Narrative Voice in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom

“On or about December 1910 human nature changed. All human relations shifted…and when human relations change there is at the same time change in religion, politics, and literature”; thus, Modernism was born (Woolf qtd in Galens 175). Modernism was a movement that pursued a truthful portrayal of the world by focusing on the human experience … Read more

Matt Mercer – The Voice Acting Expert

In addition to the on-screen celebrities who frequently grace our television screens with their splendor, there exist some behind-screen celebs who take up positions off the screen and showcase their prowess and inborn talent through their voices on the set of cartoons, video games and animated movies. The celebrated voice artist, producer and director Matt … Read more

A Review of Ama Adhe’s The Voice That Remembers

Amazon.com reviews for Ama Adhe’s The Voice That Remembers only include four and five star ratings, with comments ranging from “Her story is one all should read because her message helps one gain perspective and perseverance through adversity” to simply “I think (Adhe’s) book made me a better person” (1). Almost every review makes sweeping … Read more

Voice in The Poisonwood Bible

The use of one’s voice is one of the most powerful weapons humans possess. Yet, too often it is not used to its full potential, and rather, is overlooked, used to harm, or silenced altogether. Voices are shaped over many years and experiences, and they evolve throughout a lifetime. Each individual possesses a voice unique … Read more

The Authorial voice in Frederick Douglass’s My Bondage and My Freedom

Frederick Douglass’ second autobiography, My Bondage, and My Freedom, significantly revises key portions of his original narrative style and extends the story of his life to include his experiences as a traveling lecturer in the United States as well as England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. Douglass also frames his second autobiography differently, replacing the introductory … Read more

New Voices in the Harlem Renaissance

Despite disparities in the poetic styles of Sterling Brown and Arna Bontemps, each author was equally effective in conveying the “new voice” of the black American during the Harlem Renaissance. The idea of a more suitable expression for African Americans repudiates the Renaissance’s fundamental ideology. Unconscious variety in interpretations of new black society represents the … Read more

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar … Read more

The Voice of The Other in Wide Sargasso Sea

“How will you like being made exactly like other people?” is a question that echoes through Antoinette’s mind early within Jean Rhys’s responsive and revisionist text, Wide Sargasso Sea (Rhys 22). Constructing her protagonist from Charlotte Bronte’s insane Bertha Mason, Rhys aims to write the history, the preface, of one of the most discussed feminist … Read more

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar … Read more