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The problem of poverty in Sudan

Nearly half of Sudan’s population live in poverty despite the rising income in Sudan and 47 percent of the population lives below the poverty line. There is many factors contributing to the poverty in Sudan internal conflicts are further fuelling the volatile state of region. Between 2006 and 2013 Sudan’s trust fund supported. In some cases is being sustained through ongoing government programs. The centre of daily life for many Sudanese who live in towns and cities along with Khartoum.

Poverty in the Sudan is deeply entrenched and is largely rural. Poverty particularly affects farmers who practice rainfed agriculture. Its is more widespread and deeper in rural areas in southern Sudan and in areas affected by conflict and drought and famine. The Sudan remines a low in come and food deficit country. The main of poverty include conflicts and a oil, which has resulted in the neglect of its agriculture and live sectors, as well as of sources of energy. The fiscal resources and access to natural resources governance failures as reflected in poor . A long history of conflict has followed Sudan. Civil wars between the southern and northern states have claimed the lives of over 1.5 million people, with especially harsh conditions in regions of Darfur. One of the Sahel countries, Sudan is located in the Sahara desert. Poverty in Sudan is widespread and varies according to region, with existing conflicts as well as economic and social inequalities to the large number of people. Since 1990, Sudan’s extreme poverty rate declined from 85 percent to 46 percent. South Sudan is expansive, largely rural, yet widely depopulated.

Almost 83 percent of the population resides in rural areas. More than two decades of civil unrest in the Sudan have cost the lives of about 1.5 million people and had a effect on the well being of the population. Protracted civil conflict in the Sudan generally has its origin in socio-economic inequities caused by neglect of the agricultural sector, land reforms, unfair distribution of resources for development between rural areas and for traditional farming, and exclusion of local from decision-making. These policies have led to the development of an economy based mainly on export and lease of natural resources, to competition over access to scarce land and water, and to inadequate nation-building.

After decades of internal conflict the Sudan signed a peace agreement in January 2005 and the new Government of National Unity and Government of Southern Sudan launched a six-year recovery, peace-building and development plan. Poverty in Sudan is widespread and varies according to region, with existing conflicts as well as economic and social inequalities contributing to the large number of impoverished people. Since 1990, Sudan’s extreme poverty rate declined from 85 percent to 46 percent.

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