StudyBoss » Entertainment » "Hey, Soul Sister” Explication

"Hey, Soul Sister” Explication

Train’s “Hey, Soul Sister” uses several kinds of literary elements to pull the listener

into a romantic, but innocent relationship. The use of eloquent words that appeal to all senses provide one with imagery and a feel of freedom. This is shown through the ideas of memory, sweet romance, and love.

The first verse draws the listener in with the image of a kiss. “Your lipstick stains on the front lobe of my left side brains” (Monahan). This implies a kiss on the forehead. The following line, “I knew I wouldn’t forget you,” draws on the idea of memory (Monahan). It works especially well because the frontal lobe of the brain is where memory is stored which goes along with the determination not to forget someone or something. Later in the verse it says, “the smell of you in every single dream I dream” (Monahan). This not only creates some fantastic imagery, but continues with the play on memory in that, of the five senses, smell is the most directly connected to memory. Likewise, songs themselves are known for being aids to the memory because when one hears a song it either makes a memory, or recalls one of another time he or she heard the song before.

Next, the listener hits the chorus connecting the preceding ideas of love and infatuation with the title “Soul Sister”. Rather than jumping to a creepy view of things, the presentation of the name gives the song a friendly, innocent feel. The relationship of the girl mentioned in the song is more than just a feeling, but comparatively has a connection “Hey, Soul Sister” uses several kinds of literary elements to pull the listener

into a romantic, but innocent relationship. The use of eloquent words that appeal to all senses provide one with imagery and a feel of freedom. This is shown through the ideas of memory, sweet romance, and love.

The first verse draws the listener in with the image of a kiss. “Your lipstick stains on the front lobe of my left side brains” (Monahan). This implies a kiss on the forehead. The following line, “I knew I wouldn’t forget you,” draws on the idea of memory (Monahan). It works especially well because the frontal lobe of the brain is where memory is stored which goes along with the determination not to forget someone or something. Later in the verse it says, “the smell of you in every single dream I dream” (Monahan). This not only creates some fantastic imagery, but continues with the play on memory in that, of the five senses, smell is the most directly connected to memory. Likewise, songs themselves are known for being aids to the memory because when one hears a song it either makes a memory, or recalls one of another time he or she heard the song before.

Next, the listener hits the chorus connecting the preceding ideas of love and infatuation with the title “Soul Sister”. Rather than jumping to a creepy view of things, the presentation of the name gives the song a friendly, innocent feel. The relationship of the girl mentioned in the song is more than just a feeling, but comparatively has a connection

through soul. She is so perfect and compatible, she is like a sibling, only more so. The song shows the relationship to be new and fresh. “I don’t wanna miss a single thing you do tonight” (Monahan). As if the two people involved are clearly made for each other, but neither wants to get ahead of themselves or the other as they grow closer.

Finally, there is a recurring theme of love throughout the entire piece. Beginning in the very first line with the word “brains”, the idea of different organs and parts of the body being instruments of love are drawn out (Monahan). In the second verse, the phrase, “you have a one track mind like me,” brings in the idea of the mind which connects back to the brain (Monahan). Later in the same verse is the line, “my heart is bound to beat right out my untrimmed chest” (Monahan). This particular reference contains the generally accepted epitome of love, the heart. As the entire song eludes back to a “soul sister” the soul can also be tied into this theory (Monahan). The aforementioned chest and brains could be viewed as parts representing the entire body. This combines heart, body, mind, and soul– everything the world believes can be used to love or given in love to another.

In these ways “Hey, Soul Sister” brings together many different thoughts and images using memory, the idea of pure romance, and love in every way.

Cite This Work

To export a reference to this article please select a referencing style below:

Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.
Reference Copied to Clipboard.

Leave a Comment