use lifted something from it, And leaning forward we saw a long strand of iron-gray hair.

The story, A Rose for Emily is told in a third person point of view. This is a limited point of view because you really can not get into the heads of any of the characters to see what they are really thinking and feeling. The narrator is never really known. This story is most likely called, A Rose for Emily because of the color of her room in the end. It is the color rose, and a rose is a symbol of love. That love was her love for Homer Barron, and herself. When the town changed, she stayed the same. Emily was the last touch to the past in the town of Jefferson.

This story is more than just about a woman who slowly lost her mind, it is about the changing from the past to the present, then to the future. Emily was the symbol of the past, of a time where they did not have numbers on their houses. The town was a symbol for the current times, with gas stations and sidewalks lining its streets. We are to learn from this story. Not just that change effects everybody, but that one person can change an entire town. Without Emily, the town would have nothing to gossip. Their complete ties to the past would be cut. Emilys death was the end of an era.

Archetypes in A Rose for Emily

Archetypes are, by definition, previous images, characters, or patterns that recur throughout literature and though consistently enough to be considered a universal concept or situation. Archetypes also can be described as complexes of experiences that come upon us like fate, and their effects are felt in our most personal life. A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner contains many of this particular critical method. Although there are several archetypes found, the most important is Emilys father.

Archetypes are like riverbeds which dry up when the water deserts them, but it can find it again at any time. This short story offers many interpretations. However, the structure of the story breaks down into two stages: past and present. By examining the archetypes within the story, it can be suggested that Emilys over-protective father stands to represent Emilys feminist struggle, the ongoing battle for women to have an equal place in society. Emily should be able to do as she pleases, but her dependence her father does not allow her to have that freedom.

Her fathers over-protection is evident in this passage, We remembered all the young men her father had driven away, and we knew that with nothing left, she would have to cling to that which had robbed her, as people will (279). Her father robs her from many of lifes necessities. She misses out on having friends, being a normal woman, and her ability to be happy. Emily is not able to live a normal life which she indirectly blames on her father. Emily is so used to having her father be there for her, she figures that by keeping his body he can still be part of her life.

The Jungian archetype of this feminist struggle can be noted as: Emily is not able to live a normal life because her father keeps under his thumb. In relation to keeping her fathers body, she keeps Homer Barrons body so long because she feels that she has finally accomplished something in her life. Emily is not ready to give up that feeling. The feminist struggle is hard to detect but it is still there.

In conclusion, there are two archetypes in A Rose for Emily: Emilys father and Homer Barron. Emilys father is the chief archetype because he is the reason for Emilys breakdowns. She has been scarred for life which she obviously never over comes.

The story A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner

In the story A Rose for Emily, William Faulkner, the author talks about a life of a woman and the town she lived in. The story begins just when miss Emily died. The author doesnt tell us much about that time except that many people were interested to see what was in her house. As the story progresses, the author decides to jump all the way to the beginning when miss Emily was still a young woman and her father was still alive. During that time, the town felt bad for poor miss Emily and thought that she was going to die with out a husband by her side, since her father didnt like any men that liked his daughter.

Later on, the author gets to the time when her father just died. Miss Emily felt so alone that she decided to keep her dead fathers body in the house, and not let anyone take him away from her. After the neighbors kept coming to the city council and complaining about the fowl smell that was coming from miss Emilys house, the judge sent a few men to put lime around the house to kill the smell. As the reader later finds out, the smell was coming from miss Emilys fathers decaying body. Finely the authorities took the dead body out of the house and buried it.

As the story goes on, the reader is told that the town was being renovated, streets being paved and such. With the renovators, came a young man, by the description, he was a handsome young man. The town kept talking as they always did, gossiping about miss Emily and after Homer Barron and miss Emily were started being seen together, the town thought they were going to get married. Unfortunate for miss Emily, Homer Barron enjoyed the company of men. After find this out, miss Emily came to a drug store and ordered their strongest poison. When the druggist asked her what she needed it for, she refused to say.

After that, the town thought that poor miss Emily was going to kill herself. As the renovations were complete, the streets paved, miss Emily and Homer Barron were still seen riding together but one night Homer Barron left and didnt return for some time. The town once again felt bad for Emily that the one man that she finely liked and spent her time with has left her. After a while Homer Barron returned and one night, as he came to miss Emilys house he was never seen again. Years passed, miss Emily became sick and her hair started turning gray. Then finely, the author comes back to where he left off in the beginning.

Miss Emily died and the authorities went into her house. As the writer tells the reader, before her death and after Homer Barrons disappearance, the second floor of the house was completely off limits to everyone. Later, when the officials came into her house, they went to the second floor and finely revealed the mystery. As they went up to the second floor, they forced open a door that was locked for some time. When they entered, they saw a beautiful room. In that room they saw mans clothing nicely folded on the chair and on the bed, they saw a dead body.

By the looks of it, the body was there for quite some time. Next to the body, they saw there was enough room for a second person. On the pillow there was a dent, as if someone had slept there recently and on that pillow they found a strand of gray hair. The author chose to tell the story his way and not in order, sort of jumbled up the events, telling the story jumping from one point in time to another. I believe that the story was written this way to keep the suspense alive so the reader will want to read more of the story.

Progress in A Rose for Emily

The old South was a place where the town ruled. People were full of gossip and Southern hospitality. The town was very close. Socializing and church going was fashionable and those who did not take part were outcast. This was the time Emily lived. “A Rose for Emily” was about a woman who could not deal with progress. Emily attempted to keep herself from the town, taxes and shock of love. First, there was the town who had always respected Emily and kept distant from her.

Yet, there was a time when she was young and part of the world where she was contemporary. She was “A slender figure in white,” as contrasted with her father, who was described as “a spraddled silhouette (West 150). ” After the death of her father she became distant and aloof. Emily could not accept the death of her father. She denied it to the townspeople for three days. “Just as they were about to resort to law and force. She broke down, and they buried her father quickly (Brooks 158). ” Emily refused t acknowledge her father’s death.

Everyone in the town thought she had gone mad. Emily remained in voluntary isolation (or perhaps fettered by some inner compulsion away from the bustle and dust and sunshine of the human world of normal affairs) (Brooks 158). Even through all her mysterious actions the society still respected her. She represented something in the past of the community (Brooks 158) and they kept their distance. Next, was the confrontation that Miss Emily had when taxes were collected from her. Emily seemed to get focused and act level headed.

She was obviously a woman of tremendous firmness of will. She was utterly composed. Emily refused to believe that she owned any taxes. When the mayor protested, she did not recognize him as mayor. Instead, she refered the committee to Colonel Sartoris, who had been dead for nearly ten years. To Miss Emily the Colonel was still alive (Brooks 158). Miss Emily almost seemed normal. She insisted on meeting the world on her own terms. She never cringed, or begged for sympathy. Emily refused to shrink into an amiable old maid.

She never accepted the community’s ordinary judgments or values (Brooks 159). Yet, when she referred to the Colonel it proved how mad she had become. Finally, was the mysterious love Emily had. She was the town aristocrat; Homer was the day laborer. Emily was a raised with Southern gentility, while Homer was from the North and a Yankee. The South was the old and the North was the new. It had appeared that Homer had won her over, as though reality had triumphed over her withdrawal and seclusion (West 149).

Emily’s denial of emotional love and her act of murdering Homer, let him enter into the fantasy world she retreated to (O’Conner 152). the living Emily and the dead Homer remained together and death could not separate them. Emily had conquered time, but only breifly by retreating into it (West 150). Emily was with Homer to live in their fantasy world, permanently. Therefore, the world that Emily lived in was her own. Emily attempted to keep herself from the town, taxes, and the shock of love. She succeeded and went to live happily in her fantasy world of the past.

A Rose for Emily: Fallen from Grace

A comparative essay on the use of symbolism in William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily. ” Authors traditionally use symbolism as a way to represent the sometimes intangible qualities of the characters, places, and events in their works. In his short story “A Rose for Emily,” William Faulkner uses symbolism to compare the Grierson house with Emily Grierson’s physical deterioration, her shift in social standing, and her reluctancy to accept change. When compared chronologically, the Grierson house is used to symbolize Miss Emily’s physical attributes.

In its prime, the Grierson house is described s “white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies” (Faulkner 69). This description suggests that the house was built not only for function, but also to impress and engage the attention of the other townspeople. Similarly, the wealthy women of the era, Emily Grierson not withstanding, were dressed in a conspicuous manner. This, for the most part, is because their appearance was perceived as a direct reflection on their husbands and/or fathers.

This display of extravagance was egotistically designed by men to give an impression of wealth to onlookers. Emily was regarded by her father as property. Her significance to him was strongly ornamental, just as their overly lavish home was. As the plot progresses, the reader is clearly made aware of the physical decline of both the house and Miss Emily. Just as the house is described as “smelling of dust and disuse,” evidence of Emily’s own aging is given when her voice in similarly said to be “harsh, and rusty, as if from disuse” (70-74).

Ultimately, at the time of Emily’s death, the house is seen by the townspeople as “an eyesore among eyesores,” and Miss Emily is regarded as a “fallen monument” (69). Both are mpty, and lifeless. Neither are even remotely representative of their former splendor. Just as their physical characteristics, Faulkner uses the Grierson house as a symbol for Miss Emily’s change in social status. In its prime, the house was “big,” and “squarish,” and located on Jefferson’s “most select street” (69).

This description gives the reader the impression that the residence was not only extremely solid, but also larger than life, almost gothic in nature, and seemingly impervious to the petty problems of the common people. The members of the Grierson family, especially Emily, were also considered to be strong and owerful. The townspeople regarded them as regal. And Emily, as the last living Grierson, came to symbolize her family’s, and possibly the entire south’s, rich past.

The townspeople’s reveration of Emily soon decayed, however, once it was rumored that she was left no money, only the house, in her father’s will. Also, her scandalous appearances with Homer Barron further lessened her reputation in the public eye. And, perhaps inevitably, the prestige and desirability of the Grierson house fell right along side Miss Emily’s diminishing name. Perhaps the most significant comparison occurs when the Grierson house s used to symbolize Emily Grierson’s unwillingness to accept change. Emily Grierson held tightly to her family’s affluent past.

A good example of this occurred when representatives were sent to her home to collect her delinquent taxes. She completely rejected her responsibility to the town by referring the men to a time when the since departed mayor, Colonel Sartoris, “remitted her taxes” (70). Miss Emily and the house show further examples of their disregard for progress when Emily denies the Grierson house a number, and a mailbox, just as Emily herself refused to be labeled or to be associated with anything as odernistic and common as a mailbox.

Even when she was left “alone, a pauper,” and “humanized,” she absolutely refused to be viewed with pity (72). In fact she “demanded more than ever the recognition of her dignity as the last Grierson” (73). Likewise, just as Emily held herself “a little too high” for what she was, the house is presented as “Lifting its stubborn and Coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and gasoline pumps” (69). The cotton wagons and gasoline pumps in this description are undoubtedly used to symbolize what Emily must surely see as the mostly unimportant and purposeless townspeople.

This single comparison by itself provides indisputable evidence that Emily Grierson and her family’s house are strongly related with one another. So, it should now be obvious to the analytical reader that the relationship between the Grierson house’s and Miss Emily Grierson’s, physical deterioration, shift in social standing, and reluctancy to accept change, is too precise to be construed coincidental. It is precisely this open usage of symbolism, and expert utilization of foreshadowing that earned both William Faulkner and “A Rose for Emily” their places among the classics.

Miss Emily Grierson

After the Civil War, many Confederate soldiers returned home and founded nothing and many had no place to stay. Many people that God was punishing them for all the sins that they had done to the blacks. But many other Southerners refuse to accept that they were defeated by the Union. Instead, they thought that God spared them for something more important. So, they thought of the war as a lost cause and they interpreted it as a stepping stone to the South’s salvation. This is the feeling in Mississippi where ” A Rose for Emily,” takes place.

