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Declaration Of Independence Rhetorical Analysis

The United States Declaration of Independence is one of the most important documents in American history. It was written by Thomas Jefferson and adopted by the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776. The Declaration announced that the thirteen American colonies were no longer subject to the British Crown and were now independent states.

The document is primarily a list of grievances against the British government, which the colonists felt was tyrannical and oppressive. In addition, it sets forth the principles of liberty and democracy that would later be enshrined in the Constitution.

The rhetoric of the Declaration is powerful and persuasive. Jefferson employs several rhetorical strategies, including ethos, pathos, and logos. He appeals to the reader’s sense of justice and fairness, as well as to their emotions. And he uses reason and logic to back up his arguments.

The Declaration of Independence is a timeless document that continues to inspire people all over the world. It is a powerful reminder of the importance of liberty and democracy.

In his letter “The Declaration of Independence,” Founding Father and the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, states that the thirteen colonies must demand freedom from Great Britain. In between his rough draft and final draft, Jefferson makes various changes in punctuation, grammar, and the overall meaning of his words to support his position.

In the following paragraphs, I will analyze how Jefferson’s use of literary devices affects the persuasiveness of “The Declaration of Independence.”

As mentioned earlier, Thomas Jefferson was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and the author of “The Declaration of Independence.” In his declaration, he argues that the thirteen colonies must break away from Great Britain because they are not being treated fairly. He starts off by listing all of the ways that King George III has mistreated the colonists and then he goes on to say how the colonists have tried to work things out but nothing has changed. He ends with a statement declaring that the colonists are free and independent from Great Britain.

In his rough draft, Jefferson uses a lot of flowery language and long, complicated sentences. However, in his final draft, he makes some changes that make his argument more persuasive. For example, he breaks up some of the longer sentences into shorter, simpler ones. He also gets rid of some of the unnecessary words and replaces them with more powerful ones.

For instance, in the sentence “He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harrass our people and eat out their substance” (Jefferson, 1776), he replaces the word “harrass” with “harass” and the word “eat out” with “consume.” These changes make the sentence more concise and easier to understand.

In addition to making changes in punctuation and grammar, Jefferson also makes changes in the overall tone of his letter. In the rough draft, he sounds angry and bitter towards King George III and the British government. However, in the final draft, he sounds more rational and level-headed. This change in tone makes his argument more persuasive because it shows that he is not just blindly angry, but that he has thought about this issue carefully and come to a logical conclusion.

Overall, Jefferson’s use of literary devices makes “The Declaration of Independence” more persuasive. By breaking up his longer sentences into shorter ones, getting rid of unnecessary words, and changing the overall tone of his letter, he makes it easier for the reader to understand his argument and see why the colonists must break away from Great Britain.

The primary goal of Thomas Jefferson’s letter “The Declaration of Independence” is to secure America’s Freedom from Great Britain in order for the people to enjoy their God-given rights of Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.

The people of America are not simply King George the Third, but also reading his message. In Thomas Jefferson’s essay “The Declaration of Independence,” he uses the modifications made from his rough draft to his final version to formalize and professionalize the text while keeping it basic.

The first change to note is in the Preamble. In the final version, Jefferson states that all men are created equal, which was not present in the first version. This addition could have been due to the fact that America was founded on the idea of freedom and equality for all. By adding this statement, Jefferson is able to show that everyone, no matter their social class or race, is deserving of Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.

In addition, Jefferson also replaces “we hold these truths to be sacred & undeniable” with “we hold these truths to be self-evident” (Jefferson). The word “self-evident” means that the truth does not need to be proven because it is already known. This change could have been made in order to simplify the language of the document and to make it more understandable for the common person.

Another notable change is the removal of a sentence which detailed the king’s attempts to stop immigration to America. This sentence was most likely removed in order to keep the focus on the grievances against the king and not divert attention elsewhere.

In conclusion, Jefferson’s changes from his rough draft to final draft formalized the document while still keeping the language simple. These changes served to remind King George the Third of America’s grievances as well as establish equality and freedom for all people in America.

The changes we made to the document in order to make it formal were: adding punctuation, improving grammar, choosing better connotations, and capitalizing certain words. The new punctuation and grammar made the document sound more proper. The different connotations helped improve the quality of sentence overall. Capitalizing certain words drew attention to how important they were within context.

These changes made the document sound more formal, important, and intelligent. The United States Declaration of Independence was written to be a proper document because it was a very important law being passed. It had to be well-written so that other countries would take it seriously. Thomas Jefferson, who wrote the Declaration of Independence, did a good job at making it sound official.

The United States Declaration of Independence is a very important document in United States history. It was written by Thomas Jefferson and it declared the United States’ independence from Great Britain. The document is full of rhetoric. Rhetoric is the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing, especially the use of figures of speech and other compositional techniques. Jefferson uses many rhetorical devices in the Declaration of Independence.

One example of rhetoric in the Declaration of Independence is when Jefferson says, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” Jefferson is saying that everyone is equal and has certain rights. This is persuasive because it is convincing people that they should be independent from Britain.

Another example of rhetoric in the United States Declaration of Independence is when Jefferson states, “That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” Jefferson is saying that the government should have power over the people. This is effective because it is convincing the people that they should be free from Britain’s government.

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