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Registered Nurse Essays

A registered nurse (RN) is a healthcare professional who cares for patients in hospitals, clinics, and other medical facilities. RNs have completed an accredited nursing program and passed a national licensing exam. They may also be certified in a specialty area of nursing.

Registered nurses typically have good job prospects. The demand for RNs is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2026, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The BLS estimates that there will be more than 3 million job openings for RNs during this 10-year period.

Registered nurses can advance their careers by completing an academic degree in nursing. A bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN) or higher can lead to job opportunities in management and administration, as well as positions in research and education. RNs with a BSN or higher may also earn more money than those with an associate’s degree in nursing (ADN).

There are many different types of registered nurses. Some RNs work in hospitals, while others work in clinics, doctor’s offices, or home health care settings. Some RNs specialize in caring for certain types of patients, such as those with cancer or heart conditions. Others work in specific areas of nursing, such as geriatrics or pediatrics. No matter what type of registered nurse you are, you can be sure that your job will be both challenging and rewarding.

Since I was a young girl, I’ve always wanted to be a nurse and assist those who were sick. As I got older, I learned more and decided that I wanted to become an RN. Registered nurses are responsible for patients’ care as well as their education on health concerns in order to avoid future illnesses. Registered nurses must have interpersonal skills as well as technical competence in order to collaborate with patients and their families effectively. Formal education from a state-approved nursing school and state licensure are necessary steps toward becoming an RN.

The first step to becoming an RN is completing an accredited academic degree program. A two-year Associate’s Degree in Nursing (ADN) is the most common type of nursing degree, but a four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree is also available. The traditional BSN program includes liberal arts courses and upper-level nursing courses, while the accelerated BSN program is designed for students who have already completed a bachelor’s degree in another field.

After completing an academic nursing degree program, the next step is to obtain licensure as a registered nurse. Licensure allows nurses to practice nursing and use the title “Registered Nurse.” Nurses must pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN) to obtain licensure. Once licensed, nurses can find employment in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, clinics, physician’s offices, and home health agencies.

A career as an RN can be both challenging and rewarding. Registered nurses have the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of their patients and their families. If you are interested in a career in nursing, research different nursing programs to find the one that is right for you.

There are three main educational methods to become a registered nurse. Registered nurses generally complete a bachelor’s or associate’s degree program in nursing before becoming certified. Registered nurses have also completed diploma programs to prepare for their job. Graduates of any of these programs are typically qualified to sit for the exam and get licensing as registered nurses.

In most cases, registered nurses who want to advance their careers pursue a bachelor’s or master’s degree in nursing. A small number of registered nurses earn a doctoral degree in the field. With further education, registered nurses can specialize in a particular area of patient care or take on managerial roles. Some Registered Nurses also choose to pursue careers in advanced practice nursing, such as becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse midwife.

Academic Degree Programs for Registered Nurses

Registered nurses must have at least an associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) to be eligible for licensure and entry-level employment. Most registered nurses complete a bachelor’s degree program in nursing (BSN), however. A small number of RNs earn a diploma in nursing from a hospital-based program.

Registered nurses who want to advance their careers often pursue a master’s degree in nursing (MSN). A small number of RNs earn a doctoral degree in the field.

Associate’s Degree in Nursing

An ADN is the most common academic route to becoming a registered nurse. ADN programs typically take two to three years to complete and are offered at community colleges and technical schools. Upon completion of an ADN program, graduates are eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and enter the workforce as registered nurses.

Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing

A BSN is the preferred educational route for many employers of registered nurses. BSN programs typically take four years to complete and are offered at colleges and universities. Upon completion of a BSN program, graduates are eligible to take the NCLEX-RN and enter the workforce as registered nurses.

To become a registered nurse, nursing students may select from a range of educational programs. Some teaching hospitals provide 3-year diploma courses in nursing; however, these are uncommon. The majority of RNs obtain associate or bachelor’s degrees in nursing. People skills, emotional stability, CPR, First Aid, and another language ability would all be beneficial to the job.

Most states require RNs to be licensed. To become licensed, RNs must graduate from an accredited nursing program and pass a national licensing exam, the NCLEX-RN.

The job outlook for registered nurses is good. Employment of registered nurses is projected to grow 12 percent from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the average for all occupations. The demand for health care services will increase as the population ages.

There are many opportunities for registered nurses in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, clinics, physician’s offices, home health agencies, long-term care facilities, schools, and research centers. Some RNs work for the government or in the military.

Registered nurses usually work full time. They may work nights, weekends, and holidays.

RNs can advance their careers by completing a bachelor’s or master’s degree program in nursing. They also may choose to specialize in a certain area of nursing practice.

RNs with a bachelor’s or master’s degree may become nurse educators or nurse managers. Nurse educators teach nursing at the college level and develop curriculum for nursing programs. Nurse managers supervise other nurses in a particular unit of a hospital or other health care facility.

Some RNs earn a doctoral degree in nursing, which qualifies them for jobs in research or academia, or as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). APRNs are RNs who have completed a graduate-level education program and have passed a national Certification exam. APRNs include nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, clinical nurse specialists, and certified registered nurse midwives. They provide direct patient care and may also prescribe medication.

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