In, ” A Rose for Emily,” Miss Emily portrays the Old South, not wanting to give up on the good old times. As the people of Jefferson portrays how the South wants to move on to bigger and better things. Miss Emily Grierson lives in the pasted, and she did not want ot change at all. As time and things change, Miss Emily stayed the same. She was so much like the Old South that she had a black as a servant. Many people thought of her as,” a tradition, a duty, and a care; sort of hereditary obligation upon the town. “(Faulkner 73) That is why she did not have to pay any taxes.

The Mayor of Jefferson in 1894, Colonel Satoris declared that she did not have to pay taxes. But as time pass and new generations of mayors came they tried to maker pay her taxes. Miss Emily refuse, she says, “I have no taxes in Jefferson. “(Faulkner 73) This how Miss Emily impersonate the Old South. She refuses to forget about the past as did the South and does not want to accept the fact that things are changing. After the defeat of the South in the Civil War, many people would not accept the changes that comes with defeat. Many people would fight to preserve as much of their past in the South as the victors of the North would allow.

This is how Miss Emily felt when her father and Homer died. She did not want to accept the fact that her father was dead, and when the ladies tried to come to condole her, she said ” her father was not dead. “(Faulkner 75) Another way she tried to sustain the past was when Homer died. After Homer death, instead of her burying him and moving on with her life, she tried to preserve him as well. She kept his body up stairs in a room and for years slept with Homer’s body. Miss Emily was trying to remember the good times that Homer and her had and did not want to give that up.

The Major Years: Isolation and Emily Grierson – A Deadly Combination

William Faulkner, one of the most famed writers of our times, explores in his writing the themes of alienation and isolation. He interweaves these themes with his female characters. In A Rose for Emily, Miss Emily Grierson is a woman who is alienated and lives in isolation from the people in her town. The theme of isolation is the focal point of the story, since it is what drove her to her madness. Faulkner’s theme of alienation comes up many times in his writing. In the book The Major Years, Melvin Backman states that Faulkner was reaching for a more decent life and more decent people in the midst of evil.

He was reaching or love, innocence, simplicity, and strength, but he also knew that these things were being hidden by reality. “With Faulkner, as with all men, the personal condition underlay and shaped his view of the human condition” (Backman, p. 183). The critic goes on to note that men in Faulkner’s works tend to undermine women and their roles in society. Women are oppressed and are usually controlled by men. The women try to fight the men in their society and are trying to find a way to escape from their grasps.

They are hesitant to stand up to the men and instead they tend to hide away. Backman notes that, “The will to onfront reality seems to be losing out to the need to escape”(p. 184). Miss Emily is a woman who had the whole town wondering what she was doing, but did not allow anyone the pleasure of finding out. Once the men that she cared about in life deserted her, either by death or by simply leaving her, she hid out and did not allow anyone to get close to her. Miss Emily was indeed afraid to confront the reality that Backman discusses.

Since she did not want to accept the fact that the people she cared about were gone, she hid in her house and did not go out. She was the perfect example of a woman alienated by a ociety controlled by men who make trouble for her instead of helping her. Minrose Gwin, author of The Feminine and Faulkner, states that several of Faulkner’s female characters, including Emily Grierson, are “indeed active disruptive subjects in their narratives; theirs are voices which denounce and subvert male power”(Gwin, p. 8).

They do what they do , such as killing Homer Barron in Emily’s case, because they are tired of men telling them what to do. Gwin further states that the patriarchal world creates its own images of women. Emily tried to challenge these images by not being what the men in her ociety would consider “normal. ” The men felt that all women should tend to their homes and be sociable, not locked up in a house with a manservant to clean it. They also felt that it was not right for a man to be doing that kind of work; it was a woman’s job to clean the house. Just as if a manany mancould keep a kitchen properly,’ the ladies said; so they were not surprised when the smell developed.

It was another link between the gross, teeming world and the high and mighty Griersons”(p. 26). Backman, paraphrasing Wright Morris in The Territory Ahead, says that light and nostalgia are essential to American life, “The American flees the raw and uncongenial present for a mythic and desired past”(Backman, p. 185). This perfectly summarizes Emily’s character because she is trying to leave the present and go back to a happier past.

She is attempting to recapture her past because she needs to find the love she once knew. “After her father’s death she went out very little; after her sweetheart went away, people hardly saw her at all”(p. 26). Emily alienated herself from anyone when the two people that once loved her went away. She was afraid to grow close to anyone in fear of losing hem again. Emily was a headstrong woman that seemed frail and weak, but was instead very strong.

She had the whole town convinced that she could not hurt a fly, but instead she was capable of the worst of crimes, murder. “Faulkner’s works convey a deep sense of oppression and withdrawal, yet they convey too the struggle with self and society. In the midst of defeat and despair a small center of resistance resides”(Backman, p. 186). Emily, in the middle of all the alienation and isolation she felt from the residents of her town, also found the resistance to show them she was not someone to be taken lightly.

Influence Of Traditional Ways

The story of A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner, is written with the influence of traditional ways and attitudes of the old South with true insight. Faulkner, a writer brought up in the South, displays the upbringing and lifestyles of people in a town called Jefferson. The story reflects the life of Emily Grierson who too, is a southern woman. Her upbringing by a stern father leads to her slow journey through a secluded life to her death and shows how following the traditions of her father leads her to a life of pain.

Faulkners theme then is how clinging on to the past can harm you when all other surrounding aspects of life are changing. To understand Faulkner’s theme, one must understand the characters. As the female protagonist, Emily is an example of a bygone era. She is from an upper class where family name is venerated and is to be maintained at almost any cost. Faulkner emphasizes this many times by saying She carried her head high enough… as if she demanded more than ever the recognition of her dignity as the last Grierson. (469) and … and the high and mighty Griersons. 67)

In the end of the story officials do not pursue her lovers disappearance for the exact reason that they do not force her to pay taxes which is also the reason Emily does not rebel against her father and his wishes. This is all due to the fact that she is a Grierson. Faulkner also states that none of the young men were quite good enough for Miss Emily and such. (468) Her father, under the appearance of protection which is actually control, chases away all of her suitors, not because they are not good enough, but so that he may keep her for his own housekeeper.

Faulkner gives a description of Emily and then says … and about the eye sockets as you imagine a light house-keepers face ought to look. (469) Emily still clings to her father and his customs long after his death. She did not handle his death well as he was the only entity she had. For three days she denied that her father was dead and only after persuasions of doctors and ministers did she let the body be disposed of. We remembered all the young men her father had driven away, and we knew that with nothing left, she would have to cling to that which had robbed her… 68)

Emily had never rebelled against her fathers wishes and now was left alone with no suitors and a vague understanding of the society which had changed so much around her. Her father left her with nothing but what used to be a important ornate house on a fashionable street, which is now an eyesore as the town has matured around the home. Her behavior towards the taxes and her archaic (466) letter written in flowing calligraphy in faded ink(466) begins to demonstrate how outdated she is.

She tells the next generation(466) mayor and aldermen to speak to Colonel Sartoris while little does she know that he has been dead almost ten years. Also Miss Emily is harming herself when she refused to let them (the newer generation) fasten the metal numbers above her door and attach a mailbox to it. (471) as she is not keeping up with the times. Faulkner makes many references to members of the rising generation (467) and the newer generation (471) which makes us recall how outdated Miss Emily in fact is.

To further cling to the past, when Emilys last opportunity of matrimony is deserted, she poisons Homer Barron to preserve the only life that her father allowed her to experience. She also coheres to the past while sleeping with a rotting corpse for decades until her own death, not knowing any better. This is evidently a result of her binding to the tradition so deeply rooted in her fathers customs. She is never seen out in public which was to be expected as if the quality of her father which had thwarted her womans life so many times had been too virulent and too furious to die. 71)

Miss Emilys lifestyle never changes with the times and she grows tremendously obese and her hair a vigorous iron-grey (471) color while her Negro servant grew grayer and more stooped while his voice had grown harsh and rusty from disuse. (472) until she finally dies in a heavy walnut bed(472). Even when she lays at the funeral, her father and his traditions are still close to her with the crayon face musing profoundly above the bier. (472) After her fathers death, Miss Emily is left to continue life in future generations with the same opinions and attitudes about society that her father had left with her.

She has been kept from the outer world and is a prisoner of time thus her clinging to her past has harmed her to the extent that it ruined her life. The whole town went to the funeral, the men through sort of a respectful affection for a fallen monument, the women mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house. (465) It was only after her body had been properly buried, that Faulkner gives us complete insight to Miss Emilys failed attempt at life and lets us see the degree to which her fathers outdated traditions ruin her life and tarnish her family name.

A Rose For Emily Paper

Emily is a woman that has had a hard life. Her family made it so that she was held in high regard in the public eye. She was not suppose to encounter relationships that were below her stature. The town, being the antagonist, drives Emily to her insanity because they will not allow her to lead a normal life. They liked the show they were watching a refused to give it up.

The narrator explores how Emily is defined in her position in the town by her name and her father. People in our town, [. . . ], believed the Griersons held themselves a little too high for what they really were. pg. 3) Emilys father had been controlling during her early life and had stopped all suitors from visiting her. we had all remembered all the young men her father had driven away, [. . . ] (pg. 84) Emily is forced to live in a house were her father will is paramount to her own. When he dies we understand this lose is almost to much for her to bear. Miss Emily met them at the door, dressed as usual with no trace of grief on her face. She told them her father was not dead. (pg. 84)

The denial of her fathers death is explained by the narrator: and we new that with nothing left, she would have to cling to that which had robbed her, as people will. pg. 84) The narrator also explores the way in which the towns people define Miss Emily as a tradition, a duty, and a care, [. . . ] (pg. 81) This definition is narrowly drawn. Her rank is one of the representatives of those August names, [. . . ] (pg. 81) When she begins her relationship with Homer Barron, his name shows irony because he is described as a northerner, a day laborer, (pg. 84) the towns people are appalled.

Then some of the ladies began to say it was a disgrace to the town and a bad example to the young eople. (pg. 6) The towns people go as far as to send the Baptist preacher, the towns moral leader, to chastise Emily regarding this relationship. Emily refutes this chastisement and quickly flaunts her relationship with Homer. The next Sunday they again drove about the streets, [. . . ] (pg. 86) Having been rebuked, the ministers wife enlists the aid of Emilys cousins to pressure Emily back into the role they feel she should play. They do arrive at which time Emily buys poison. The towns people feel placadid after Emily buys the arsenic. So the next day we all said, She will kill herself, and e said it would be the best thing.

The towns people it seems would have Emily play by their rules as have been defined by tradition and duty or commit suicide. Emily at first tries to break away from the defined role after her father dies by establishing a relationship with Homer Barron. When she sees how the community reacts she is torn between maintaining her stature and connecting to man in a relationship. This conflict ultimately leads her to madness. She buys the arsenic not to kill herself but to kill Homer Barron. However, she cannot bear to relinquish their relationship and so eeps his corpse in her bed where she has murdered him.

Her denial for death which is foreshadowed in her fathers comes into play here as she is able to play her societal role while keeping her sweetheart forever in her bed. As you can see because of her father, her social stature, and the town she was driven to insanity. Without all of these variables Emily might have been able to lead a normal life. Living up to others expectations is not an easy thing to do. We can all learn a lesson from Emily, living up to others expectations is not as important than the happiness of our own.

Miss Emily Grierson’s

Miss Emily still represented and stood for the beliefs of the Old South while the New south generation stood back and allowed her to bask in this illusion According to a prominent critic, Elizabeth Sabiston, Emily is a gothic character (142). Sabiston is referring to Emily that way because of the fact that she slept with the skeleton of her lover for forty years. Miss Emily added a mystical tone the mood of the story due to her incapability of being able to live in reality (Watson 180).

She was awfully stubborn to the townspeople. This stubbornness also ties in with Emily’s ability to live in reality. After she refuses to Nichols 2 pay her taxes, directly to the mayor, she tells them to go and see Colonel Satoris, who has been dead for ten years. This portrays that Emily’s illusion of reality was greatly distorted ( Arthur Voss, a notable critic compares Miss Emily Grierson to the outstanding Mrs.

