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Importance of the Lesson Learned in the Future

We were all very happy with today. As we walked around the room, we saw that the students were making connections between their art and the Revolution. I talked to many students who were able to explain to me why they chose the colors, patterns, and techniques that they did, and how those fit in with the Revolution. For example, one student said that she chose to splatter her paint because it showed some of the chaos of battles in the Revolution. We were also very pleased that so many of the students wanted to share their art with the rest of the class. Unfortunately, we ran out of time. Luckily Ms. Watkins said that she will let them share the next morning, and that she may have them write about their experiences with painting and what they gain from it. I am glad that we are leaving Ms. Watkins with something to build off of.

Probably the most relaxed lesson we have had so far. We just did the day one portion of our music lessons, which was having the kids listen to Union and Confederate music, and looking at what the songs meant to them, and what they may have meant to people in the Civil War. Many of the kids were engaged, and seemed to really understand how both North and South felt patriotism for their side, while also feeling the effects of war, such as being separated from loved ones. The end message of the lesson, which tied in the concept of a house divided against itself, really seemed to strike a chord with many of the kids. They understood that both sides were Americans at the end of the day, and that brother fighting against brother was what was happening both figuratively, and literally. I do wish we had just a few minutes more in that lesson. I would have liked to have them listen to one last song, Write a Letter to My Mother, which talks about brother fighting against brother in the Civil War. That song would have been a great way to end the lesson, and tie in the final message through music, rather than verbally explaining it. This is a lesson that I think I would certainly use one day in my own classroom, as long as the kids are a bit older. This lesson might not be developmentally appropriate for younger kids, at least in its current form.

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