StudyBoss » Theme Of Loyalty In King Lear Essay

Theme Of Loyalty In King Lear Essay

Loyalty is one of the most prize possessions any human being can offer unto you along with trust. In the book “King Lear”, William Shakespeare introduces readers to the theme of the book which is loyalty. Loyalty is seen throughout the characters of Cordelia, Kent, and the Fool, due to their actions and not their words. Although King Lear mistreated these characters they were the main characters in the book who demonstrate loyalty towards King Lear despite his cruel actions towards them. Throughout King Lear’s good and bad conditions these characters loyalty for King Lear never changed. Later on in the paly Kind Lear realizes who had been loyal to him all along when he is placed in a bad situation. William Shakespeare play “King Lear” represents…

Kent was banished from King Lear presences after stating the truth about the mistake Lear was making when he said “Royal Lear, whom I have ever honored as my king, loved as my father, as my master followed, as my great patron thought in my prayers../ Let it fall rather, though the fork invade the region of my heart. Be Kent unmannerly when Lear is mad….Thinkst thou that duty shall have dread to speak when power to flattery bows? To plainness honors bound when majesty falls to folly. Reserve thy state…” (Shakespeare, 1.1. 139/ 144). Due to Kent loyalty and honesty, King Lear took it as betrayal and dishonor. Kent was banished from the town and if he was to be spotted on the land a week after it would result in the end of his life. The motivation and intention of Kent was to serve and protect the King, and not be rewarded for his loyalty. Although banished by King Lear, Kent did anything in his will to make sure he was close to the King. King Lear couldn’t recognize Kent and Kent did not reveal his identity either. Kent remained a loyal servant and a friend to the King. Kent also demonstrated his loyalty towards th king when he stated “…Gracious my lord, hard by here is a hovel. Some Friendship will it lend you gainst the tempest. Repose you there…” (Shakespeare, 3.2.59-61). Kent didn’t have to help the King, but he did it anyway even if it caused him his life. His actions rather than his words demonstrated the love and loyalty he had for King Lear even if he didn’t realize it…

Cite This Work

To export a reference to this article please select a referencing style below:

Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.