Havisham of the famous story by Dickens, “Great Expectations. ” Both are motivated by their lovers, isolate themselves in old decaying houses, and refuse to recognize that time has passed. Both characters are proud, disdainful, and independent (Voss 249). This comparison shows the importance of characterization Miss Emily who shuts herself from the world around her and doesn’t want any contact with it.

When the town saw her, a while after her father’s death, she was described as “sort of tragic and serene” (77), which represents the condition of the south at that time, and even when the modern times were coming around and a “newer generation became the backbone and the spirit of the town” (79), the south, or Miss Emily, remained the same, locking herself in the past: ” the front door closed upon the last one[painting student] and remained closed for good” (79). Miss Emily wouldn’t even allow the smallest changes to occur, such as putting metal numbers on her door.

Miss Emily’s “Negro” servant grew ” grayer and more stooped” (79), aging with her in the old southern setting Miss Emily Grierson’s struggle with her family, her town, and herself makes her do things that are out of the “norm. ” Her struggle makes her act inhuman and deranged. Emily is a living a very sheltered life. This struggle between “an individual and the society that attempts to restrict her” (Brooks & Warren 158) would be unbearable for Miss Emily. This is what ultimately leads to her downfall Because her father blocked her from the outside world, Emily became dependent.

A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner

The story A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner in my opinion was a very interesting story. The story was about a old and troubled woman named Emily Grierson who because of her father’s death had become one of the towns obligation’s and also one of it’s problems. Emily a very stubborn old lady who refused to pay her taxes because of a little tale that Colonel Sartoris who was the mayor at the time had told her. He told her that her father had lent the town some money and because of it in a way of paying her back all of her taxes were remitted.

Faulkner portrayed Emily’s character to be very Stubborn and by the end made people think she was crazy. He develops this through many things but the main thing was by her actions to different situations and the way she lived her life This essay is going to talk about the things she said, did and about what other people said about her. Emily Grierson’s is an old lady who is very stubborn. Faulkner manages to show this through different events that happen in the story and how she reacts towards them. One of the events that happened was when Emily received a tax notice in the mail telling her that she has to pay her taxes.

At this point in time Colonel Sartoris had been dead and there was no recollection in the cities files of what he had told her. Because she had refused to send any money to pay her taxes an alderman had shown up at her door to settle the situation. When he told her she had to pay her taxes Emily simply said “I have no taxes in Jefferson. “(Faulkner, 142) The gentleman continued insisting that she pay her taxes. Emily believed so much that she was right that she continued to say “see Colonel Sartoris. I have no taxes in Jefferson. ” (Faulkner, 143) This was the first time Faulkner showed how stubborn Emily could be.

She told the alderman to leave and that was the end of it. The second incident that showed Emily was stubborn and a little crazy was when she went to that pharmacy to buy some poison. “I want some poison” “I want the best you have. I don’t care what kind. ” (Faulkner, 145) This gave me the impression that she was a little crazy and that it was possible that she was dangerous. It also showed me that she could be very demanding. Emily did many things that made her character seem stubborn and crazy. When she received the tax notices in the mail she simply through them into the garbage or mailed them right back without response.

This showed us how stubborn she was. Miss Emily would manage to make her self disappear for a certain period of time. This would cause people to talk because no one would know where she was or what she was doing. At the end of the story when the town people were walking around her house they finally found what had caused her house to smell as bad as it did. It was Homer Baron. He was laid down on a bed that was in a locked room. This was when they knew she was crazy because she murdered her one lover that she ever had. People in this town liked to gossip a lot about Miss Emily.

When she went to buy the poison from the pharmacy, the town was convinced she was going to kill herself and that she was crazy. When her father had died people called and dropped by the house to give Miss Emily their condolences. For three years she told them that he was not dead and that he was still alive. She refused for her father’s body to be disposed. The town thought she was crazy. One of the things they talked a lot about was Miss Emily’s servant that worked for her. They made racial comments about him for example when Miss Emily’s house started giving off some sort odor.

People started complaining to a judge named Judge Stevens about the smell. All he could say was “It’s probably a snake or a rat that Niger of hers killed in the yard” One lady who complained accused Miss Emily of smelling bad. Miss Emily was pitied throughout the town because she wasn’t married. The reason for this was because every time a man wanted to have something to do with Emily her father would scare them away. When Emily started seeing Homer Baron people started to talk. “She will marry him” and “She will persuade him yet” people would say.

Critique On A Rose For Emily

A Rose for Emily is a very popular short story because of its, style , climax, and plot. The author, William Faulkner, was a Southern writer from Oxford, Mississippi. FAulkner bases this story on the tale of Oxford’s aristrocratic Miss Mary Neilson. She married Captain jack Hume, the charming yankee foreman of a street-paving crew, over her family’s shocked protests. The style of this story is false romance. Miss Emily’s father, before his death, would run off every man that tried to court her. Because of this, she felt any man she loved would leave her. After falling in love with Homer Baron, she feared he would run off like the others.

To keep this from happening, she poisoned him and kept his body upstairs in the bedroom. The climax focuses on the room where the corpse was found. After Miss Emily’s death, the town people were cleaning up the house and found a room that was locked. They had to break down the door. To their surprise, they found Homer Baron’s corpse lying in the bed dressed in a night shirt. As the story progresses there is no indication that he had died. When they found the toilet things sitting on the dresser with initials H. B. , it was well known that the corpse was Homer Baron.

I first thought it was her father in the bed, then I realized that her father was already buried. I then knew it had to be her lover. I cringed on the thought of what she did while she was lying next to the corpse. Finally, the end of this story surrounds a woman’s life from her mid twenties until her death at the age of seventy-four. It describes a prominent lady of a town who led a private life. I learned, while reading this story that this woman is crazy and had the mind of a child. She seemed to lose everything she loved. Keeping the body of the individual she loved was her eay of not feeling so alone.

A Rose for Emily – the story, Faulkner

In times of distress, trauma and uncertainly, many people find a comfort in familiar surroundings, where they can close out the world and relax. This was certainly Emilys way of handling her trauma. All her life Emily tried to escape from change. Even the posting of the new mailbox was unacceptable for her. She acted as though nothing around her had changed her entire life. Even though death and loss affected her, she seemed to try to avoid thinking about it. Emily is unable to balance her traditions in modern times.

But, the roots of her tragedy lay in the fact, that neither can the people who surround her in the town. In the story, Faulkner presents us with a sad tale of a lonely woman, who is only met with disappointment and grief in her search for love. Emily was a lonely woman. Miss Emily came from a powerful family. She had experienced a controlling love from her father. That love only demanded that she abide by his rules and his expectation of her in his lifetime. Her suitors were all sent away by her father.

After failing to marry, she lost the only person who was her family, her father. After her father died, she met Homer Barron, a Yankee, who was in the construction business in the town. Finally she had someone to love. They dated and possibly were happy with each other, but the traditions, customs and prejudices of the South doomed this affair to end. She could not allow this. Emily could not have lived with Homer, but she could not loose him, her only love. So she poisoned him with arsenic. She needed someone to love her eternally, and someone to love.

She did not have any family members to love and nurture, to turn to for love or support. The few family members she had thought she was crazy, but actually they were even more proud of their position in the society. They prohibited her relationship with Homer. They pushed her to do what she did. The town, the family, all the people were against her love. She could not have Homer alive. This is why she killed him.

This way he was hers, only hers, forever: Then we noticed that in the second pillow was an indentation of a head. . we saw a long strand of iron-gray hair. In this story, you can’t help but to feel sadness for the characters. Emily was born into position, which her family, particularly her father placed upon her. Her position was that of a Southern prominent family. It demanded that she marry well according to the Southern culture. Emilys position set her apart from the townspeople. In her mind, and in mind of the people in town, it became Emilys inherited duty to meet the obligations of that position.

Alone and lonely, with the stigma of her fallen position, Emily chose seclusion rather than to face the embarrassment she endured. The only connection she had with the townspeople was her noblesse oblige. Emily was caught up in that culture. Had Emily been a stronger person, she might have broken from the mold and lived out her own will, marring her love and being happy. But she was not that strong. She succumbed to the insanity that had crept upon her during the course of her life. The only roses Emily ever received during her sad and lonely life were those that were placed on her grave.

Rose For Emily By Faulkner

“A Rose for Emily” is one of William Faulkners famous stories. The antagonist of it is Miss Emily Grierson, which was forced by her dominating and repressive father to grow up alone. She was raised to adhere to a certain standards. So, she stocked with the old souths rules. Miss Emily was raised with the belief that no man was suitable for her. And her father is the cause of her superior feeling. After her fathers death, she wanted to live her life her way, but every body in the town including the authorities make her feel that er life of living is unacceptable, and that based on old south and new south traditions and beliefs.

Her relation ship with the Colonel Sartoris to make her exempt from paying taxes is suspicious. But, he did not realize that once he is gone, there would be some one else to put her in the right track. Miss Emily tried to do some changes in her life when Homer showed up. But her feeling of loosing him made her start with a plan that kept him close until her death. Many analysts give attention to the story since the first time published. Petry entioned two reasons for making “A Rose for Emily” a special. First, the disordered chronology, Second the end of the story which is definitely a shocking ending to every reader.

So we can see how the narrator starts off telling that Miss Emily was dead and everyone in the town went to her funeral. Then, he went back to tell about Emilys life, which ended by killing Homer and keeping his body in the “bridal bed. ” (52-54) Loneliness can be a terrible thing to prey on someones mind. Apparently no man was good enough for Emily, that why she never got married and was by self Her father gone and ow she is alone, even though she still have Tobe to help her with the market and other chores. Then, the foreman Homer Barron showed up in her life.

He was sent by the Construction Company to pave the sidewalks. But, his job did not finish there. He is the only one left, a northerner that would love her despite of all the southerners who were scared of her weird family. Truly, Homer can not give her what she is looking for neither did her father. The need for companionship is the basis of courting Homer Barron. When the work finished and Homer left town, Miss Emily was once again alone. And the insanity began to set in. Even though her cousins stay with her for a short while, this is not what Emily wants.

When Homer came back, her chance for everlasting companionship was available. So, she killed him to secure the fact that she will always have him by her side, and she will never be alone again. Blythe think that the most provocative aspect in the story is the motive in killing Homer Barron. And he suggested that homosexuality is the reason for Emily to poison him. Homer himself said that he only like men, and whether this means he is gay as his last ame would imply, or he simply is just like to be around men, he will not settle down.

Emily could not stand the thought of loosing another man; she wanted to save face, her pride, and loneliness (49-50). In the other hand, Wallace mentioned in one of his articles that he denied the knowing that Homer Barron is a gay, because he is wandering how the narrator know all of the details in the story. Beside that, he did not get to write about Emily until fifty years passed, which will make every thing he says is suspect. The narrator just wants to trap us (105-107). Miss Emily is a southern lady.

She was raised to adhere to certain standards by stocking to the old souths rules. She locked herself in her house and refused to see any one but her servant. She represents the past south (a fallen monument). In the story we can see how Miss Emily tried her best to keep the southern tradition, she write on “note paper of an archaic shape” in “faded ink. ” After her fathers death, she kept him for three days maybe because he was the only symbol of the south that left for her. She told the tax collectors to go and ask Colonel Sartoris to explain why she is xempt.

Even though, he had died long time ago (Kurtz). By looking at Schwae work in analyzing “Rose for Emily”, we see that he think the watch in the golden chain is the symbol of time. It is in her pocket and not pinned to her, so she can have a total control of time. She thinks that any changing in time will involve a loss. The loud sound of watch ticking will never let her forget about her duty to stop time and stay in the past (512-517). In the story we noticed that there was an unclear relationship between Miss Emily and all men that the narrator mentioned.

As Curry says we do not know exactly what happened after the Baptist minister visited her (397-402). Even the Negro manservant who lived with Miss Emily left. There was something needs to be cleared about his leaving the scene after some curious lady came to visit. Carry thinks that Tobe has some important information, but since he was an African-American, the narrator considered his information insignificant (397-402). Even though Tobe is minor character in the story, he might be the one who killed Homer to protect Miss Emily from further humiliation that started when her father was alive.

