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Whose Life Is It Anyway Play

Brian Clark’s play “Whose Life Is It Anyway?” is a thought-provoking exploration of the question of who has the right to make decisions about one’s own life. The main character, Ken Harrison, is paralyzed from the neck down and must fight for the right to end his own life. The play raises important questions about autonomy and quality of life that are still relevant today. Brian Clark’s play is a powerful work that will stay with you long after you’ve seen it.

The purpose of this essay is to analyze Brian Clark’s play, “Whose Life Is It Anyway?” and determine how well the author kept the audience engaged throughout the performance. To do so, I researched the play in depth as well as studied different perspectives from other sources such as books and websites. By doing this, I was able to identify which techniques captured and held the audience’s attention.

Brian Clark’s play “Whose Life Is It Anyway? ” is about a man named Ken Harrison who is paralyzed from the neck down and wants to end his life. The play follows Ken as he tries to convince those around him that he should be able to end his life, even though they want him to live.

The play opens with Ken in his hospital bed, telling us about his plans to end his life. He then proceeds to talk about how he got into this situation and what life is like for him now. Throughout the play, we see Ken interact with various people, including his doctor, nurse, girlfriend, and lawyer. We also see flashbacks of Ken before he was paralyzed.

One of the things that Brian Clark does well in this play is keep the audience engaged. He does this by using a variety of devices, including humor, dialogue, and suspense.

Humor is used throughout the play, especially in the scenes between Ken and his nurse, Sheila. Their interactions are often funny, but they also serve to highlight the seriousness of Ken’s situation.

Dialogue is another important device that Brian Clark uses to keep the audience engaged. The conversations between Ken and his doctor, for example, are often carefully crafted so as to provide information about Ken’s condition while also raising questions about whether or not he should be allowed to end his life.

Suspense is also used effectively in “Whose Life Is It Anyway? ”. Brian Clark uses it to keep the audience guessing about what is going to happen next. For example, we are not sure if Ken will be able to convince his girlfriend, Jane, to help him end his life. We are also left wondering if Ken will actually go through with his plan.

“Whose Life is it Anyway” by Brian Clark, follows the story of Ken Harrison. Prior to a car accident that left him with damage to his spinal cord, Ken was a professional sculptor and teacher. He is now paralyzed from the neck down and only kept alive by medical technology. But Ken doesn’t want to be kept alive and this provides the core conflict of the play. It explores how Ken’s life has changed since he can no longer make decisions for himself and how those around him fight to keep him alive against his will.

The play is set in Ken’s hospital room where we see him interacting with his girlfriend, Jane; his best friend, Cliff; and his doctor. Ken’s battle to die is played out against the efforts of those around him to keep him alive.

At the beginning of the play, we see that Ken has already made the decision to end his life and is just waiting for the opportunity. He is tired of being a burden on those around him and feels that there is nothing left for him to live for.

Throughout the play, we see Ken’s resolve being tested by the people around him who are trying to convince him to change his mind but he remains adamant that he wants to die.

At the end of the play, Ken gets his wish and dies but not before making a final request to Cliff to make sure that his life was worth living.

Ken must repeatedly ask the doctors, who barely tell him anything, if he will need to spend the rest of his life in a hospital. Ken is determined to have a choice over whether he lives or dies, but his decision is being opposed by those who work in the medical system who want to keep him alive. Ken proves himself “a most eloquent advocate of his own demise”1 first with the doctors and nurses caring for him, and then with the judge who decides if Ken should be allowed to leave the hospital—a move that would lead inevitably to his death.

Brian Clark’s play Whose Life Is It Anyway? is a thought-provoking drama that challenges our assumptions about life and death. The play centers on Ken Harrison, a sculptor who is paralyzed from the neck down after a car accident. Ken is determined to exercise a choice over his own life or death, but his decision is being opposed by the forces of medical bureaucracy who try to keep him alive.

Ken proves “a most eloquent advocate of his own demise”1 first with the doctors and nurses who attend him, and then with the judge who is brought in to decide if Ken should be allowed to leave the hospital, a move that would lead inevitably to his death.

While the play raises many important questions about the value of life and the importance of choice, at its heart it is a story about one man’s journey to come to terms with his own mortality. Ken Harrison is a complex and fascinating character, and Brian Clark’s play gives us a unique insight into the mind of someone who is facing death. Whose Life Is It Anyway? is an important work of drama that should be required reading for anyone who is interested in the subject of euthanasia.

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