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A Study of the Personality of Scrooge in Charles Dickens’ Book, The Christmas Carol

Have you ever tried stepping up, making a change in your own life? Everyone is scared of taking chances and making differences in their lives. Scrooge, the main character of Charles Dickenss novel, The Christmas Carol, is no different. Scrooge is an old man who does not celebrate the Christmas season like everybody else. He is harsh, rude, and makes it very clear that he does not like Christmas. Throughout the novella, Scrooge is visited by a total of three spirits in one night. They all have a different effect on him. The three spirits in A Christmas Carol embody the major steps in Scrooges transformation the recollections, both good and bad, of memory, the awakening of senses and sensitivity, and the awareness of death.

The Ghost of Christmas Past helps Scrooges transformation by reminding him of good and bad memories from his youth. This apparition comes to Scrooge and shows him where his pain is coming from and the exact time in his life when he turned his main focus to the importance of money. The Spirit was like a child; yet not so like a child as like an old man. Its hair was white as with age, although the face had not whitened. This demonstrates that the Ghost is showing him not only the memories from his childhood, but new and young ones as well. The first place it takes him is the boarding school his father sent him to as a child. Scrooges lip [was] trembling because he was all alone, with no friends or father to turn to. The Ghost of Christmas Past takes him to his old boss Christmas party and this visit shows Scrooge that although the Fezziwigs did not have much money, they were still having a good time. Scrooge starts to realize that it does not matter if it cost a fortune, but it is the happiness [Fezziwig] gives. The Ghost of Christmas past also shows him how rude he was to the Christmas caroler. This saddens Scrooge and he regrets his behavior because he would of [liked] to have given him something. His second regret is being impolite to Bob Crachet, denying him the opportunity to come in and get warm. The Spirit is trying to get Scrooge to realize how wrong his behavior is so that he will change. The Ghost of Christmas Past, tries to show him more but Scrooge cannot handle it and tells him to remove [him] from this place.

The Ghost of Christmas Present makes Scrooge sensitive to his lifestyle and how he affects the lives of others he comes in contact with. He takes Scrooge to see for himself how other people act and speak of him. All the people went flocking down the streets in their best clothes and with their gayest faces to the church and chapel. They came from everywhere. When two people started fighting in the streets, they said that it was a shame to quarrel upon Christmas day. This shows that everyone appreciates Christmas day and Scrooge is starting to appreciate it a little more with the appearance of each Ghost. The Spirit also shows him the deep love the Cratchets share despite their financial situation. Scrooge sees how desperate the Cratchets are to help for their son, Tiny Tim. Scrooge, with an interest he had never felt before, was concerned if Tiny Tim [would] live. Scrooge continues to grow more sensitive towards others and their feelings as he visits with the Ghost of Christmas Present. The Ghost reveals to Scrooge two wretched, miserable children who scare him by their appearance. The children, Ignorance and Want, show another example of the fact that not everyone is well off financially and is also a warning that the future is harmful. When the Ghost takes Scrooge to his nephews house, Scrooge listens and hears that he is sorry for him because he is the one who suffers for all of his ill whims.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come reveals to Scrooge many disheartening images of his future. The Spirit responds to Scrooges questions with unnerving silence and simply motions him to follow. Scrooge fears this Ghost the most; however, he is aware of its promise is to do [him] good. Scrooge hopes to live to be another man from what [he] was. This shows Scrooges desire to change, to become a better person and to live the rest of his life doing good for others. They listen as some business men casually and jokingly discuss someones death. Scrooge is upset and wants to know if there is any person in the town, who feels emotion caused by this mans death. And, if so, he wants the ghost to show [him] that person. The next stop is a dingy pawnshop, where there are some of the dead mans personal belongings. It is obvious there is relief all across town that this stubborn man has finally died. Scrooge is appalled and begs the Ghost to reveal the identity of the dead man. Finally, the last place the Spirit takes him is the Churchyard. The Ghost pointed downward to the grave by which is stood and upon seeing his name on the tombstone, Scrooge cries that he is not the man [he] was. Scrooge says he will live in the Past, Present, and the Future.

The three Spirits in A Christmas Carol embody the major steps in Scrooges transformation: the recollections (good and bad) of memory, the awakening of senses and sensitivity, and the awareness of death. During the visits from the three ghosts, Scrooge learns many important lessons. He sees how poorly he interacts with people and the negative effect that has on them. He becomes frightened to learn that he will live a sad and lonely life by himself. The ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future help Scrooge realize his faults and teach him how to change to be a better man. After their visits, it is said of Scrooge that he [knows] how to keep Christmas well. Changing ones life is a very difficult task for anyone to do, and doing so will have a major impact on those around them.

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