Pretty much any idea is possible since the author did not give clues to the death of either man. I feel sad about Miss Emily; every thing in her life was not fair. Is it her problem to have a measurable life as a child? Is it her fault to have maybe a mentally sick father? I think Miss Emily is a victim of her society. I do not blame her, because I really can not feel what she went through. Even the narrator is not close enough to her to explain exactly how she feels. Her life was translated by others feelings and from their point of view.

Short story, A Rose For Miss Emily

In a story, we have two circumstances: The first is what happened in the story, and the second, is why did this event occur. The plot helps define the story with a series of events that are arranged in a certain order. The main character, usually the protagonist, is also very important to the story. In this particular short story, A Rose For Miss Emily, the author, William Faulkner, uses the main character Emily to set up the plot. The focus is on the end of this short story, and the events that lead to the dramatic conclusion. Emily has murdered her former lover and has kept his decayed body in her house.

The corpse is located in a room that has long since been transformed into a tomb. This tomb has not changed in decades. Faulkner then proceeds in hinting that Emily has been sleeping with the fleshless body of Homer Barron. After the reader finishes the story, he or she goes back and pulls out events that lead to the conclusion. The reader must ask himself several questions to substantiate these events, such as: Miss Emilys motivation for killing Homer, the identification of Homer Barron, and whether Miss Emily was sleeping with this dead Yankee?

Faulkners introduction of Homer Barron is an essential event in the movement of the plot. He portrays Homer as Emilys lover, and develops his character with her life. Emily and Homer are seen together on a yellow wheeled buggy, riding through town. This scene makes Homer an important character by showing how their relationship together is causing gossip in the town. Then, Homer mysteriously disappears from Emilys life: So we were not surprised when Homer Barron–the streets had been finished some time since–was gone. He just vanished.

Therefore, the disappearance of Homer Barron answers the question of whose body was found in the tomb. Another important event was when Emily bought rat poison. Emily goes into the store and asks to buy poison. When the store owner inquires about Emilys motives for the poison, she gives no response and simply implies: I want the best you have. I dont care what kind (78). She just stares at the man, scaring him into giving her the rat poison. At the end of the story, the reader finally understands the reasons why Emily bought the poison and how she murders Homer.

These events start tying the story together to help move it towards developing a more dramatic plot. The first things to stand out about Emily is her prestigious family, and her house. The reader also knows that there is a bizarre odor coming from her house. The townspeople confer about this current situation and ponder: Will you accuse a lady to her face of smelling bad. Some men than slunk around like burglars spreading lime around the house. The lime was used to cut out the smell.

At first, when the reader comes across this event in the story, it does not seem too significant. However, looking back after finishing the story, the reader realizes that this stench was coming from the rotting corpse inside the house. This strange smell becomes a key asset to the development of the plot. Those were just three events that move the reader ahead to the conclusion. They were main events that were important and clear to the reader. Then, there were smaller events and expectations that gave clues in this short story.

One of these clues is discovered in the numerous conversations, between the townspeople, concerning Emilys family history: People in our town, remembering how old lady Wyatt, her great Aunt, had gone completely crazy at last. This reveals that insanity was prevalent in the Grierson family. Emilys condition of craziness lends evidence to the question of why she sleeps with a dead body, and what may have motivated her into committing a violent crime. Lastly, there is the mention of Emily growing older and her hair getting grayer and grayer until it attained an even pepper-and-salt iron gray.

One would first think that Faulkner is using imagery to help the reader create a mental picture of Emilys looks. However, at the end of the story, we find that this description is one more clue that fills the plot, and draws a conclusion. We can interpret the meaning of the iron gray hair lying on the pillow as Miss Emilys continuation to sleep with Homer Barron. Emilys hereditary insanity, her purchase of the poison, and the peculiar odor coming from her house, were extremely important events. All of these events, that seemed obscure while reading the story, really tie together and make the plot more tense.

Emily’s Rose Essay

Emily lives in the small town of Jefferson. Jefferson is a town where her family has lived for generations, and where her family is known to have held themselves a little to high for what they were; so they were treated as such. Emily is kept home by her father and almost hidden from the entire town; the gentlemen callers who dared come calling for Miss Emilys hand were only vanquished by her father. They were not of social standing to be permitted her time and company. In her fathers eyes Emily was the last to continue their noblesse oblige duty as a Grierson.

I believe that Emily couldnt escape her familys fate because of her father and her townspeople. Even if Emily wanted to shed the family reputation, she couldnt. The town would never have accepted her as anything, but a Grierson. Even as the generations change, Emilys family reputation is still known. Years of solitude couldnt change her reputation. Emily obviously lived a sad and lonely life. Her father had taken every hope for love from her because of the regarded August name.

I believe because of her fathers death and the sweetheart who deserted her, she realized that she had one last chance to form a new life, and she had a new chance for love (or just companionship). When she reappears after the burial of her father, she has a new look of a young girl. I believe this was Emilys attempt to become part of the town, rather then a tradition, a duty, and a care. During this time she meets Homer, a Northerner, who she is seen riding throughout town on Sunday afternoons with her.

Emily (seeing a man not from her town feels) knows that this is her last hope for companionship. Courting Homer, which was undignified for a Grierson, was her only way to fill her void of the loss of her father and sweetheart. Yet even in this fabricated attempt she still demands recognition as the last Grierson. Its like that old saying, You can take a boy out of the city, but you cant take the city out of a boy. Miss Emily Grierson will always hold that obligation in her stature. However, I dont believe Homer Barron sees Emily as a potential mate.

I think he felt sorry for her and was only being kind out of pity. As stated, He was not a marrying man and remarked he himself liked men. I believe Homer Barron is gay, and to put it simply in todays lingo, hes a player. One can infer that Miss Emily heard the talk around town, small towns and gossip go hand in hand, about Homes sexuality. I believe this is where the demented intensions arouse. I think when Homer returned to Emily, she asked him to marry her, but I think Homer refused. His intensions I believe were only friendship.

Faulkner uses the color Yellow twice in this story when showing Miss Emily and Homer together. Yellow is a color of friendship or uncertainty. For example, pregnant women receive yellow items for the unborn baby, and yellow roses are given as symbol of friendship. Hence the use of Yellow and Roses in A Rose For Emily. Emily has always been ruled by, and depended on men to protect, defend and act for her. Her father, who nurtured, protected, and loved her (in an odd way), to the Negro servant, Tobe, who fed and sheltered her from the outside world. And then there is Homer Barron, who gives her hope.

Emilys rose briefly re-blooms for Homer, but in the end it fades and dies as she didleaving only a lingering fragrance and dusty petals. Faulkner planted only five roses in this story, and within Miss Emilys life she had lost four men. I believe the roses that Faulkner planted were for each of the men Miss Emily lost. The first rose I believe was for her dead father. The second rose was for the sweetheart who deserted her. The third rose for the men her father drove away. And the fourth (yellow) rose was for Homer Barron, who she preserves for everlasting love.

There it stays lain, forever a reminder in an embrace, frozen in time the sleep that outlasts love, as if it were tableau of Emilys tragic and serene desires for love, The man himself lay in the bed. Emily loved the only way she knew howthe way of the rosebeautiful on the outside, but sharp, harsh, and painful as the stem of thorns. By analyzing the significance of the roses in this story it is clear that the men are Emilys fallen roses. However Faulkner did plant one last rose, the rose for Miss Emily Grierson. I believe Faulkner was saying, roses are beautiful and given to show love or admiration by another.

When cared for and loved, roses are the most beautiful sight, but if neglected they can become ugly and spooky, just as Emily had. Her personality was prickly as a torn. Emily without doubt falters after her fathers demise. So poor Emily spends the rest of her life as a wilting, dying flower in which no winter ever quite touches. I think Faulkner gives Emily these roses throughout the story out of pity and obligation just as the town felt pity and obligated to Miss Emily, their fallen monument. Life can be sad and tragic, some of which is made for us, and some of which we make ourselves.

The famous story by William Faulkner

In the famous story by William Faulkner there is a lonely tale of a woman that is living out the better part of her life in a cage. The setting is in a southern town that may aid to the problems she faces. Her father is the type that did not approve of any contact from the men of the town so she was always being held back in the area of socialization. So she started out in a bad situation of not being a part of the community. Her father didn’t see it as proper for her to be as the others her age. The father figure is still a important symbol in her life though.

When he dies she doesn’t accept the fact that he is gone. Her father was the only real person in her life. She had relatives in Alabama but they were pushed away by her father over some land that was left behind by a crazy aunt. The relatives in Alabama were the only were all she had but the old wound inflicted by her father was not going to heal. Then the worst thing happens after her father is gone. The man that she was engaged to runs off and leaves her all alone. She didn’t ever recover form this, she isolated her self in her house.

The only person that saw her on a regular basis was a black man that brought her food when she needed it. The only man that her father must of approved of ran out on her. This must have been the breaking point for her. Loosing the two most important people in her life near the same time must have been unbearable for her. After these two events have passed the community attempts to reach out to her. When her father dies the women on the town try to comfort her but she is still in denial. Then the doctors are sent over and convince her and the body is buried.

The women try to further help her but to no prevail. She just will not let anyone into her life, but then one day she will. One day the unthinkable happens to poor Emily. A man who is in charge of building the new sidewalks comes to town. He is a northerner and a day labor superioeser, not a very respectable carrier. Despite that Emily falls for him and they hit it off. This must have been a hard thing to do for Emily. For one thing it is the first man in her life since her spouse and her father.

Faulkner did not relay go into much detail with the construction worker Homer Barron. Just that they were seen in a carriage riding back form church one Sunday. So time passes by and the sidewalks are finished, time for Homer to leave. Emily will not let another man walk of her life for a third time. From the town people’s point of view everything was fine. Emily went out and got some cloths and a grooming set for Homer. So it appeared everything was fine. But there is a twist, she goes to the drug store and purchases some serious rat poison for no reason. A sort time later Mr.

Barron was seen slipping in after sun set but never seen again. Emily led a sheltered and tormented life. With her father hanging over in her adolescent years totally controlling her life. Keeping her to a mold of how he thought she should be raised in. The thought of another man leaving her must have freaked her out and put her in this position. Mabey killing him was a bit rash, but she must have been really weirder out after all of that . plus the fact that there was insanity in her family may have contributed to that and what she did after she kills him.

This was just psycho, there is no better way to put it. I guess the cloths were to dress the corps and the grooming ideas were to keep him looking as handsome as the day he died. One thing that boggles me, how did she bear the smell that a rotting corps must have put off. I would think that it would be unbearable. This is a sad story that Faulkner has written. It depicts the hard ships that individual who has had so much loss is led to deal with all of her pain. Is it the right way or the wrong way, she just needed some kind of release.

The Reason the main character, Emily Grierson

The Reason the main character, Emily Grierson, in William Faulkners A Rose for Emily murdered her lover, Homer Barron, was a combined contribution of the society she lived in. The cousins snootiness and high expectations of the Grierson family legacy made it difficult for Emily and Homer to be together as a couple. The two female cousins were more Grierson than Miss Emily had ever been. (5) The cousins would keep Emily in line because they were more aristrocatic, therefore forcing Emily into keeping the family name pure by not eing with a labor worker who often got drunk and liked men.

The cousins had a talk with Emily, which drove Homer out for a short period of time. For fear of Homer leaving her, she ventured to the local pharmacy to purchase arsenic (then used as rat poison) for what she believed might be the only way to keep the man she loved from leaving her. Emilys father scared all her suitors away, believing that she was too good for all of them, which in turn left her single at a very old age. Emilys over-possessive, father traumatized her into believing that she would be alone all of her life.

The Patrimony of a man destroys Emily as her father smothers her with over-protectiveness. He prevents her from courting anymore (Internet 1). Her father never gave her the opportunity of a happy, joyful family life, which every person deserves. Her father never gave her the opportunity of a happy, joyful family life, which every person deserves. When her father died and she found someone she liked, she instantly became attached to this man and was not willing to let him go. Emily decides she will be vindictive, she will have her man(Internet 2).

