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The Awakening Character Analysis Essay

Change does not occur easily or without conflict. Change does not occur quickly nor smoothly. Many characters go through change in a novel, like Edna from The Awakening. Edna lives as a simple mother-woman and follows the general rules of society. She later experiences new bearings which lead to her self-discovery toward a better life. Edna kills herself at the end of the novel and frees herself from the social confinements.
Edna, in the beginning of the novel, tailors her life to the path set before her. A mother of two, Ednas life does not concern herself, but her husband and children. All of Ednas interests are thrown to the side to make way for her family, as a mother-woman would do in the nineteenth century. Edna understands…

There is a dual personality in Edna, “the dual life—that outward existence which conforms, the inward life which questions” (Chopin 26). Edna does not express opinions or anything that would insinuate a power struggle between her and the men around her. This behavior is typical of the woman in the nineteenth century as women were only seen as objects. Edna is especially seen as an object in the eyes of her husband. After Edna comes back to her husband from the beach, he shows concern over her darkened appearance. Mr. Pontellier looks at his wife as if she is “a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage” (Chopin 7). Edna does not establish herself as a human with thoughts and opinions, as she just laughs with her friend soon after. Although, there are a few women who do share opinions and speak about educated topics in broad daylight. Edna is with these women in the…

Edna experiences a kiss with a man that is not her husband, this is the first experience she has that goes against the female ideals of her time (Chopin 139). Edna already shows signs of going against the grain of her society before this experience, but this experience sets her wants and needs for a freer life. A more free life from the confines of mother and wife. Her role as a wife commences to diminish and her husband becomes concerned and even consults a doctor to try and find what is wrong with her. He tells the doctor, Edna “goes tramping about by herself, moping in the street-cars, getting in after dark. I tell you she’s peculiar. I don’t like it” (Chopin 110). He shows concern due to Ednas lack of socialization with other females and the general rebellion against societal norms. Edna recognizes that the love she feels for another man is not the main reason that she is going through what she is going through. Edna says “it was not love which had held this cup of life to her lips” (Chopin 140). She knows that this desire for a life of free will is driven by her own desire. Edna begins to recognize the faults in her life and starts to revolutionize her life and…

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