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FMS definition

The purpose of this article was to establish whether the compensatory movements the college athletes make to achieve high and better performance predispose to an injury. The Functional Movement Screening (FMS) was utilized to evaluate these athletes to determine if an injury in this population could be predicted with this tool. What led investigators do this research was that few studies have investigated the use of FMS and its ability to predict injuries in athletes. On the one hand, Peate studied the relationship between the FMS with previous injuries in firefighters, and Kiesel examined the scores of the FMS in professional soccer athletes. Although female athletes have the highest range of injuries within the athletic population, no study has been conducted to determine if the FMS could detect them an injury.

The participants in this study were thirty-eight female student-athletes between the ages of 18 and 26 who were part of the soccer, volleyball and basketball teams within Division II of the NCAA. Within the requirements that were asked to participate in this study, no injury could have occurred within 30 days prior to the study participation.

Otherwise, if the athlete had suffered an injury within the previous 30 days that had led her to not participate in her sport, she was excluded from the study. In addition, permission from the university was granted before the study. All the participants had to provide an informed consent and fill out a medical history. The participants were evaluated within the two weeks after the start of the season of their corresponding sport. The movements that the participants were asked to perform were based on those composed by the FMS. These movements tests were: Deep Squat, Hurdle Step, In-Line Lunge, Shoulder Mobility, Active Straight Leg Raise, Trunk Stability Push-Up, and Rotary Stability. A score of 14 points (maximum score of 21) in the FMS was used to determine the relationship of a low score and an injury. The evaluations were analyzed by two experts in the use of FMS, and a third person in charge of video recording.

The mean FMS score and standard deviation (SD) for all subjects (n=38) included in the study was 14.3 ± 1.77 (maximum score of 21). The mean FMS score was 13.9 ± 2.12 for individuals that that sustained an injury, and a mean score of 14.7 ± 1.29 for those who did not sustain an injury. A score of 14/21 or less was significantly associated with injury, which in this study was sixty-nine percent. The average FMS scores for subjects in their corresponding sports with the number of injuries can be seen in Table 3. The conclusion in this investigation is that compensatory fundamental movement patterns can increase the risk of injury in female collegiate athletes, and can be identified by using a functional movement screening tool.

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