Emily chose the first man possible in a sort of way to lash back at the father who never allowed her to have what she desired the most, companionship. With her father now deceased, she had complete freedom in choosing and keeping any suitor she found acceptable. Having never had the opportunity, Emily had no concept of how to treat and be a companion to the opposite sex. This would explain the unbreakable attachment to the first man who came along, Homer Barron. In a way she took what she could get at that moment thinking that there might never be nother chance for her again, therefore she settled for Homer Barron.

All of the towns pity, gossip, and assumptions about Emily and her family brought on more stress and insanity about keeping the Grierson name aristocratic and clean. In essence, she was living up to the family standards set by that of her local society. Her father and the townsfolk that see her as an untouchable idol perpetrate this dementia; the loneliness that they force her to endure is maddening (Internet 1). At times the town felt sorrow for her and had thoughts of consoling her but never actually put them into action. They always let her endure everything she was suffering on her own.

Although they no longer had any reason to be, the women of the town still felt a pang of jealousy towards her family aristocracy and history. The women, to satisfy their own consciences, acted as if they actually felt sympathy for Emily, where in all honesty, not a single one cared for her in any way. The town merely wanted to put up a false front. Homer Baron, who was very inconsiderate and casual about her past, contributed to his own murder. Homer Barron was a bi-sexual, Yankee, runk who was going to leave her after he had his way with her.

She knew this from the towns gossip and she was growing more and more insecure about Homer. We can imagine, however the outcome might have been had Homer Barron, who was not the marrying man, succeeded, in the towns eyes, in seducing her and then deserting her. (Short Story criticisms 150) Homer was seen drinking at the bar with men and it was known that he was interested in men. Homer was never really intending to stay long term with Emily. He was just a passer by who was only there for road construction.

And when she lost him she could see that for her that was the end of life, there was nothing left except to grow older, alone, solitary. (Internet 2) The thing she feared the most was being alone with no companion. Emily had endured all of this from her father too long and she was not going to stand for this. Emilys Insanity and loneliness drove her to murder her lover and keep him in a room where she could rest at ease that he would never leave her. Denied a normal Romantic and sexual life, Emily becomes unable to distinguish between reality and illusion (Modern fiction stories 687).

She was to the point where to her having a dead lover was more secure to her than having a live one who might leave her at any moment. She wanted security and she obtained it by killing Homer and sleeping with him every night. She wanted to keep time still. Emily had a problem with time. Emilys small room above the stairs has become that timeless meadow. In it, the living Emily and the dead Homer have remained together not even death could separate them. (Short Story Criticism 150) Even when her father died she was unwilling to accept his departure. She refused to have him buried.

Interpreting “A Rose for Emily”

William Faulkner (1897-1962) is known for his portrayals of the tragic conflict between the old and the new South. The majority of Faulkner’s works are centered on his hometown of Oxford, in Lafayette County, Mississippi. In his works of fiction, his hometown is used, but is renamed to Jefferson, in Yoknapatawpha County. This author’s fiction recreates more than a century of life in the town of Jefferson a few years before, during and after the Civil War. Many different types of people come into focus in his literature.

A Rose for Emily easily fits into Faulkner’s pattern of fiction writing. The present, or “new south” agenda was expressed several ways in A Rose for Emily; through the words of the narrator, the new Board of Aldermen, Homer Barron (the Yankee), and in what was called “the next generation with its more modern ideas” (354). This technique is not unusual for Faulkner. It is present in many of his works and that is why A Rose for Emily is easily interpreted.

In A Rose for Emily, Faulkner discussed those conflicting values of the past and present and point out those values that are misrepresented and those that continue to have meaning for today by contrasting the past with the present era as he descriptively portrayed unusual characters. In A Rose for Emily, the past was represented in Emily. Miss Emily was referred to as a “fallen monument” in the story (353). She and her antiquated home were almost a shrine to Southern gentility and an ideal of past values. She and her home were depicted as susceptible to death and decay.

Through this imagery Faulkner was symbolizing the demise of the way of life of the old, pre-industrial, pre-civil war south. The description of her house “lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumps–an eyesore among eyesores” shows a combined image of the past and present (353). It is easy to imagine that the house had once been grand and the envy of everyone in the community. It is precisely that past grandness that has the monument still standing at the time presented in Faulkner’s writings.

No one in the community could really bear to have the house condemned because most residents remembered their awe of the home in its glory days. Inside, the house smelled of dust and had a closed, dank smell. This too, tells the reader that the home and its contents were well beyond their prime. A description of Emily tells how she is in a similar condition, “She looked bloated like a body long submerged in motionless water, and of that palled hue” (354). These images of decay and age have two meanings.

While it is obvious that the home, its contents and Emily are nearing the end of their existence, it is also evident from knowing the themes of the of writing of Faulkner that the author is using the house and Emily as a symbol for the death and decay of traditional “old south” values. Emily lived in the ideal past. She was the symbol of a bygone era where things were simpler, more genteel and more formal. Faulkner shows Emily to be a symbol of the old culture by contrasting her personal conflict with conflicts in the outer world.

It is very difficult for Emily to live in the ‘real’ world outside her home and it has been for sometime when this story takes place. Emily has found conflict between her father’s ways of doing things and the ways of the outside, new world since she was a young woman and could not please her father with her choice of a beau. This conflict is also seen through examples of discord between Emily and two town officials, as well as she and her lover, Homer Barron. Emily owes taxes, according to the young town officials.

Emily’s side of the story is that she does not owe taxes because her father had made an arrangement with a town official. When the representatives of the new, progressive Board of Aldermen called on Emily about her delinquent taxes she declared that she had no taxes in Jefferson, basing her belief on a verbal agreement made with Colonel Sartoris, a past mayor of Jefferson who had been dead for ten years. Emily refused to acknowledge the death of Colonel Sartoris or of his genteel manner of governing the city. He had given his word and according to the traditional view, his word knew no death.

This scene pitted the past, with all its honor and social decorum against the present, where everything goes by “the books. ” Both her father and the official are long since dead but Emily is certain the agreement still stands. Those still in government who are older and remember her father and the agreement know that it stemmed from lack of funds and was an act of charity and they are loathed to bring this fact to light by asking Emily to pay taxes. The younger officials in the town, who represent the new way of conducting business, have no such sense of honor.

They want Emily to pay like all the rest of the citizens. In this scenario, Emily is matched against progress. The town also had another conflict with Emily. Everyone believed that a long lost love, Homer had jilted Emily, but Emily had a way of preserving the past through denial of reality. She would not allow her father’s rules or Homers inclination to leave her to prevail. She took matters into her own hands in a gruesome way, but because Emily took refuge in her ideal world, when she poisoned Homer it was with the sense that he would be with her in the permanent, unchanging form of death.

In a simplest sense, the death of Homer shows that this story is about an old woman holding so tightly to past ideals that she becomes a gruesome friend; sleeping with the dead. On another level, the death of Homer is a symbol for the death of the past, of the traditions of the old south. Homer is the symbol for those people that deny the changing customs and the passage of time. Miss Emily’s position in time was clear to her. Time didn’t march on and things didn’t change. Emily’s room above the stairs was timeless.

In it, the living Emily and the dead Homer were together as she pretended that death could never separate them. Emily Grierson faces a tragic life full of internal conflict because she cannot to let go of her past. Her refusal to pay taxes and the murdering of Homer Barron are two examples of this. Emily’s stubbornness to accommodate to the new town officials and their request of taxes supports the argument that Emily is unable to deal with conflicts because she is unable to let go of the past. Along with her refusal to pay taxes, Emily’s murder of her lover, Homer Barron, also emphasizes her desire to hold on to the past.

Emily’s lover plans on leaving her, so she murders him, lying him down next to where she sleeps in bed, which is implied when it was “noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head” and a “long strand of iron-gray hair”(353). While Emily’s inability to let go of the past is shown in the examples of her refusal to pay taxes and her murdering of Homer, the true cause of her inability to let go of the past lies in her conflict with in herself. Emily tries to embrace the tradition and background of getting married, having a family, and being in love.

However, these aspirations caused her to break down in her prime when Homer was about to leave. Even Emily, monument to past and to genteel values, could not make that antiquated system work for her. She “knew that you do not murder people. ” She had been trained that you do not take a lover, but that you do marry. Yet, if no one would agree to marry her, how else was she to make that marriage ideal come true for herself, but to claim the actual life of the man? The decorum and rigid rules of the old traditions thwarted Emily and caused her to commit murder.

This idea of past decorum is also noticed in the attitude of Judge Stevens, who was eighty years old. When a younger man came to the judge to complain about a bad odor at Emily’s house, the younger man expected that solving the problem would be a simple matter because of the health regulations that were on the books, but it was not so simple for the judge, who was reared in an earlier time. He could not bring to Emily’s attention a matter so crude. In his own words he asked, “Dammit, sir… will you accuse a lady to her face of smelling bad? ” ( 355).

Of course, the younger man would have no qualms about doing so but gentlemen of earlier generations find that task abhorrent. Again, the difference between the past and present culture is personified in Faulkner’s characters. The post civil war “new south” expressed through the words of the narrator, the new Board of Aldermen, Homer Barron (the Yankee), and in what was called “the next generation with its more modern ideas” is contrasted with Emily and all those who could not accept the loss of the Civil War and the beginning of new ways ( 354).

Emily, and the old south in general did conquer time briefly by retreating into the “rose-tinted” world of the past. This sort of retreat is hopeless since everyone, even Emily, was finally vulnerable to death and to the invasion by the inhabitants of the world of the present. Faulkner expressed this inevitable invasion at the very beginning of the story when the narrator claims, “When Miss Emily died, [the] whole town went to her funeral” ( 353). The whole town of Jefferson eventually must lay to rest the ways of the past and Miss Emily’s funeral is the perfect setting for a collection of outdated values.

The William Faulkner story

The following paper analyzes the William Faulkner story called A Rose for Emily. The paper discusses my thoughts and ideas about the story, and evaluates different elements of the story. The paper analyzes the style that the author uses in characterization, and a few specific methods used to convey the plot and lay out the scene mentally, giving specific examples in the story. Finally, I give my overall opinion of the story. I found the first paragraph very enticing; first drawing me in with the explanations of why all the townspeople attended her funeral.

Then making me want to get a look into her house that only a few others had seen for so many years. The descriptions of the house with its cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies sparked memories of old houses in my neighborhood when I was growing up. The story quickly created strong mental images of contrasting scenery with the mention of the encroaching cotton gins, garages, and gas pumps around Emilys grand, but decaying home on what the author calls a select street, (Xroads, 2005). The Authors smooth use of imagery and language drew me deep into the story after only the first paragraph, and it just kept getting better.

I enjoyed this story for a number of reasons, which included how the author laid out the plot. The story was not told in a chronological order, thus allowing relevant information to be pieced together in an interesting and different way. It started with Emilys death, then jumped back in time and finally led to her ultimate demise. This play on time was carefully constructed so that it built suspense and anticipation in a way that a chronological story could not, (Xroads, 2005). I also enjoyed the story because of its gothic undertones.

The authors use of dark images such as the decaying mansion, dead bodies, and the morbid attraction of Emily to dead bodies was only part of the carefully crafted multi-layered story line that used descriptive language, characterization, and chronology to keep you on the edge of your seat, (Xroads, 2005). I also liked the way the author portrayed the characters in the story, especially Emily. One example is Emilys characterization when she purchases the arsenic, looking through her cold, haughty black eyes which peer from a face the flesh of which was strained across the temples and about the eye-sockets, (Xroads, 2005).

The author uses Emilys elusive habits to suggest a mysterious element that helps heighten suspense. These haughty black eyes stays silent and stares down the druggist rather than give away too much, thereby amplifying the suspense. I found the whole story from start to finish, very exciting and stimulating. The story deftly created strong mental images, and built suspense in ways I had not experienced before. The story was also enjoyable because of its variance from the chronological telling on a tale that I am generally used to, which created a sense of anticipation.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed the paper due to the descriptive language, characterization, and chronology, which kept me on the edge of my seat. This paper analyzed the William Faulkner story called A Rose for Emily. The paper discussed my thoughts and ideas about the story, and evaluated different elements of the story. The paper analyzed the style that the author used in characterization, and a few specific methods used to convey the plot and lay out the scenes mentally, giving specific examples of these in the story line. Finally, I gave my overall opinion of the story.

