Everything That Rises Must Converge: Breaking Down the Inner Conflicts

In “Everything that Rises must Converge” Flannery O’ Connor compares the robustness of different methods of maintaining identity. The two identity schemas being compared are those of Julian, the highly individualistic, cerebral main character and his mother, a condescending Southern woman clinging to her fading social status. By focusing on the ongoing clash between these … Read more

Criticism leading to the truth

“La Belle Dame Sans Merci”, or in translation, “the beautiful lady without pity” is a phrase appropriated by John Keats as the title of his 1820 poem depicting the story of a seductive and deceitful woman who tempts men away from the world of masculinity and then leaves them with a life in ruin. It … Read more

Motifs of Light in The Stone Boy

Gina Berriault’s “The Stone Boy” follows the story of a young boy facing the aftermath of a terrible accident and trying to understand his responsibility in the matter. When Arnold does not respond emotionally, the adults’ false assumptions isolate Arnold. In “The Stone Boy”, Berriault uses the motifs of light to represent knowledge and truth … Read more

Overcoming the Misguidance: "Carp Poem"

As legendary poet and hip-hop artist Tupac Shakur once said, “The seed must grow regardless of the fact that it’s planted in stone.” Those who live in impoverished neighborhoods are prone to a life empty of education and full of crime. From the very beginning of their lives, these disadvantaged people are often set on … Read more

John Keats’s Poems Ode To Nightingale And When I Have Fears That I May Cease To Be: A Study Of The Tone, Structure And Syntactical Structure

Close Reading of John Keats “Ode to a Nightingale,” by John Keats, details a speaker in thought whilst observing a nightingale singing nearby. This is not the only time in which Keats writes from the perspective of a pondering speaker, such as in “When I have Fears that I May Cease to Be,” but “Ode … Read more

Comparative analysis of Cassius and Brutus in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar

“ Caius Cassius and Marcus Brutus are both main characters in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, and are in multiple ways are either quite similar to or quite different from one another. These ways are presented in both their words and their actions. Both of these characters shared a lot of similarities; however, in personalities … Read more

An Understanding of Rossetti’s Methods and Concerns in “Promises Like Piecrust”

“Promises like Piecrust” by Christina Rossetti relates a narrative between a speaker and beloved in regards to the other’s romantic attraction towards the speaker. The title of the poem is taken from the expression ‘Promises are like pie crust, they are made to be broken’, likening the difficulty of keeping a promise to the fragility … Read more

Isolation and Identity in The Namesake

The Namesake explores the themes of isolation, identity, clash of cultures and the immigrant experience. Through the Ganguli family Lahiri looks at how the immigrant experience is different for the two generations of immigrants, Lahiri does this by first introducing us to Ashima’s experience and her feeling of alienation which is representative of most of … Read more

Essay on Nine Lives by Ursula K. Le Guin

Have students ever thought of what makes a short sci-fi/fantasy story so extradentary to read? “Nine Lives” by Ursula K. Le Guin “is a novelette that was first published in Playboy magazine in 1968.At the time of the story’s magazine publication, Playboy requested that she publish the work under her initials U. K. Le Guin … Read more

Masculinity In The Brief Wondrous Life Of Oscar Wao

Throughout the novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, written by Junot Diaz, sex and masculinity is the vital element in being a Dominican male. Dominican males according to Yunior, the narrator of the novel, is someone who has power and pizzazz, dominates women, controls female sexuality through physical violence and verbal aggression and … Read more

MaddAddam as a Biblical Allegory

The MaddAddam series by Margaret Atwood can best be described as a commentary on every aspect of society. One of the most prevalent themes in Atwood’s series is religion, which is apparent in the names she assigns to different aspects of her society(God’s Gardeners), and in the many biblical references and symbols such as the … Read more

Love and Control Shown in ‘The Collector’

Love is a complex concept, one that even ingenious writers have struggled to understand. While scientists confine their understanding of love to ‘chemical reactions’ involving dopamine and serotonin, one cannot deny the qualitative nature that love has. Clegg expresses signs of love throughout the The Collector by John Fowles; however, there is more evidence that … Read more

Ritualistic Consumerism: How Consumption Replaces Religion in ‘White Noise’

Consumer culture has been discussed by many authors and philosophers as long as the human race has been consuming. Consumerism is often referred to as a negative force in society, specifically in the United States, due to America’s image of surplus and leisure even in times of societal and economic suffering as discussed in Clay … Read more

Power of a woman in marriage

Romance and sexuality are not unfamiliar concepts to the typical Victorian sensational novel. Reversing and deconstructing these themes, however, marks a more sophisticated sensation novel and makes for a more enduring literary work. This technique is intriguing to a postmodern audience, but to a Victorian audience such an idea may have been seen as threatening … Read more

A Psychological Analysis of Prozac Nation

Prozac Nation chronicles a bright 19-year-old woman’s struggle with depression. Elizabeth “Lizzie” Wurtzel is an aspiring writer and freshman at Harvard University. With a childhood plagued by divorce and abandonment, Lizzie has a history of depressive episodes and self-confidence issues. The book is set in the 1980s, when mental illness was very much a taboo … Read more

Arthur Brooke’s Poem “The Tragicall History Of Romeus & Juliet” As A Basis Of Shakespeare’s Romeo ; Juliet

Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet (1594-1596) is mostly based on Arthur brooke’s poem, “The Tragicall History of Romeus and Juliet”, published in 1562, which in itself was another translation from an Italian folklore which can be dated back many years. Shakespeare in turn, adapted brooke’s poem, his main source of inspiration, of a nine month duration … Read more

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the … Read more

What Are The Furies?

Furies were seemingly similar to rabid animals and savaged beasts in their behaviour. These deitieswere described as horrific and hideous creatures that one could mistake as women at first, but soonrealize their appearances were worse than Gorgons. When the priestess of Apollo saw them insidethe temple, she felt the presence of these apparitions were an … Read more

Literature review: The Giver

The book The Giver is about an supposedly ideal society, however as the book continues it seems to be more of a dystopia with a totalitarian government. Everyday life is the same and almost never changes because the consequence is so severe, which could be public humiliation to releasing. In our Society you can do … Read more