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Lowering The Drinking Age Essays

Drinking alcohol is a part of many cultures around the world. In some countries, the drinking age is as low as 16 or 18. In the United States, however, the drinking age is 21. Some people believe that this is too high and that the drinking age should be lowered to 18.

There are a few reasons why lowering the drinking age might be a good idea. For one, it could help reduce binge drinking among young people. Drinking in moderation is generally considered safer than binge drinking, so if more young people had access to alcohol, they might be less likely to overdo it.

Another reason to lower the drinking age is that it could help young people learn how to drink responsibly. In countries with lower drinking ages, young people are typically introduced to alcohol at a younger age and are taught how to drink it responsibly. This could help reduce problems with alcohol abuse in the future.

Of course, there are also some reasons why lowering the drinking age might not be such a good idea. For example, it could lead to more drunk driving accidents. Young people are already more likely to get into accidents than older drivers, and adding alcohol into the mix could make this problem even worse.

For years, there has been debate regarding whether the drinking age should be lowered to 18. In today’s culture, most youngsters drink behind their parents’ backs without realizing the consequences of their actions. With so much discussion, this issue has become a fascinating debate. What affects the growth of the brain when people drink? Is alcohol as detrimental to someone who is 18 as it is to someone who is 21?

Drinking at a young age can defiantly lead to some risky behaviors, but what could be the benefits?

The legal drinking age should be lowered to 18 because alcohol consumption is already happening at that age, lower drinking age would decrease the amount of binge drinking among college students, and adults aged 18-20 are more likely to drink responsibly.

Drinking before the age of 21 is considered underage drinking and it is illegal. Drinking alcohol comes with consequences if caught, such as getting a fine or being put in jail. The negative effects of alcohol usually only happen when people abuse it and consume too much. Drinking in moderation can actually have some positive health effects like reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke. So if young adults are already drinking alcohol at the age of 18, why not just lower the drinking age?

The Drinking Age should be lowered back to 18 because it would decrease the amount of binge drinking among college students. “Binge drinking is defined as a pattern of drinking that brings a person’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08 grams percent or above” (Wechsler). The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism did a study and found that 60% of college students aged 18-20 admitted to binge drinking in the past month.

If the Drinking Age was lowered back to 18 then these same students would not have to drink illegally and they would be less likely to binge drink because they would not have to consume all the alcohol at once. Drinking in moderation would become more normal to them.

Adults aged 18-20 are more likely to drink responsibly than adults aged 21-25 (O’Malley and Wagenaar). In a study done by O’Malley and Wagenaar, they concluded that “raising the minimum legal drinking age has reduced traffic fatalities among young drivers and has not led to substantial increases in heavy drinking or other adverse consequences among 18- to 20-year-olds” (O’Malley and Wagenaar).

This means that if the Drinking Age was lowered back to 18, these adults would be more likely to drink responsibly and there would not be an increase in car accidents caused by drunk driving.

Drinking alcohol is a personal choice that should be made when people are considered adults at the age of 18. If they are old enough to vote and join the military then they should be able to drink alcohol. Drinking in moderation can actually have some positive health benefits, so if young adults are already drinking alcohol at the age of 18, lowering the drinking age would decrease the amount of binge drinking among college students and make adults more likely to drink responsibly.

Underage drinking has the potential to impede several areas of bodily and mental development. The brain is critical in every day life. This causes difficulties, since the brain isn’t fully developed until around the age of twenty (“Teen Brain.”). The brain performs fundamental activities such as picking up a pencil or instructing the body what to do. Alcohol consumption has been linked to impairment of adolescent adult brain frontal lobes, which are vital for functions like emotional control, planning, and organization.

This can lead to problems in school, work, and social life. Drinking before the age of 21 can also lead to developing chronic problems, such as addiction.

Lowering the drinking age would be beneficial in a number of ways. It would allow for better education on responsible drinking habits. It would also get rid of the “forbidden fruit” allure that comes with alcohol. Drinking would become more normalized and less of a “party” activity. This could lead to less binge drinking and more moderate consumption.

There are risks associated with lowering the drinking age, but these can be mitigated with proper education and enforcement. If young adults are taught about the dangers of alcohol abuse and given the tools to make responsible choices, they are more likely to do so. Drinking should be approached with caution and moderation, not as something to be done in excess.

Lowering the drinking age would have many benefits and should be seriously considered. With proper education and enforcement, the risks can be minimized. Drinking is a part of life and should be treated as such. Drinking responsibly can lead to a healthier, happier life.

The MLDA 21 minimum legal drinking age should be raised to 18. This is because a higher age would decrease the number of underage consumers. Since 1984, when most MLDA21 laws were implemented, the proportion of underage drinkers has decreased.

Newly-legal purchasers frequently buy alcohol for their younger counterparts in high school and middle school, resulting in a “trickle-down” effect. Young people ages 18 and under are notorious for being inconsiderate; as a result, those who are 18 years old are more likely to buy alcohol for high school students and younger kids in middle school.

Drinking at a younger age can lead to alcohol addiction and other health problems. Drinking alcohol is a privilege that comes with responsibility. Young adults who drink responsibly should be able to enjoy the same social activities as their peers who are of legal drinking age.

Drinking is often seen as a rite of passage for many young adults, and denying them this experience can result in feeling left out and isolated. Research has shown that most young adults who drink do so responsibly, and lowering the drinking age would likely not cause an increase in binge drinking or other risky behavior.

Teens who drink are more likely to develop alcohol problems later in life. Drinking at a young age can interfere with normal brain development and lead to problems with learning, memory, and judgment. Drinking before the age of 15 is associated with a 50% increased risk of developing alcoholism later in life.

Lowering the drinking age would send the wrong message to teenagers about alcohol use. Drinking should be seen as something that should be done responsibly and only by those who are of legal age. Making alcohol more accessible to teenagers would likely result in more underage drinking and put them at risk for developing alcohol-related problems.

There are many reasons why the drinking age should not be lowered from 21 to 18. Teens are known for being impulsive and irresponsible, and drinking alcohol can lead to health problems and addiction. Drinking is often seen as a rite of passage for many young adults, but it is a privilege that comes with responsibility. Lowering the drinking age would send the wrong message to teenagers about alcohol use and put more at risk for developing alcohol-related problems.

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