Isolation And Loneliness

In many works of literature, some characters isolate themselves from society due to certain events that happen in their life that make them isolate themselves. Isolation from the society can cause loneliness in ones life. In “A Rose For Emily”, William Faulkner suggests that isolation from society can cause people to do unspeakable acts because they are lonely. The main character, Emily Grierson lives her life under her father. Her father thinks that no man is good enough for his daughter. Therefore, he pushes anyone who comes near his daughter.

After living like this for so many years, Emily is left with othing after her father dies. “We remembered all the young men her father had driven away, and we knew that with nothing left, she would have to cling to that which had robbed her, as people will ” (417) Due to that fact that her father has driven all the men who wanted to enter her life, she is left alone after her father’s death. Her attitude towards men is affected by her father. Therefore she isolates herself from others because she is used to living under her father which causes her to become lonely.

Miss Emily does not go out for some time after her father’s death until she meets man named Homer Barron. They are together for a long time and everyone in town thinks that they will be married soon. However, after this relationship lasts about one year and a half, Homer decides that he wants to leave Emily. Emily, having to go through the loss of her father, decides to kill Homer. “A neighbor saw the Negro man admit him at the kitchen door at dusk one evening. And that was the last we saw of Homer Barron. And of Miss Emily for some time ” (419). Emily does not want to be left alone so she kills Homer and leaves him in her house.

This way she still has Homer by er side. The difference is that he is dead and she is alive. His dead body remains in her house for a while but no one knows of his disappearance. After Miss Emily kills Homer a smell develops in the area around her house. Crazy as it is, she lives through the smell. It does not bother her but it bothers her neighbors. “Then we noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head. One of us lifted something from it, and leaning forward, that faint and invisible dust dry and acrid in the nostrils, we saw a long strand of iron-gray hair” (421).

After Emily’s eath, there is a discovery of Homer’s dead body laying in the bed upstairs. It appears that Emily still lays in bed next to his rotting body after she kills him with poison. Apparently, the smell that was bothering the neighbors years before is from Homer’s rotting body. Here we can see that insanity took over her. She did not want to be left alone with nothing so the only way to get out of the loneliness is by killing her one love. The thought of marriage enters Emily’s mind because she has been with Homer for a while. However, Homer decides to leave her.

We learned that Miss Emily had been to the jeweler’s and ordered a man’s toilet set in silver, with letters H. B. on each piece. Two days later we learned that she had bought a complete outfit of men’s clothing, including a nightshirt… ” (419). Even though he wants to leave her, Emily still has the thought that they will always be together. This is what leads to the murder of her love so that they could always be together. To Miss Emily, Homer is still alive because she buys this silver made especially for him. After his death she is never seen by anyone.

She stays inside her house and sleeps beside her love even though he is dead. At the end, Emily dies alone in her house. “She dies in one of the downstairs rooms, in heavy walnut bed with a curtain, her gray head popped on a pillow yellow and moldy with age and lack of sunlight ” (420). Emily dies in tragedy for she lived her life alone and deserted from society. She died as a lonely women who became lonely only because she isolated herself from everything that surrounded her. Being isolated from society can cause one to go insane because of being alone. This can cause someone to do very abnormal things.

William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”

William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” tells a story of a young woman who is violated by her father’s strict mentality. After being the only man in her life Emily’s father dies and she finds it hard to let go. Like her father Emily possesses a stubborn outlook towards life, and she refused to change. While having this attitude about life Emily practically secluded herself from society for the remainder of her life. She was alone for the very first time and her reaction to this situation was solitude.

This story takes place throughout the Reconstruction Era from the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s in Jefferson, Mississippi. Emily was raised in the period before the Civil War. Her father who was the only person in her life with the exception of a former lover who soon left her as well raised her. The plot of this story is mainly about Miss Emily’s attitude about change. While growing up Emily was raised in a comfortable environment because her father possessed a lot of money.

Considering that her father was a very wealthy person who occasionally loaned the town money Emily had everything a child could want. This caused Emily to be very spoiled and selfish and she never knew the value of a dollar until her father left her with othing but a run down home that started to decay after a period of time. She began to ignore the surrounding decay of the house and her appearance. These lies continued as she denied her father’s death, refused to pay taxes, ignores town gossip about her being a fallen woman, and does not tell the druggist why she purchased rat poison.

Her life, like the decaying house suffered from a lack of genuine love and care. Her physical appearance is brought about by years of neglect. As time went on pieces from Emily started to drift away and also the home that she confined herself to. The town grew a great deal of ympathy towards Emily, although she never hears it. She was slightly aware of the faint whispers that began when her presence was near. Gossip and whispers may have been the cause of her hideous behavior. The town couldn’t wait to pity Ms.

Emily because of the way she looked down on people because she was born with a silver spoon in her mouth and she never thought she would be alone the way her father left her. Miss Emily might have stayed out of the public eye after the two deaths because she was finally alone, something she in her petty life was not use to. Emily’s father never left her alone and when he ied Homer Barron was a treat that she was never allowed to have. He later died and left her and she was completely alone after that.

After her fathers death she went out very little; after her sweetheart went away, people hardly saw her at all. ( ) With this dilemma she isolates herself from civilization, using her butler, Tobe to run her errands. Miss Emily cannot except the fact that times are changing and society is growing. Maybe Miss Emily is shy about her old fashioned beliefs. If no one was to observe her then no one could force her to change. Emily had been through much and has seen many generations grow efore and around her. This brings reason to her strong Confederate beliefs.

Miss Emily refused to allow modern change into her depressed life. For example when she refused to let the newer generation fasten metal numbers above her door and attach a mailbox when Jefferson got free mail service. This reflects Emily’s stubborn persona caused by her father’s treatment when she was young. “A Rose for Emily is told through the eyes of the townspeople. William Faulkner expressed a lot of the resident’s opinions towards Emily and her family’s history. They mentioned old lady Wyatt, her great aunt who had gone completely mad.

A Rose For Emily, a brilliant story

“A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner is a brilliant story. Faulkner uses great techniques to try to confuse the reader. The story begins at one point; he throws a twist in the middle and brings the reader back to the ending of the story. This is a fantastic story that gives us an insight of a fallen monument. Faulkner has illustrated some strong irony and symbolism. The story begins in a small (made-up) town where a woman by the name of Emily Grierson died. Emily is described as a “fallen monument” that many people admired as well as questioned.

Emily lived with her father until the last day of his life, and tried to cling a little longer. She had taught some painting classes but with the years her classes stopped. Craziness ran in her family and that is the only thing that could have happened to this poor woman. Through the years her father would run off her guy friends and she began not having a social life. After her father’s death she met a man named Homer Barron and began to go out a little. The town people were happy for her because they now seen her a little more and it was better than to be in a old house all the time.

Emily began to think that some day she and Homer would marry, and when things went wrong she poisoned him. As time passed people began to wonder, and a smell began developing. Although the smell was hitting everyone in the town, no one said anything, instead they sprinkled lime all over her house. Emily died a time later. After the town people heard the new they went to see her to begin the funeral arrangements. Tobby her faithful servant ran off and the town people discover the smell. After all this time Emily had been sleeping with Homer’s dead body until she herself died.

This story had some symbolism. A Fallen Monument” that is what town people classified Emily. A woman who at some point could have had it all but her craziness held her. Emily was once a young woman that latter became an obligation. She was kept in the past and kept clinging to all she had even if it was dead. First, she did not want to admit her father’s death. Then after she poisoned Homer she kept clinging to his body for some time. Her voice had became dry from not talking to people and her body was a sagging bag. She had become crazy, but no one tried to help her, because they thought greatly of her.

For example, after her father’s death Colonel Sartoris told her she would not have to pay any taxes in that town and even after the new generation came in it stayed that way. The new mayor tried to get her to pay her taxes but after some time gave up. The reader can also see he power when she goes to the store to buy some rat poison. The guy helping her knows that there is a policy he must follow and must ask what the poison is for. He tries to get some answers before giving her the poison, but gets no where and ends up caving in and giving her the poison.

Emily was once a strong woman who with time became falling and falling and that is how the name “Fallen Monument” became about. There is also some irony to the story; Emily being from the south falls in head over heals with a Northern. She even thinks about marry him when back in that time people would not do those kind of things. She goes off and buys the necessities for the wedding and stores them in a room. This lady thought she was getting married, but Homer was “not a marring man”. At the end of the story Faulkner talks about a strand of “iron-gray hair,” which belonged to Emily.

It was found in the bed next to Homer’s rotten body. Throughout time all the town people pity her for being alone in that old home, with only her servant. Wondering if she’s all right and how she is taking things. While all this time she has been at home sleeping with Homer’s rotten body. In conclusion Faulkner used some good techniques writing this story. “A Rose for Emily” gets one of my best ratings. All together he creats a story with a good conflict about a woman who can not let go. He show symbolism and irony in the story and puts in some good points.

Who Is Crazier

I picked two short stories that I would like to compare and contrast in this essay. The first story is called “The Yellow WallPaper” and was written by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The second story I chose is called “A Rose for Emily” and was written by William Faulkner. Both of these stories are about women who have serious mental problems. These stories are similar in that aspect, but there are also some differences. In this essay, I will compare and contrast these two short stories and determine which one best illustrates insanity.

The first thing that I noticed about these stories was that they were purely fictional. I also noticed that they both had a weird twist. “A Rose for Emily” is about a woman who kills her lover and hides him in her home: The man himself lay in the bed. For a long while we just stood there, looking down at the profound and fleshless grin. The body had apparently once lain in the attitude of an embrace, but now the long sleep that outlast love, that conquers even the grimace of love, had cuckolded him. In “The Yellow Wall-Paper” the woman starts out normal and gradually sinks into depression.

Her depression gets so bad that she begins to see objects in her wall paper: We have been here two weeks, and I haven’t felt like writing before, since that first day. I am sitting by the window now, up in this atrocious nursery, and there is nothing to hinder my writing as much as I please, save lack of strength. I don’t feel as if it was worth while to turn my hand over for anything, and I’m getting dreadfully fretful and querulous. I cry at nothing, and cry most of the time. Of course I don’t when John is here, or anybody else, but when I am alone.

At night in any kind of light, in twilight, candlelight, lamplight, and worst of all by moonlight, it becomes bars! The outside pattern, I mean, and the woman behind it is as plain as can be. I didn’t realize for a long time what the thing was that showed behind, that dim sub-pattern, but now I am quite sure it is a woman. The weird twist in these stories not only captures your attention, but also makes the stories memorable. Although both stories are fictional, Charlotte Perkins Gilman did battle with depression in her own life on more than one occasion.

Ms. Gilman was treated for depression with what is called the “rest cure. ” This basically meant that you lived as much of a domestic and stress free life as possible. You were limited to two hours of intellectual stimulation per day. She was told by her doctors that she would never be allowed to write again. She listened to the doctors advice for three months, but during that time she became worse. She said, ” I came so near the border line of utter mental ruin that I could see over. ” She knew what would really help her and it was not what the doctor advised.

Gilman obtained her normal life again and eventually got well. In her story “The Yellow Wall-Paper” her character is also a writer and treated with the ” rest cure. ” Gilman wrote the story as a celebration of her own recovery and in many ways the story reflected her own experiences. The Author of “A Rose for Emily” had no personal experience with the sickness he wrote about. The author had not experienced what Emily went through, which made it hard for him to explain the story with the same amount of detail as Charlotte Gilman. This made it hard for him to be as personal in his writing:

Then we noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head. One of us lifted something from it, and leaning forward, that faint and invisible dust dry and acrid in the nostrils, we saw a long strand of iron-gray hair. Another difference that I noticed between these stories was that they were written from different points of view. “The Yellow Wall-Paper” was written in first person: I think that woman gets out in the day time! And I’ll tell you why-privately-I’ve seen her! I can see her out of every one of my windows! ”

The main character was the one telling the story, which gives you a good idea of what the character was felling and thinking. “A Rose for Emily” was written in third person: When Miss Emily Grierson died, our whole town went to her funeral: the men through a sort of respectful affection for a fallen monument, the woman mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house, which no one save an old manservant-a combined gardener and cook-had seen in at least ten years. Because ” A Rose for Emily” was written in the third person it allowed no access to what the haracters emotions or motivations were.

I have decided that “The Yellow Wall-Paper” described insanity the best. Gilman had not only experienced most of what she wrote about, but also wrote her story in the first person, which allows the reader to feel exactly what the character is going through. Since “A Rose for Emily” is written in the third person, you have no access to what Emily is going through. You only get to see her breakdown through others’ eyes, which are not always accurate. It is still a great story, but it just does not give you as much detail.

Time and Setting in “A Rose for Emily”

In “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner, the author uses the element of time to enhance details of the setting and vice versa. By avoiding the chronological order of events of Miss Emily’s life, Faulkner first gives the reader a finished puzzle, and then allows the reader to examine this puzzle piece by piece, step by step. By doing so, he enhances the plot and presents two different perspectives of time held by the characters. The first perspective (the world of the present) views time as a “mechanical progression” in which the past is a “diminishing road.

The second perspective (the world of tradition and the past) views the past as “a huge meadow which no winter ever quite touches, divided from them now by the narrow bottleneck of the most recent decade of years. ” The first perspective is that of Homer and the modern generation. The second is that of the older members of the Board of Aldermen and of the confederate soldiers. Emily holds the second view as well, except that for her there is no bottleneck dividing her from the meadow of the past.

Faulkner begins the story with Miss Emily’s funeral, where the men see her as a “fallen monument” and the women are anxious to see the inside of her house. He gives us a picture of a woman who is frail because she has “fallen,” yet as important and symbolic as a “monument. ” The details of Miss Emily’s house closely relate to her and symbolize what she stands for. It is set on “what had once been the most select street. ” The narrator (which is the town in this case) describes the house as “stubborn and coquettish.

Cotton gins and garages have long obliterated the neighborhood, but it is the only house left. With a further look at Miss Emily’s life, we realize the importance of the setting in which the story takes place. The house in which she lives remains static and unchanged as the town progresses. Inside the walls of her abode, Miss Emily conquers time and progression. In the first section, Faulkner takes us back to the time when Miss Emily refused to pay her taxes. She believes that just because Colonel Sartoris remitted her taxes in 1894, that she is exempt from paying them even years later.

The town changes, its people change, yet Miss Emily has put a halt on time. In her mind, the Colonel is still alive even though he is not. When the deputation waits upon her, we get a glimpse of her decaying house. “It smelled of dust and disuseIt was furnished in heavy, leather covered furniturethe leather was cracked. On a tarnished gilt easel before the fireplace stood a crayon portrait of Miss Emily’s father. ” The description of Miss Emily’s house is very haunting. There is no life or motion in this house.

Everything appears to be decaying, just as Miss Emily herself. The picture of her father is just another symbol of immobility and no sense of time. When he died, Miss Emily refused to acknowledge his death. She stopped time, at least in her mind. From this point, Faulkner makes a smooth transition to a period of thirty years ago, when Miss Emily “vanquished their fathers about the smell. ” The plot continues in the backward direction, demonstrating Miss Emily’s lack of understanding of time.

A smell develops in Miss Emily’s house, which is another sign of decay and death. Miss Emily is oblivious to the smell, while it continues to bother the neighbors. This town’s people are intimidated by Miss Emily, and have to squeeze lime juice on her lawn in secrecy. They are afraid to confront her, just as the next generation is afraid to confront her about the taxes. Her strong presence is enough for her to surpass the law. The scrambling of time throughout the story is a great demonstration of the scrambling of time in Miss Emily’s mind and in her house.

As the town changes and progresses, grows and modernizes, Miss Emily’s “stubborn and coquettish” house remains the same. Perhaps if the story of Miss Emily had been set in a different place, her life would have turned out differently. With all the pressures from her father and the town’s people, she became a very closed up and rather frightening person. There were too many expectations of women in those days and Faulkner demonstrates the consequences of such a life through Miss Emily.

By setting the story in an upscale, post Civil War town, he uses both the details of the setting and time to show what happens to women such as Miss Emily, the “tragic monument. ” Miss Emily’s world was always in the past. When she is threatened with desertion and disgrace, she not only takes refuge in that world but also takes Homer with her in the only manner possible death. As a final conclusion of Miss Emily’s life and the story, her position in regard to the specific problem of time is suggested in the scene where the old soldiers appear at her funeral.

The very old me-some in their brushed Confederate uniforms-on the porch and the lawn, talking of Miss Emily as is she had been a contemporary of their, believing that they had danced with her and courted her perhaps, confusing time with its mathematical progression. ” These men have lost their sense of time as well as Miss Emily. They hallucinate and imagine things that never occurred; there is no sense of time in their minds. Faulkner presents a very horrifying picture in this story, and he does this by playing with the chronology, using symbol of time, and presenting a very twisted but detailed setting.

The Past Is the Present

After World War One, there were many changes occurring in the world. Mans inherent need to follow tradition was now being challenged by a continually changing, modern world. The past and the present often conflicted. William Faulkner, a southern born writer, based much of his novels and short stories on this conflict. He aptly reflects the turmoil of the past and the present in, A Rose for Emily.

The conflict between the past and the present is symbolized in the beginning of the story by this description, only now Miss Emilys house was left, lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and gasoline pumps-an eyesore among eyesores (331). It is ironic that the same description stubborn and coquettish decay can be a description for Miss Emily as well. And just like her house, which had once been white and on a select street, Miss Emily had been a slim young girl dressed in white.

But as the house fell into decay so had Miss Emily, she looked bloated, like a body long submerged in motionless water, and of that pallid hue(332). The town played a part in Miss Emilys delusion. There were numerous complaints of a foul stench permeating from her property. A younger member of the Board of Aldermen suggested that Miss Emily be told to clean up her property. But due to the old southern ideals of honor, duty and loyalty the older, the more traditional members could not possibly confront her about this matter.

Dammit sir, Judge Stevens said, will you accuse a lady to her face of smelling bad(333)? So in the midnight hour they chose to slunk about the house and apply lime to the infected areas. Then thirty years later the Board of Aldermen allow themselves to be vanquished by Miss Emily as they attempted to collect the delinquent taxes owed the town. The druggist also permits her to purchase arsenic without following protocol. By law Miss Emily was required to tell the druggist what she plan to do with the arsenic.

She did not. Ray B. West Jr. aught at the University of Montana and the University of Kansas. He was also the editor of, Rocky Mountain Stories and The Art of Modern Fiction. He wrote an analysis on, A Rose for Emily, titled Atmosphere and Theme in A Rose for Emily in 1949. He states, It is the Past pitted against the Present-the Past with its social decorum, the Present with everything set down in the books. Emily dwells in the Past, always a world of unreality to us of the Present. (68). In his analysis, Mr. West sees an atmosphere (time, place, and conditions) of unreality created by the female character, Emily.

And once this atmosphere of unreality is established, the reader is being prepared for Emilys unnatural act at the end of the story. This same atmosphere allows the reader to see Miss Emily as a tragic figure instead of an evil monster. Miss Emily hold on the past had made her a victim of her own values. The relationship with Homer Barron is also a conflict of the past and the present. Miss Emily, a Southern aristocrat, is the ideal of past values and Homer, a northern laborer, is a part of the ever-changing present.

While Miss Emily is of moonlight and magnolias, cotton fields, faithful old family servants and Mount Vernon mansions a quote by Joel Williamson, a historian of the south (Williamson 401). Homer is of machinery, a hearty laugh and a mans man. Miss Emily symbolizes the slow moving pace of the old south while Homer symbolizes progress of the fast moving pace of the new south. Even during their buggy rides Miss Emily sits with her head high, representing the past and Homer sits with his hat cocked, representing the present. Homer must have planned to leave Miss Emily.

When her father had died, she refused to acknowledge his death for three days. Her father, who had been the mainstay of her life, had left her . The father that turned away potential suitors because he felt that they were not good enough for his daughter. I t was said that she had to cling to that which had robbed her. Homer entered her life by courting her publicly, for there not to be marriage, would have robbed her of her dignity and high standing in the community. The ladies of the town had already felt that Miss Emily was not setting a good example for the young people.

The situation was becoming a disgrace to the town. Homer could not be allowed to leave, henceforth the arsenic. But this time, the town people would not be able to take Homer from her, as they had with her father. Now the little room above the stairs became the past for Miss Emily. In this room, Emily and Homer remained together as though death had not separated them. Emily had conquered the present; she was allowed to live her life in the past. The bridal room is the color of roses and symbolizes the color of love.

In the room the valence curtains of faded rose color, upon the rose-shaded lightsand the mans toilet things backed with tarnish silver, silver so tarnished that the monogram was obscured(337). For a while Miss Emily was able to maintain her past in this rose-colored bridal room, in her rose-tinted world. Miss Emily could not fight time forever, because through death, her past was invaded by the present, at last. After the burial of Miss Emily, the door of the little room was broken down and the past was finally allowed to escape its tomb.

The man himself lay in bed (337). The corpse of Homer Barron was in the bridal bed, with the remnants of his nightshirt laid about him. Beside him, a pillow with the indentation of a head and a strand of gray hair told the macabre story. This could have ended being a gothic, horror story but instead it shows a repressed, overprotected woman denied a chance to live a normal life because of the times (past). The present had tried to defeat her but only through death, did this become possible. On the victor, Faulkner bestows a rose of tribute, a rose for Miss Emily(FIU 26).

A Rose for Emily character analysis

In the short story A Rose for Emily, by William Faulkner there is a very interesting character. Her Name is Emily Grierson and she is a rich southern gentile. All her life it seems that she was raised at a standard that was above the rest. By living such a secluded and controlled life it set her up for the happenings in her future. When her father passed away she had nobody to tell her what to do and how to act. This was very devastating and she had a hard time dealing with change.

So much so that she wouldn’t let the police take the body of her father out of the house for three days after his death. The only thing that was constant in her house was the slave that was bound to serve her. In this writing I feel that the author takes an outside look at Emily to let you make your own decisions about her. This is a very good way of doing it because it leaves you with an open-ended judgment. You may feel a variety of ways about her, the first being that she is completely psychotic.

This is the first and easiest conclusion to come up with. If you werent reading with much thought and analyzing the character it would be easy to feel this way. The second emotion is the strongest I feel about her, this would be pity for her. Leading a life that is mapped out for you by someone would not be a hard task. In the old south when this story takes place the women are not meant to make decisions or choice on their own. Women were meant to be mindless and powerless to the superior men that knew what was best for them.

By losing this father figure she was left to fend for herself and was virtually helpless. When she finally found a male that showed some interest and emotion, she was attached to them. Thats where Homer Barron comes into the story. He would visit Emily and go for Sunday drives with her. When Homer told Emily that he must move on she found herself on the verge of loneliness once again. If Homer would leave it would be two men that have left her. When she realized that he was about to leave she poisoned him and would keep him forever.

In her mind she had the one thing she needed most, companionship. Even if it was a dead corpse, it was stilling something. In the end of the story when the book states, We saw a long strand of iron gray hair, it was obvious that she sought refuge from the world in that bed with Homer. However twisted that may sound it showed how desperate she really was. That is the pint in the story where things really change. If you look back on her life and how everyone in town abandoned her, you really have strong feelings for her.

You feel sorry that she was left to fend for herself without any idea of what to do. She did what she felt she had to do, and in her mind it was all right. The author wrote this story as a literary genius. There is an extreme level of suspense that leaves you wanting more. You can wait to get to the next page to see what is going to happen next. The mystery due to the narrators outside look on the situation shows how the towns people looked down on her for being with Homer, but offer no solution to help her out. This is why I feel pity for Mrs. Emily Grierson.

Tradition at A Rose For Emily and The Lottery

People throughout the world do things for many different reasons. Religion, peer pressure, or tradition are some of the reasons the people do things. In the U. S. we have many traditions such as Christmas. Some people have strange or out of the ordinary traditions. The two short stories “The Lottery” and “A Rose for Emily” both portray tradition. In “The Lottery”, tradition is showed in three main ways. First, Old Man Warner says, “there has always been a lottery (Jackson 11). ” The town people accept The Lottery because there has always been a lottery.

The older people in the town such as Old Man Warner keep the tradition alive with their ideals. Second, The Lottery is held every year. Tradition is upheld in this way because it introduces the younger generation to the tradition. This shows that the lottery is a tradition because traditions happen over and over again. Lastly, tradition is shown with the parifanilia used in the story of “The Lottery”. The black box used to draw names is a duplicate of the original. The black box is a symbol of what was in the years past.

In “A Rose for Emily”, tradition is also shown in three main ways. First, Emily does not get courted by anyone. This would not seem to be a normal tradition but in the story her father did not want Emily to become involved with anyone. Emily’s father was not following tradition when doing this because normal tradition would be to allow Emily to become involved with someone. Second, “A Rose for Emily” shows tradition in the way the townspeople treated Miss. Emily. Tradition is shown when the older generation of people put lime down instead of confronting Emily with the smell.

The elders of the town also allowed Emily to go without paying taxes after she told them she did not have to pay them. Finally, tradition is shown with Emily cutting her hair. Emily cut her hair after her father died (Faulkner ? ). This shows some tradition because women in that time and place of society do not cut their hair unless they want to show something. Emily was showing she had gotten over her father’s death and ready to move on with her life. “The Lottery” and “A Rose for Emily” both show tradition in the same ways.

First, both stories have women as the main characters as the ones showing tradition. Miss. Emily was the woman in “A Rose for Emily” that showed tradition. Tessie was the woman in “The Lottery” that showed tradition in the story. Second, in both stories the elders had the strongest tradition. In the story “A Rose for Emily” the older generation are the ones that respected Emily and let her get away with many things such as the taxes. In “The Lottery” old man Warner was the person keeping “The Lottery” alive with his ideals and his role in “The Lottery” throughout the years.

Finally, in both stories the tradition changed a little. In “A Rose for Emily” the younger generation was changing the tradition in the way they treat the elder, august named people. In “The Lottery” the rituals and sayings that have been taken out of the agenda of “The Lottery” changed the tradition. The short stories “A Rose for Emily” and “The Lottery” both have their own ways of showing tradition. “A Rose for Emily” had three main ways of showing tradition, “The Lottery” had three main ways of showing tradition also, and both stories have some of the same concepts of traditions.

Miss Emilys House: A Symbol of Neglect

“A Rose for Emily,” is the remarkable story of Emily Grierson, whose death and funeral drew the attention of the town. The bizarre outcome is further emphasized throughout by the symbolism of the decaying house, which parallels Miss Emilys physical deterioration and demonstrates her ultimate mental disintegration. Emilys life, like the house which decays around her, suffers from lack of genuine love and care. The characteristics of Miss Emilys house, like her physical appearance, are brought about by years of neglect. For example, the house is located in what was once a prominent neighborhood that has deteriorated.

Originally white and decorated in “the heavily lightsome style” of an earlier time, the house has become “an eyesore among eyesores”(177). The description of her house represents a place side by side of the past and present and was an emblematic presentation of Emily herself. Through lack of attention the house has evolved from a beautiful representative of quality to an ugly holdover from another era. Similarly, Miss Emily became an eyesore; for example, she was first described as a “fallen monument”(177) to suggest her former grandeur and her later ugliness.

She was a “monument,” an ideal of past values but fallen because she had shown herself susceptible to death and decay. According Fetterley, “the violence implicit in the desire to see the monument fall”(194). Like the house, she has lost her beauty. A women who once was beautiful, later became obese and bloated. Both the house and occupant have suffered the ravages of time and neglect. The interior of the house also parallels Miss Emilys increasing degeneration and the growing sense of sadness that accompanies such decay.

Initially, all that can be seen of the inside of the house is a slim half where a staircase is mounted into still move shadow, with the house smelling of “dust and disuse”(178). The darkness and the smell of the house connect with Miss Emily, “a small, fat woman in black” with a voice that is “dry and cold”(178) as if it were dark and dusty from disuse like the house. The similarity between the inside of the house and Miss Emily extends to the mantel, with the portrait of her father and Miss Emily sitting there.

In the picture of a young Emily with her father, she was frail and apparently hungering to participate in the life of the era. After her fathers death, she looked like a girl “resembling to angels in colored churches”(180). Inside and out, both the building and the body in which Miss Emily lives are in a state of deterioration like tarnished metal. Finally, the townspeoples description of both the house and the occupant reveal a common intractable arrogance. At one point the house is described as stubborn, as if it were ignoring the surrounding decay.

Similarly, Miss Emily proudly overlooks the deterioration of her once-ground residence. This dominant theme recurs as she denies her fathers death, refuses to discuss or pay taxes, ignores town gossip about her being a “fallen woman,” and does not tell the druggist why she is purchasing arsenic. Brooks argues, “Miss Emily is crazy, but she is no coward”(191). This meaning she didnt mind what the town people thought of her. Both the house and Miss Emily become traps for that strongest representative of the twentieth century, Homer Barron, laborer, outsider, confirmed bachelor.

For Blythe, Homer is “Miss Emilys gay beau”(192). Just as the house seems to reject progress and updating, so does Emily, until both of them become decaying anachronisms. Through descriptions of the house that resemble description of Miss Emily Grierson, “A Rose for Emily” emphasizes the way that beauty and elegance can become repulsive distorted through neglect and lack of love. In this story, the house deteriorates for forty years until it becomes ugly; Miss Emily physical and emotional condition dissipate in a similar manner.

Guy DE Maupassant’s, “The Necklace” and William Faulkner’s, “A Rose for Emily” Comparison

The desire for freedom is a similar aspect of the female protagonists Louise Mallard, Mathilde Loisel, and Emily Grierson. In Kate Chopin’s, “The Story of an Hour,” Guy DE Maupassant’s, “The Necklace,” and William Faulkner’s, “A Rose for Emily,” the female protagonist’s have a desire for freedom. The stories are about three women living in patriarchal societies. Each character longs for freedom in a different way, but because of the men in their lives they are unable to make their own life decisions.

In “The Story of an Hour,” Louise Mallard is a repressed married woman that has a heart condition. The reaction to her husbands presumed death is a sign that she is unhappy. After hearing the tragic news she goes up stairs to her room and looks out an open window and notices “new spring life”, “the delicious breath of rain”, and “countless sparrows twittering in the eaves. ” As she looks out the window among the storm clouds, she stares at patches of blue sky. “It was not a glance of reflection, but rather indicated a suspension of intelligent thought. Louise is not grieving over her dead husband or having negative thoughts about her future.

She realizes that she will have freedom through her husbands death and whispers over and over, “free, free free! ” Her unhappiness is not with her husband, it is with her ranking in society because she is a married woman. Becoming a widow is the only chance she has to gain the power, money, respect, and most importantly freedom. Mathilde Loisel’s chances for freedom are decreased because she comes from a middle-class family of clerks. She had no dowry, no expectations, no means of being known, understood, loved, wedded by any rich and distinguished man; and she let herself be married to a little clerk at the Ministry of Public Instructions. ” Mathilde feels her marriage is beneath her and that she is worthy of a richer more powerful man. Because Mathilde is of a middle class family, she feels that she is rejected from societies social elite. Mr. Loisel pampers Mathilde with a maid, gives her money to buy expensive clothes, and invites her to a ball that “The whole official world” will attend.

Even though her husband spoils, her she still feels like a rich woman trapped in a poor woman’s body. She feels that because of the way she looks it is a “mistake of destiny” that she is born into a family of clerks. Her strong belief that money is the key to social mobility and freedom, demonstrates how materialistic, envious, and self centered she is. In Mathilde’s eyes, wealth opens the door to freedom. Emily Grierson is similar to Louise Mallard and Mathilde Loisel because she also desires freedom. Emily is living with her domineering father that thinks “None of the men were quite good enough” for her.

He isolates her from society, never allowing her to meet a potential husband. Emily has no real freedom at all. At her fathers death, Emily is well past the marrying age but “even with insanity in the family she wouldn’t have turned down all of her chances if they had really materialized. ” Then she meets Homer Barron, “a Yankee—a big, dark, ready man, with a big voice and eyes lighter than his face. ” Emily and Barron begin a relationship. It seems as if she is enjoying her new found freedom, but because of the twisted social norms her father instills in her, her idea of freedom is not actually what it should be.

To Emily freedom is having something to hold on to, a controlling father or husband does not scare her. Emily’s worst nightmare is to be left alone. For example, when her father dies she refuses to believe it. Some of the town ladies come over to pay their respects and “she told them that her father was not dead. She did that for three days. ” Emily totally denies the fact that her father leaves her. It is not surprising that Emily is terribly upset when her relationship with Homer falls apart.

Because she fears to be left alone, she kills Homer and keeps his decaying corpse in a spare room in her house. By killing Homer, her perverted idea of freedom is somewhat satisfied. She kills him because of her fear of being alone, if she has nothing to hold on to, she would not be free at all. Although all three characters have the desire to be free, freedom has a different meaning for each one. Emily’s idea of freedom is extremely different than Louise’s and Mathilde’s, but kind of the same because they all wanted to be free in their own ways.

Rose For Emily Review

Emily is a woman that has had a hard life. Her family made it so that she was held in high regard in the public eye. She was not suppose to encounter relationships that were below her stature. The town, being the antagonist, drives Emily to her insanity because they will not allow her to lead a normal life. They liked the show they were watching a refused to give it up. The narrator explores how Emily is defined in her position in the town by her name and her father.

People in our town, [. . . ], believed the Griersons held themselves a little too high for what they really were. pg. 3) Emilys father had been controlling during her early life and had stopped all suitors from visiting her. we had all remembered all the young men her father had driven away, [. . . ] (pg. 84) Emily is forced to live in a house were her father will is paramount to her own. When he dies we understand this lose is almost to much for her to bear. Miss Emily met them at the door, dressed as usual with no trace of grief on her face. She told them her father was not dead. (pg. 84)

The denial of her fathers death is explained by the narrator: and we new that with nothing left, she would have to cling to that which had robbed her, as people will. pg. 84) The narrator also explores the way in which the towns people define Miss Emily as a tradition, a duty, and a care, [. . . ] (pg. 81) This definition is narrowly drawn. Her rank is one of the representatives of those August names, [. . . ] (pg. 81) When she begins her relationship with Homer Barron, his name shows irony because he is described as a northerner, a day laborer, (pg. 84) the towns people are appalled. Then some of the ladies began to say it was a disgrace to the town and a bad example to the young eople. (pg. 6)

The towns people go as far as to send the Baptist preacher, the towns moral leader, to chastise Emily regarding this relationship. Emily refutes this chastisement and quickly flaunts her relationship with Homer. The next Sunday they again drove about the streets, [. . . ] (pg. 86) Having been rebuked, the ministers wife enlists the aid of Emilys cousins to pressure Emily back into the role they feel she should play.

They do arrive at which time Emily buys poison. The towns people feel placadid after Emily buys the arsenic. So the next day we all said, She will kill herself, and e said it would be the best thing. pg. 85) The towns people it seems would have Emily play by their rules as have been defined by tradition and duty or commit suicide. Emily at first tries to break away from the defined role after her father dies by establishing a relationship with Homer Barron. When she sees how the community reacts she is torn between maintaining her stature and connecting to man in a relationship. This conflict ultimately leads her to madness. She buys the arsenic not to kill herself but to kill Homer Barron. However, she cannot bear to relinquish their relationship and so eeps his corpse in her bed where she has murdered him.

Her denial for death which is foreshadowed in her fathers comes into play here as she is able to play her societal role while keeping her sweetheart forever in her bed. As you can see because of her father, her social stature, and the town she was driven to insanity. Without all of these variables Emily might have been able to lead a normal life. Living up to others expectations is not an easy thing to do. We can all learn a lesson from Emily, living up to others expectations is not as important than the happiness of our own.